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artforum.com

Sep 27 2018
FILM: Sound Off
Tausif Noor on Steve Loveridge’s Matangi/Maya/M.I.A (2018)
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The Guardian

Sep 27 2018
Cottingley Fairies hoax pictures expected to fetch £2,000 at auction

Photos taken in 1917 by cousins Elsie Wright and Frances Griffiths were cause of huge controversy

Photographs of what is considered to be one of the greatest hoaxes of the 20th century are expected to fetch more than £2,000 when they are sold at auction.

The two images of the Cottingley Fairies were taken in July and September 1917 by 16-year-old Elsie Wright and her nine-year-old cousin Frances Griffiths, in the village of Cottingley, near Bingley in Yorkshire.

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The New York Times

Sep 27 2018
The Robin Williams Auction: On the Wall and Off the Wall
Banksy, Gus Van Sant, Martin Mull and “Hook” — the eclectic collection of Robin and Marsha Williams goes on the auction block at Sotheby’s.
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The Guardian

Sep 27 2018
Dark tourism and floating road: Photaumnales festival – in pictures

Twenty-seven photographers are showcasing their work at the 15th edition of the festival held in the small town of Beauvais in northern France. On until 31 December, this year’s festival is all about the relationship between photography and history

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The Guardian

Sep 27 2018
Mantegna and Bellini review – 'abandon hope, all ye who enter here without a PhD'

National Gallery, London
With their spectacular light and heavenly visions, these pictures have a timeless appeal – so why crush the life out of them with deadly dull erudition?

In Giovanni Bellini’s incandescent painting the Resurrection of Christ, a nearly naked Jesus floats in the air above stunned soldiers guarding his now empty tomb. What catches your heart, though, is the sky. Nimbus and cumulus clouds – observed 300 years before they were classified by science – are tinged with the salmon-pink light of dawn as they float in a sky that’s changing from night blue to morning gold.

It is a gorgeous moment that melts away the time between us and Bellini. An artist who died more than half a millennium ago lives, breathes and shares his soul with us through those achingly sensitive colours.

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The New York Times

Sep 27 2018
Critic's Notebook: The Existential Void of the Pop-Up ‘Experience’
I went to as many Instagramable “museums,” “factories” and “mansions” as I could. They nearly broke me.
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The Guardian

Sep 26 2018
Alastair Thain's best photograph: Joseph Beuys close to death

‘I love the fragility in his face – although that human spark, that charisma, is still intact’

In the mid-1980s I was working with a woman who wanted to make a book about artists. She was married to a very famous one herself and knew them all, as well as the dealers. She had a mega-mansion on Capri and that is how I came to meet Joseph Beuys.

I shot this portrait of him for the book a few months later. Beuys was installing a show, Plight, at the Anthony d’Offay gallery in London; that’s one of his felt works you can see in the background. The space was designed to get warmer with the felt; I remember the change in temperature. The work was up and Beuys was on a cigarette break. There’s ash on his hat.

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The Guardian

Sep 26 2018
News, lifestyle, fashion: Australia's emerging photographer awards – in pictures

A selection of the finalists in the Sun Studios emerging photography awards for 2018. The images will be on display at the accompanying exhibition at Sun Studios, Alexandria, Sydney, from 27 September

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The New York Times

Sep 26 2018
Art Review: Firebrands Who Forged a New Art for a New India
Asia Society presents the first United States exhibition of the Progressives Artists’ Group, the avant-garde painters of post-independence Mumbai, in decades.
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The New York Times

Sep 26 2018
What to See in New York Art Galleries This Week
Glen Fogel’s videos and soul-baring drawings; Martine Gutierrez’s “Indigenous Woman”; and Toyin Ojih Odutola’s portraits of imagined Nigerian aristocracy.
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The Guardian

Sep 26 2018
Trust us to look after Parthenon marbles | Letters
Brexit should have no bearing on where the Parthenon marbles are kept, says the British Museum’s Richard Lambert. Jeremy Chaundry reckons they should stay in the UK, while Chris Hardy has a suggestion for replacing them.

