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The Art Newspaper

Apr 24 2017
Hermitage to loan Scythian treasures for British Museum show
Gold applique showing two archers back to back, Kul Oba, in the British Museum's collection (400BC-350BC) (Image: © The Trustees of the British Museum)
The British Museum is planning a major exhibition on the Scythians in September with loans from Russia, including gold jewellery. Although few details have been released, the State Hermitage Museum will lend 200 objects.
 
The Scythians, one of the great nomadic civilisations of antiquity, dominated a huge area of what eventually became the Soviet Union, stretching from Siberia to the Black Sea. Their empire was at its height from the seventh to third centuries BC. The Hermitage loans will include gold items excavated in tombs in Russia and Kazakhstan. Although important material was excavated in Ukraine, this is unlikely to be coming, to avoid political and legal complications in the wake of Russias occupation of Crimea in 2014.
 
The British Museum exhibition is being curated by St John Simpson of the Middle East department. Informal discussions on the Scythian loans began some years ago, with the formal agreement being made after the Parthenon sculpture Ilissos (around 438-432 BC) was lent to St Petersburg in January 2014. The historic decision to lend one of the Marbles may well have smoothed the way for the Scythian treasures. A British Museum spokeswoman says there was no quid pro quo and the two museums have a long-standing relationship, of which the loan of Ilissos is but one example. 
 
Treasures of the Scythians, British Museum, London, 14 September-12 January 2018
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The Art Newspaper

Apr 24 2017
Tomás Saraceno collaborates with 7,000 spiders to make largest-ever exhibited web
Tomás Saraceno's Quasi-social musical instrument IC 342 built by: 7000 Parawixia bistriata - six months (2017) during its installation at the Museo de Arte Moderno de Buenos Aires (Photo: © Studio Tomás Saraceno)
Arachnophobes look away now. The Argentinian artist Toms Saracenos first show in a public institution in his home country, which opened this month, includes an installation of the largest spider web to have ever been exhibited. Made by around 7,000 spiders, the work titled Quasi-Social Musical Instrument IC 342 built by 7000 Parawixia bistriatasix months (2017), covers an area of more than 190 sq. m.
 
The piece is one of two large installations that form the exhibition How to Entangle the Universe in a Spider Web (until 27 August), which opened this month at the Museo de Arte Moderno de Buenos Aires. The particular species of spider used for the workparawixia bistriatais quasi-social, Saraceno says; they live together in a single web for only a period. This type of behaviour is seen in less than 1% of arachnids.
 
The spiders worked together for around two-and-half months spinning their webs in the museums gallery to make the immersive installation. Once they had created it, they were gathered together again and taken back to where they were originally collected in the north of Argentina by the artist and colleagues in collaboration with staff from the Bernardino Rivadavia Natural Sciences Museum.
 
As well as the giant web installation, the show also includes a second immersive work where visitors can hear the sound that another species of spiderNephila clavipesmakes when plucking its web. The work, titled The Cosmic Dust Spider Web Orchestra (2017), uses tiny microphones to amplify the spiders movements. The work also includes live, three-dimensional video recordings that track 25 particles of dust in the air, lit by a beam of light, and translate their movement into sounds. These vary depending on where the particles are in relation to each other and how quickly they are moving. Among the particles in the air is cosmic dust, introduced by the artist into the museum space. The dust particles are above the speaker that is activated by the spiders movements and, inevitably, by the movement of visitors in the gallery. It is like a concert created by the spider, the dust and visitors, the artist says.
 
Saraceno has one of the largest collections of spider webs in the world, and has worked extensively with researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in the US and the Department of Collective Behaviour at the Max Planck Institute in Germany.  
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The Guardian

Apr 23 2017
East London review – a journey through Apple-tinted glasses

Charles Saumarez Smith’s ‘connoisseur’s’ tour of the East End is enjoyable but unashamedly whimsical

Who will admit to being a gentrifier? Who will confess to being part of that rent-inflating urban scourge, over which so many hands are wrung, that lays a plague of artisanal bread and absurd beards upon the land, which like the enclosures of yore sends widows and orphans and honest craftsmen weeping into exile? Who will sing that they’re glad to gentrify?

