News

Displaying 251 to 300 of 14292 results

The New York Times

Sep 04 2018
Alley Oop’s Team Steps Down, but Comic Strip May Still Have a Future
As the time-traveling Alley Oop and his girlfriend, Ooola, pause to enjoy the view, something new may be on the horizon.
Read More
The Guardian

Sep 04 2018
Xbox controller and mosquito emoji join V&A collection

Snapchat spectacles also among new acquisitions ahead of video games exhibition

An Xbox controller, a mosquito emoji and a pair of Snapchat spectacles have been added to the Victoria and Albert Museum’s collection.

The acquisitions were made as part of the museum’s “rapid response collecting” programme, which began in 2014 and has seen an eclectic range of objects, including an Ikea soft toy, a Jeremy Corbyn T-shirt and a pink knitted pussyhat enter the collection.

Continue reading...
Read More
The Guardian

Sep 04 2018
'Art can play a valuable role': climate change installations appear in New York

Solar-powered highway signs have been placed in the city’s five boroughs as part of the Climate Signals installation

The existential threat of climate change is being spelled out to New Yorkers via a selection of flashing highway signs that have been placed around the city.

The 10 large solar-powered signs have been placed in locations in each of New York’s five boroughs, including areas deemed particularly vulnerable to the sea level rise and powerful storms associated with climate change, including the Rockaways in Queens and the west side of Manhattan.

Continue reading...
Read More
The Guardian

Sep 04 2018
Adventures in street photography – in pictures

Funny, tragic and often bizarre, Stephen Leslie’s photos in his book Sparks are an unique ode to street photography, matching short fictions with the images that inspired them.

• An exhibition of selected prints will be on display at theprintspace gallery in London until 5 September.

Continue reading...
Read More
The Guardian

Sep 03 2018
From Gloria Swanson to Madonna: a century of fashion photography

Icons of Style, at the J Paul Getty Museum in Los Angeles, covers the years 1911 to 2011. Here are the highlights

Continue reading...
Read More
The Guardian

Sep 03 2018
'Joyless in the extreme' – I Object: Ian Hislop's Search for Dissent review

British Museum, London
The Private Eye editor has scoured history in search of objects and images that express dissent. But where’s the satire?

You know a joke’s in trouble when the audience needs to be told to laugh. Canned laughter would probably be going too far in a British Museum exhibition, so instead an enormous speech bubble, placed next to an 18th-century portrait of Louis XVI wearing a red liberty cap, gives us Ian Hislop’s assurance that it is funny.

“The saying ‘Ridicule kills’ is usually an exaggeration,” says the Private Eye editor. “Not for Louis XVI. They have taken a well-known picture of the king and shoved a revolutionary hat on it. The effect is comical as the great Louis XVI is made to look as if he is a supporter of the revolution. Not so funny for him though.”

Continue reading...
Read More
The Guardian

Sep 03 2018
Royal Academy to be flooded with water and mud for Gormley exhibit

Details of 2019 programme include Phyllida Barlow show and Lucian Freud self-portraits

One of the Royal Academy of Arts’ historic main galleries is to be flooded with water and mud for a major solo exhibition devoted to the work of Antony Gormley.

Other spaces will be “engineered” to take some of the more technically challenging works made by an artist best known for landmark public sculptures, such as the Angel of the North, and the casts of his body which are installed across the world from Crosby beach to the Austrian Alps.

Continue reading...
Read More
The Guardian

Sep 03 2018
Louvre Abu Dhabi postpones display of Leonardo's Salvator Mundi

Delayed unveiling of world’s most expensive painting adds to mystery shrouding its acquisition and authenticity

The Louvre Abu Dhabi has indefinitely postponed the unveiling of Leonardo da Vinci’s Salvator Mundi, the world’s most expensive painting, which has been the subject of intense speculation over its acquisition and authenticity.

The United Arab Emirates capital’s department of culture and tourism, which was revealed as the owner of the work after an extraordinarily tense auction at Christie’s New York in November, announced on Monday in a tweet that the exhibition had been delayed.

