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The Guardian

Mar 27 2017
Feminism doesn't need more female statues – it needs political action

Bulgarian artist Erka has rightly protested against Sofia’s total lack of statues of women by erecting her own pop-up versions. But permanent statues don’t advance feminism – they trap people in the past

Images of women recently invaded the streets of the Bulgarian capital, Sofia. Placed there by artist Erka, working with socially engaged art platform Fine Acts, these colourful pop-up busts protest against the total absence of monumental artworks dedicated to women on Sofia’s streets.

Related: Diana deserves the best of British sculpture – not some tacky statue

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The New York Times

Mar 27 2017
First Glance at the New Bar in the Old Four Seasons Space
The Bar, as it will be called when it opens this spring, will retain a midcentury spirit in design and drinks.
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The Art Newspaper

Mar 27 2017
New professorial position at UK university dedicated to contemporary art and culture of the Middle East
Anthony Downey speaking at Art Dubai in 2015
Anthony Downey, the founding editor of the online publication Ibraaz, has been appointed professor of visual culture in North Africa and the Middle East at Birmingham City University (BCU), the first position of its kind in the UK. Downey was formerly the director of contemporary art at Sothebys Institute of Art in London; his recent publications include Future Imperfect: Contemporary Art Practices and Cultural Institutions in the Middle East.

BCU has created the position to address the fact that there is currently no postgraduate programme offering degrees in the field of visual culture in the Middle East. The idea is to create a globally significant research cluster for postgraduates and PhD research students to study visual culture in the Middle East at BCU, in partnership with other organisations based in the [Gulf] region, Downey says. 

The new department will develop over the next three years, with research seminars and conferences scheduled to take place at the university focusing on art practices in the region, institutions, and culture networks. An undergraduate programme is expected to follow.   
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The Guardian

Mar 27 2017
'Their message is urgent': the Holocaust survivor and his 7,000 pieces of antisemitic propaganda

When Arthur Langerman was two, his parents were sent to Auschwitz. As his collection of antisemitic works opens in Normandy, he explains his obsession

The drawing is detailed, dramatic and disgusting. Called The Jew, Universal Enemy, it shows Christ on the cross and churches in flames, overseen by a sinister, red-lipped, voracious face. Philipp Rupprecht, better known as Fips, composed this caricature for the notorious Nazi newspaper Der Stürmer in 1937. He also illustrated a 1938 children’s book Der Giftpilz (The Poisonous Mushroom), intended to educate young Germans about the Jewish menace.

Rupprecht was sentenced to 10 years hard labour after the war. His work is among 150 pieces of antisemitic propaganda – posters, drawings and objects – on show at the Caen-Normandy Memorial Museum, in an exhibition called Heinous Cartoons 1886-1945: The Antisemitic Corrosion in Europe. They depict sinister, red-faced, obese capitalists smoking cigars on the backs of oppressed workers. They show grotesque communists clamping chains on a suffering Aryan. They portray Jews as rats and vermin. As the dates in the title suggest, the exhibition chronicles how anti-semitism grew at the end of the 19th century and reached a horrible culmination in the Holocaust.

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The Guardian

Mar 26 2017
Hyperreal visions of the world's most northerly town – in pictures

In her series This Is Not Real Life, photographer Dominika Gesicka celebrates the stark beauty of the Svalbard archipelago

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The New York Times

Mar 26 2017
Bernie Wrightson, Artist and a Creator of Swamp Thing, Dies at 68
Mr. Wrightson, who learned his craft by studying comics and taking correspondence courses, loved to meet fans and attend conventions.
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The Art Newspaper

Mar 26 2017
Guggenheim Abu Dhabi should be postponed or downsized, says the man who launched the project
Frank Gehry's design for the vast Guggenheim Abu Dhabi
The plan to build a Guggenheim in Abu Dhabi should be postponed or downsized believes Thomas Krens, the former director of the Guggenheim Foundation in New York, who brokered the 2006 deal to establish a Guggenheim designed by architect Frank Gehry in the United Arab Emirates. 
  
Speaking on the podcast In Other Words, produced by the art advisory firm Art Agency Partners, Krens said the project to establish a major cultural complex on Saadiyat Island with five new museums was conceived at a time when people were far more naive and could never have happened today. The world financial crisis and the Arab Spring has changed the equation radically it may not be such a good idea these days to have an American museumwith a Jewish name in a country [that doesnt recognise Israel] in such a prominent location, at such a big scale. 

