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The New York Times

Sep 22 2017
Art Review: A Head-Spinning, Hope-Inspiring Showcase of Art
In Latin American Los Angeles, bridges soar, walls fall. A grand exchange beckons the art traveler to “Pacific Standard Time: LA/LA.”
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The New York Times

Sep 22 2017
Editor’s Letter: T’s Design & Luxury Issue: Editor’s Letter
Good design — like a good idea — is always relevant, and that context, while important, isn’t everything.
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The Guardian

Sep 22 2017
Prince Charles is called to public debate by designer Richard Rogers

The designer says he knows of five developers who privately consulted prince over architects, fearing his opposition

Richard Rogers has challenged Prince Charles to engage in public debate over Britain’s built environment after claiming he knows of five developers who privately consulted him over their choice of architects because they fear his opposition.

The Labour peer and designer of the Pompidou Centre reopened a simmering row over the heir to the throne’s interventions in architecture by alleging in a new book that the developers consulted the palace “to check what would be acceptable”. Rogers believes Charles should keep out of the subject unless he is willing to engage in open argument.

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The New York Times

Sep 22 2017
The Design Companies Conquering New Ground
Three companies — two established, one emerging — move in new directions.
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The New York Times

Sep 22 2017
Exhibition Review: Remember When They Wanted to Build a Parking Lot Over the Hudson?
‘Never Built New York,’ a new exhibition at the Queens Museum, showcases unrealized ideas, from the almost practical to the magical.
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The Guardian

Sep 22 2017
May's Florence speech venue represents European unity, not division

Santa Maria Novella is church with rich links to the Renaissance, a movement based on ideas that Brexit clearly rejects

The most charismatic of Santa Maria Novella’s artistic ghosts left no visible trace there. In 1503, Leonardo da Vinci was handed the keys to a set of rooms off its cloisters, where he lived for the next few years at the expense of the Florentine Republic; thinking, inventing and occasionally working on the Mona Lisa. He even seems to have built a flying machine there. The same rooms adjacent to the church were the venue for May’s Florentine address.

Related: Theresa May proposes two-year 'period of implementation' after UK leaves EU - live updates

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The New York Times

Sep 22 2017
Alternative Movie Posters: Fan Art We Love
Artists’ odes to favorite films are increasingly valuable. It’s “like a Keith Haring knockoff becoming more popular than the original,” an expert says.
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artforum.com

Sep 22 2017
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The Guardian

Sep 22 2017
Jasper Johns' hot wax, Big Tom's geometry, and the strangest surrealist ever – the week in art

The great America unfurls his flags, targets, maps and beer cans, an old master called Big Tom reveals some weird geometry, and the Turner prize hits Hull – all in your weekly dispatch

Jasper Johns
The intellect and emotion of the objects and paintings, prints and assemblages of this exquisite artist put him at the centre of the art of our time. Flags, targets, maps and beer cans – Johns has done them all with unequalled wit. He managed to invent pop art, conceptual art and minimalism all in one go when he started to make an American flag out of waxy paint layered over newspaper collage in 1954 and has been meditating with the same serious irony about objects and their meanings ever since.
Royal Academy, London, from 23 September to 10 December.

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The New York Times

Sep 22 2017
A Family Compound in Coastal Maine, Made From Scratch
At just 31 and with no formal training in architecture, Anthony Esteves has built a beautiful place to live — with a Japanese influence.
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The New York Times

Sep 22 2017
Bowie, Bach and Bebop: How Music Powered Basquiat
What was on the turntable in Jean-Michel Basquiat’s studio? The answer is crucial to understanding his work.
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The Guardian

Sep 22 2017
‘There was an unsaid understanding between us’: the Dallas Veterans Day Parade, 2004

Marine staff sergeant Mark Graunke recalls being embraced by Pearl Harbor veteran Houston James in Dallas

There’s an unwritten rule in the Marines that if you get caught in the media, you have to buy everyone a case of beer. So when this photograph went viral, my first thought was: “Uh-oh, I owe a lot of people a lot of drinks.”