Charles Saumarez Smith, that’s who. The secretary and chief executive of the Royal Academy of Arts, owner of a double-fronted Georgian house in Stepney – before that a terrace house in Limehouse, bought in 1982 – lets you know in the very first sentence of his book on east London, with lack of cant, that he is not your traditional cockney diamond geezer.

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The Guardian

Apr 23 2017
A pint and a portrait: the landlord who snapped small town legends

If you lived in rural Cork in the 60s and wanted your picture taken, there was only one place to go: Dennis Dinneen’s bar

In 2003, aged 16, David J Moore moved to the small town of Macroom in County Cork, where he soon gravitated to Dinneen’s bar to play pool with the local lads. “It was a regular country pub except that the walls were covered in black and white photographs,” he recalls. “There were all these amazing shots of the locals and the town as well as family gatherings and celebrations. It took me a while to find out that the publican, Dennis Dinneen, was also the photographer.”

Dinneen’s bar is still a magnet for the locals of Macroom, but the man himself died in 1985, leaving behind an archive of over 20,000 images that amounts to a sustained snapshot of the town and its inhabitants. An exhibition of his work, entitled Small Town Portraits and curated by Moore, has just opened at the Douglas Hyde Gallery in Dublin.

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The Guardian

Apr 23 2017
Mayor to subsidise 'naked' homes solution to London housing crisis

Sadiq Khan adds weight to scheme to construct spartan apartments that will sell for up to 40% less than usual new-builds

Who needs internal walls or a fitted kitchen anyway? As house prices soar ever further out of reach, London’s mayor, Sadiq Khan, is to subsidise a new generation of ultra-basic “naked” homes wthat will sell for up to 40% less than standard new builds.

The apartments will have no partition walls, no flooring and wall finishes, only basic plumbing and absolutely no decoration. The only recognisable part of a kitchen will be a sink. The upside of this spartan approach is a price tag of between £150,000 and £340,000, in reach for buyers on average incomes in a city where the average home now costs £580,000.

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The Guardian

Apr 23 2017
Dennis Dinneen: the pub landlord who captured Cork – in pictures

Dennis Dinneen turned his pub into a photography studio, and everyone stopped by – from awkward teenagers to boozy wedding parties

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The New York Times

Apr 23 2017
Barkley L. Hendricks, Portraitist of a New Black Pride, Dies at 72
Having seen virtually no black subjects among the portraits he admired in Europe, Mr. Hendricks painted friends, family and strangers who conveyed a culture of assertiveness.
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The Guardian

Apr 23 2017
Great Australian photographs: Max Dupain's Sunbaker – an audio essay

In the first in a new audio-visual series on celebrated Australian photographs, we look at the hidden history of this 1930s image shot on a New South Wales beach

Click on the audio buttons to hear the discussion between the Guardian Australia picture editor, Jonny Weeks, the Guardian Australia photographer, Mike Bowers, the senior curator of photography at the National Gallery of Australia, Shaune Lakin, and the curator at the Centre for Contemporary Photography, Pippa Milne.

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The New York Times

Apr 23 2017
Don’t Blame the Russians, Tax Judge Tells Sotheby’s Expert
In a case involving an estate and a Sotheby’s expert’s valuation of two paintings by old masters, a judge sides with the Internal Revenue Service.
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The Guardian

Apr 23 2017
Padraig Mac Miadhachain obituary

My friend the artist Padraig Mac Miadhachain, who has died aged 88, lived most of his life at Swanage on the Isle of Purbeck, Dorset, and also had a long association with St Ives, Cornwall, where he was a member of the Penwith Society of Arts and maintained a studio for many years.

Paddy travelled widely, throughout the US, South America, Europe, north Africa, the middle east and central Asia. These experiences contributed to a vast mental archive of visual images from which he drew the inspiration for paintings that distilled these memories into simplified and vital expressions of form and colour.

