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The Guardian

Feb 23 2018
Lost luggage: Degas painting stolen nine years ago is found on bus

1877 painting Les Choristes was stolen nine years ago from a museum in Marseille

French customs police have found a painting by 19th century master Edgar Degas that was stolen nine years ago from a museum in Marseille in the luggage compartment of a bus near Paris, the government said on Friday.

Degas’ 1877 painting Les Choristes, or The Chorus Singers, is done in pastels and depicts a line of men singing in the opera Don Juan.

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artforum.com

Feb 23 2018
NEWS: Max Desfor (1913–2018)
The Associated Press
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artforum.com

Feb 23 2018
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The New York Times

Feb 23 2018
A Rammellzee Exhibition Is Coming to New York
The hip-hop pioneer will receive a retrospective featuring graffiti and sculptures at Red Bull Arts New York.
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The New York Times

Feb 23 2018
Degas Painting, Stolen in 2009, Is Found on Bus Near Paris
“The Chorus Singers,” worth nearly $1 million, was taken from a museum in Marseille. Customs officials found the artwork in the bus’s luggage compartment.
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artforum.com

Feb 23 2018
SLANT: Glissando Through the Blues: A Tribute to Alice Coltrane at MoMA PS1
Lauren O’Neill-Butler on a tribute to Alice Coltrane at MoMA PS1
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The New York Times

Feb 23 2018
Made Before the Boston Tea Party, This Teapot Cost $800,000
The teapot, which the Metropolitan Museum of Art bought at auction, is said to represent the “entrepreneurial spirit” of 18th-century America.
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The Guardian

Feb 23 2018
'What a performance gender is!' – a century of cross-dressers

Prisoners of war, ramblers, lipstick floozies at a transvestite hotel … our writer is transfixed by a show of ‘found’ photographs telling a secret history of cross-dressing

A girlfriend of mine once attended a drag-king workshop. I saw the photographs: her pasted-on moustache and sideburns, her breast-bindings, her plaid shirt, the prosthetic bulge in her leather trousers. “Seeing myself as a man,” she said, “made me realise how constructed my femininity was.” Her mother went, too. It was play but more than play. When I wear a skirt or paint my nails, it signifies resistance to a normative masculinity I have never wanted. It attests to something beyond the binary. What a performance gender is.

There is an urgency to the 200 or so images in Under Cover: A Secret History of Cross-Dressers, which has just opened at the Photographers’ Gallery in London. These amateur images, taken between the 1880s and the 1980s, belong to the French director Sébastien Lifshitz, who put the collection together after making Wild Side (2001), a film about the life of a transsexual woman.

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The Guardian

Feb 23 2018
The world according to Jet magazine and a century of bodywork – the week in art

Bacon, Freud and Rego paint from life, Lorna Simpson dips into old magazines and Jasmina Cibic builds a nation – all in your weekly dispatch

All Too Human: Bacon, Freud and a Century of Painting Life
The genius of Lucian Freud and his meaty friend Francis Bacon seen in a context of British “figurative” art from Sickert to Paula Rego and beyond.
Tate Britain, London, 28 February to 27 August

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The Guardian

Feb 23 2018
So Neanderthals made abstract art? This astounding discovery humbles every human

Scientists say cave paintings in Spain, thought to have been by our ancestors, were actually by Neanderthals. So did they teach us everything we know?


If you go to the painted caves of Spain and France, crawl through narrow passages and keep your balance on slippery rock floors, you reach the hidden places where ice age hunters made their marks tens of thousands of years ago. Nothing seems more startling than the way they placed hands against the cold rock and blew red ochre out of their mouths to leave fiery images. Of what though?

Up to now we called it the human presence. “The print of the hand says, ‘This is my mark. This is man’,” declared the scientist Jacob Bronowski when he visited caves in northern Spain in his classic TV series The Ascent of Man. Simon Schama visits those same caves in the BBC’s new epic series Civilisations and raves about those same handprints. For what could communicate the curiosity, self-assertion, intelligence, and above all self-consciousness of our unique species Homo sapiens, more clearly that this desire to literally leave our mark?

