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The New York Times

Jul 21 2017
When a Comic Book Hillbilly and Milton Collide
Gary Panter — known for his punk graphics, the sets of “Pee-wee’s Playhouse” and Jimbo — returns to graphic novels with a phantasmagoric take on “Paradise Regained.”
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The Art Newspaper

Jul 21 2017
Contemporary artists transform traditional Muslim prayer rugs for timely San Francisco show
The traditional Muslim prayer rug becomes a way to explore the universal human need for security, as well as ideas of heritage, family and cultural identity, in an upcoming exhibition Sanctuary, to be presented by the San Francisco arts non-profit For-Site Sanctuary this autumn (7 October-11 March 2018). The show will feature 36 wool prayer rugs hand-made by master weavers in Lahore, Pakistan, from new designs by 36 artists from 22 countriesmany of which are predominantly Muslimincluding the Palestinian artist Emily Jacir, the Mexican artist Ana Teresa Fernndez and the US artist Hank Willis Thomas.

The four-by-six feet rugs will be arranged across the floor of a former sacred space in San Francisco: a former interfaith chapel for military personnel at the Fort Mason Centre for Arts and Culture, located in a disused military facility that is now a national park. Visitors will be able to walk across and sit or lie on the rugs, after removing their shoes, as one would in a sacred space. This act is a way of making oneself more vulnerable to the ideasjust the very act of exposing that part of their body to experience the work,  says Cheryl Haines, the executive director of For-Site. 

The show has been in the works for around a yearso before Trumps immigration ban from six Muslim-majority countriesbut has proved to be sadly on point in terms of current social issues, says Haines. The idea of sanctuary addresses the growing numbers of people who are shifting from one place to another in the world, looking for human rights, security and safety, Haines says.

Sanctuary was inspired in part by the video work Disintegration (2012) by the France-born, Iran-based Yashar Azar Emdadian, included in For-Sites 2016 exhibition Home Land Security. The work shows the artist shaving his body hair as he stands on a family heirloom Persian rug in the Tuileries Garden in Paris, which speaks to place, culture and history, Haines says. The rug could not be brought to the US for the show, and so a stand-in rug was specially made in Pakistan.

For the newly-designed rugs in Sanctuary, the 36 artists were given relative freedom in subject matter and composition. We really did not edit the content of any of the works, and when you see the multiplicity of approaches and ideas, its clear that many of the designs have a highly personal significance, Haines says.

Haines points to the Syrian artist Tammam Azzams design which looks like a father holding a child walking away from rubble what appears to be a bombing site, repeated multiple times and reflected in an upside-down mirror image. The Chilean artist Alfredo Jaar, meanwhile, has designed a rug that is almost entirely black, with a series of long, lit candles, which resemble votive candles in a church, at the bottom. The Lebanese artist Mona Hatoums design has a crenellated stamp-like field, white with black images that look like story-book cut-outs. A magical, starry background surrounds a group of figures around a moon or planet, who point weapons at each other in an endless ring.

There are potential plans for the show to travel to other venues, including museums and community spaces. We would love to activate some additional National Park venues, Haines says. The organisers are also looking into venues abroad, including museums in the Middle East, and a London venue has already expressed interest in hosting the exhibition. I absolutely do think it could have a lengthy life, Haines says.
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The New York Times

Jul 21 2017
Painting From Goering’s Collection Is Returned to Banker’s Heirs
Nearly 80 years after it was stolen from a German family by the Nazis, a 16th-century painting was returned to the family’s descendants in Munich.
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The New York Times

Jul 21 2017
Live Auctions End at Christie’s South Ken. Will Online Sales Fill the Void?
More than 40 years of history at the London salesroom closed with the sale of a walnut table used for auction house board meetings.
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The Art Newspaper

Jul 21 2017
Lygia Pape's daughter sues LG Electronics over cellphone wallpaper
An image of Lygia Pape's Ttéia (photo by Tony Kyriacou/Rex Features), left, and a screenshot of LG's wallpaper, right (courtesy of Cahill Cossu Noh & Robinson)
Paula Pape, daughter of the Brazilian artist Lygia Pape, has filed a suit in the US District Court for the Southern District of New York against LG Electronics, several vendors of its mobile phones and Getty Images Korea alleging an infringement of copyright of one of the late artists works.

