News

Displaying 251 to 300 of 10244 results

artforum.com

Dec 27 2017
Read More
The New York Times

Dec 27 2017
Make Mine the Burlap Wrap
Whether a horticultural necessity or an off-season display of wealth, the now-ubiquitous custom of burlapping has had the unexpected effect of transforming the Hamptons into an enormous art park.
Read More
The New York Times

Dec 27 2017
The Best Uses of Color in T This Year
Some of the most vibrant images of 2017 include a fiery orange and marigold dim sum parlor, and floral Balenciaga dresses photographed at the fashion house’s archives.
Read More
artforum.com

Dec 27 2017
Read More
The Guardian

Dec 26 2017
Ultra violet: Pantone’s 2018 colour of the year

Every year, the colour experts at the Pantone Colour Institute pore over research and analyses of design, film, food, fashion, art and entertainment, as well as materials, travel, sports and technology, to arrive at a colour of the year. This year it’s Pantone 18-3838, also known as ultra violet

Pantone describes ultra violet as a “provocative and thoughtful purple shade” that embodies individuality and spirituality. According to the company, it alludes to the mysteries of the cosmos and the unknown.

Related: Ultra violet: the colour of 2018 – in pictures

Continue reading...
Read More
The New York Times

Dec 26 2017
What to See in New York Art Galleries This Week
Some highlights: Michelle Segre’s surrealist sculptures; Elizabeth Murray’s exuberantly colored canvases; and Sally Webster’s psychedelic paintings.
Read More
artforum.com

Dec 26 2017
Read More
The Guardian

Dec 26 2017
Colin Dick obituary

When my friend Colin Dick died aged 88, I was part way through cataloguing his prolific output of paintings. This fascinating journey followed on from Richard Yeomans’ critical survey Colin Dick: Seeing Life (2011).

Colin was born in Cheam, Surrey, the son of Stanley Dick, an administrator for BP, and his wife, Mabel (nee Cant); wartime evacuation of his father’s company took the family to Henley, in Oxfordshire. After the second world war, Colin studied at St Martin’s School of Art in London (now Central Saint Martins), with contemporaries such as Frank Auerbach, Eva Frankfurther, Sheila Fell and Leon Kossoff, and subsequently worked as a scene painter for West End shows. He always maintained that the broad technique required for the theatre loosened his art school practice.

Continue reading...
Read More
The New York Times

Dec 26 2017
Clock Is Ticking on $10 Million Reward in Gardner Art Heist
Until 2018 begins, a $10 million reward remains on the table for information leading to the return of art stolen from the Gardner Museum in Boston.
Read More
The Guardian

Dec 26 2017
Jill Lever obituary
Architectural librarian and curator of drawings who changed the way that architecture was studied and interpreted in Britain and internationally

The architectural librarian and curator Jill Lever, who has died aged 82, wrote in the final volume of the printed catalogue of the Drawings Collection of the Royal Institute of British Architects that if the publisher or cataloguers had known the immensity of the task, it would never have been started. Although cataloguing drawings may not seem a heroic activity, Lever’s innovative methods of description, high standards and persistence made it one. Through the series of printed catalogues that she wrote or edited, the entire drawings collection of the RIBA at the time was brought to wide attention, changing the way that architecture was studied and interpreted in Britain and internationally.

Before the 1940s, the institute had set little store by what the librarian James Palmes called its “haphazard accumulation of interesting and in some instances extremely valuable” drawings. Lever joined the RIBA library in the early 60s alongside John Harris, who had become the first curator of drawings in 1960.

Continue reading...
Read More
artforum.com

Dec 26 2017
Read More
The New York Times

Dec 26 2017
Show Us Your Wall: Trading One Salon for Another
Stephen Frailey and Mary Ehni have bartered her hairdressing skills for the paintings and photographs that make up a fifth of their wide-ranging art collection.
Read More
The Guardian

Dec 25 2017
Exhibition celebrates wartime artist famous for Mills & Boon covers

Elizabeth Friedlander, whose design career flourished after she fled Nazi Germany, honoured in Ditchling retrospective

Few will recognise the name Elizabeth Friedlander but many may be surprised to discover they have examples ofthe artist’s work at home, in the thousands of books, cards, posters and advertisements she designed, or even text set in Elizabeth-Antiqua, the font she created.