The fear that the Guggenheim Abu Dhabi, designed to house a collection of international Modern art, could become a target for terrorists in the region was on organisers minds from the beginning, Krens said. One of the biggest concerns was security, because we were right on the edge of the Persian Gulf, and so everybodys imagination was [about] water-borne terrorismboatloads of explosives crashing into the museum and blowing it up. He noted that on the plans: "There are these huge concrete fences and walls that are planted in the ocean bed with chains through the channels that would not allow boats to come in.

Although the Guggenheim satellite was first announced over a decade ago and was initially scheduled to open in 2012, construction on the building itself has yet to begin. Of the four other planned museums on Saadiyat Island, only the Louvre Abu Dhabi designed by French architect Jean Nouvel is near completion. Krens suggested local authorities are delaying the start of building on the Guggenheim Abu Dhabi until after the opening of the Louvre outpost in order to gauge local reaction. The Louvre will open next year. In my view thats a political calculation that essentially is testing the waters. 

The authorities in Abu Dhabi should now rethink the entire cultural district, Krens said. If I were them, I would say were not abandoning our mission to building these institutions but we dont need all five of them up and running at the same time. Well do one, the one that is global, because the Louvre is a global, international collection. In the long-term, human nature[may] argue in favour of co-operation and co-ordination, he said.

A spokeswoman for the Guggenheim said: At a time when greater understanding among peoples and cultures is especially urgent, the Guggenheim Foundation remains committed to the Guggenheim Abu Dhabi and its transformative potential as a catalyst for exchange and for expanding the narratives of art history. A team of curators based in New York and in Abu Dhabi has been actively developing a curatorial strategy and collection for the future museum. As we continue to work toward the museums opening, we are pleased to work with our partners, the Abu Dhabi Tourism & Culture Authority, on a range of ongoing initiatives in education, public programming, and professional development as well as the recent opening of the second exhibition from the Guggenheim Abu Dhabi collection, The Creative Act, in Abu Dhabi.

The Abu Dhabi Tourism Development & Investment Company, which is overseeing the development of Saadiyat Island, did not respond to a request for comment.
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The Art Newspaper

Mar 26 2017
BMW Art Journey shortlist announced
The jury of the BMW Art Journey 2017 announced the three shortlisted artists at Art Basel in Hong Kong (Photo: courtesy of BMW)
The artists Lin Ke, Julian Charrire and Astha Butail have been shortlisted for this years BMW Art Journey, which enables artists almost anywhere in the world to develop new ideas and envision new creative projects, according to a press statement. Judges include Alexandra Munroe, senior curator of Asian art at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York, and Claire Hsu, the director of the Asia Art Archive. The winner of the Art Basel-backed initiative is due to be announced this summer. Past winners include Samson Young, who will represent Hong Kong at the 2017 Venice Biennale, and Abigail Reynolds whose installation, The Ruins of Time: Lost Libraries of the Silk Road, was on show in the BMW Lounge of Art Basel in Hong Kong last week.
 
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The Art Newspaper

Mar 26 2017
Christie’s cancels June contemporary art auctions
Christie's is cancelling its June postwar and contemporary art auctions  (Image: courtesy of Christie's Images Ltd. 2016)
Christies is cancelling its June postwar and contemporary art auctions in London, the auction house confirmed on Friday. In a statement, it says this year is particularly busy for collectors, with Venice, later New York sales in May, Documenta 14 and Art Basel all putting a squeeze on the art world summer calendarand consignments.

The move comes amid a string of belt-tightening measures announced under the leadership of Guillaume Cerutti, who was appointed chief executive in December. These include closing Christies South Kensington saleroom, which hosts around 60 sales annually, and slashing its Amsterdam auctions.

According to the statement, Christies now plans to focus on its contemporary sales in March, which were moved from February this year to avoid a clash with Chinese New Year, and during Frieze Week in October when the energy of the contemporary art world in London is at its highest. The next contemporary art evening auction will take place on 6 October. Christies Impressionist evening sale will go ahead as usual, taking place on 27 June.

Mirroring New York, which holds contemporary sales twice a year, Jussi Pylkkanen, Christies global president, says the aim is to create two highly focused moments in the calendar that maximise Londons position at the crossroads of the world art market.