Visitors to Papes exhibition A Multitude of Forms at Met Breuer (through 23 July) might recognize Ttia (2003), a delicate linear installation of golden threads that bisect in a dark room. The plaintiff charges that the Seoul-based electronics giant is using a too-similar riff on Papes work as a cell phone wallpaper for its K20 V mobile phone, widely promoted by such outlets as Metro PCS, Verizon Wireless and Cricket.

LG, the complaint says, had previously sought to license an image of Ttia from the Projeto Lygia Pape, the artists estate administered by her daughter. After denying LGs repeated requests (via Getty Images, also named as a defendant), the plaintiff says the company ignored the advice of its copyright agent and proceeded to create an unauthorized derivation of Papes work that it then sought permission to use instead. The Projeto Lygia Pape refused unequivocally, noting that a license would not be granted under any circumstances as the artist had refused to engage in commercial transactions around her art for much of her life. LG used a similar image anyway, the complaint says. 

Pape is seeking a jury trial to award damages, plus a permanent injunction against LG prohibiting further shipment or sales of the device or promotional materials, and is demanding that the company reveal the identity of the images creator and destroy all unauthorized derivations. Because the image is the default wallpaper in the phones software and is featured on the box it comes in, Ms. Pape has asked the Court to recall all packaging, advertising, and other materials that contain the infringing image, including the phone itself if the wallpaper cannot be otherwise removed therefrom, says Paul Cossu, of Cahill Cossu Robinson & Noh LLP.

"This is an extreme, perhaps unique, case in which a multinational corporationfully aware that it was doing wrongabused a work of fine art in the service of the profit motive, adds John Cahill. US laws and US juries frown on such behavior, and we are hopeful that the defendants will be stripped of their profits, that the work can exist again solely as one of the artist's masterpieces, and that all artists will be more protected against such egregious misconduct in the future." LG's counsel, John A. Mancini of Mayer Brown LLP, could not be reached for comment.
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The Art Newspaper

Jul 21 2017
Dalí’s moustache still in fine form
Dalí's awesome moustache

Salvador Dals famous twirling moustache is in a good condition, says the embalmer who tended the Surrealists body after his death in 1989. The artists most recognisable facial feature remains unblemished, says Narcs Bardalet who assisted with the exhumation of Dals corpse yesterday at the Dal Theatre-Museum in Figueres (21 July). His moustache is still intact [set at] ten past ten, just as he liked it, its a miracle, Bardalet told the Catalan radio station RAC1. Last month, a Spanish court ordered that Dals body be exhumed to determine whether he is the biological father of Mara Pilar Abel Martnez. According to the Spanish newspaper El Pas, Abel has been fighting to be acknowledged as Dals daughter since 2007.  Abel claims that her mother had an affair with the artist in 1955 in Port-Lligat, a small coastal village in northern Catalonia where Dal lived and worked. Abel was born the following year in February 1956 (Dal was married to Gala at the time; the couple never had any children). If Abel is the daughter of Dal, she could make a claim towards the artists estate, which was left to the Spanish state following his death in 1989. The DNA results are expected in the next two months. 
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The Guardian

Jul 21 2017
‘We lived in an area known as the slums’: life in 1960s Manchester

Bridget Cunniffe recalls growing up in a community photographed by Shirley Baker

I was five when this picture was taken. I’m the girl lying on the ground. The two girls in the light blue dresses are my sisters Kate and Mary, who are twins; my oldest sister Sarah is having her hair combed by her friend Marie. We were generally known as the redheaded Murray sisters. My mum is wearing a flowery dress, and talking to our neighbour, Mrs Bowers. I think it must have been a Sunday, because we’ve all got our nice dresses on. The saucer on the floor would have had ice-cream on it. My mum used to buy a bowl from the van and share it out.

We lived in an area of Manchester known as the slums, but we weren’t really aware of that as children. We were always clean and tidy, and we had plenty to eat. We didn’t feel as though we were missing out. And we had such freedom. There were a lot of half-demolished houses around, and we used to play in them. We’d make swings and hang them off the lamp-posts.