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The New York Times

Apr 23 2017
Grace Notes: Finally, From Italy, the Full George Washington
A two-century-old statue of the nation’s father, in the buff, is coming to the United States for the first time. And, no, he didn’t pose for it.
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EosArte.eu

Apr 23 2017
Milano. Due mesi di fotografia d’autore con Photofestival
Dal 20 aprile al 20 giugno oltre 150 mostre fotografiche si terranno presso spazi pubblici e privati a Milano, dal centro alla periferia; particolare attenzione è rivolta agli eventi che si terranno nel corso della PhotoWeek, la nuova iniziativa lanciata dal Comune per promuovere e valorizzare il settore della fotografia. di Vittorio Schieroni È stato [...]
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The Guardian

Apr 23 2017
Cathedrals in crisis: fears of closure as half face big cash problems

Bishop examining finances of England’s Anglican cathedrals to look at possible impact ‘if individual cathedrals fail’

As many as half of England’s Anglican cathedrals are facing financial crisis and a closure cannot be ruled out, according to the chair of an investigative task force set up by the archbishops of Canterbury and York.

Adrian Newman, the bishop of Stepney, said the Cathedrals Working Group would examine the “potential reputational damage done to the church if individual cathedrals fail”. The group, which meets for the first time early next month, will review the governance and financial management of England’s 42 Anglican cathedrals.

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The Guardian

Apr 23 2017
Nazi-looted painting to be auctioned as owners' heirs fail to halt sale

Auction house Im Kinsky accused of moral bankruptcy for sale of Bartholomeus van der Helst work despite ownership dispute

A 17th-century Dutch old master painting stolen by the Nazis is to be auctioned in Vienna next week, provoking outrage from the heirs of the owners from whom it was looted who have accused the auction house of moral bankruptcy.

Auctioneers at Im Kinsky have not shied away from describing the painting, Bartholomeus van der Helst’s Portrait of a Man, as disputed stolen art in the sales catalogue. They state that its current owner bought it in good faith from a German art dealer in 2004 and under Austrian law she has the right to sell it.

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The Guardian

Apr 23 2017
Florence Nightingale's 'rubbish' amulets to go on display for first time

Fake objects Nightingale rated highly to join ancient Egyptian amulets she thought ‘shabby’ at World Museum in Liverpool

A collection of ancient Egyptian amulets acquired by Florence Nightingale in the winter of 1849 when she went on an adventurous Egyptian holiday are going on display for the first time – and the curator at the World Museum in Liverpool is rather more impressed by them than the Lady of the Lamp herself was.

Five years before she sailed to Scutari, Istanbul, during the Crimean war, Nightingale travelled to Egypt at a time when mass tourism there was in its infancy. She wrote vivid letters home to her older sister, Parthenope, who later published them, but described her little amulets as “rubbish”.

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The Guardian

Apr 23 2017
Grayson Perry: ‘As an artist I find Brexit exciting. No doubt it will be a disaster’

Britain’s finest transvestite potter is hard at work exploring the nature of masculinity. Over a game platter near his London home, he discusses motorbikes, body image and more

For a while, perhaps all his life, Grayson Perry has been making a study of what it means to be a man. So, what do two blokes nursing a beer in the corner of a pub talk about of a Tuesday lunchtime? The topics of conversation with Britain’s greatest ever transvestite potter-cum-tapestry-maker kick off as follows: what do net curtains really signify (he was working on a theory on his way here); the difficulty of taking corners at speed on a 9ft-long pink motorbike (he is having a more wieldy model custom made in Sussex); books as the last talisman of taste (“they are the knick-knacks of thought, aren’t they?”); and the distinction, if any, between bohemians and hipsters (“as soon as something becomes a phenomenon it’s already died”).

We are in the Draper’s Arms in Islington, north London, a place in which we both feel something of a proprietorial interest. I lived in a flat across the road 20-odd years ago, when this place was more a villains’ pub than gastropub. Perry’s association goes back further. He moved into his wife Philippa’s house near here in the mid-1980s, and watched the area become a byword for gentrification. He’s more normally found in an unreconstructed caff on nearby Upper Street, he insists, but the Draper’s is a good option if he is going posh. One way of looking at his career, he suggests, is that he has spent half a lifetime working and saving enough money to move his studio from Walthamstow to within a five-minute bike ride of his home. He calculates that the relocation of space cost him £220,000 a mile (seven in all).