Perhaps Friedlander’s most famous work is the classic volumes of the 1950s and 60s she designed for publishers including Penguin, Reader’s Digest and Mills & Boon.

Continue reading...
Read More
The Guardian

Dec 25 2017
My best winter photograph

A polar limousine, ice skyscrapers in China, a New York snowstorm, Sitting Bull’s descendant at a pipeline protest, and a flying figure-skater … top photographers pick their coolest shot

Naoki Ishikawa

Continue reading...
Read More
artforum.com

Dec 24 2017
DIARY: Choice Words
Maggie Foucault on Masha Gessen at the New York Public Library
Read More
artforum.com

Dec 24 2017
DIARY: Divine Comedy
Cathryn Drake around openings in Naples
Read More
The New York Times

Dec 24 2017
Op-Art: 2017, With All the Trimmings
Twelve illustrators sum up their year in the form of an ornament.
Read More
The New York Times

Dec 24 2017
Where Winter’s Silver Skates Warmed the Soul
The Museum of the City of New York show is a history of skating and its long-lost ice palaces, where single show-offs and romantic duos once glided.
Read More
The New York Times

Dec 24 2017
A Woman Now Leads the Vatican Museums. And She’s Shaking Things Up.
Barbara Jatta has abandoned her predecessor’s moves to limit visitor numbers to the Holy See’s collection of treasures, including the Sistine Chapel.
Read More
The Guardian

Dec 24 2017
Thomas Bock review – an extraordinary glimpse of 19th-century Tasmania

Ikon Gallery, Birmingham
Shipped as a convict to Tasmania in 1823, Thomas Bock made his name there with portraits of exceptional empathy, both of colonists and those they displaced

There is a painting in this riveting exhibition of a child in a red muslin frock with puffed sleeves and a black velvet sash. The year is 1842. She might be any Victorian sitter, posing for her portrait with hands sedately clasped in her lap. But there are signs of strain in her sweet face, the feet are bare and her dark hair is cropped. Mithina is the child’s name, and she is an Indigenous Australian from Flinders Island off the coast of Tasmania. The painter is evidently a strange figure to her.

He is Thomas Bock (c1793-1855), and quite possibly unfamiliar to us as well. For Bock was a convict artist. He started out with a considerable reputation for engraving and miniature painting in Birmingham, where he lived, and is now being brilliantly revived by the city’s Ikon Gallery. On the evidence of his fine and sensitive images, he would surely have become a celebrated portrait painter.

Continue reading...
Read More
The Guardian

Dec 23 2017
Beetles and bats threaten treasures of the medieval parish churches
Major project aims to protect panel paintings in East Anglia from catastrophic effects of infestations

They have survived the religious purges of the Reformation, the sectarian violence of the English civil wars, even the widespread whitewashing of church walls in the 19th century.

But now hundreds of priceless medieval panel paintings in churches across East Anglia – depicting gruesome scenes from hell, biblical figures, English monarchs and angels and apostles – face a new and potentially deadly threat: deathwatch beetles.

Continue reading...
Read More
The Guardian

Dec 23 2017
Country diary: 'Demanding Ladies' blossom in a Victorian time warp

Hawkhurst, Kent One of Britain’s largest collections of Victorian glasshouses is being restored thanks to the fond memories of a wartime evacuee

Just outside Hawkhurst, in the Kentish Weald, there’s a walled garden so quintessentially Victorian that stepping inside feels like time-travelling. Rustic brickwork glows in the winter sun; in bright corners the skeletal arms of buddleia seem to beckon the ghosts of bees; and everywhere you look the light is reflected by shimmering glass.