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The Art Newspaper

Jul 21 2017
Various roles, India

Sophie Macpherson Ltd are running various searches for a client based in India which include:





Commercial Director


Operations Director


Gallery Director


Creative Director


Outreach Director


Archivist





All positions are posted on our website: www.sophiemacpherson.com/opportunities





If you are interested, please send your CV to Hattie Culshaw at hattie@sophiemacpherson.com
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The Guardian

Jul 21 2017
Sex and social realism, Scotland's new gothic folly and Frieze all summer long – the week in art

The Frieze fair flings open the doors of its outdoor sculpture garden, Pablo Bronstein’s striking new sculpture is unveiled in Edinburgh and a show devoted to comics opens in Derby – in your weekly dispatch

Pablo Bronstein
A gothic folly is connected with a Chinoiserie pavilion by a narrow rose walk in Bronstein’s new permanent commission for Scotland’s superb sculpture park.
Jupiter Artland, Edinburgh, opening 27 July.

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The Guardian

Jul 21 2017
Daniel Richter’s Tarifa: an emblematic image of suffering

The German artist’s 2001 painting is a dystopian nightmare – but also a scene that could have been pulled from coverage of the current refugee crisis

Daniel Richter’s Tarifa is both a dystopian nightmare and a scene that could have been pulled straight from recent front-page news. Women in headscarves and men, all hunkered low on an orange dinghy barely large enough to bear their weight, recall countless images of the ongoing refugee crisis.

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The Art Newspaper

Jul 21 2017
Galleries and programme confirmed for ninth Abu Dhabi Art fair
The new director of the Abu Dhabi Art fair, Dyala Nusseibeh, is making changes to the Middle Eastern event, including a new curated section organised by the high-profile museum curator Omar Kholeif. The ninth edition of the Modern and contemporary art fair,  which launches later this year at Manarat al Saadiyat (8-11 November), is due to include 48 galleries, up from 35 last year. These include regional dealers such as Abu Dhabi-based Etihad Modern Art Gallery and Lawrie Shabibi of Dubai. Notable international names include Sprth Magers, which run spaces in Berlin, London and Los Angeles, and Sean Kelly Gallery of New York. 
 
Kholeif, the Manilow senior curator at the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, will oversee Beyond Territory. The focus is artists who work with landscape in the broad sense: the formal, social and political landscape, he tells The Art Newspaper. I wanted to not limit this to artists from the region but to create an inter-generational and global map to show that there were connections across geographies, subjects, sites and forms.
 
We will most definitely be introducing lots of new artists to Abu Dhabi for the first time: Sprth Magers, who have never before exhibited at any fair in the Middle East, will be doing a beautiful solo booth of Otto Piene, the German Zero artist; Jhaveri Contemporary will be bringing a prized and unique installation by Nalini Malani and Iftikhar Dadi (Bloodlines, 1997); Isabelle Van den Eynde will be showing early works by Hassan Sharif, the incredible UAE artist, which have not been seen before, Kholeif adds.
 
Another new section, Solo Projects, follows other fairs, bringing curated presentations of solo artists. The artists Manal Aldowayan, Magdi Mostafa and Nasser Alsalem will create new public works located in Manarat al Saadiyat and other sites as part of the Beyond programme.
 
Meanwhile, a series of images by the Kuwaiti photographer Tarek Al-Ghoussein, which document the development of the Saadiyat Island cultural quarter in Abu Dhabi over the past seven years, has been used by the fair for its advertising and branding campaigns this year. Seven of Al-Ghousseins works will be used across print and digital platforms; the photographs will also be displayed at the fair.
 
Nusseibeh was appointed last November; she was previously director of the defunct Art International fair in Istanbul. Her father, Zaki, was an adviser to Sheikh Zayed, the founding president of the United Arab Emirates. Abu Dhabi Art is run by the Abu Dhabi Tourism & Culture Authority, a government body. Meanwhile, the exact date of the opening of the Louvre Abu Dhabi museum, a major draw for collectors and galleries, has yet to be fixed. 
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The Guardian

Jul 21 2017
Salvador Dalí's moustache still intact, embalmer reveals after exhumation

Narcís Bardalet, who tended Dalí’s body after his death in 1989, ‘delighted’ to see surrealist’s best-known feature remains

Experts who exhumed the body of Salvador Dalí to collect samples for use in a paternity claim have revealed that the enigmatic artist’s trademark moustache still graces his face almost three decades after he died.