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The Guardian

Apr 23 2017
Francis Terry: ‘Architects tend to think if it’s popular, there’s something wrong’

The neoclassical country piles designed by Quinlan Terry and his son Francis are adored by the royals and multimillionaires. Now Francis is striking out on his own

In the 1980s the architect Quinlan Terry was a bogeyman to much of his profession. Unbendingly traditionalist, he believed that the classical orders were handed down by God. He saw nothing good in modern architecture. He thought that the stainless steel exo-viscera of Richard Rogers’s Lloyds building needed brick walls and a slate roof. His stance also made him a pinup, in his three-piece suit and all, to those who thought that new buildings should like just like old buildings. In the decade when economics were handed down by Margaret Thatcher – for whom, indeed, Terry designed interiors in No 10 Downing Street – and aesthetics by the Prince of Wales, an era when radical finance felt the need to dress itself in the trappings of old England, he was a man of his time.

Well, here we are again, in the reign of another she-Tory and another time of patriotic nostalgia, of the promised return of dark blue passports and a hoped-for relaunch of the royal yacht Britannia. Quinlan Terry is still at it, designing, among other things, country houses in Dorset, Ireland and Kentucky, but now there is also his son Francis, who last year set up his own practice after nearly 20 years working alongside his father. He is carrying out the same type of work as the older Terry – he has country houses on the go in Wiltshire, Norfolk, Hampshire and Ireland, and a mixed-use development in Twickenham – but he has also developed a new line of business, developing counter-proposals, backed by local residents, to overweening developers’ plans in places like Mount Pleasant and West Hampstead, London.

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The Guardian

Apr 23 2017
Shipping container architecture – in pictures

Designers and architects are exploring the potential of repurposed shipping containers, but critics say they are not necessarily sustainable or cost-effective

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The Guardian

Apr 23 2017
Annette Messager: Avec et sans raisons; Geta Brătescu: The Studio: A Tireless, Ongoing Space – review
Marian Goodman Gallery; Camden Arts Centre, London
Two veteran European artists conjure marvel and mischief from the everyday lives of women

The English have landed. That is what Parisians of Annette Messager’s generation used to say when their period came. And now the 73-year-old French artist has returned the favour, arriving in London with a flood of bleeding wombs, fallopian tubes and bare-breasted women all painted, aptly, in spreading red watercolour. You don’t like the sound of it? Messager has you fixed in her sights.

It is eight years since her big Hayward retrospective, and more since Messager won the Golden Lion at Venice. Certain things have changed, including a more obvious response to current affairs. Many of these watercolours simply transcribe press shots of Femen, the Ukrainian feminist group, whose slogan – “our weapons are bare breasts” – appears on their bodies during topless protests. Others are unexceptionable jabs at oppressive laws – no female drivers in Saudi Arabia, say. But there are still moments of typically mischievous affront.

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The Guardian

Apr 22 2017
Concrete thinking's in fashion at Brussels' brutalist Jam Hotel

Budget hotels always offer basic, boxy rooms, but not many are as creative as this alternative gem in the Belgian capital

Brussels is a city of grand townhouses and art nouveau. Yet plonked in the middle of the Belgian capital, on a nondescript street corner, has appeared a hotel that looks like downtown LA had it been swallowed by lava. An old 1970s art college has been redesigned and rebuilt, by people who usually make film sets, to become the oddest, most fashionable, most affordable stopover in Europe.

The reception desk is held up by a pair of motorcycles dipped in concrete – above it rest maquettes, Paolozzi-like little bricks of angles and texture. Three guests under 10 years old leap joyfully between leather sofas and concrete benches while they wait for their parents to check into one of the Supra rooms which sleep five, one up by the ceiling, in what they call a “cabine bed”.

