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The New York Times

Nov 15 2018
27 Art Exhibitions to View in N.Y.C. This Weekend
Our guide to new art shows and some that will be closing soon.
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The New York Times

Nov 15 2018
3 Days, 150 Paintings: A Whirlwind Tintoretto Tour
On the 500th anniversary of the painter’s birth, our critic set himself a challenge: to see all of Tintoretto’s major works, spread around Venice at 23 locations.
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The Guardian

Nov 15 2018
Welsh artist Cerith Wyn Evans wins Hepworth sculpture prize

Artist who extended possibilities of sculpture with floating light installations takes home £30,000 prize

Cerith Wyn Evans, the Welsh artist who was an assistant to the late film director Derek Jarman before establishing himself as a significant figure in contemporary art, has won the UK’s most prestigious sculpture prize.

Wyn Evans has been a major art world figure for a number of years but is not well known among the wider public. Winning the £30,000 Hepworth prize for sculpture may go some way to changing that.

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The Guardian

Nov 15 2018
Jean Mohr obituary

Award-winning photographer and longtime collaborator with the writer John Berger

Jean Mohr, who has died aged 93, began his life as a photographer in 1949, with a camera he had bought for one of his brothers as a present. Working with Palestinian refugees for the International Red Cross in Jordan and the West Bank, Mohr was moved to use the camera himself. He went on to become well known for his photographic work with humanitarian organisations, and particularly with refugees, as well as his collaborations with the writer John Berger.

Of the images used in After the Last Sky: Palestinian Lives (1986), another friend and collaborator, Edward Said, wrote that Mohr “saw us as we would have seen ourselves – at once inside and outside our world”. Yet, during a 2014 exhibition in Tel Aviv, Mohr explained that he had chronicled not only the Palestinian experience but also, with the American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee, that of endangered Jewish communities in Iran, India and Tunisia. “In my entire life as a photographer,” he said, “I have been trying to build bridges between these two communities.”

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The New York Times

Nov 15 2018
‘At Eternity’s Gate’ Review: An Exquisite Portrayal of van Gogh at Work
A magnificent Willem Dafoe stars in Julian Schnabel’s film, a work that Manohla Dargis calls “an argument for art.”
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The Guardian

Nov 15 2018
Ben Quilty transforms St Paul's Cathedral's Christmas tree into refugee tribute

Collaboration with Mirra Whale is made of life vests discarded by refugees en route to Europe

The Christmas tree inside Melbourne’s St Paul’s Cathedral this year will look a bit different – it will be made largely of life vests discarded by refugees en route to Europe.

The politically charged take on the Christmas tradition is the work of the Archibald prize-winning artist Ben Quilty in collaboration with fellow artist Mirra Whale and is entitled Not a Creature Was Stirring.

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The Guardian

Nov 15 2018
Martin Parr returns to Manchester to capture its changing landscape

Exhibition in city where photographer learned his trade focuses on past and present

Almost 50 years after he was nearly kicked out of Manchester’s polytechnic for failing his photo theory course, the documentary photographer Martin Parr has trained his lens on the city once more.

In Return to Manchester, a major commission for Manchester Art Gallery, Parr creates a portrait of a rapidly changing urban landscape which this year had more cranes on the skyline than any other European city, according to the council’s chief executive.

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The New York Times

Nov 15 2018
Critic’s Pick: Arbus, Untitled and Unearthly
A series considered one of the towering achievements of American art reminds us that nothing can surpass the strange beauty of reality if a photographer knows where to look.
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The New York Times

Nov 15 2018
Critic’s Pick: Sterling Ruby Pipes Down, a Bit
A small museum show that concentrates on the ceramic works of a multidiscipline dynamo comes as something of a relief.
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The Guardian

Nov 15 2018
Bum freezers, feathercuts and flares: Martin Parr's Return to Manchester – review

Manchester Art Gallery
Before he became famous for his lurid shots of the working class at play, the photographer set out to capture the urban grit of 1970s Manchester. The results are oddly overpowering

From 1970 to 1973, Martin Parr studied photography at Manchester Polytechnic. In the catalogue for his new exhibition, Return to Manchester, he recalls how, having fled “the safety of suburban Surrey”, he found the city “exciting and very real”. The earliest photographs here, many of them taken while he was still a student, are a portrait of another Manchester: grittier, less commercial, more definably northern. They are also a portrait of another Martin Parr: a monochrome documentarist yet to find his style, much less his brand. For that reason, they are the most intriguing part of this show.