Narcís Bardalet, the embalmer who tended Dalí’s body after his death in 1989 and helped with the exhumation on Thursday night, said he had been delighted to see the surrealist’s best-known feature once again.

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The Guardian

Jul 21 2017
Send me a masterpiece: the museum texting its artworks to anyone who asks

Fancy a Lichtenstein? How about a Warhol? San Francisco’s MoMA will now send you anything from its collection – all you have to do is ask the artbot

If you fancy receiving an artwork from a world-class gallery, all you now have to do is ask. Liberating itself from the confines of physical space, the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art has launched a service that has already gone viral. You simply take out your phone and text it a request, keying in “Send me” followed by a descriptive word or an emoji. Send me mountains. Send me sadness. Send me something orange. It will text back an image selected from one of the 34,678 artworks in its vaults.

SFMOMA was aiming for 100,000 texts over the summer. On Monday last week, it clocked up 385,000. By the end of the week, it had passed 2m. Browse through some of the exchanges and you quickly see the potential. It’s beautifully simple – and consistently surprising. “Send me a Warhol” won’t get you a Warhol: the artbot doesn’t search by artist, nor by title. Asking for Kardashians won’t get you anything, either. But if a match can’t be found, texters don’t emerge empty-handed. Suggestions will be given instead. Maybe try “Send me the ocean” or “Send me San Francisco”.

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The Guardian

Jul 21 2017
The return of Memphis: how the 80s design staple found a new audience

Once derided, the design style that specialized in squiggles and DayGlo colors is the subject of a new series of exhibitions shedding light on a loved, loathed and often misunderstood movement

The Memphis Group’s design style is unmistakable. The output of the short-lived, divisive design collective, which debuted at the Milan furniture fair in 1981 and closed shop six years later, embodied the garish appeal of the decade that style forgot. Their furniture was colorful, kitschy and exaggerated. They stacked slanted rows of cheap plastic laminates and called it a bookshelf. The group – led by founder Ettore Sottsass – decided that geometric shapes made great table legs, and that black-and-white stripes totally worked with lemon-yellow circles.

Related: Ettore Sottsass: the godfather of Italian cool

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The Guardian

Jul 21 2017
Pablo Bronstein and Jac Leirner: this week’s best UK exhibitions

Architecture and the human body are intertwined at Edinburgh’s sculpture park, while across the city deeply personal minimalist works pack an uneasy punch

If you have ever wondered about the connections between the chinoiserie and gothic styles in the 18th century, this one’s for you. Bronstein is fascinated by architectural history and the human body. In his new permanent commission for Edinburgh’s wonderful sculpture park, he links two pavilions – one in the pseudo-Chinese style popular in Georgian Britain, one in the neo-medieval mode – with a narrow rose walk. Will it be genius or a folly?
Jupiter Artland, Edinburgh, 28 July to 1 October

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The Art Newspaper

Jul 21 2017
Three Francis Bacon works stolen in Madrid recovered by Spanish police
Cecil Beaton, Francis Bacon in His Studio (1960). Gelatin silver print with paint from Francis Bacon's studio on the recto and verso. Courtesy of Phillips
Spanish police say that they have recovered three works by Francis Bacon that were stolen from a private residence in Madrid in June 2015. Five works by the Dublin-born artist were removed during the raid. 

According to the BBC, the three unidentified works, which belong to Bacons acquaintance Jos Capelo, were recovered following a tip-off from the Art Loss Register, the London-based stolen art database. The UK organisation was contacted by an individual in Sitges who wanted to verify one of the works. Spanish police did not respond to further enquiries. 

"The return of the pictures is testament to the benefits of international cooperation between the private sector and law enforcement agencies. That these pictures have now been recovered through the skill of the Spanish police, after the Art Loss Register had identified them, and following the circulation of details of the loss via Interpol, is a perfect example of the value of such collaboration," says James Ratcliffe, director of Recoveries & General Counsel at the Art Loss Register.