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The Guardian

Apr 22 2017
See how the other half lives from the Tate’s balcony | Catherine Bennett
Neo Bankside residents wanted to be close to culture, so they shouldn’t complain about being a little too close

In a short but compelling 2011 film in praise of Neo Bankside, a cluster of luxury apartment blocks, Kevin Spacey, then running the Old Vic, stressed their superb location, courtesy of the South Bank’s artistic assets, Tate Modern in particular. For any property enthusiast who combines a love of speculation with an equal passion for, say, Joseph Beuys, there could be, you gathered, no finer investment.

“I think it’s probably the most extraordinary stretch of cultural land that you’ll find anywhere in the world,” Spacey assured prospective neighbours, on behalf of the developers, British Land and Grosvenor. “And I can tell you it’s a remarkable place to live.”

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The Guardian

Apr 22 2017
How one woman harnessed people power to ‘save’ old New York
New film tells story of Jane Jacobs’s battles against the wealthiest developers in the city

She was a beaky, bespectacled architecture writer, hardly a figure likely to ignite protests that changed the shape of one of the world’s great cities. Yet such is the legend of Jane Jacobs and her bitter struggles to preserve the heart of New York from modernisation that a film charting her astonishing victories over some of the most powerful developers in the US is set to inspire a new generation of urban activists around the world.

Citizen Jane: Battle for the City tells the story of Jacobs, author of The Death and Life of Great American Cities, who made herself the bane of New York’s powerful city planners from the 1950s to 1970s. Her nemesis was Robert Moses, the city’s powerful master builder and advocate of urban renewal, or wholesale neighbourhood clearance – what author James Baldwin termed “negro removal”.

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The Guardian

Apr 22 2017
Freewheeling in the city: cycling London – in pictures

For south London-based illustrator Hannah Warren, cycling in London is about “exploration, slowing down and seeing the city from a different perspective”. In part inspired by David Byrne’s book Bicycle Diaries, she started a series of digital drawings depicting some of her favourite spots to cycle in the capital. Warren started cycling in the city some years ago, tired of being stuck on the bus while seeing bikes whizz past and thinking: “Why am I stood under this man’s armpit? I could be doing that.” The illustrations, which seek to capture the feeling of “stumbling upon a place I didn’t know was there”, are on display at the exhibition This Must Be the Place at tokyobike, London EC2, until 30 May.

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The New York Times

Apr 22 2017
Miró, Calder and a Convergence of ‘Constellations’
When two galleries and two heirs collaborate, the stars align. A visitor can experience two artists’ works separately but in sync, as they were created.
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The Guardian

Apr 22 2017
The 20 photographs of the week

Protests in Caracas, mass dancing in Pyongyang, the Paris shooting and anti-government protests in Istanbul – the news of the week captured by the world’s best photojournalists

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The New York Times

Apr 21 2017
At Some Museums, the Art Is Now on the Outside
Institutions from Sydney to Cincinnati are hoping to draw more visitors by using outdoor projections, sometimes putting art on their buildings’ facades.
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The New York Times

Apr 21 2017
The Art of Barkley L. Hendricks
Mr. Hendricks was known for his portraits of friends, family and strangers who conveyed a growing culture of black assertiveness.
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artforum.com

Apr 21 2017
PASSAGES: Dore Ashton (1928–2017)
Michael Leja on Dore Ashton (1928–2017)
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The New York Times

Apr 21 2017
Magdalena Abakanowicz
Magdalena Abakanowicz once described her sculpture as “a search for organic mysteries.”
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The Art Newspaper

Apr 21 2017
Is this painting to be sold in Madrid really a work by Velázquez?
Retrato de niña o Joven Inmaculada (Portrait of girl or Young Immaculate) is due to be auction in Madrid
The painting Retrato de nia o Joven Inmaculada (Portrait of girl or Young Immaculate), due to be auctioned on 25 April at the Spanish auction house Abalarte in Madrid, is attracting the attention of experts. Billed as a potential early work by Velzquez, the 57cm x 44cm oil on canvas was discovered by chance by Richard de Willermin, a specialist in 17th- and 18th-century Italian, Flemish and Spanish art and a consultant for Abalarte. Specialists at Madrids Prado museum have examined the painting but have declined to comment publicly on whether it is an authentic work by Velzquez.