In June 2016, Christies evening sale fetched 33.7m (39.6m with fees), well within the 26.3m to 37.7m estimate, but its lowest-value June auction since 2009. The result was heavily marred by the last-minute withdrawal of a painting by Gerhard Richter that had been estimated to sell for 14m.
 
Sothebys says it has no plans to reschedule its June contemporary sales, while a spokeswoman for Phillips says the auction house has not yet made a decision.
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The Art Newspaper

Mar 26 2017
Rodin's mistress Camille Claudel steps out of sculptor’s shadow with a museum of her own
Camille Claudel working in her studio in 1887
More than 70 years after her death, the sculptor Camille ClaudelAuguste Rodins muse and mistresshas a museum of her own. The Muse Camille Claudel opened in her former family home in Nogent-sur-Seine, around 70 miles southeast of Paris, on 26 March.

Better known for her passionate, tragic relationship with Rodin and her 30-year confinement in a psychiatric hospital near Avignon, Claudel was largely forgotten as an artist until the late 1970s. The new museum holds most of the sculptures that she did not destroy when her affair with Rodin ended. It aims to offer a broad overview of Claudels artistic trajectory that complements the smaller collection of her works at the Muse Rodin in Paris.

Preparations for a dedicated museum began in 2008, when the town purchased the villa and the collection built by Claudels great-niece, Reine-Marie Paris, and her partner Philippe Cressent. Assembling the 43 core pieces by Claudel, including drawings, plaster casts and mixed-media sculptures, involved a lot of detective work, says the museums director, Ccile Bertran.

The collection spans her career, beginning with Old Hlne (1882), the first work Claudel exhibited at the French Artists Salon, through her most productive decade, 1889 to 1898, and up to late bronzes from 1905. Pride of place goes to her only monumental marble sculpture, Perseus and the Gorgon (1902), which the town acquired for 950,000 in 2008, thanks to heritage funding and corporate sponsorship. French museums, including the Muse des Arts Dcoratifs and Muse Bourdelle in Paris, are also contributing long-term loans.

The Camille Claudel museum puts an original and exceptional talent back into the context of her time, Bertran says. With more than 150 works by other sculptors from the period, the comparative displays finally give Claudel an equal footing with Rodin. We will show the differences and links between the two artists work, thus revealing how they inspired each other, Bertran says.
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The New York Times

Mar 26 2017
Ai Weiwei’s Latest Artwork: Building Fences Throughout New York City
Commissioned by the Public Art Fund, “Good Fences Make Good Neighbors,” an ambitious work about divisive politics and borders, opens on Oct. 12.
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The Guardian

Mar 26 2017
Letters: Gustav Metzger obituary

Russell Clarke writes: In December 1962 Gustav Metzger gave a lecture at Ealing Technical College & School of Art, now part of the University of West London, entitled Auto Destructive Art, Auto Creative Art: The Struggle for the Machine Arts of the Future. It clearly inspired all who heard it, including Pete Townshend, then a graphic arts student at the college.

Shortly afterwards in a nearby pub, he watched as the double bass player Malcolm Cecil sawed his instrument in half while still attempting to play it, as his piano player, Andy “Thunderclap” Newman, played bizarre arrangements of jazz classics. (In 1969 Townshend produced Newman’s No 1 hit Something in the Air.) It surely cannot be a coincidence that once Townshend got the Who up and running, he specialised in his own form of auto-destructive art – smashing his (usually expensive) guitar to pieces at the end of the show.

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The Guardian

Mar 26 2017
Kangaroo pictures found at RCS may be Australia's earliest oil paintings

John Lewin canvases from about 1800 pre-date his still-life of fish hanging in Adelaide gallery

A pair of Australian oil paintings believed to be the first in the country have been discovered at the Royal College of Surgeons in London.

The two canvases, showing groups of amiable kangaroos sitting in a leafy landscape, were unearthed by an academic in the collection of the Hunterian Museum at the RCS.