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The Guardian

Feb 23 2018
Seascapes without a camera: Meghann Riepenhoff's cyanotypes

Tidal patterns made by ocean waves, sand and marine life are captured by the photographic process of Meghann Riepenhoff, a US artist fascinated by the nature of humans’ relationship to an impermanent landscape. She will be creating a site-specific work for Photofairs San Francisco by the shore at the city’s Fort Mason arts centre

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EosArte.eu

Feb 23 2018
Milano. Fritz Hauser. Trommel mit Mann
ERRATUM è lieto di presentare un progetto dedicato alla figura di Fritz Hauser (Basilea, 1953) con un’importante opera realizzata dal musicista e compositore svizzero in collaborazione con la regista Barbara Frey e la light designer Brigitte Dubach dal titolo Trommel mit Mann / Drum with Man. Il pezzo di batteria, della durata di un’ora e creato [...]
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The New York Times

Feb 23 2018
Is It an Art Collective or a Vietnamese Ad Agency? Yes and Yes.
An exhibition in San Jose, Calif., shines a light on the Propeller Group, Vietnam’s renowned art collective, as its members strike out on their own.
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The Guardian

Feb 23 2018
Katy Grannan’s Anonymous, Modesto: challenging the norm of sexuality

The American photographer known for capturing the drifters and drug addicts, failed by a hollow American dream

The woman Katy Grannan has photographed wears her beach babe persona like a suit of armour, albeit one that lays all the chinks bare.

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The Guardian

Feb 23 2018
North Korea’s graphic artistry – in pictures

Everyday objects, such as sweet wrappers and posters, will be exhibited for the first time outside the communist republic at a London show to showcase the country’s graphic art. Made in North Korea: Everyday Graphics from the DPRK is at the House of Illustration until 13 May

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The New York Times

Feb 22 2018
Outsider Art Fair to Expand to Basel
The fair, which celebrates self-taught artists, will open up a satellite event in Switzerland during Art Basel in June.
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The New York Times

Feb 22 2018
What to See in New York Art Galleries This Week
Medieval paintings and sculpture from the London dealer Sam Fogg; photographs curated by David Hartt; and Toyin Ojih Odutola’s royal portraiture.
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The New York Times

Feb 22 2018
$50 Million for the Hammer Museum, and Fresh Energy for Arts Giving in L.A.
A thriving art scene is nurturing philanthropy in Los Angeles, and young artists are moving in or staying put instead of heading to New York.
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The New York Times

Feb 22 2018
Art Review: New Museum Triennial Looks Great, but Plays It Safe
You say you want a revolution? You won’t find it in “Songs for Sabotage,” which keeps its political voice low and its money on well-made art.
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The New York Times

Feb 22 2018
16 Art Exhibitions to View in NYC This Weekend
Our guide to new art shows, and some that will be closing soon.
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The New York Times

Feb 22 2018
Latin American Art Collection to Find Homes in Spain and the U.S.
Ella Fontanals-Cisneros, who has one of the largest private troves of the art, will donate some works to the Tabacalera arts complex in Madrid.
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The New York Times

Feb 22 2018
After a Blowup Kara Walker Lets Off Steam in New Orleans
Delayed by a dispute between Ms. Walker and organizers, her calliope installation finally opens to the public at Prospect New Orleans.
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The Guardian

Feb 22 2018
Studio 144: why has Southampton hidden its £30m culture palace behind a Nando's?

Southampton’s new arts venue has been almost 20 years in the making and consumed millions in public funds. But commercial interests have overshadowed a bold cultural vision

Southampton’s new culture palace squats on the town square like a particularly lacklustre block of flats, clad in grey and beige tiles. Studio 144, the city’s £30m arts venue, provides a new well-equipped auditorium for Nuffield Southampton Theatres and an airy home for the university’s John Hansard Gallery, as well as a base for the City Eye film charity.

But you’d be hard-pressed to realise this as you approach the building. A pair of huge beige bookends face each other across an alley on one side of the square, looking like the entrance to a cut-price dictator’s palace. The five-storey high inverted L-shapes frame tinted glass walls, forming a momentous portal leading to a park beyond. Where you might expect to find this publicly funded arts beacon celebrating its presence on its frontage on Guildhall Square, instead you are greeted with a Nando’s, Costa and Gourmet Burger Kitchen. The theatre is up four flights of stairs, while the listed Victorian park behind, meanwhile, is treated to a parade of service entrances and ventilation grilles. How could £20m of council money, £8.6m of Arts Council England grants and a chunk from the University of Southampton have led to this?

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artforum.com

Feb 22 2018
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The Guardian

Feb 21 2018
Photofairs in San Francisco: the best pictures on display

The contemporary art fair PHOTOFAIRS San Francisco returns for its second year, featuring 40 galleries from 15 countries. The boutique fair offers collectors and curators access to artists never seen before in the area

It runs 22–25 February at the Festival Pavilion, Fort Mason Center

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