In what was one of the great acts of the Enlightenment, in 1753 parliament established the British Museum as a trust, the first of its kind in the world, which was to be run independently of politics and of parliament. This autonomy has been central to its scholarship and public purpose for the past 265 years. And it means that contrary to the arguments of Rhiannon Lucy Cosslett (The Parthenon marbles need to be in the EU, Journal, 25 September), the Brexit negotiations have no bearing on the location of the Parthenon sculptures.

Trustees today have three broad responsibilities: to conserve and enhance the collections for ever; to generate new knowledge, especially by supporting the kind of research that is only possible in a large encyclopaedic museum; and to make the collections accessible to the whole world. They work with colleagues across the UK and around the world to share knowledge and objects from their collections as widely as possible. But they don’t see the objects for which they are responsible as negotiating chips in a political debate.
Richard Lambert
Chair of the British Museum trustees

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The New York Times

Sep 26 2018
Robert Morgenthau Donates Great-Grandfather’s Diary to Jewish Archive
Lazarus Morgenthau, a prosperous clothing salesman, wrote down his memories of his impoverished and nomadic childhood in the early 19th century.
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The New York Times

Sep 26 2018
Show Us Your Wall: In a Bronx Home, Look Up to See a Mythical Creature
The new director of the Bronx Museum of the Arts designed her apartment around a colorful work by a lifelong mentor, the printmaker Robert Blackburn.
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The Guardian

Sep 26 2018
From Prince Naseem to the war on terror: did 9/11 ruin UK Asian culture?

The year is 2001, and video clips of a boxer, race riots and September 11 paint a striking picture of hard times for south Asians in the UK. Now, says artist Kazim Rashid , it’s time to talk about it

Where did all the brown people go? It’s a question that British Pakistani artist Kazim Rashid has been pondering. The 1990s saw a boom in south Asian cultural output in the UK, from the success of Goodness Gracious Me to Panjabi MC’s crossover chart hit Mundian To Bach Ke and the Mercury prize win for Talvin Singh. The country seemed to be embracing the Blair government’s multiculturalism. And then, as Rashid identifies it, in the two decades that followed, silence.

“How come there’s this insane decade of output [by south Asians] that just vanishes?” he says, sinking into a sofa on the fifth floor of London member’s club Shoreditch House. Rashid used to be a party animal before parlaying his club kid days into a successful career in music management. “Behind the scenes, there are some really influential brown people. Why are we good enough to do the work, but not good enough to be the work? And why do we have the confidence to pull the strings, but we don’t have the confidence to tell the story? I couldn’t make sense of it.”

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The Guardian

Sep 26 2018
Elmgreen & Dragset review – a deep dive into sadness, humour and sex

Whitechapel Gallery, London
From an installation of a decaying public pool to lonely sculptures thinking the unthinkable, the Scandinavian duo bring their subversive wit to social and sexual politics

Remember the old Whitechapel swimming pool by Aldgate East in London? The kids dive-bombing and semi-drowning, and coming home all red-eyed and reeking of chlorine? The banter in the changing rooms, the towel-flicking and the furtive looks? After it was shut down in the 1980s, there were the club nights, the squatters and the illegal raves. It was an institution, proper old East End. The Whitechapel pool has been sold to some art hotel and resort corporation. It will be a spa, with reduced-price membership for locals on Wednesday afternoons and slack time for wellness junkies and gym bunnies. You should visit before they do it up.

A faint tang of chlorine still lingers round the drained pool. The paint is peeling off the walls and the tiles are cracked. There is builders’ rubble down the shallow end and scaffolding up by the entrance. Some of the stains are worrying. The ceiling might be about to give way. Surely this used to be the Whitechapel Gallery? I must have got it wrong. Filled with an echoing silence and with a security guard wandering about, these old baths have been here for decades. Just look.