As a staff sergeant, I was part of the initial effort in Iraq, entering from Kuwait in March 2003. My first job was to keep routes open, making sure there were no explosive hazards near the roads. Then I worked in explosive ordnance disposal, the military version of the bomb squad. Our job was to prevent things blowing up, or explode them in a controlled environment. I handled everything from bombs to grenades and mines.

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The New York Times

Sep 22 2017
At a Los Angeles Art Show, Mickey Mouse as an Imperialist Icon
As part of the art extravaganza “Pacific Standard Time: LA/LA,” an exhibition focuses on Walt Disney’s trip to South America.
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The Guardian

Sep 22 2017
William Eggleston’s Las Vegas (yellow shirt guy at pinball machine): an American snapshot

Taken from a series shot between 1965 to 1968, this photograph illustrates the artist’s ability to capture the idiosyncrasies of life in the US

Racked up and positioned in rows that disappear along sharp diagonals, pinball machines, magazines and men are of a piece here.

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The New York Times

Sep 22 2017
Berlin Has a New Art Fair. Can It Attract the Buyers?
Art Berlin joins the popular Gallery Weekend as an opportunity for the art world’s international buyers to swoop in.
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The New York Times

Sep 22 2017
It Might Have Been a Masterpiece, but Now It’s a Cautionary Tale
A disputed Mondrian passed unchecked around some important art institutions as though it were the real thing.
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The Guardian

Sep 22 2017
Jasper Johns and the Turner prize: this week’s best UK exhibitions

The world’s greatest living artist gets the blockbuster treatment he deserves, while four nominees for the coveted award exhibit their work in Hull

The world’s greatest living artist gets the blockbuster treatment he deserves. In 1954, Johns began painting an American flag in waxy layers over newspaper clippings. What was he saying about the US? Ever since, this enigmatic and highly intelligent artist has ploughed a furrow between art and life. Together with Robert Rauschenberg and Cy Twombly, he has created the most subtle, profound art of the past 60 years.
Royal Academy of Arts, W1, 23 September to 10 December

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The Guardian

Sep 21 2017
The striking feminist art of Louise Bourgeois – in pictures

The often provocative work of the French sculptor is being celebrated in a new exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art in New York and shines a light on some of her lesser-known print pieces that focus on issues of patriarchy, sexuality and womanhood.

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The New York Times

Sep 21 2017
Guggenheim Exhibit With Video of Dogs Trying to Fight Stirs Criticism
Facing a backlash, the museum put out a statement defending an exhibition by Chinese conceptual artists that is to open on Oct. 6.
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The New York Times

Sep 21 2017
Albert Speer Jr., Architect and Son of Hitler Confidant, Dies at 83
The younger Mr. Speer ultimately had more influence on urban landscapes than his notorious father, from whom he sought to distance himself.
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artforum.com

Sep 21 2017
DIARY: Take Me To The Other Side
Trinie Dalton around Pacific Standard Time: LA/LA
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The New York Times

Sep 21 2017
Art and Museums in NYC This Week
Our guide to new art shows.
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The New York Times

Sep 21 2017
What to See in New York Art Galleries This Week
Bunny Rogers brings her Columbine trilogy to the Whitney; Mary Heilmann’s Process Art is on view at Craig F. Starr Gallery; and more.
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The New York Times

Sep 21 2017
Peabody Essex Museum Gets Set of Native American Artifacts
Some of the items are claimed by tribes and will likely be returned by the museum as part of its compliance with federal repatriation laws.
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artforum.com

Sep 21 2017
500 WORDS: Tabboo!
Tabboo!, aka Stephen Tashjian, talks about his life and art
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artforum.com

Sep 21 2017
FILM: Small Wonder
Nick Pinkerton on Wavelengths at the Toronto International Film Festival
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The Guardian

Sep 21 2017
David Shepherd obituary
Artist whose popular wildlife paintings helped raise millions for conservation

Fresh out of school, with no scholastic achievements to recommend him, David Shepherd applied for a place at the Slade School of Art in London. The Slade did him the biggest favour of his life by telling him that he had no talent for art. Instead, Shepherd, the artist and conservationist, who has died aged 86, took to painting meticulous pictures of railway engines, aircraft and – the real breakthrough – wildlife, especially his trademark African elephant bull, facing the viewer head-on with ears spread wide. A picture of this beast, alone or with its fellows, might be called The Men of Etosha, or Dusty Evening, or Elephant Heaven, or even, as in his bestseller, Wise Old Elephant. It didn’t much matter. The reproductions sold hugely.