Continue reading...
Read More
The Guardian

Sep 03 2018
Jim Bodoh obituary

Jim Bodoh, who has died aged 70 of cancer, was one of the unsung heroes of design and branding. As a consultant with the corporate branding agency Lloyd Northover, he established a pre-eminence in university branding. He even encountered his alma mater, the Central School of Art and Design (now called Central St Martins and part of the University of the Arts London) when he helped with its rebrand in 2004-05.

Jim was born in Evanston, Illinois, to Al, a jukebox designer, and Genevieve, a nurse, and attended Glenview high school. He travelled to London in 1978 to do an MA in graphic design at Central. He never returned to the US, taking a teaching post on the same MA, and falling in love with Marilyn (“Madge”) Leyshon, an administrator at the college.

Continue reading...
Read More
The New York Times

Sep 03 2018
Mind and Body Take Center Stage at This Year’s London Design Biennale
As participants shift their focus to creating happiness rather than products, the festival approaches design with a nod toward “well-being.”
Read More
The Guardian

Sep 02 2018
Siberia's forgotten women – a photo essay

Photographer Oded Wagenstein visited a remote community in the depths of Siberia to discover the impact of ageing and isolation on the elder tribal women

In a remote peninsula in northern Siberia lives a group of elderly women. They were once part of a migrating community of reindeer herders but today, in their old age, they spend most of their days in the village of Yar-Sale, cut off from their nomadic relatives and friends.

Though the men are encouraged to stay within the wandering community as they grow older, the women often find themselves facing the struggles of ageing in isolation.

Continue reading...
Read More
The Guardian

Sep 02 2018
Pet project: roadkill helps radical art group defy the norm

The avowedly anti-commercial A/political is only interested in creating ‘impossible’ art

Petr Davydtchenko has a cat simmering on the stove and a newly skinned rabbit on his chopping board, while behind him is a large salting trough big enough to take donkey legs.

Davydtchenko is an artist who has spent the last two years surviving on roadkill. Whatever he finds, he eats. Sometimes local people help him by sending GPS coordinates of dead animals they have spotted. Other times they might come to see if he has eaten their missing pet. On occasion, he has.

Continue reading...
Read More
The Guardian

Sep 02 2018
Why photographer Eddie Otchere swapped drum’n’bass for rural idylls

Best known for his portraits of DJs and rappers, the London snapper found new inspiration in the South Downs

In May 2017, at the end of a week-long commission for the Brighton festival, Eddie Otchere picked up his camera and ventured out into the countryside. As hikes go, it was fairly unremarkable: he wandered into the South Downs and then wandered back again. But for a committed Londoner like Otchere, whose 25-year career as a photographer has been intimately tied to urban subjects – he documented the rise of drum’n’bass in the mid-90s and is best known for his revealing portraits of rappers such as Jay-Z and the Wu-Tang Clan – this walk marked the beginning of something new and unexpected and even, he admits, a little bit terrifying.

Over the next year, Otchere kept going back to Sussex, visiting Bloomsbury Group sites around Lewes and skirting the white cliffs at Seven Sisters. He would return home to Mitcham in south London with striking images of dogs and sheep and human silhouettes, of trees and beaches and the wide-open, “shaved” landscapes of southern England.

Continue reading...
Read More
The Guardian

Sep 02 2018
The big picture: Chris Schwarz and the changing face of Deptford, south-east London
The late photographer’s work while working at the Albany arts centre in the 1970s creates a vibrant time capsule

Chris Schwarz first caught the photography bug as a child and after leaving school set off with his camera to capture the world. On his return, while hitchhiking back to his parents’ house in Maidenhead, he met somebody involved in a fringe theatre company called the Combination, based at Deptford’s Albany arts centre, and soon became its photographer-in-residence.

“It was fast and furious work,” says his former Albany colleague and friend John Turner. “And we all fell in love with the area.” Schwarz stayed in the role for 15 years, creating a huge and historically important body of work documenting this vibrant community: from Albany performers to children in playgrounds, market stallholders to scrap-metal workers. His photographs would be blown up and displayed in shop windows and on tower blocks.