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The Art Newspaper

Mar 26 2017
Solange, tattoos & Judy Chicago's latest work at SFMoMA bash
Solange Knowles (courtesy SFMoMA)

The San Francisco Museum of Modern Art is marking the first anniversary of its heralded refurbishment in style, with a performance by the pop songstress Solange Knowles and the inauguration of new works by Judy Chicago and Clare Rojas. The Birthday Bash benefit, scheduled to take place 26 April, will unfold in two concurrent parties, says a statement: the Birthday Supper, a seated dinner in the museums fifth-floor Jean and James Douglas Family Sculpture Garden and the Surprise Bash, an interactive art experience in the museums seventh-floor galleries. Chicagos Be No More installation, which will be on show at the museums Howard Street entrance, is a new iteration of the dry-ice environments that the feminist artist began making in 1967. Rojas will unveil a series of wall works at the Surprise Bash made in collaboration with the artist Barry McGee, featuring lyrics by Rojas's alter ego, the musician Peggy Honeywell. Artist Alex Israel will be inking guests with limited edition permanent tattoos, while Solange will crown the evening with a performance in the museums Haas Jr. atrium. 
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The Guardian

Mar 26 2017
What’s So Great About the Eiffel Tower? 70 Questions That Will Change the Way You Think About Architecture by Jonathan Glancey – review
These engaging essays on global landmarks show that our opinions aren’t set in stone

All buildings are temporary, said the great architectural thinker Cedric Price, but some are more temporary than others. In other words, even something as enduring as the Parthenon and the pyramids will one day go. And even before they disappear, these seemingly fixed and eternal objects are in constant flux. Not only do they weather, decay and get altered, but they change in public perception. An eyesore can become a landmark, a pagan temple can become a church, a symbol of tyranny can become a popular icon.

These paradoxical truths have allowed Jonathan Glancey, formerly architecture critic of the Guardian, to have a bit of fun. In What’s So Great About the Eiffel Tower? he finds 70 examples of buildings whose backstories are not as you might imagine. The title refers to Exhibit A in the case of the changeability of architectural perception, the fact that what is now one of the world’s most popular structures was originally opposed by 300 members of the French cultural elite.

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The Guardian

Mar 26 2017
Damien Hirst stakes all on his Venice treasure comeback show
The only thing certain about the artist’s secret exhibition is that he has a lot riding on it

Two Venetian museums, the Palazzo Grassi and the Punta della Dogana, will fling open their doors in a fortnight and allow visitors to view one of the most tightly guarded art exhibitions of recent years.

Treasures from the Wreck of the Unbelievable is the first new exhibition of works by Damien Hirst since 2014’s indifferently received Schizophrenogenesis – and the stakes couldn’t be higher for British art’s jester king.

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The Guardian

Mar 26 2017
The Japanese House: Architecture and Life After 1945 review – sheer imagination

Barbican, London
A manifesto, a fiction, a transient shelter… this fascinating survey of postwar architecture in Japan shows that a house there can have radically different meanings

Among the oblong concrete tree trunks that occupy the centre of the Barbican art gallery, opposing structures have grown up, one a series of hard-edged, white-walled boxes, the other a rickety hut-on-stilts, possibly erected by goblins in the night, in charred timber and bumpy plaster. If nothing else they make flesh the sheer imaginative fertility that Japanese architects bring to the design of houses.

“Weeds are wonderful things,” is how the late architect Kiyonori Kikutake once put it, “for they are expressive of pure vitality,” which could be taken as the motto for the Barbican’s exhibition. For, forcing their way through the crevices in crowded and hard-surfaced Japanese cities, the houses on show are indeed energetic weeds, obdurate, weird, unexpected, fascinating.

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The Guardian

Mar 26 2017
Howard Hodgkin: Absent Friends review – hello, not goodbye

National Portrait Gallery, London
This show of portraits – or are they? – by the late painter is as noisy as it is contemplative. And, always, a dancing blaze of colour

The National Portrait Gallery’s new Howard Hodgkin show borrows its title from Absent Friends, a picture (2000-1) in which broad strokes of black and brown gradually shade into stripes of muddy, fleshy white and then, finally, into a band of the artist’s favourite turquoise. To my eyes, this painting is not a portrait. Rather, it is an expression of what it means to miss someone: a visual ache in which longing is delicately balanced against the hope of return, the turquoise bringing to mind a summer sea as glimpsed from a far-off hill. Nevertheless, it’s hard to think of a more appropriate work with which to open an exhibition of what the gallery is quite determined to call portraits. Hodgkin died on 9 March at the age of 84, for which reason the exhibition, just like Absent Friends, is black-bordered, his loss running through the mind on a loop. But as you wander round, something else bubbles away too: an insistent, green-blue optimism. This, you come to realise, is hello again, not goodbye.