Related: Martin Parr returns to Manchester to capture its changing landscape

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The New York Times

Nov 15 2018
Show Us Your Wall: His and Hers Collecting: She Prefers Art That’s ‘in Your Face’
Billy Frist is attracted to the prettier photographs, unlike his wife, Jennifer Frist. Together, they have amassed a mini-museum.
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The New York Times

Nov 15 2018
critic’s pick: She Needed No Camera to Make the First Book of Photographs
The British botanist Anna Atkins published her evocative cyanotypes of algae and seaweed 175 years ago. Now, the New York Public Library is celebrating her innovation.
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The Guardian

Nov 14 2018
Vanity projects and kamikaze loggias: Tbilisi’s architectural disaster

The centre of the Georgian capital has long been the plaything of outsize egos – but can its architecture biennial inspire useful debate about the city’s future?

Sprouting like malignant glass tumours across the historical centre of Tbilisi, Georgia, the trophy buildings of the country’s former president Mikheil Saakashvili are hard to miss. There is the heap of white “petals” forming the roof of his public service hall, which looks like someone spilt a bowl of prawn crackers over a pile of glass boxes. A little downriver stands the wavy roof of his Bridge of Peace, locally nicknamed the “Always Ultra” for its unfortunate resemblance to a discarded sanitary towel. Nearby sit the conjoined tubes of his concert hall and exhibition centre, left unfinished and abandoned, their chubby legs spread akimbo towards the old town. It is a surreal scene, a tragic parody of vanity projects gone wrong, all watched over by the presidential palace, an illiterate neoclassical pile crowned with a great glass egg.

“For nine years we had a president who was very interested in architecture,” says local architect and planner Irakli Zhvania, who leads “ugly walks” around the city highlighting the catastrophic results of corrupt deals, destroyed heritage and the privatisation of swaths of public parks. “It was a disaster.”

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The Guardian

Nov 14 2018
Vanity projects and kamikaze loggias: Tbilisi’s architectural disaster

The centre of the Georgian capital has long been the plaything of outsize egos – but can its architecture biennial inspire useful debate about the city’s future?

Sprouting like malignant glass tumours across the historical centre of Tbilisi, Georgia, the trophy buildings of the country’s former president Mikheil Saakashvili are hard to miss. There is the heap of white “petals” forming the roof of his public service hall, which looks like someone spilt a bowl of prawn crackers over a pile of glass boxes. A little downriver stands the wavy roof of his Bridge of Peace, locally nicknamed the “Always Ultra” for its unfortunate resemblance to a discarded sanitary towel. Nearby sit the conjoined tubes of his concert hall and exhibition centre, left unfinished and abandoned, their chubby legs spread akimbo towards the old town. It is a surreal scene, a tragic parody of vanity projects gone wrong, all watched over by the presidential palace, an illiterate neoclassical pile crowned with a great glass egg.

“For nine years we had a president who was very interested in architecture,” says local architect and planner Irakli Zhvania, who leads “ugly walks” around the city highlighting the catastrophic results of corrupt deals, destroyed heritage and the privatisation of swaths of public parks. “It was a disaster.”

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The Guardian

Nov 14 2018
The shock of the weird: cutting-edge video art – in pictures

Named after the late experimental film director Derek Jarman, the Jarman award celebrates UK-based artists who work with moving images. This year’s nominees include Daria Martin, Hardeep Pandhal and Margaret Salmon. The artists discuss their work at the Whitechapel gallery in London this weekend. The £10,000 prize is given on 24 November

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The Guardian

Nov 14 2018
Only Michelangelo made abdomens – and wonky toes – like these

Fitzwilliam Museum reveals research it says proves bronzes are by Renaissance master

A four-year research project that included painstaking examination of wonky toes, eight-pack abdomens, bulging thigh muscles and wavy pubic hair has helped to convince academics that Michelangelo is the maker of two works known as the Rothschild bronzes.