Continue reading...
Read More
The Guardian

Sep 01 2018
Agi's story: the family trauma buried for 30 years – picture essay

Mum paced up and down like a caged tiger as finally told me the uncensored tale of her six years with my father

15 August 1989. It was late, a knock at the door, a police officer’s voice. She was there to inform my mum that my father had taken his own life. Had they not divorced it would have been their 13th wedding anniversary. He had called her earlier that afternoon, barely lucid. She had known something was horribly wrong. Even given his history of violence, instability and alcohol abuse, my mother could never have imagined what he had just done, or what he was about to do.

Continue reading...
Read More
The Guardian

Sep 01 2018
Tŷ Pawb review – an art gallery that truly is everybody’s house

A covered market in Wrexham has welcomed a new exhibition and performance space in an understated revamp that unites art and commerce

There was a time when you would have known what to expect of a lottery-funded art gallery in a middle-sized town like Wrexham. It might have been a new building, or at least a conspicuously transformed old one, standing alone, its architecture making some sort of statement about its cultural contemporariness. It would probably have had more space than it really needed, a sign of optimism that it would grow to fill it.

If that town also had, as Wrexham did, something like a 1990s covered market that was struggling to function as originally envisaged, that would have been a separate problem. But times have changed. Local authorities have less money to spend than they did on running things like art galleries. Ingenuity is called for. So, in the case of Wrexham, they addressed both questions at once. They put the new premises for the town’s Oriel Gallery inside the covered market.

Continue reading...
Read More
The Guardian

Sep 01 2018
Peter Kennard's potent anti-war images for the CND

This year marks the 60th anniversary of the Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament, founded in 1958 at the height of the cold war. According to leading political artist Peter Kennard, who has been creating anti-war images since the late 1970s and has a show currently on in Sheffield, the CND’s message is more urgent than ever: “You’ve got Trump who’s got his finger on his button and he’s completely out of control in terms of rationality. It’s all very worrying.” Kennard’s preferred medium is photomontage (his best-known work is probably Photo Op, co-created with Cat Phillipps, depicting Tony Blair taking a selfie in front of a burning oilfield in Iraq). The technique “joins two clicks of a photo shutter to reveal what’s usually hidden; you can show the victim and the victimiser in one picture. And that encourages people to think critically about what’s going on.”

Art Against War: Peter Kennard and the CND Movement is at the Millennium Gallery, Sheffield until 7 October

Continue reading...
Read More
The Guardian

Sep 01 2018
George Loudon: Surreal Science review – riveting and bizarre

Whitechapel Gallery, London
With freakish flowers and picklings that prefigure Hirst, Loudon’s collection is a terrific blurring between science and art

A mushroom – vast, alarming – burgeons out of the gallery wall. It looks real, in just the artificial way of such fungi. But we are not in a forest, and this is not just any botanical specimen. It emerges from a neat plaque of wood like the lion’s head in a clubroom trophy. Real, unreal, certainly surreal: it is a phenomenon in monumental plaster.

Velvet toadstools, glass slugs, a pair of miniature turtles deep in conversation in their tank of formaldehyde – every object in this spectacular show might be a work of contemporary art. But almost all were made in the 19th century. A turkey or a tumour were hard to preserve for Victorian students of medicine and zoology; after dissection, moreover, they would have to be thrown away. So why not make the bird in papier-mache, stripping it of feathers and skin so that its innards were visible, while catching its clumsy not-quite-airborne flight? And why not make each tumour in tinted glass, so that the different internal tissues were available to the inquiring eye?

Continue reading...
Read More
The Guardian

Sep 01 2018
Original Observer photography

Pride, pop, poets and ponies: all feature in this showcase of the best commissioned photography in the Observer in August 2018

Continue reading...
Read More
The Guardian

Aug 31 2018
The 20 photographs of the week

The Venezuelan migration crisis, protests in Gaza, Novak Djokovic in the US Open and the heat in New York – the week captured by the world’s best photojournalists

Continue reading...
Read More
artforum.com

Aug 31 2018
Read More
The Guardian

Aug 31 2018
Australian Life photo competition – in pictures

A record 2,478 submissions have been narrowed down to a handful of finalists in the 2018 Australian Life photography competition. The awards showcase Australia’s diversity as part of the City of Sydney’s Art & About program.