The auction house, however, is cautious and has not released an estimate ahead of the sale. The work is in good condition, having belonged to a private owner based in Madrid for some time and after being in the family for generations. It depicts a young girl, who might be Velzquezs sister, De Willermin says, although little is known about the artists family.

It is evident that it is an authentic Velzquez, De Willermin says, suggesting that it might be one of the artists earliest works, painted when he was still an apprentice. He might have painted it in Seville around 1617, before the two canvases of the Immaculate Conception at the National Gallery in London (1618-19) and the Focus-Abengoa Foundation in Seville (1618-20), and The Adoration of the Magi (1619) in the Prado, De Willermin says. There is an unquestionable connection through the clothing and the technique. The girl stands with a crown of stars, as with the Immaculate Conception at the National Gallery. An x-ray of the portrait has revealed that a crown of stars is hidden by overpaint.

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artforum.com

Apr 21 2017
FILM: Stealing the Scene
David Frankel on Laurie Simmons’s My Art
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The Guardian

Apr 21 2017
Naked ambition: £15,000 appeal to revive nude sunbather statues

Historic England seeks donations to restore Peter Laszlo Peri’s postwar sculpture found dilapidated in south-east London garden

Two dirty and dilapidated concrete figures of naked sunbathers which lay mouldering in the corner of a hotel garden have been identified as an important, presumed lost sculpture from the 1951 Festival of Britain.

Peter Laszlo Peri’s The Sunbathers was on the wall of an entrance to Waterloo station for the festival, an attempt by the Labour government bring cheer to the country after the second world war.

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artforum.com

Apr 21 2017
FILM: Digital Divide
Tony Pipolo on new digital films by Ernie Gehr
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artforum.com

Apr 21 2017
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The New York Times

Apr 21 2017
Magdalena Abakanowicz, Sculptor of Brooding Forms, Dies at 86
The Polish artist’s works ranged from woven shrouds and tree trunks to mythic human figures that evoked the dark forces at work in the 20th century.
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artforum.com

Apr 21 2017
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artforum.com

Apr 21 2017
500 WORDS: Joe Goode
Joe Goode on his life and work in Los Angeles
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The Guardian

Apr 21 2017
‘It was ridiculous that 16-year-olds didn't get a vote’: teens protest after Brexit result

Amy Gibbs and schoolmates head for Downing Street on 24 June 2016

It was the day after the EU referendum; Brexit had won, David Cameron had resigned, and we were like: “Are you kidding?” It was a Friday and we weren’t at school, as we’d finished our GCSEs, so we looked on Facebook to see if there were any protests taking place. This photo was taken outside Downing Street later that day. It wasn’t a big march, as I think the result was still sinking in: just a few hundred of us congregating with banners, making our voices heard. It was my first protest.

It’s ridiculous that we, as 16-year-olds, weren’t given a vote. In the Scottish independence referendum in 2014, 16- and 17-year-olds were allowed to vote. I did the maths after the Brexit result, and based on the turnout of young voters in Scotland, if 16- and 17-year-olds had voted, the result would have gone the other way – just. A survey backed that up. Were we excluded on purpose? It makes you wonder. We weren’t really given a reason. Britain’s relationship with the EU affects our generation’s future more than anyone else’s – much more than a general election – so we should have had a say.

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The Art Newspaper

Apr 21 2017
What is Schneider hiding in Athens?
Gregor Schneider

The German artist Gregor Schneider, who is known for his unsettling installations, will transform a square in downtown Athens next month but the end result may, for now, be hard to decipher. Schneider plans to turn the site into a place of shelter according to a cryptic press statement. Omonia Square will become a neutral zone hidden from attackers and the watchful eye of Google maps alike as part of the Onassis Cultural Centre's Fast Forward Festival 4. The concept of camouflage will be key (though perhaps the main clue is in the title of the piece: Invisible City, 2-14 May). Schneider usually causes a stir; Haus u r the artist's childhood home in Rheydt, north-west Germany, which he has reconfigured since 1985is a work in progress. In 2008, he outlined plans to create a room in which a person could die (The Dying Room was eventually unveiled at the Kunstraum Innsbruck in 2011).
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The Art Newspaper