The Fitzwilliam Museum in Cambridge made a sensational claim in 2015 that Michelangelo was responsible for two privately owned bronzes depicting handsome, ripped, nude men riding panther-like creatures.

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The New York Times

Nov 14 2018
What to See in New York Art Galleries This Week
John Houck’s visual trickery; Svenja Deininger’s “Crescendo” paintings; Didier William’s eye-catching mixed-media works; and the poet John Ashbery’s demure treasures.
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The New York Times

Nov 14 2018
Stan Lee: One Fan Remembers the Voice, the Words, the Face
Our comic book reporter looks at how Stan Lee — the character and the person — recurred throughout his life.
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The New York Times

Nov 14 2018
MoMA Photography Chief Returns to Paris to Direct Museum
Quentin Bajac will leave the Museum of Modern Art to run the Jeu de Paume, France’s national photography museum.
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The Guardian

Nov 14 2018
Sydney from the sky: the aerial photography of Milton Kent – in pictures

Australian photographer and pilot Milton Kent is best known for the extensive collection of aerial images his studio took between 1926 and 1971. He was given his pilot’s licence in 1926 and specialised in oblique aerial photography

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The Guardian

Nov 14 2018
Enzo Apicella obituary
Designer and cartoonist who revolutionised the look of Italian restaurants in Britain during the 1960s

Enzo Apicella, who has died aged 96, was the padrone – the godfather – of London’s Italian restaurant culture. His distinction was not as a maestro in the kitchen. Nor was he specially good at business. Instead, Apicella had a very particular, wholly individual and completely persuasive vision of what an Italian restaurant should be.

Out went murals of the erupting Vesuvius, tourist board posters of Lake Como and trellis with plastic vines. In came cool tiles, white paint, downlighters, Magistretti chairs and proper art. Thanks to Apicella, the Pizza Express in Fulham had murals by Eduardo Paolozzi, forming in many customers’ minds an unbreakable connection between pop art and pizza margherita.

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The Guardian

Nov 14 2018
Richard Young's best photograph: Jerry Hall parties at Annabel's

‘You had to earn your way into the club. But once the celebrities got to know you, they realised you weren’t such a bad old fruit’

I can barely remember when this was taken, one of those glam parties at Annabel’s in the late 1980s, when men had to wear black tie and women had to look absolutely scrumptious to get in. That period was a bit of a blur and Annabel’s was just a vortex.

There were a lot of gorgeous women about back then, but for me Jerry Hall sums up the whole decade. I shot her a few times over the years and always found her very warm, very kind, and a lot of fun. She’s giving that smile she can just turn on, while the other woman is It girl and socialite Francesca von Thyssen [now von Habsburg].

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The Guardian

Nov 14 2018
Robert Indiana: the artist, the caretaker, the lawsuit and the $4m auction

Key pieces from artist’s estate for sale to fund vital repairs – and a lawsuit that alleges Indiana, who died in May, was exploited

Two key artworks in the collection of the late American artist Robert Indiana are set to be auctioned this week, in a controversial sale to help fund the restoration of his home and mounting legal fees related to his estate.

The two paintings, Ellsworth Kelly’s Orange Blue and Ed Ruscha’s Ruby, are set to be auctioned by Christie’s in New York on 16 November and are expected to fetch up to a total of $4.2m.

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The Guardian

Nov 14 2018
Penises of the ancient world: phallus found in Roman toilet was far from the first

A mosaic of a young man holding his erect penis has been found in a Roman toilet in Turkey. But portraying the male member is a tradition that stretches much further back in human history

When excavations began at the ancient Roman city of Pompeii in the 18th century, the place turned out to be full of penises. The ancient art preserved under ash from the 79 AD eruption of Vesuvius was so rich in willies that the English antiquarian Richard Payne Knight argued for the existence of an ancient fertility cult there. After all, there was one still alive in southern Italy at the time. His 1786 book An Account of the Remains of the Worship of Priapus has an engraved frontispiece showing an array of contemporary wax phalluses made as votive offerings.