Continue reading...
Read More
The New York Times

Aug 31 2018
An Artist Ascendant: Simone Leigh Moves Into the Mainstream
With her first major New York gallery show and an important public commission, the artist spotlights African-American women “left out of history.”
Read More
The Guardian

Aug 31 2018
Pollock storms into London and Banksy dials up the dissent – the week in art

Joe Tilson invades Venice, Helsinki unveils a subterranean culture hub and the prestige art scene finds no takers for Nigel Farage – all in our weekly dispatch

I Object
Subversive art from Gillray to Banksy, ancient Egyptian obscenity to a suffragette song, dug up in the British Museum by Private Eye editor Ian Hislop.
British Museum, London, 6 September to 20 January

Continue reading...
Read More
The New York Times

Aug 31 2018
Climate Museum Sends Distress Signals to Stimulate Discussion
Promoting the climate change conversation in a bold way throughout the five boroughs.
Read More
The New York Times

Aug 31 2018
The Week in Arts: Season 2 of ‘The Deuce,’ 5-Minute Dances at Joe’s Pub
HBO’s rough-and-tumble series about the 1970s Times Square sex trade is back, and the Dance Now Festival returns to present 40 artists.
Read More
The Guardian

Aug 31 2018
Frida Kahlo’s Self-Portrait on the Border: championing Mexico

Kahlo’s shock at an industrialised and over-populated America compared with the deep-rooted culture of her homeland

Frida Kahlo plays with the pretty in pink stereotype in one of her more directly political paintings (its full title is Self-Portrait on the Border Between Mexico and the United States of America). Far from the demure figure of soirees that her outfit suggests, she stands, fag in hand, tense, with her lips pursed.

Continue reading...
Read More
The New York Times

Aug 30 2018
30 Art Exhibitions to View in N.Y.C. This Weekend
Our guide to new art shows and some that will be closing soon.
Read More
The New York Times

Aug 30 2018
Art Review: This Surrealist Is Having a Moment, 66 Years After Her Last New York Show
Karma gallery celebrates the strange, lonely paintings of the Chicago artist Gertrude Abercrombie with an exhibition and a comprehensive catalog.
Read More
artforum.com

Aug 30 2018
FILM: Rise, Resist
Lauren O’Neill-Butler on Stephen Maing’s Crime + Punishment (2018)
Read More
The New York Times

Aug 30 2018
Worth the Ride: 5 Surprising Exhibition Spaces in Upstate New York
A glass house, a drawing made of bent wood and a sculpture about the slave trade that uses piano keys: These are among the intriguing works awaiting north of New York City.
Read More
artforum.com

Aug 30 2018
Read More
The Guardian

Aug 30 2018
Krishna Reddy obituary

Pupil of Krishnamurti who became a world-leading printmaker and art teacher

In the late 1950s, on moving to Paris, the Indian artist and printmaker Krishna Reddy, who has died aged 93, found himself in the heart of bohemian society. “There was one tiny little street,” Reddy recalled, “in which all the great artists gathered.” He regularly met Alberto Giacometti, and would look in on Constantin Brâncuşi every Sunday. In the cafes of Montparnasse, Reddy would discuss how the spiritualism he had learned from his first teacher, the philosopher Jiddu Krishnamurti, had blended with European modernism. Underpinning his ideas was a technical knowhow that produced several innovations in the medium Reddy made his own.

Reddy joined Atelier 17, the studio of a fellow printmaker, Stanley William Hayter, at 17 Rue Campagne-Première, and together they developed “viscosity printing”, in which multiple colours can be applied to the same metal printing plate, each paint mixed to a different thickness with linseed oil so that it does not contaminate the others. Whirlpool, a work from 1963 held in the collection of the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, is typical in its frantic composition of discrete blues.

Continue reading...
Read More