Ten people have so far been detained in connection with the robbery; seven arrests were made in Madrid last year and three more people were arrested in January.
 
Bacons triptych, Three Studies for a Portrait of George Dyer (1963), the first portrait of the artists longtime lover, fetched $51.8m at Christies New York in May.
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The Guardian

Jul 20 2017
Magnum's masterclass – in pictures

Indian wrestlers grappled with futuristic pool players to scoop the top prizes at the 2017 Magnum and LensCulture photography awards

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artforum.com

Jul 20 2017
FILM: Electric Sheep
Sarah Nicole Prickett on Episodes 9 & 10 of Twin Peaks: The Return
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artforum.com

Jul 20 2017
500 WORDS: Trevor Paglen
Trevor Paglen talks about surveillance, AI, and his new work
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The New York Times

Jul 20 2017
Art and Museums in NYC This Week
Our guide to new art shows, and some that will be closing soon.
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The Art Newspaper

Jul 20 2017
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The Art Newspaper

Jul 20 2017
What would Oscar Wilde have made of the fuss? On Queer British art at Tate Britain
The Critics (1927) by Henry Scott Tuke (Courtesy of Tate)
Perhaps the greatest exhibit at the Tate Britain exhibition Queer British Art, 1861-1967, is the sign on the door to the facilities reading all gender toilets. Next to it is a lustrous array of mythopoeic paintings by Simeon Solomon, who was arrested in a Parisian pissoir for indecent touching. There is a vast disconnect hereas there still is in the greater world, where LGBTQ people are still being prosecuted and, in some countries, executed for the crime of loving differently.

The 150 or so works included in this show are caught between two dates: the British abolition of the death penalty for sodomy in 1861 and the decriminalisation of some sexual acts between men in 1967.

On the one hand, we have the incredible creativity of more than a century of art; on the other, we have the external narrative of despair imposed upon that work and the lives of the artists who made it. When Solomon portrays androgynes and barely coded homosexuality in his dreamy, fin-de-sicle other world, or when John Craxton, who regarded himself as an Arcadian, paints Peter Watson, the aesthete and chief benefactor of Londons Institute of Contemporary Arts, dancing through a neo-Romantic landscape in 1948, these disparities, aspirations and realities are brought forcefully yet nebulously into focus in the way that only art can do.

There is intrinsic value in bringing this subversive material into a temple of the establishment. Look at Edward Burras huge watercolour Soldiers at Rye (1941), which on close examination looks more like a collage of surreal, mask-wearing figures. It is bursting with physicality. In the tension that Burra captures between the appealing masculine soldiers and the knowing viewers of the work, he has his little revenge on the straight world. The work is a hymn to the (sometimes) untouchable.

So much of the work in the show is about performance because queer people have always had to performfirst to disguise their real selves, but at the same time to express their realities. Thus the socialite Stephen Tennant plays Prince Charming in Cecil Beatons exquisite photograph of 1927, lying like a medieval tomb figure but draped in satin and pearls. No wonder Caroline Blackwood, the former wife of Lucian Freud, told me when I was writing Serious Pleasures, a biography of Tennant, that the only person to whom she could compare him was David Bowie. (Freud himself spoke affectionately of Tennant to me, too, as if he were a queer pet.) Later, lost in his own fantasies of pre-war Marseilles, Tennant created elaborate pen-and-ink drawings of tough lascars (South Asian sailors) bedecked with roses. One of these drawings, lent by one of his contemporary champions, Viktor Wynd, hangs in the show.

And then there are the private moments. When Maud Allanthe Salom Dancer, so named for a ballet she produced that was based on Oscar Wildes playdances in her see-through ninon skirt in a carte de visite, her bosom bedecked in more pearls than Jean-Paul Gaultiers brassiere for Madonna, she does so for private delectation. Allan was probably one of the first women to be publicly accused of lesbianism. In 1918, the politician and rabid homophobe Noel Pemberton Billing was supposedly outraged by her performance; he identified her as the leader of a Cult of the Clitoris. Pemberton Billing was using Allan and the residual decadent memory of Wilde to stir up war hysteria to his own ends. Indeed, one of the most moving exhibits in Queer British Art is the cell door behind which Wilde was kept at Reading gaol after he was imprisoned for homosexuality in 1895. Next to it stands a full-length portrait of the inmate looking as if he had only just stepped out from behind the door.