More than 200 years later, the priapism of the ancient world can still astound us. Archaeologists have uncovered a Roman public toilet in southern Turkey with some filthy and funny floor decorations. As they hitched up their togas or reached for sponge on a stick, users of this men’s loo could look down at a mosaic of a young man holding his cock. He is labelled in the mosaic as Narcissus, who in Greek myth fell in love with his own reflection and wasted away gazing at it. Here, his attention is more focused: he’s obsessed with his own erection. As he plays with it, he looks sideways to reveal a ludicrous phallic nose. “Narcissus, what are you doing in that latrina?” his mater might be demanding from outside the door, in a gag that anticipates Portnoy’s Complaint by around 1,800 years.

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The New York Times

Nov 14 2018
Hopper Painting Sells for Record $91.9 Million at Christie’s
In three auctions, there were some formidable prices, though eyebrows were raised at a number of intimidating estimates. And there were failures.
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The Guardian

Nov 13 2018
Vive la difference! Photo Vogue festival – in pictures

From gender identity to vitiligo, from disabilities to drag queens, a new exhibition called Embracing Diversity explores what it’s like to be different

• Part of Photo Vogue festival 2018, 15-18 November at Base Milano in Milan

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The New York Times

Nov 13 2018
Tavares Strachan Teams With SpaceX to Launch Satellite-Sculpture Into Orbit
The object, made of 24-karat gold, honors Robert Henry Lawrence Jr., the first African-American to train as an astronaut.
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The Guardian

Nov 13 2018
Polly Borland on art, bodies and Melbourne in the 80s: 'It was kind of a free-for-all’

As the LA-based Melbourne artist’s surreal photographs grace Australian galleries, she talks selfies, Nick Cave and shooting the Queen

The group of friends would go on to become some of Australia’s most important artists, film-makers and musicians. But in Melbourne in the 1980s, they were just kids: young, hanging out, with an inexhaustible appetite for partying.

It was the era of punk and the “little band scene”, where small bands formed and dissolved over the course of a night or a week, playing in venues around St Kilda and Fitzroy.

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The New York Times

Nov 13 2018
Critic’s Notebook: Amazon’s HQ2 Will Benefit From New York City. But What Does New York Get?
Amazon promises tens of thousands of new jobs, but should we expect more than that?
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The New York Times

Nov 13 2018
New Director Expands MOCA’s Board With Four Global Members
Klaus Biesenbach chose new members based in art capitals outside California — and three have ties to MoMA PS1, where he had been the director.
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The New York Times

Nov 13 2018
Leonard Cohen Exhibition to Come to New York
After its debut at the Musée d’Art Contemporain de Montréal, “A Crack in Everything” will open at the Jewish Museum next year.
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The New York Times

Nov 13 2018
Walker in Minneapolis Raids Long Island City for New Director
Mary Ceruti will lead the Walker after nearly 20 years at the SculptureCenter in Queens. The Walker’s last leader stepped down amid conflict over a sculpture.
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The Guardian

Nov 13 2018
The world’s most stunning super structures – in pictures

A floating concert hall in Mexico, guesthouses on stilts in rural China and a visitor centre inspired by Lego in Denmark are among the 535 shortlisted projects from 57 countries for the World Architecture Festival Awards. The building of the year will be announced in Amsterdam at the end of this month.

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The Guardian

Nov 13 2018
Hitchcock remade and fake IDs: Paris Photo's altered reality

From doctored passport pics to stick-on Hitler moustaches, maverick minds and painstaking processes reign at the photography show where art meets commerce

Laid out under the ornate vaulted dome of the Grand Palais, Paris Photo is a daunting prospect even for the seasoned photography buff. It is, first and foremost, a market: the increasingly well-heeled clientele who are drawn there reflect the commercial clout of photography’s equivalent of Frieze – with all the same tensions between art and the hard sell that entails. Your best bet is to ignore the sales pitches and wander through the vast network of exhibition booths at will, following your instinct.

