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The New York Times

Nov 23 2017
This Exhibition Will Help You Make Sense of Your Senses
“Our Senses” takes visitors out of their comfort zone at the American Museum of Natural History.
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The Guardian

Nov 23 2017
Unity Spencer obituary
Daughter of Stanley Spencer who was a talented painter with a powerful imaginative vision

Unity Spencer, who has died aged 87, was perhaps best known for being the daughter of the artist Stanley Spencer, but she was also a talented painter in her own right, a skilful realist with a powerful imaginative vision. Two of her best and most memorable works, which reveal her father’s influence, are a striking self-portrait from 1954, and a 1957 portrait of Stanley himself.

She had three solo shows of her paintings in London, and contributed to many mixed exhibitions, from the London Group to the Royal Academy shows. The first of her one-person shows was at Lauderdale House in Highgate, in 1993, the second at the Boundary Gallery in St John’s Wood in 2001, both in north London, but it was the third that really established her reputation. In 2015, the Fine Art Society in Bond Street mounted the first West End exhibition of her work, to coincide with the publication of her autobiography, Lucky to Be an Artist. Fifty of her paintings from all periods were shown along with her etchings, accompanied by a group of pictures by her family: works by her parents, her uncles Gilbert Spencer and Richard Carline, and by her grandfather George Carline.

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The Guardian

Nov 22 2017
The forgotten women of the 1980s indie boom – in pictures

A new book, Untypical Girls, documents the women who refused to be cowed in the male-dominated indie scene that flourished in the 1980s – from riot grrrls to shoegazers

  • Untypical Girls by Sam Knee is out now, published by Cicada Books
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artforum.com

Nov 22 2017
FILM: Unprofessional Pride
Tony Pipolo on “The Non-Actor” at Film Society of Lincoln Center
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The New York Times

Nov 22 2017
Robot From ‘Forbidden Planet’ Breaks Auction Records
Robby the Robot sold for $5.375 million, breaking the record for price of a movie prop sold at auction.
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The New York Times

Nov 22 2017
In the Air: An Ode to Things That Are Not What They Seem
The curious beauty of illusion: gems that appear to float on one’s finger; fabric that emulates stone; two-in-one fashion that plays tricks on the eye.
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The Guardian

Nov 22 2017
Mary Batchelor obituary

My friend Mary Batchelor, who has died aged 73, was one of Scotland’s best- loved artists. Although she began painting professionally in later life, her commitment to the Scottish art scene was then immediate.

She became an associate member and regular exhibitor with Visual Arts Scotland and the Royal Glasgow Institute of the Fine Arts, and artist member of Paisley Art Institute. She was also awarded the Mayfest MacRoberts prize in 1997 and the Mackintosh residency in Collioure, on France’s Mediterranean coast in 2011.

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The New York Times

Nov 22 2017
Art Review: Stephen Shore’s MoMA Survey Shows a Restless Reformer as a Master of Photography
The Museum of Modern Art offers a commanding retrospective of five decades of Stephen Shore’s groundbreaking work.
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The Guardian

Nov 22 2017
London gallery honours Tarantino precursor Jusepe de Ribera

Art of Violence exhibition in Dulwich to explore depictions of torture and martyrdom by 17th-century Spanish artist

A stomach-churning exhibition of tortured human bodies will open in London next year. Described by the director of Dulwich Picture Gallery as “akin to witnessing a Quentin Tarantino film”, it will be the first major show in the UK devoted to the 17th-century Spanish artist Jusepe de Ribera.

Titled Ribera: Art of Violence, the gallery currently housing a charming exhibition devoted to the creator of the Moomins will include a room of his nightmare visions of the martyrdom of Saint Bartholomew by being flayed alive, and end with a shift from religious art to classical mythology – inexorably the death of Marsyas, excoriated by Apollo for his presumption in challenging the god to a music competition, and losing.