Apr 21 2017
East Anglian sculpture park set to be created on university campus
Antony Gormley, 3x Another Time (Image: © Andy Crouch 2017)
Ambitious plans to turn the grounds of the Sainsbury Centre for Visual Arts (SCVA) into the east of Englands answer to the Yorkshire Sculpture Park have been announced. The arts centre, which was designed by Norman Foster in 1974 to house the large collection of Robert and Lisa Sainsbury, currently has seven sculptures including works by John Hoskin, Liliane Lijn and three bronzes by Henry Moore. The sculptures can be found around the 350-acre parkland that the SCVA shares with the campus of the University of East Anglia (UEA). We plan to develop the sculpture park in the coming years and we are looking at potential partners and funders for the project, says Calvin Winner, the head of collections at the SCVA and the parks curator.

The project will be launched on 22 April with a major commission by the British sculptor Antony Gormley. 3x Another Time (2016) includes three life-sized cast-iron sculptures from the artists ongoing series Another Time (1999-2013), which have been placed at different locations on the UEAs striking Denys Lasdun-designed Brutalist buildings. Antony was very engaged with the idea of placing these sculptures in the very particular environment of student life on a campus, and was energised when he saw the university and its architecture, Winner says.

But the sculptures have sparked controversy, with students complaining that the figuresparticularly the one placed on the library rooflook like real people trying to jump. An online petition, which currently has around 175 signatures, describes the sculptures as unsettling and has requested that the university remove them. Winner says that there are no plans to remove the works, adding: Antony didnt want or expect everyones reaction to be positivefor him, the point of the work is to be thought-provoking and for people to take notice.

For future sculptures, the SCVA hopes to commission or acquire works that complement the exhibitions inside the galleries. The next sculpture is a 10m model of Tatlins Tower by Jeremy Dixon, gifted to the centre by the Royal Academy, which showed it in its courtyard in 2012, and will be revealed in the park in October, when the SCVA opens its exhibitions marking the anniversary of the Russian Revolution. Winner says that there are also discussions under way with the estates of Elisabeth Frink, Anthony Caro and Eduardo Chillida. We would be very interested in expanding our collection of Henry Moore sculptures and we have a very good relationship with the estate, he says.
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artforum.com

Apr 21 2017
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The Guardian

Apr 21 2017
Ofili tapestries, Hockney etchings and Apple's HQ – the week in art

Mat Collishaw’s new cinematic sculpture questions the origins of art, while Langlands & Bell recreate Silicon Valley campuses – all in your weekly dispatch

Mat Collishaw
A surreal cinematic sculpture that advances a provocative theory about the origins of art by this intelligent analyst of the power of images.
Blain Southern, London, until 27 May

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The Guardian

Apr 21 2017
On the edge of madness: the terrors and genius of Alberto Giacometti

He drank with Sartre, mocked Picasso and took silent walks with Beckett – but his work was going nowhere until a vision on Boulevard Montparnasse left him trembling. Ahead of a major Tate show, we explore the obsessions of Giacometti

In 1957, the writer Jean Genet described the studio of his friend Alberto Giacometti. It was “a milky swamp, a seething dump, a genuine ditch”. There was plaster all over the floor and all over the face, hair and clothes of the sculptor; there were scraps of paper and lumps of paint on every available surface. And yet, “lo and behold the prodigious, magical powers of fermentation” – as if by magic, art grew from the rubbish; the plaster on the floor leapt up and took on permanence as a standing figure.

Of all the artists working in Paris in the 20th century, Giacometti was the great enthusiast of plaster. He worked away at it with his knife, often subjecting it to so much pressure that it finally crumbled away, forming the rubbish observed by Genet. When he was happy with it, he painted it. The original Women of Venice exhibited at the Venice Biennale in 1956 were plaster figures with black and brown lines etched on to their faces and bodies, making them resemble the women in his paintings.

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