On the contemporary front, I was taken with Eamonn Doyle’s big, vivid prints from his new series, K, which were on show at Michael Hoppen’s exhibition space. The series features a ghostly female figure, draped in all-concealing fabric and silhouetted in stark relief against the elemental landscapes of the Atlantic west of Ireland. The images are a dramatic contrast to traditional renderings of grieving and hauntedness and to Doyle’s previous series of works, which depict the passing parade of people he encountered on the streets of his inner-city Dublin neighbourhood.

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The Guardian

Nov 13 2018
Saffron harvest in Greece – in pictures

Saffron – the spice so expensive it’s called ‘red gold’ – has brought jobs and money to a region better known for coal mines and unemployment. Most are young people who were shut out of the job market during Greece’s economic downturn. They returned to the countryside to make a living off the land

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The Guardian

Nov 12 2018
New York's squalid core: Jane Dickson in Times Square – in pictures

She operated the billboard in New York’s Times Square – giving artist and photographer Jane Dickson a bird’s eye view of the busy crew of strippers, hustlers and tourists that she and her fellow downtown artists chronicled and were inspired by. Read an interview with her here

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The Guardian

Nov 12 2018
Sleaze, hustlers and strippers: Jane Dickson's lost Times Square

Living and working in the grimy heart of 70s New York, Dickson’s photographs and paintings gave a close-up view of the nocturnal activities that made the place so notorious – and alluring

In 1978, Jane Dickson answered a job advert in the New York Times that read: “Artist wanted, willing to learn computers.” Soon afterwards, she was hired to work on the first digital light Spectacolor billboard on Times Square.

“I sat in an office on the third floor of a building just behind the giant screen,” she recalls. “I mainly worked night shifts at the weekend, programming the digitally animated visuals and, for the first few years, I ran the countdown for New Year’s Eve. That was my introduction to Times Square after dark. It really couldn’t have been more exciting or surreal.”

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The New York Times

Nov 12 2018
50 Years Later, Chicago Artists Are Getting Their Due
“The Time Is Now!” at the Smart Museum of Art in Chicago examines a watershed cultural moment and the African-American artists figures who defined it.
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The New York Times

Nov 12 2018
Like a Diamond in the Sky: The Rockefeller Center Christmas Tree Has a New Glow
Daniel Libeskind’s architectural feat — all 900 pounds, 70 spikes, and three million Swarovski crystals of it — will light up the night at Rockefeller Center.
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The Guardian

Nov 12 2018
Sweat it out: how to make art from your own body fluids

Artists from Warhol to Duchamp have created pieces used their own excreta. Now RCA graduate Alice Potts has joined them

Name: Body-fluid art.

Age: In theory, as old as the human body, but generally considered to be a modern phenomenon.

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The Guardian

Nov 12 2018
From Manus Island to sanctions on Iran: the art and opinions of Hoda Afshar

The Tehran-born Melbourne artist’s confronting photography puts people on the margins in the centre of the frame

At first glance the video looks like a tourism promo. There is lush tropical jungle. Fat, glistening fish. White sands. Azure water. Remain, by Iranian-Australian artist Hoda Afshar, was not filmed in paradise, however, but in a prison: Manus Island.

“I wanted to [move beyond] images of a refugee behind bars,” says Afshar. “I wanted the subject to decide how to share the story: to give them autonomy and agency.”

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The Guardian

Nov 12 2018
Pop's dark star: the return of Andy Warhol

He predicted Trump, selfies and social media – but a blockbuster retrospective reveals that it’s the overlooked later work which can truly move us today

In the summer of 1968, Valerie Solanas, a disgruntled bit player on the New York arts scene, broke into Andy Warhol’s office and shot him twice with a .32 Beretta. The bullets punctured Warhol’s lungs, stomach, liver and spleen, cutting the Pope of Pop down at the peak of his fame. Doctors briefly pronounced him dead at the scene.

Warhol recovered – but he was never the same. He turned his back on the in-crowd and embraced high society. He balanced lucrative portrait commissions with melancholy abstracts that left the critics unmoved. “I stopped being creative when I was shot,” Warhol would lament, although one wonders if this is entirely true. More likely he embarked on a tactical retreat. He wanted to dismantle his image and script his own exit line, an impish control freak right to the end.