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The New York Times

Sep 26 2018
A Baroness, Her Skulls and a Macabre Exhibition
When she died in 1926, Mathilde de Rothschild bequeathed a strange collection to a Paris museum. The grisly artifacts have now been given their own show.
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The Guardian

Sep 26 2018
David Hockney unveils iPad-designed window at Westminster Abbey

Artist’s stained-glass creation, The Queen’s Window, celebrates Elizabeth II’s reign

A vibrantly coloured window designed by David Hockney on his iPad, showing blue skies and a red country path through blossoming Yorkshire Wolds hawthorn, has been unveiled at Westminster Abbey.

The stained-glass window was commissioned to celebrate the Queen’s reign and has been installed in the north transept, above the statues of former prime ministers including Peel, Gladstone and Disraeli.

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The Guardian

Sep 25 2018
Italy in the aftermath of the second world war – in pictures

In Italy, 1945 was known as ‘year zero’ – it was time for people to start a new life, and with a new style of photography.

The New Beginning for Italian Photography: 1945-1965 is on display at the Howard Greenberg Gallery in New York until 10 November

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The Guardian

Sep 25 2018
Eight great Australian buildings: from the Sydney Opera House to a Wagga woolshed – in pictures

Eight Australian Institute of Architecture’s gold medal winners nominate a selection of great Australian buildings. As part of the 12th Sydney Architecture festival, on Saturday, a panel event at the Sydney Opera House will discuss the question ‘what makes a building truly great’

Mt Druitt Hospital, New South Wales

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The Guardian

Sep 25 2018
Detained, grilled, denounced: Tania Bruguera on life in Cuba – and her Turbine Hall show

Whenever she leaves Cuba, the authorities tell her not to come back. What does the Cuban artist have in store for Tate Modern’s Turbine Hall? Will the mounted police have to be called out again?

Tania Bruguera, the Cuban artist and activist, is sort of talking about a project she shouldn’t talk about. She is the latest artist to take on Tate Modern’s Turbine Hall commission – its details a secret until the installation is opened with theatrical flourish on 2 October. And she is enjoying the suspense: she has been dropping tantalising clues on her Instagram account that take the form of images of well-known paintings. Clue No 1 is Caillebotte’s Les Raboteurs de Parquet, an impressionist work from the 1870s that depicts three artisans scraping down the wooden floor in a bourgeois apartment. Clue No 2 is Holbein’s Ambassadors, which shows two beautifully dressed men standing next to a table loaded down with intriguing objects.

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The New York Times

Sep 25 2018
Isa Genzken Wins the Nasher Prize for Sculpture
The German artist will receive a $100,000 award for excellence in sculpture.
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artforum.com

Sep 25 2018
SLANT: Clothes Encounters
Jess Barbagallo on Bill Cunningham's Fashion Climbing
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The New York Times

Sep 25 2018
The Getty to Start a Research Center for African-American Art
The Getty Research Institute has begun to acquire archives of African-American artists, starting with Betye Saar.
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The New York Times

Sep 25 2018
Mediating Faith and Style: Museums Awake to Muslim Fashions
Max Hollein’s show at the de Young brings “modest fashion” into the modern museum age.
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The Guardian

Sep 25 2018
Doug Moran portrait prize 2018 – in pictures

The Moran Arts Foundation has announced the semi-finalists for the 2018 prize, which showcases original works by Australian artists

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The Guardian

Sep 25 2018
Who posed for the 'Mona Lisa of vaginas'?

I refuse to accept the news that the Irish model may not be the sensual subject of Courbet’s 1866 painting L’Origine du monde – and my proof lies in a painting of her fully clothed

Poor Joanna Hiffernan. Her vagina may just have been written out of history. While there was no absolute proof – and one blazing bit of contradictory evidence – it was until now generally believed that this Irish model and artist posed for one of the most outrageous nudes of all time, Gustave Courbet’s 1866 painting L’Origine du monde. A new discovery by a French researcher suggests it is not her after all on that bed but a dancer called Constance Queniaux.