There are 13 crumbling, deeply atmospheric glasshouses – the “Demanding Ladies” – most of them more than 140 years old. There’s a shaded fern house, a long, leaning peach case, a sunken glass corridor for melons and pineapples, a pelargonium house, a carnation house, a hot house with great vats that once steamed with heated water.

Continue reading...
Read More
The New York Times

Dec 23 2017
Who Wants to Buy the Most Expensive House in America?
One man is building a house so enormous, and so absurdly lavish, that it may be the ultimate symbol of our age of thirst, excess and inequality. Asking price? $500 million.
Read More
The Guardian

Dec 23 2017
The 20 photographs of the week

The Catalan election, protests in Ramallah and homelessness in London at Christmas – the week’s biggest news stories captured by the world’s best photojournalists

Continue reading...
Read More
The New York Times

Dec 22 2017
An Illuminated Hebrew Bible Has a New Home
The Metropolitan Museum of Art acquired the Bible, from 14th-century Spain, from a collector. It will be on display at the Cloisters.
Read More
The New York Times

Dec 22 2017
12 Surprising Reasons to Be Grateful for the Arts in 2017
The blink-and-you-might-have-missed-them cultural moments that brightened up a year otherwise defined by turmoil and tragedy.
Read More
The Guardian

Dec 22 2017
New Renaissance: how Florence is freeing its great female artists

They painted magnificent works, from Madonnas to Last Suppers, often earning more than men. But their paintings were hidden away. Now a rescue mission is creating a fresh female Renaissance

In a dark cluttered studio in central Florence, restorer Rossella Lari is working on a little-known jewel of the Renaissance. It’s vast: a seven metre by five metre depiction of the Last Supper, with figures that are almost lifesize, that was painted in the 1560s.

As she works, Lari says she thinks often of the person who painted it. “You get to know an artist when you restore their painting,” she says. “You learn about them from the way they use the paint, from their brushstrokes, from their attention to detail.” This artist, she says, was strong, confident and determined. She had to be, because she was also female, the earliest significant female Renaissance artist.

Continue reading...
Read More
The Guardian

Dec 22 2017
‘The club was a place to be optimistic, to be goofy’: New York’s Club 57

Ann Magnuson and other Club 57 regulars in the early 80s

I moved to New York from West Virginia in 1978 to be an intern at an off-off-Broadway theatre. I was 22, with ambitions of becoming a theatre director.

The city of New York was bankrupt; it was a dangerous environment. I still had memories of having a switchblade held to my throat within an hour of setting foot in Manhattan, when I first visited in 1975. But I was out every night downtown: there were lots of modern dance and theatre events happening in abandoned spaces, behind shabby storefronts.

Continue reading...
Read More
The New York Times

Dec 22 2017
The Best Rooms in T in 2017
This year, the most stunning (and unique) homes we’ve featured included a Fire Island kit house, an Italian castle and an all-gray apartment in Copenhagen.
Read More
The Guardian

Dec 22 2017
Siberian warriors and a Christmas cracker of surrealist fun – the week in art

The Natural History Museum has a whale of an exhibition, a Games of Thrones world comes to life at the British Museum and Susan Philipsz finds her voice – all in your weekly dispatch

Continue reading...
Read More
artforum.com

Dec 22 2017
Read More
The Guardian

Dec 22 2017
Paul Nash’s Winter Sea: the natural cycle of life and death

The landscape painter created this work in the coastal village of Dymchurch, where he spent time recovering from the horrors he had witnessed at Ypres

Winter Sea is the beloved English landscape painter Paul Nash at his bleak best. Working a cubist reduction, his waves are knife-like slivers of black ice. This is a painting about transformation, freezing rolling waters into forms as solid as concrete, and suggesting the natural cycle of active life into petrified death.

Continue reading...
Read More
artforum.com

Dec 21 2017
FILM: Aftermaths and Undergrounds
Leo Goldsmith at the 4th Porto/Post/Doc
Read More