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The Guardian

Nov 12 2018
Tate Liverpool to stage major Keith Haring exhibition

US artist, who died in 1990 aged 31, is best known for his visual motifs and Aids activism

Tate Liverpool is to stage the first big UK show devoted to the American artist Keith Haring, who died in 1990 aged just 31.

Related: A brief history of protest art from the 1940s until now - in pictures

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The New York Times

Nov 12 2018
Five More Museums Acquire Art From Souls Grown Deep Foundation
To reshape the narrative of art told by American institutions, the foundation will transfer 51 works by black self-taught artists to additional museums.
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The New York Times

Nov 12 2018
In a Netherlands Museum Director, the Nazis Found an Ally
As Dutch museums scour their holdings for Nazi-looted art, historians are revisiting a wartime arts administrator associated with tainted works.
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The New York Times

Nov 12 2018
8 Artists at the Paris Photo Fair Who Show Where Photography Is Going
The world’s largest photography show features works that go far beyond traditional two-dimensional prints. Some were even made without a camera.
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The Guardian

Nov 12 2018
Portrait of Humanity photography prize entries – in pictures

A boy riding a wave and a family picking flowers … these are some of the striking entries for the Portrait of Humanity prize, which is backed by the Guardian. The competition is judged by industry leaders and invites photographers of all levels to submit images expressing individuality, community and unity. To take part, enter your photos before 8 January 2019. This is the first in a series of monthly galleries of pictures selected by a Guardian picture editor.

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The Guardian

Nov 11 2018
Punk rock to pottery studio: how Brendan Huntley changed his tune

The former frontman for cult Melbourne band Eddy Current Suppression Ring talks about his unexpected artistic transition

Brendan Huntley has two art studios. One where he lives in Melbourne’s inner-north; that’s where he does most of his painting. Then there’s another way down south in Frankston, at his mother’s rambling house where he grew up, surrounded by bush and birds. This is where I meet him and it’s where he makes his extraordinary, primordial clay sculptures.

It’s so quiet here. This is semi-rural land, nowhere near the malls and freeways. There’s just the sounds of birds in the trees here, nothing else. It’s an artist’s idyll. “This is where I have control of my little world, in these creations,” he says. “This is my world. There’s something very satisfying about just being in it.”

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The New York Times

Nov 11 2018
Louvre Abu Dhabi Draws One Million People in Debut Year
Visitors from India top attendance, along with Germany, China, England, the U.S. and France. Some precious loans are returning to Paris — others are arriving.
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The Guardian

Nov 11 2018
Paula Rego: ‘It isn’t nice in my mind’

Visceral and unsettling, Paula Rego’s art has challenged us for decades. Now, at 83, she talks about cruel fables and the medicinal joy of champagne

There’s a moment in old age when some people become a little girl again, and it’s at this point in her life that I meet Dame Paula Rego, the 83-year-old artist who has always been fascinated by fairytales. “There’s a traditional Portuguese folk tale where a very poor couple have run out of food.” This is her favourite. “The children are crying so the wife cuts off her breast and cooks it for supper. The next day she cuts off her other breast. But on the third day she explains to her husband that there’s nothing left to eat, and he says, ‘We’ll have to start on the children.’” She likes it because it’s “ruthless and terrible,” which are also words that have been used to describe her work, along with comical and visceral and grotesque. She sits, slowly. “I’m very, very old. But I’m an idiot. I feel very young. How old do I feel?” She thinks for a second, her eyes slightly glazed. She smiles constantly. “Eight,” she settles on, firmly.

Paula Rego, who was born into a privileged family in Portugal during a dictatorship (though she was “being repressed and restrained by my mother, not Salazar”), began exhibiting with the London Group in the 1960s alongside David Hockney. She became the first associate artist at the National Gallery and today is one of our greatest living painters. Her themes are power and possession, childhood, and sexual transgression; in The Policeman’s Daughter (1987), a girl polishes her absent father’s jackboot, her fist rammed in deep. She offers me some ginger tea.

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