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EosArte.eu

Nov 22 2017
Galleria d’Arte Moderna di Roma. Presentazione trilogia Mara as Muse di Mario Vespasiani
La figura della Musa compare nei racconti mitici fin dall’origine dell’umanità, cercata e citata da Omero nelle prime righe sia dell’Iliade che dell’Odissea, arriva ai giorni nostri, ma con un significato decisamente mutato e ridimensionato. Un tempo intesa come complice dell’esecutore che la invita a guidare il “suo braccio” in un’opera composta a metà, sembra oggi essersi riconvertita, [...]
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The Guardian

Nov 22 2017
Cheeky, cartoonish … and under threat: why our postmodern buildings must be saved

PoMo architecture, often derided as gaudy and excessive, is having a revival – just in time to save some of its greatest treasures

A gaggle of architecture enthusiasts are standing on the windswept edge of Greenland Dock in southeast London, shivering on their bikes and straining to see beauty in the 1980s housing development that stands across the water. “If you look closely,” says their guide, Elain Harwood, “you will see it is a combination of Miami Tudor crossed with Charles Rennie Mackintosh, with a hint of the docklands warehouse.”

What had begun as a punk aesthetic became synonymous with the era of Margaret Thatcher and Ronald Reagan

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EosArte.eu

Nov 22 2017
Roma, Associazione Civita, presentazione del libro Cuore di Napoli di Ugo Cedrangolo
«Regnanti e ciabattini, rivoluzionari e prostitute, gentiluomini e canaglie, leggende autentiche e verità inventate, in una miscela surreale. Napoli, appunto ». Questo libro, insolito e sorprendente, può servire a rendere un po’ meno aspra la sfida di  chi vuole capire davvero la città, quasi percorrerla strada per strada. Com’è [...]
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EosArte.eu

Nov 22 2017
Milano, Accademia di Brera: presentazione del volume di Aligi Sassu, Catalogo ragionato dell’opera sacra
Giuseppe Bonini ed Elena Pontiggia presenteranno il 5 di dicembre 2017 alle ore 11:00, nella Sala Napoleonica dell’Accademia di Brera, il Catalogo ragionato dell’opera sacra di Aligi Sassu. Edito da Silvana Editoriale, curato da Alfredo Paglione, contiene saggi di Antonio Paolucci, Gianfranco Ravasi, Antonello Negri, Elena Pontiggia, Giuseppe Bonini e [...]
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EosArte.eu

Nov 22 2017
Bibbiena, Arezzo. La FIAF annuncia il vincitore di “Portfolio Italia – Gran Premio Hasselblad”
La FIAF - Federazione Italiana Associazioni Fotografiche, associazione senza fini di lucro che si prefigge lo scopo di divulgare e sostenere la fotografia su tutto il territorio nazionale, annuncia la cerimonia di proclamazione della quattordicesima edizione di “Portfolio Italia – Gran Premio Hasselblad” che si terrà sabato 25 novembre 2017 alle ore 18.00 nell’ottocentesco Teatro [...]
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The New York Times

Nov 22 2017
Step Inside Bolivia’s Psychedelic Dream Homes
Bolivian architect Freddy Mamani is gaining fame for his elaborate, electric style of architecture that he sees as part of a movement embracing local culture and traditions.
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The Guardian

Nov 21 2017
Edvard Munch: Between the Clock and the Bed – in pictures

A new exhibition positions Edvard Munch as a revolutionary whose personal tragedies peppered his work, and made him more than a symbolist scream

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The Guardian

Nov 21 2017
Rose Wylie: 'I want to be known for my paintings – not because I'm old'

She didn’t get her break until her 70s, but the world now can’t get enough of Rose Wylie’s blissfully unruly paintings. On the eve of her solo Serpentine show, the artist shows our writer round her Kent cottage – then dabs her down with turps

A lot has changed for Rose Wylie since Germaine Greer first praised her vast and blissfully unruly paintings in the Guardian seven years ago. Then the late-blooming artist was a new discovery and her unsold, unstretched canvases were stacked from floor to ceiling in the 17th-century Kent cottage that’s been her home for 50 years. When I arrange to meet her there, just before her new solo show opens at the Serpentine Sackler this month, I worry that there won’t be anything to see.

Over leftover birthday cake – Wylie has just turned 83 – she says that when it comes to the day-to-day business of creating drawings and paintings, little has altered. “I have the same carpenter making the stretchers. I put the glue on myself and cut the canvas. Everything is the same. They just used to pile up. Now they don’t.”