The eclectic essays in the accompanying catalogue (edited by Clare Barlow, with contributions from writers such as Neil Bartlett and Ilsa Colsell) underline that many of the artists represented in the exhibition would be regarded as minor figures. That, of course, is their appeal. It is strange to tour these rooms in the company of other peoplethe self-selected publicbecause it is like leafing through a private album. A tin filled with soldiers buttons, taken from sexual partners by the artists Denis Wirth-Miller and Richard Chopping in the 1940s, speaks eloquently of this hidden world.

There are notable lacunae in this exhibition. Where, for instance, is the work of Denton Welch, a wonderful queer artist beloved by John Waters and William Burroughs? Desire is both found and lost in these solemn rooms on the banks of the Thames. The lazily stretching bronze nude of Frederic Leightons The Sluggard (1885), the boy in the shower in David Hockneys Cleanliness is Next to Godliness (1964), Nol Cowards red silk dressing gownall are stage-managed lives of revelation and concealment. What on earth would they have made of these visitors, this benediction, this fuss? As the actor Ernest Thesiger is suppoed to have said of the First World War, My dear, the noise! And the people!

Philip Hoare is professor of creative writing at the University of Southampton. His books include biographies of Stephen Tennant and Nol Coward, and the study Wildes Last Stand: Scandal, Decadence, Conspiracy and the First World War


Queer British Art 1861-1967, Tate Britain, London, until 1 October
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The Art Newspaper

Jul 20 2017
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The Art Newspaper

Jul 20 2017
Private museum of Arab art in the pipeline for Beirut
Basel Dalloul with works from his family's art foundation (Photo: courtesy of Basel Dalloul)
Lebanons surprise museum boom shows no signs of losing momentum. Despite political paralysis and a refugee crisis driven by civil war in neighbouring Syria, there are more than half a dozen museum projects in the pipeline for the capital, Beirut. The latest addition to their ranks is the privately funded Beirut Arab Art Museum, which is set to become the citys biggest art museum when it opens downtown in 2020.

The planned 10,000- to 15,000-sq.-m institution will house the 4,000-strong Modern and contemporary Arab art collection of the Beirut-based Ramzi and Saeda Dalloul Art Foundation. It will join the still-unbuilt Beirut City Museum, designed by Renzo Piano and backed by the Lebanese government, and the private, non-profit Beirut Museum of Art.

There is enough demand to accommodate them all, says Basel Dalloul, an IT entrepreneur and the managing director of the Dalloul foundation. Lebanon is a cultural centre in the region and it has always been considered that way historically. Downtown is the traditional hub of Beirut and its accessible [to] everyone.

While the location is still under consideration, Dalloul says the future museum will have temporary exhibitions as well as spaces for education, research and the conservation and authentication of Arab art. It will be free to enter, he says. He has ambitious plans to partner with international institutions including the State Hermitage Museum in St Petersburg, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York, the Centre Pompidou in Paris and Londons British Museum.

The foundation spends around $5m a year on acquistions and is considered one of the worlds largest collections of Modern and contemporary art from the Middle East. It is also actively lending pieces to major museums abroad. Four works by Dia Al-Azzawi were on show at the Mathaf museum in Qatar earlier this year and there are loans planned for 2018 exhibitions at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago; the Reina Sofia in Madrid and Tate Modern in London.

Dallouls father, the Palestinian businessman Ramzi Dalloul, began collecting almost 40 years ago in the hopes of building a legacy of pan-Arab art. For years, people have only heard stories about death and destruction coming from the Arab world and forget that it is the cradle of civilisation, Basel Dalloul says. Wed like to show a better face of this part of the planet.

With works spanning 150 years, the collection is mostly devoted to painting but also includes photography, sculpture, ceramics, video and conceptual art. Increasingly popular 20th-century artists such as the Egyptian Mahmoud Sad and Lebanese Saliba Douaihy are represented, as well as contemporary artists who have achieved international recognition, including Etel Adnan, Dia Al-Azzawi and Mona Hatoum.