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The Guardian

Mar 25 2017
Rachel Whiteread: thinking inside the box

Once a key part of a generation of artists who transformed east London, the sculptor talks to Eva Wiseman about doll’s houses, her fellow YBAs, and why she left Shoreditch

It wasn’t just that Rachel Whiteread was moving house, it was that she was leaving Shoreditch, east London, the last artist standing, responsible for turning off the lights. “Shoreditch, my great love,” she sighs, wistful. She left a year ago, relocating with her husband and two sons to north London, a journey that takes half an hour in the car but, probably, around a decade in therapy.

To enter her new studio in Camden, visitors must squeeze through a low doorway cut into a garage, then carefully descend a single-file staircase. And then, from that tiny darkness, you go through a final door and stand, blinking, in a church of a space, an almost triple-height room that smells of coffee and cultivated peace. On the walls are casts in paper. When Whiteread moved in, she tried to get rid of as much of her collected ephemera as possible. She was left with a single plan chest of drawings, and it weighed on her. So she bought three shredders and turned the lot into papier mâché, which she cast on corrugated iron. Today they hang beside her desk, an abstract archive of a 30-year-old career.

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The Guardian

Mar 25 2017
Studio Swine's designs on the world

Husband-and-wife team Studio Swine’s work is a real flight of fancy – and it’s taking the design world by storm, says Becky Sunshine

Early next month design duo Studio Swine heads to the Milan Furniture Fair. They are not there to present a new sofa or lighting range like many of their contemporaries, but instead to unveil a 6m high blossoming tree sculpture crafted from recycled scaffolding metal. Every five seconds the tree will dispense vibrating vapour bubbles from its 30 branches. These bubbles will bounce on certain textiles, but pop on skin.

“We really looked into Milan as a city,” says Azusa Murakami, one half of Studio Swine. We loved the palazzos with blown glass rather than cut Murano chandeliers. That seemed to cast a new light and we wanted to capture that, but also think about this time of year, and how you can experience nature and seasonality.” The interactive installation is a collaboration with Cos. The brief from the fashion brand was entirely open, but the brand’s values work well with Swine’s: minimalism, modernity and a delight in interesting materials.

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The New York Times

Mar 25 2017
Africa Center Looks to Close Fund-Raising Gap, and Open Its Doors
The center in Harlem posted video of what its headquarters may eventually look like, and announced financing efforts under its new board president.
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The Guardian

Mar 25 2017
Colourful characters beneath Berlin – in pictures

Berlin is known for its underground scene of artists, DJs and techno, but it was the actual underground that captured the attention of photographer Sebastian Spasic. In his project Berlin Lines, a collaboration with website Pixartprinting, Spasic photographed 20 people in the German capital’s metro stations that had a particular significance to them. “Subway stations are part of people’s daily landscape but in most cases go unnoticed,” he says, “but if people wake up to some elements of the stations, like the rich typography, the colour palettes, they can appreciate a new point of view full of meaning and interesting facts.” To Spasic, Berlin is one of the world’s creative capitals: “It’s an eclectic city with a youthful and tolerant mentality. It’s best experienced and not explained.”

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The Art Newspaper

Mar 25 2017
At last—Yoko Ono’s banned bottoms film is bared in London
Yoko Ono (1968) courtesy of Sheridon Davies<br />

When the artist Yoko Ono made the film Bottoms in 1967, officials at the Royal Albert Hall in London refused to show the 80-minute piece which consists of nothing but close-up shots of 365 bums. According to the UK newspaper, the i, Marion Herrod, the venue secretary, was enflamed by the proposal, saying: We are concerned with the protection of the hall and I was not convinced that we should not have disruptive behaviour from way-out elements. The film was shot in a London residence after Ono advertised for participants in a niche newspaper. Ono tweeted: Im very pleased my film Bottoms is finally being shown at The Royal Albert Hall, 50 years after it was banned. The rear-filled footage is due to be screened on 3 May as part of the Summer of Love: Revisited season.
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The New York Times

Mar 25 2017
Art and Museums in NYC This Week
Our guide to new art shows, and one coming attraction.
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The Guardian

Mar 25 2017
The 20 photographs of the week

The Westminster attack, the ongoing offensive in Mosul and the funeral of Martin McGuinness – the news of the week captured by the world’s best photojournalists