Shepherd was, some said, Britain’s Tretchikoff, with Wise Old Elephant his Chinese Girl, and this was intended as a compliment. Certainly, he became immensely rich and helped to raise more than £8m for his other great passion – wildlife conservation – initially through donating painting sales proceeds to charities such as the World Wildlife Fund, and latterly through the efforts of the David Shepherd Wildlife Foundation, set up in 1984. The charity campaigns to protect endangered species, and combat poaching and its trade.

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The New York Times

Sep 21 2017
Four Modern Masters of Color Reinvigorating Design
They're using vibrant shades in jewelry, interiors, lingerie and flowers. Get to know them.
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The Guardian

Sep 21 2017
Tate Modern to host its first ever solo Picasso exhibition

Show focusing on one year - 1932 - will bring together three paintings of reclining nudes based on artist’s lover Marie-Thérèse Walter

Three reclining nudes, inspired by one of Picasso’s most famous lovers, Marie-Thérèse Walter, are to be reunited for the first time in 85 years in an exhibition at Tate Modern.

The three paintings, which were described by Tate Modern director Frances Morris as “sensual, seductive and beautiful”, will be the centrepiece of the gallery’s first solo Picasso show, which will focus on just one formative year of the artist’s life – 1932.

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The New York Times

Sep 21 2017
By Design: The Unique Value of Seeing Works in the Wild
Why three European art parks — outdoor spaces with large-scale, site-specific sculpture — have become essential places to engage with culture.
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The New York Times

Sep 21 2017
The New Yorker Said No, but These Cartoons Just May Make Your Day
There are likely to be some winners — and a few groaners — at an exhibition of 45 cartoons that didn’t make the cut.
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The Guardian

Sep 21 2017
Poor Art | Arte Povera review – the show that proves Britain's on the blink

Estorick Collection, London
What can we learn from these British responses to arte povera, the subversive Italian movement from the 1960s? That it’ll take more than fur sculpture and a daisy cross to outclass the Europeans

The bilingual title of this exhibition is more than a little unfortunate. The term arte povera, the 1960s Italian movement so christened by the critic Germano Celant, translates as “poor art”. And, as it happens, most of the British imitations of arte povera at the Estorick Collection are very poor indeed. This is a great advert for immediately abandoning Brexit. As part of the EU, we can share in the great artistic heritage of Italy which includes, as this show reminds us, not only Michelangelo Buonarroti but also Michelangelo Pistoletto, not only Caravaggio but also Mario Merz. What can Britain boast? On this evidence, a couple of daft Eric Bainbridge sculptures covered in fur and some solipsistic nonsense by Gavin Turk.

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The New York Times

Sep 21 2017
Some Cartoons That Missed the Cut
The New Yorker is highly selective of the cartoons it publishes. Here are cartoons that didn’t make it.
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The Guardian

Sep 21 2017
Jeremy Corbyn - a travelling portrait

In the weeks before Labour’s annual party conference, Jeremy Corbyn travelled the length and breadth of the UK for a tour of marginal seats. Photographer Sean Smith was with him for the journey

Jeremy Corbyn placed his party on permanent campaign mode with a national tour beginning in Cornwall.Choosing Conservative-held seats across England and Wales, and SNP seats in Scotland, the Labour party planned a series of campaigning events to prepare for the next election, visiting 47 marginal seats, and 50 constituencies in total.

Corbyn wanted to take a “message of hope to marginal seats” and by targeting Tory-held seats, rather than those with Labour MPs, focus on achieving a parliamentary majority. Almost all the seats, apart from two in Scotland, are held by other parties where the sitting MPs’ majorities were significantly cut in the general election.

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