Ahead of the 2020 opening, the foundation is looking for other ways to share its art with the public. A collection database is expected to go online by the end of the year and Dalloul hopes to stage pop-up exhibitions in some of downtown Beiruts vacant buildings next year.

Our collection is quite unique in its quality as well as its diversity, Dalloul says. We look forward to educating and inspiring generations to come, not only from the region, but the world over.

Three key works in the collection



1. Suleiman Anis Mansour
Jamal Al Mahamel III (2005)
This is one of the best-known paintings in Palestine, and arguably in the Middle East. With a title meaning the camel or carrier of hardships, the work is a larger version of the 1975 work that belonged to the Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi, thought to have been destroyed in the 1986 US bombing of Tripoli. The Dalloul foundation purchased it from Christies Dubai in 2015 for $257,000.







2. Georges Hanna Sabbagh
Nu au Fauteuil (nude in armchair) (1930)
The Egyptian Modern painter spent much of his life in France and was associated with the cole de Paris. He worked in the European tradition of portraits, landscapes and nudes. Beirut is a more open place than many in the regionwe will be able to show a variety of subjects from nudes to political works, Dalloul says.






3. Abdul Rahman Katanani
The Tornado (2015)
This three-metre-high sculpture was made by hand from more than 500 metres of barbed wire. It is a visual metaphor for refugees caught up in natural disasters. This Palestinian artist could live anywhere but he chooses to live and work in the Sabra refugee camp to teach kids about art, Dalloul says.
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The Art Newspaper

Jul 20 2017
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The New York Times

Jul 20 2017
What to See in New York Art Galleries This Week
Becky Beasley communes with Bernard Malamud at 80WSE; Andrew Kreps offers a group show on power; and Meschac Gaba raises flags at Tanya Bonakdar.
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The Guardian

Jul 20 2017
Hokusai: the influential work of Japanese artist famous for 'the great wave' – in pictures

The work of Katsushika Hokusai (1760–1849), one of Japan’s most prolific and enduringly popular artists, are in Australia for the first time in a major exhibition at the National Gallery of Victoria. Hokusai produced a body of work comprising some of the most recognisable and reproduced images in the history of Asian art, most notably The Great Wave off Kanagawa. Two prints of this famous image will be on show at NGV alongside over 150 of Hokusai’s artworks, including his renowned series on Mt Fuji

Hokusai is showing at the National Gallery of Victoria until 15 October

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The New York Times

Jul 20 2017
Getty Museum Buys Art by Michelangelo, Parmigianino and More
The museum’s acquisition of 16 drawings and a painting from an unidentified British collector is its “biggest in terms of financial value,” its director said.
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The New York Times

Jul 20 2017
Copyright Case Over Richard Prince Instagram Show to Go Forward
A photographer has sued Mr. Prince over the use of an Instagram photo in a gallery show. A New York federal judge has declined to dismiss the case.
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artforum.com

Jul 20 2017
FILM: Family Circus
Nick Pinkerton on Tizza Covi and Rainer Frimmel’s Mister Universo
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The New York Times

Jul 20 2017
A Bill Funding Arts and Humanities Endowments Passes House Committee
Months after President Trump proposed eliminating the N.E.A. and the N.E.H., a bill to finance them was approved by the appropriations panel.
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The Art Newspaper

Jul 20 2017
Rafael Moneo steps up for inaugural Soane Annual Lecture
Rafael Moneo (credit: Massimiliano Polles).

Sir John Soanes Museum in London has announced a new initiative designed to raise the profile of architects, artists and writers whose work has broadened and enriched understandings of architecture and the built environment, according to a museum statement. The inaugural Soane Annual Lecture, to be held at the Royal Institution in Albemarle Street, London, on 1 November, will be given by the Spanish architect Rafael Moneo who designed the Prados new wing (2007). And in a neat nod to history, Moneo will be awarded the Soane Medal, a copy of the medal presented in 1835 to Sir John Soane by the Architects of England, in recognition of his essential services to architecture. The museum director, Bruce Boucher, says in a statement: Moneos buildings, writings, and teaching have immeasurably enriched the field of architecture, and his lecture promises to be a significant contribution to the contemporary discussion.
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