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artforum.com

Apr 20 2018
SLANT: She's Lost Control
Shelley Elizabeth Carter on Susanne Kennedy’s Women In Trouble
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The Guardian

Apr 20 2018
Mexican court blocks sales of Frida Kahlo Barbie doll
  • Distant relatives gain injunction against toymaker Mattel
  • Dispute centres on who controls late artist’s image rights

Distant relatives of Frida Kahlo have won a temporary injunction that stops sales of a Barbie doll depicting the late Mexican artist.

Kahlo’s great-niece Mara de Anda Romeo argued in a Mexican court that Mattel does not have the rights to use Kahlo’s image as part of its Inspiring Women series.

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The Guardian

Apr 20 2018
Interstellar sexual adventures and underground erotica – Glasgow International review

This year’s citywide showcase is a sprawling, ambitious mixture of the marvellous and the mundane, with Tai Shani’s S&M-tinged installation the edgy standout

One of my favourite things in this year’s Glasgow International festival is an empty gallery at the Modern Institute, where two fist-sized mechanical snails crawl slowly across the floor. I could watch Urs Fischer’s snails all day, not least because they’re not trying to tell me anything.

Lubaina Himid’s deeply underwhelming painted cut-out dragons cross the vast atrium far above our heads at Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum. They look like leftovers from Chinese New Year. The installation is cumbersome and forced. Why am I here? The eighth edition of GI is full of false steps and wasted journeys.

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The Guardian

Apr 20 2018
Joe Corré on his £5m punk ashes – and Malcolm McLaren's death mask

Vivienne Westwood and Malcolm McLaren’s son shocked the music world in 2016 by burning £5m of punk memorabilia. He talks about his new installation, which incorporates the ashes from that fire, as well as his father’s death mask

If you were looking for a good place to smash the system, why not try Mayfair? The home of the British hedge fund industry, a place of couture salons and boutique fish restaurants, London’s most monied district is also hosting the latest artwork by punk dauphin Joe Corré.

The son of Vivienne Westwood and the late Sex Pistols manager Malcolm McLaren, Corré made headlines two years ago by burning an estimated £5m of punk memorabilia to ash. His new work, called Ash from Chaos, takes that detritus, sticks it in a casket and places it in a dark room surrounded by votive candles. The room is at the top of a set of plush carpeted stairs in the Lazinc gallery, and among those in the queue to view the work on its opening night were Dame Vivienne, Rose McGowan, the eccentric designer Daniel Lismore and Bez from the Happy Mondays.

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The Guardian

Apr 20 2018
Toxic neighbour: Monsanto and the poisoned town

Almost a century ago, Monsanto opened a chemical factory in Anniston, Alabama. Mathieu Asselin spent years photographing this damaged landscape – including a creek where the water runs red

In June 1957, Disneyland in California added a new building to Tomorrowland, its vision of a carefree world to come. Made of plastic, the House of the Future looked suitably avant garde and was entirely mechanised. Sponsored by Monsanto, then one of the world’s biggest chemical companies, it attracted 20 million visitors over the next 10 years.

However, as Mathieu Asselin points out in his book Monsanto: A Photographic Investigation, a very different vision of the future was unfolding in Anniston, Alabama. There, since the 1920s, Monsanto had been producing PCBs, chemicals widely used in the creation of lubricants, inks, paints and electrical equipment. PCBs were banned in the US in 1979 due to fears about their toxicity, but the damage to Anniston had already been done. Between 1929 and 1971, some 27 tonnes of PCBs were released into the atmosphere, 810 tonnes flushed into Snow Creek canal, and 32,000 tonnes deposited in an open-air landfill site near the city centre, according to a 2005 report by the Environmental Protection Agency.

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The Guardian

Apr 20 2018
Revolutionary Rodin and Tahiti before Gauguin – the week in art

The great sculptor meets his ancient Greek inspirations, as Glasgow International kicks off and Anne Hardy presents dark images of a ruined future – all in your weekly dispatch

Rodin and the Art of Ancient Greece
The revolutionary meets the classic in this blockbuster encounter between the great sculptor of the impressionist age and the Hellenic art he loved.
• At the British Museum, London, 26 April-29 July.

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The New York Times

Apr 20 2018
She Won the Turner Prize. Now She’s Using Her Clout to Help Others.
Lubaina Himid is using her enhanced influence to make galleries that show her work reach out and involve black artists around them.
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The Guardian

Apr 20 2018
René Magritte Le Genre Nocturne: sum total of our own thoughts

The Belgian surrealist paints a mysterious headless, ashen woman with shadows and suggestive cracks

Related: Sign up to the Art weekly email

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The Guardian

Apr 19 2018
From pilgrims to pub crooners: Sony world photography awards winners – in pictures

A selection of the winners in the professional categories of the world’s largest photography competition

• The Sony world photography awards exhibition is at Somerset House, London, until 6 May

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The Guardian

Apr 19 2018
UK's Alys Tomlinson named photographer of year at Sony awards

London-based Tomlinson wins top prize for ‘spiritual power’ of images on theme of pilgrimage

The London-based photographer Alys Tomlinson has won the $25,000 top prize in the Sony World Photography awards.

It is the first time in 10 years that a Briton has been named as photographer of the year in the competition, regarded as the Oscars of the photography world, and the first time a woman has won since the US photojournalist Sara Naomi Lewkowicz in 2014.