Related: Mystery solved? Identity of Courbet's 19th-century nude revealed

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The Guardian

Sep 25 2018
'Callous exercises in brutal pornography' – Martin Eder: Parasites review

Newport Street Gallery, London
Why has Damien Hirst given his gallery over to a German artist whose daubs of pampered pooches and teenage girls reduce painting to a shower of hate?

I have a horrible feeling I am about to become a cog in Damien Hirst’s publicity machine. The artist’s Newport Street Gallery, having now been going for three years, has settled into a quiet role on the noisy London art scene. What it needs is a blazing controversy to remind people it exists. So Hirst may be trying to shock by showcasing the work of German painter Martin Eder. He certainly managed to discomfort me – but not in an artistically interesting way.

In fact, I was so disturbed by this exhibition that I tried to find out more about what I thought I saw. Has Eder been attacked in the German press? No – all I could find were art-world homages to his “provocative” paintings. One of the first, in the lavish exhibition Hirst has given him, is a tribute to the figurative artist Balthus who had a penchant for painting adolescent girls. Nearby is a picture of a woman having sex with a much younger male partner. Uncomfortable? Ja, this is uncomfortable.

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The Guardian

Sep 25 2018
Photobox Instagram photography awards shortlist – in pictures

Shortlisted images in the running to be crowned Photobox Instagram photograph of the year range from furry friends to the Holi festival to the meaning of love. Judges, including the Guardian’s former picture editor Eamonn McCabe, have whittled down 180,000 submissions to unearth a shortlist that celebrates the best of social media

  • Winners will be announced 3 October
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The Guardian

Sep 25 2018
Anarchy at the south pole: Santiago Sierra plants the black flag to destroy all borders

The Spanish provocateur, who once filled a former synagogue with lethal gas, has gone to the ends of the Earth to liberate humankind

‘I travel a lot,” says Santiago Sierra. “But entering a country is like going to jail. Borders disgust me – as an idea and as a personal experience. This work denies all of that.”

It’s a typically forthright remark from the Spanish artist, who once caused uproar by pumping carbon monoxide into a former synagogue in Germany, then inviting visitors to don gas masks to enter this simulated death chamber.

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The Guardian

Sep 25 2018
Space Shifters review – hall of mirrors that messes with your mind

Hayward Gallery, London
From Anish Kapoor’s distorting door-mirror to Richard Wilson’s spooky pool of oil, this exhibition of illusion-creating sculpture disturbs the senses – and your reflection

Space Shifters, the latest Hayward Gallery exhibition, should ideally be called Head-fuck. Rather than challenging your perceptions, as gallery statements often have it, the show mangles them. And what it does to your own reflection and self-image is nobody’s business. Anish Kapoor’s stainless steel Non Object (Door) is a fairground distorting mirror, extruding and smearing me like a particularly spiteful Francis Bacon painting, then making me enormously bloated, then doubling and trebling me and making me wish, in a roundabout way, I’d dressed better for the occasion.

Mmwaaaeeeuuuuwwghhh, my reflection goes. There I am again in Jeppe Hein’s rotating double mirror that turns upon the wall, and then in the first of a series of mirror and wood pieces by Josiah McElheny, which a number of dancers will wear, like people carrying sandwich boards, as they carefully make their way round the galleries, careful not to trip in these 20 or 30kg objects, which rest upon their shoulders. There I go again, fleeting and glimmering in all these Instagram-opportunity artworks.

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The Guardian

Sep 25 2018
Murder set Thomas Gainsborough on path to success, say experts

Without bequest from murdered uncle, he could not have afforded to train as artist in London

Art historians are reappraising the life of Thomas Gainsborough after fresh research disclosed a double murder in his family, committed when he was only 11.

The revelations about Gainsborough’s early life shine significant new light on his his path from obscurity as the son of a wool merchant in early 18th-century Sudbury, Suffolk, to becoming one of Britain’s most celebrated artists with a grand house on Pall Mall.

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