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The Guardian

Mar 24 2017
My ‘wild child’ cousin, the surrealist painter Leonora Carrington

Throughout her childhood, Joanna Moorhead never heard a good word from her family about her cousin. When she went to Mexico she found out why she had abandoned them 60 years ealier

In most families the ghosts are dead but in my family, somewhere out there, our ghost was still alive. Her name was Prim, and she had left us on an autumn day in 1937, when she was only 20. Prim was the empty chair at Sunday lunch. She was the unseen aunt at the christenings of her nephews and niece. She was the cousin who hadn’t turned up, yet again, at the latest family funeral. And, just occasionally, she was the misty-eyed, faraway look on the face of Great-Aunt Maurie, who was her mother.

Throughout my childhood, I never heard a good word said about Prim. As far as our relatives were concerned, she was deficient, disloyal and dangerous. She was an impossible creature, a wild child, an unfathomable puzzle of a girl; a young woman who refused to be tamed and who eventually, when she had wreaked more havoc than any family could reasonably be expected to bear, simply flounced off into the sunset. These were the snatches, picked up from Maurie and from my grandmother Miriam (who was Prim’s aunt), and from Prim’s brother Gerard (who was my father’s best friend as well as his cousin, and a regular visitor to our house when I was growing up). Prim, the family narrative went, had simply refused to fit in: she had been expelled from various schools, had failed to net a husband during her season as a debutante, and then she had been caught up in some scandal so shocking that my great-aunt and my grandmother still seemed to be reeling from it decades later. If you asked anyone in the family, the story was that everyone else had behaved entirely reasonably throughout. “It certainly wasn’t us,” one of my cousins told me, years later. “It was Prim; she was the reason everything went wrong.”

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The Guardian

Mar 24 2017
Museum rescues sculptor Camille Claudel from decades of obscurity

French artist, once the lover of Auguste Rodin, has her career celebrated with opening of museum in Nogent-sur-Seine

Two elderly ladies sit side by side, one English, one French, one smartly dressed, one wearing clothes that were already very old fashioned by the late 1920s when the photograph was taken. One, her hand reassuringly on the other, looks slightly towards the camera: the other is wrapped in her own thoughts, not reacting to the camera, her companion or the world.

The photograph is the last known image of the sculptor Camille Claudel, once a renowned artist, a dazzling beauty, and lover of the most famous sculptor of the day, Auguste Rodin. Her career is celebrated in a new museum opening on Sunday in the small French town of Nogent-sur-Seine, which holds the largest collection of her work in the world.

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The New York Times

Mar 24 2017
Can the Arts Thrive Without Washington? A Kansas Town Says Yes
The Hays Arts Council and other small-town groups have proved nimble in maintaining programs despite inconsistent funding since 2011.
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The Art Newspaper

Mar 24 2017
PAD Paris loses its vetting committee after opening of 20th anniversary edition this week
PAD Paris 2016
PAD, the Paris art and design fair (until 26 March), has lost its vetting committee, the panel of experts that screens all the works offered by dealers, with a right to veto any objects they find to be questionable. Soon after the opening of the fairs 20th anniversary edition on Wednesday, the Compagnie Nationale des Experts (CNE), which was in charge of PADs vetting, decided to withdraw. The circumstances were such [that we] could no longer perform a proper job, its chairman Frdric Castaing told The Art Newspaper.

It was a difficult decision, but one we took unanimously; our trade has a professional and ethical position to stand for. All those who volunteered for the mission thought they were being treated disrespectfully, Castaing added. The time given to screen the objects before the opening has been dramatically reduced, even though experts had doubts about certain objects. Some booths could not be controlled at all. So we thought it was better to stop than take on responsibility for something over which we had no control.

Although Castaing said that some works at this years fair appeared to be problematic, he declined to give specifics. This situation is not new, he added. Over the years, the material conditions have deteriorated. We decided to stop vetting PAD London before the last edition for the same reasons.

Apparently, tensions erupted when the fairs organisers excluded two experts from the vetting committee, for motives that have nothing to do with professional and ethical standards according to CNE.