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The New York Times

Nov 21 2017
What to See in New York Art Galleries This Week
New shows focus on Emma Amos’s women of many colors, McArthur Binion’s “DNA Series” and Torbjorn Rodland’s arresting photographs.
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artforum.com

Nov 21 2017
DIARY: Welcome to (ようこそ) the Jungle
Paige K. Bradley at the 1st AnimeNYC
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The Guardian

Nov 21 2017
Drag acts and drunken sailors – Mary Reid Kelley and Patrick Kelley: We Are Ghosts review

Tate Liverpool
In their bizarre black-and-white films, the Americans confront war and death – with a boisterous, cartoonish take on Das Boot

The films of American artists Mary Reid Kelley and Patrick Kelley are, to use a technical term, bonkers. Actors and sets are rendered as though they inhabit a slapdash monochrome painting, rejigged as a silent-era black-and-white movie. The actors wear cartoonish theatrical makeup, which extends to cover their clothes and all the objects and furnishings that surround them. This, in itself, is arresting and strange. Somewhere between the avant garde and the amateur, between theatre and cartoon, history lesson and literature class, their films are equally curious in their subject matter.

For their first UK exhibition in a public gallery, Mary and Patrick (the pair prefer to use their first names) are showing two films and a number of lightbox photographs. In one film, This Is Offal, we find ourselves witnessing the autopsy of a drowned woman. In the second, In The Body of the Sturgeon, we are on board a US submarine, somewhere in the Pacific, in the closing days of the second world war.

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The Guardian

Nov 21 2017
Francis Crick Institute's £700m building 'too noisy to concentrate'

Some of the 1,250 people working at the year-old laboratory say its open plan layout, designed to produce collaboration, makes it hard to focus on work

It is a £700m cathedral to biomedical science, where scientists work together to make breakthroughs in cancer, neuroscience, pandemics and genetics. But the Francis Crick Institute is not proving to be the easiest place to concentrate.

A year after opening, some of the 1,250 people working at the Crick Institute, in its central London laboratory, have complained that the open plan design, intended to assist informal collaboration, means some areas set aside for thinking and writing up research are too noisy.

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The New York Times

Nov 21 2017
Mel Chin to Sound the Call, All Over New York
Mr. Chin’s first augmented-reality work, “Unmoored,” about sea level, is coming to Times Square next year, as part of a sprawling socially minded exhibition.
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The Guardian

Nov 21 2017
David LaChapelle: ‘I never wanted to shoot another pop star – I was tortured by them’

His lurid aesthetic shaped the celebrity age, but 11 years ago LaChapelle escaped to a farm in Hawaii. He talks about his journey from 14-year-old gay runaway in Warhol’s New York to enlightened ‘Grandpa Moses of photography’

The evening before we are due to meet, David LaChapelle spends several hours greeting fans and signing books in Berlin. The queue snakes outside his publisher Taschen’s bookshop and down the street. One woman, a middle-aged artist, bares her breasts for a photo with him. Another gets her wrist signed and returns later to show she got it tattooed. The next afternoon, LaChapelle, no stranger to daft behaviour, can only shrug, touched but baffled. He wasn’t sure there would be interest in this comeback; his two new anthologies are going to be his final books. This is it, he promises. An edit of unseen photos from his 30-year career as one of the most striking and controversial chroniclers of pop culture.

“For a long time, I worked non-stop,” he says. “I had to always have three magazine covers, a music video in the Top 10 of [MTV chart show] TRL, one of the Vogues happening or I’d be forgotten and irrelevant.”

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artforum.com

Nov 21 2017
500 WORDS: Rafa Esparza
Rafa Esparza talks about “Tierra. Sangre. Oro.” at Ballroom Marfa
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The Guardian

Nov 21 2017
Largest collection of Modigliani nudes ever seen in UK go on show

Tate Modern exhibition opens 100 years after police shut Paris show because painting showed woman’s pubic hair

A hundred years ago police in Paris closed down a show by Amedeo Modigliani because of his scandalous and indecent painting of a female nude which included, horror of horrors, pubic hair.

On Thursday Tate Modern will exhibit 12 nudes by the artist and do not expect an eyelid to be batted. “It is really fantastic. We are so excited,” said Nancy Ireson, the gallery’s curator of international art. “It is the largest group of his nudes which have ever been shown together in the UK.”