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The New York Times

Apr 19 2018
Art Review: Adrian Piper: The Thinking Canvas
She’s an artist and scholar, and at “A Synthesis of Intuitions” you see thinking — about gender, racism, art — happening before your eyes.
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The New York Times

Apr 19 2018
25 Art Exhibitions to View in NYC This Weekend
Our guide to new art shows and some that will be closing soon.
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The New York Times

Apr 19 2018
Art Review: How Latin America Was Built, Before Modernism Came Along
“The Metropolis in Latin America,” at the Americas Society, is a tale of ambition, nationalism, violence, technical innovation and economic transformation.
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The Guardian

Apr 19 2018
Westminster artist’s reputation 'sullied by London grime'

Conservators unearth truth about Daniel Maclise, whose status was sullied when his murals turned murky

Almost 150 years after he died, ending his life exhausted and depressed at apparent failure, the Irish artist Daniel Maclise has been vindicated: it was London filth, not his technique, which tarnished his reputation and the surface of his two masterpieces, the biggest paintings in the Palace of Westminster.

Related: Relief for Dickens museum as experts say portrait of writer's wife is genuine

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The New York Times

Apr 19 2018
Design Review: At This Museum Show, You’re Encouraged to Follow Your Nose
“The Senses: Design Beyond Vision” at the Cooper Hewitt asks visitors to consider sound, taste and smell.
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The Guardian

Apr 19 2018
‘One of the most important’ sets of Middle East artifacts unveiled

A three-year, $5m renovation at the Penn Museum introduces a collection of nearly 1,200 objects, many of which will be on public view for the first time

The fertile lands of Mesopotamia are rightly hailed as a “cradle of civilization”, where some of the most important human innovations originated, from agriculture and writing to religion and music. The Penn Museum in Philadelphia has long been home to one of the world’s most significant collections of ancient artifacts from the region – but for years, only a limited number of pieces were shown in encyclopedic, old-school displays that did not do them justice.

Related: Top of the pots: the smashing rise of ceramics

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The New York Times

Apr 19 2018
Four Masked Burglars Steal Jade and Gold Artifacts From Museum in England
Witnesses reported seeing the thieves break a first-floor window on Tuesday at the Museum of East Asian Art and steal items of “priceless” significance, the police said.
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The New York Times

Apr 19 2018
What to See in New York Art Galleries This Week
Joe Overstreet’s abstract paintings; Jared Bark’s photo-booth ready-mades; Zoe Pettijohn Schade’s large gouaches; and “Clay Today” at the Hole.
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artforum.com

Apr 19 2018
NEWS: Istanbul’s SALT Beyoğlu Reopens
Social Media/ArtAsiaPacific
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The Guardian

Apr 19 2018
50 years of British photography: from Twiggy to whaling – in pictures

The Association of Photographers, which represents the UK’s professional photographers, is celebrating its 50th anniversary with AOP50, a retrospective of images curated by Zelda Cheatle. Here is a selection

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The Guardian

Apr 18 2018
Danny Fields' best photograph: the Ramones prowl round the US supreme court

‘Hey, it’s Washington! Let’s run around!’

I became the Ramones’ manager after seeing them at CBGB in New York. From the opening downstroke of the guitar, I loved them. When I met them afterwards, they asked if I would write about them. I said: “More than that, I want to manage you.” I started taking photos of them when they were making their first album. If the manager has done a good job there’s nothing to do once the band gets to the studio except let her bang, so I took a camera along, thinking I could record moments that might be considered candid. They realised that even if I took pictures of them drooling, I wasn’t going to use them – as their manager, I wasn’t going to do anything to damage their career.

What made them good to photograph was the same thing that made them good on stage: presentation. They were intuitive. The first time I saw them live, the presentation was perfect – the clothes, the hair, the architecture of the set. They knew how to do it and they’d figured it out themselves. They weren’t puppets. When rock’n’roll wants to come out, it comes out of every pore, and they had that.

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The New York Times

Apr 18 2018
With Choice of New Director, the Met Gets a Scholar and a Showman
For all his Old World qualities, Max Hollein has an individualistic streak that promises to disrupt some of the Met’s traditional ways.
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The New York Times

Apr 18 2018
Hidden Stash of Valuable Drawings Found in Walls of Artist’s Home
Officials in Boise, Idaho, were surprised when they stumbled across 11 never-before-seen works by the outsider artist James Castle. His family was less shocked.
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The New York Times

Apr 18 2018
Venice Architecture Biennale to Honor Kenneth Frampton
The historian and critic, whom the biennale’s president called “a maestro,” will receive the Golden Lion for Lifetime Achievement.
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The Guardian

Apr 18 2018
London's skyline soars with record 510 tall buildings in pipeline

Construction has begun on cluster of skyscrapers that will transform city over next decade

London’s skyline is to be transformed over the next decade with a record 510 tall towers, more than 20 storeys high, planned or under construction. The total is up from 455 towers in the pipeline in 2016, according to research from the industry forum New London Architecture (NLA) and real estate consultancy GL Hearn.

Construction has started on 115 towers, also a record. Over the past two years, work started on more projects than in the preceding five years combined.

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The Guardian

Apr 18 2018
Taryn Simon: An Occupation of Loss review – transfixing cacophony from a secret underworld

Islington Green, London
A vast underground cavern that could be a Bond-villain lair is filled with the keening of professional mourners in this extraordinary exploration of grief

From a corner of London’s Islington Green, then under a horrible, canopied atrium overlooked by luxury flats, we are led into the dark, through a space of bare cement and concrete. Down we go, into a cavern sunk beneath the building, where a balustrade circles a deep circular pit. Two more levels of balustrades rim the emptiness below.

Artangel’s venue for the American artist Taryn Simon’s An Occupation of Loss took several years to find and procure. An unfinished performance or theatre space, it has only ever been used twice before (once as a set for John Madden’s 1998 movie Shakespeare in Love).

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