Founded in 1997 by Patrick Perrin, the son of one of the most prestigious antiques dealers in Paris, PAD is held in the Tuileries Gardens, near the Louvre. It features some 67 exhibitors presenting a mix of design, sculpture, jewellery, tribal and modern art. PAD London, held in Berkeley Square each October, at the same time as Frieze, had its 10th anniversary last year. Perrin did not reply to calls and a spokeswoman for the fair said she could not comment.
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The New York Times

Mar 24 2017
A Space Odyssey: Making Art Up There
The artist Eduardo Kac and Thomas Pesquet, a Frenchman on the International Space Station, have created art in space.
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The Guardian

Mar 24 2017
Tate Britain to open till midnight to cope with Hockney show demand

Retrospective of Yorkshire-born painter broke pre-sales records and is one of most popular exhibitions in gallery’s history

Tate Britain will be opening its doors until midnight for the first time to cope with demand for the David Hockney exhibition.

The retrospective of the Yorkshire-born painter broke pre-sale records for all Tate galleries, selling more than 350,000 tickets before the doors opened in February, and has gone on to become one of the most popular shows in Tate Britain’s history.

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artforum.com

Mar 24 2017
FILM: Great Migrations
Nick Pinkerton on the 8th Migrating Forms
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artforum.com

Mar 24 2017
500 WORDS: Heide Hinrichs
Heide Hinrichs on her work in the Kathmandu Triennale
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artforum.com

Mar 24 2017
PASSAGES: Ferreira Gullar (1930–2016)
Kaira M. Cabañas on Ferreira Gullar (1930–2016)
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The Art Newspaper

Mar 24 2017
Tate Modern opens first 'live' show with mist, plants and a rave
The Japanese artist Fujiko Nakaya with her new commission London Fog (2017) outside the Tate Modern (Photo: © Tate Photography)
The veteran Japanese artist Fujiko Nakaya has created a site-specific work made of mist as the centrepiece of BMW Tate Live Exhibition: Ten Days Six Nights (24 March-2 April)the Tate Moderns first ever live exhibition, says the museum director Frances Morris.

Nakayas worktitled London Fog (2017) and made in collaboration with Ryuichi Sakamoto and Shiro Takataniis on show outside the museums new Switch House building. The exhibition brings together old friends with new friends, Morris says. Nakaya, who has lifetime of collaboration behind herincluding with the US artist Robert Rauschenberg whose major survey is also on show at the museumwas the starting point for the exhibition, which combines performances, film, installations, music and dance.

There will be a continuously changing programme throughout the duration of the exhibition, says the shows co-curator Catherine Wood. The exhibition, which is primarily housed in the museums subterranean Tanks galleries, is the first in a series of annual live exhibitions that will take place over the next four years, Woods says.  

The exhibition includes works by around 20 artists, ranging from a rave dance music piece by the Italian artist and musician Lorenzo Senni to an immersive installation filled with plants by the Dominican artist Isabel Lewis, which will host several events including Angolan kizomba dancing, discussions and food and drink experiences. There are also interactive works by the US artists Wu Tsang and Fred Molten, and CAMP, a collaborative studio group from Mumbai. One-off live screenings and performances will also take place, including a piece by the Berlin-based choreographer and dancer Ligia Lewis in the Tanks as well as a dance performance by Min Tanaka within Nakayas mist and soundscape installation outside. 

Although Tate Modern has hosted live performances beforeand for two days in 2015 the French choreographer Boris Charmatz turned the whole gallery into the Muse de la dansethe group exhibition is the first in a dedicated programme focusing on live works, many by artists who work in media that is not usually experienced in a traditional museum setting.  One of the aims of the exhibition is also  to welcome unplaceable artists, says the exhibitions co-curator Andrea Lissoni. The BMW Tate Live programme is sponsored by the BMW Group. 
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The Guardian

Mar 24 2017
Behind the scenes at Disneyland Paris – in pictures

As Disneyland Paris prepares to celebrate its 25th anniversary, employees at the workshops build new floats and costumes based on films including Finding Nemo. Take a look behind the scenes

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The Guardian

Mar 24 2017
Whaling, worship and a farewell to Howard Hodgkin – the week in art

The National Gallery pits Rubens against Rembrandt, while the National Portrait Gallery hosts Howard Hodgkin’s posthumous show – all in your weekly dispatch

Howard Hodgkin
This exhibition serves as a farewell to the great British painter who recently died. His works may seem abstract at first sight, but each one is a passionate evocation of people, places and lost time.
National Portrait Gallery, London, until 18 June

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