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The New York Times

Nov 21 2017
Show Us Your Wall: The Protest Art of Cuba Finds an Unlikely Champion
A birthday trip to Havana prompted Chris von Christierson to start putting together an ambitious collection of contemporary Afro-Cuban art.
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The New York Times

Nov 21 2017
Market Report: 8 Elegant Ashtrays
Smoking may have gone the way of ‘Mad Men,’ but good design never quits.
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artforum.com

Nov 21 2017
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The Guardian

Nov 21 2017
City: the remarkable urban photographs of David Levene - video

Award-winning photographer David Levene has revealed an unparalleled cross-section of the urban 21st century over more than a decade documenting how people live and work in 70 cities. From east to west, using archive and never-before-seen images, we hear the story behind three of the most moving photographs in his new book - from Yangon in Myanmar, Ulaanbaatar in Mongolia​ ​and​ Calais in France​ - and follow him back to his birthplace as he hunts for the final picture

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The Guardian

Nov 21 2017
Modigliani review – 'a gorgeous show about a slightly silly artist'

Tate Modern, London
He took the drugs and had the sex. But Modigliani was no barrier-breaking subversive when it came to painting, despite what this exhibition claims. Was there anyone he wouldn’t steal from?

She looks at me through leaf-shaped eyes with huge black pupils fringed by spiky lashes. Just these eyes alone say sex, without having to even look at the opulently rounded breasts, narrow waist and curvaceous hips of Amedeo Modigliani’s Reclining Nude on a White Cushion.

This is one of a spectacular array of paintings of models posing naked that Modigliani made in 1917, while war and revolution blazed in the world beyond his Paris studio. There’s a huge gathering of these women at the heart of Tate Modern’s highly enjoyable homage to modernism, beauty and love. Modigliani’s 1917 nudes, and a few later ones, all hang together in one scintillating gallery. Yet are these nudes really as radical and revolutionary – let alone feminist – as this exhibition makes out?

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The Guardian

Nov 20 2017
Street art in Medellín, Colombia – in pictures

Photographer Juancho Torres tours the streets of Comuna 13 in the once notorious city, capturing the graffiti and murals that adorn buildings and walls

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The Guardian

Nov 20 2017
Ruined temples and forgotten places: historic photographer of the year – in pictures

The first historic photographer of the year awards showcase the world’s very best historic places and cultural sites from across the globe, capturing everything from the most famous national treasures to obscure and forgotten hidden gems. Here, the photographers tell the stories behind their pictures

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The New York Times

Nov 20 2017
The Making of a Family Home in ‘Call Me by Your Name’
The director Luca Guadagnino and the set decorator Violante Visconti di Modrone transformed a run-down estate into the perfect backdrop for the film.
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The Guardian

Nov 20 2017
Jaws of death: the Jarman prize winner on her excruciating look at dying in the digital age

Oreet Ashery, who has just won the award for artists working in film, talks about asking Syrian refugees to converse in a darkened room – and her frequently hilarious examination of today’s death industry

‘For a long time,” says Oreet Ashery, “I was motivated by utter rage.” The winner of the 2017 Derek Jarman award is remembering growing up in Jerusalem, where she was born in 1966. “I had rage about everything,” she recalls, “and got involved in activism.” It’s a spirit that lives on in her art which, as well as film-making, spans photography, performance, workshop, text and music.

We are speaking shortly before her Jarman win is made public. Ashery has just staged, in the run-up to the announcement, a short fragment of her ongoing project NoNothing Salons in the Dark, a series of collaborative storytelling works, at the Whitechapel gallery, London. The fragment contained stories of Syrian refugees and the people trying to help them, recorded in a darkened room in Thessaloniki, Greece, earlier this year. “I was interested in how people work together,” she explains, “telling stories in a darkened room. Even if no one speaks, that is a story, too.”

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artforum.com

Nov 20 2017
DIARY: This Is Not a Test
Trinie Dalton at High Desert Test Sites
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The New York Times

Nov 20 2017
Palmyra, Plato and Play Doh: Getty Plans New Shows for Renovated Villa
The exhibitions will starting in April include one on Middle Eastern sculpture and another featuring contemporary artists on Plato’s legacy.
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The New York Times

Nov 20 2017
An Artist Turns Her Lens on a New Art City: Miami
With a major retrospective at the Pérez museum, the Miami filmmaker Dara Friedman talks about her art, her career — and her city as a cultural capital.
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