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The New York Times

Jan 14 2021
Monument Honoring Martin Luther King Jr. and Coretta Scott King is Set for Boston
Monument Honoring Martin Luther King Jr. and Coretta Scott King is Set for Boston
The memorial, called “The Embrace” and designed by Thomas and architects at MASS Design Group, will honor the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and Coretta Scott King.
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The Guardian

Jan 14 2021
Tintin cover art sells for record-breaking €3.2m

Hergé’s original artwork for Le Lotus Bleu was rejected as too expensive to reproduce in 1936 and given to editor’s son, who kept it in a drawer for decades

A rejected Tintin cover illustrated by Hergé that was gifted to a child and kept in a drawer for decades has set a new world record as the most expensive comic book artwork, selling at auction for €3.2m (£2.8m) on Thursday.

Le Lotus Bleu was created in 1936 by the Belgian artist, born Georges Remi, using Indian ink, gouache and watercolour. It had been intended for the eponymous cover of his fifth Tintin title, which sees the boy reporter head to China in order to dismantle an opium trafficking ring.

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The New York Times

Jan 14 2021
Guggenheim Names First Black Deputy Director and Chief Curator
Naomi Beckwith, who succeeds Nancy Spector, comes from the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago and will help the museum work toward a more equitable work environment.
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The New York Times

Jan 14 2021
3 Art Gallery Shows to See Right Now
Mario Merz’s igloos and spirals at Dia Beacon; Mernet Larsen’s mysterious representational paintings; and a group show, “Everybody Dies!,” explores mortality.
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The New York Times

Jan 14 2021
Nick Cave’s ‘Truth Be Told’ Moving to Brooklyn Museum
Nick Cave’s ‘Truth Be Told’ Moving to Brooklyn Museum
Anne Pasternak, the Brooklyn Museum’s director, shows solidarity with “Truth Be Told,” three words in vinyl that address racial injustice.
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artforum.com

Jan 14 2021
Mimmo Rotella
The Fondazione Mimmo Rotella and the Mimmo Rotella Institute are pleased to announce the recent publication of Mimmo Rotella. Catalogue raisonné. Volume two 1962–1973, edited by Germano Celant and
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artforum.com

Jan 14 2021
Warhol Foundation Announces Fall 2020 Grant Recipients
The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts has announced the fifty-one recipients of its fall 2020 grants, which total $3.9 million and are issued in support of visual arts programs, exhibitions,
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artforum.com

Jan 14 2021
Orange County Museum of Art Names Heidi Zuckerman CEO and Director
The Orange County Museum of Art (OCMA) has announced Heidi Zuckerman as its new CEO and director. Zuckerman, who previously served as CEO and director of the Aspen Art Museum, will assume her new role
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The New York Times

Jan 14 2021
Smithsonian Scales Back $2 Billion Expansion Plan
The organization announced that it would abandon elements of its ambitious redesign, opting for a more modest approach.
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The Guardian

Jan 14 2021
Phoenix rising: philanthropically funded cultural centre in Sydney tests its wings

Funded by Judith Neilson, the new gallery and performance space will privately support new works and make them available to the public for free

Digital-only performances and live streaming to a virtual audience are set to become a permanent feature of the live performance landscape, long after the Covid-19 pandemic comes under control, and leading the way in this new era of post-pandemic art is a new gallery and live performance space in Sydney’s inner city suburb of Chippendale.

Phoenix Central Park was conceived and funded by philanthropist Judith Neilson, the founder and owner of Sydney’s White Rabbit gallery, which houses one of the largest collections in the world of contemporary Chinese art.

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The New York Times

Jan 14 2021
The Enduring Legacy of the Kamoinge Workshop, Finally in the Spotlight
At the Whitney Museum, the enduring legacy of the Kamoinge photography collective — 14 distinctive talents finally in the spotlight.
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artforum.com

Jan 14 2021
Tourmaline talks about pleasure, freedom dreaming, and her new solo show
OVER NEARLY two decades of political organizing, archival research, writing, and art-making, Tourmaline has demonstrated that abolition, Black trans liberation, and abundant pleasure are interwoven,
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The Guardian

Jan 14 2021
Agatha Christie cinema in Devon to be restored to former glory

Paignton Picture House on the English Riviera awarded £200k grant from Historic England

A lovely old cinema in Devon that once reserved a balcony for the crime writer Agatha Christie – and a second one for her butler – is to be restored to its former glory.

The Paignton Picture House on the English Riviera has been awarded a £200,000 grant from Historic England to refurbish intricate stonework and stained glass windows.

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The New York Times

Jan 14 2021
5 Things to Do This Weekend
5 Things to Do This Weekend
Our critics and writers have selected noteworthy cultural events to experience virtually.
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The Guardian

Jan 13 2021
Birth pangs to sugar rushes: Grace Robertson's postwar Britain – in pictures

Grace Robertson, who has died aged 90, documented everyday life for Picture Post at a time when photojournalism was dominated by men. Her pioneering work captured a nation at work, at play – and in the delivery room

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The Guardian

Jan 13 2021
The Great British Art Tour: a life-size scene of merciless revenge

With public art collections closed, we are bringing the art to you, exploring highlights and hidden gems from across the country in partnership with Art UK. Today’s pick: Worcester City Museum’s Clytemnestra

Worcester City Museums’ Clytemnestra portrait by the pre-Raphaelite painter John Collier illuminates one of the most enduring of the Greek myths. In order to appease the goddess Artemis and secure favourable passage as he embarked on his Trojan expedition, Agamemnon, king of Mycenae, sacrifices his daughter Iphigenia.

Her grief-stricken mother Clytemnestra was portrayed by Greek tragedians – and by artists for centuries afterwards – as implacable and vengeful, and Collier captures her in the moments following her murder of her husband.

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artforum.com

Jan 13 2021
Multiples, Inc. 1965-1992
Marian Goodman Gallery is very pleased to present the first historical exhibition of Multiples, Inc., the art publishing company founded by Marian Goodman and a few partners in the 1960s. The show,
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artforum.com

Jan 13 2021
Antônio Henrique Amaral
The protean Brazilian artist Antônio Henrique Amaral (1935–2015) didn’t identify with any movement, though critics often tie him to neo-Cubism and Surrealism, with forays into Pop. And rightly so:
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The New York Times

Jan 13 2021
Pig Painting May Be World’s Oldest Cave Art Yet, Archaeologists Say
Pig Painting May Be World’s Oldest Cave Art Yet, Archaeologists Say
The depiction of the animal on an Indonesian island is at least 45,500 years old, the researchers say.
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artforum.com

Jan 13 2021
Marian Goodman Gallery and ICI Launch Emerging Curator Initiative Honoring Okwui Enwezor
Marian Goodman Gallery has announced an initiative in support of emerging BIPOC (Black, Indigenous, and people of color) curators and honoring the late curator Okwui Enwezor. The initiative, conceived
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artforum.com

Jan 13 2021
Documenta 15 Faces Possible Postponement
Organizers are grappling with the realization that the fifteenth edition of Documenta, the internationally known contemporary art show held every five years in Kassel, may have to be pushed back at
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The Guardian

Jan 13 2021
Swedish postage stamp celebrates work of Greta Thunberg

Illustration of activist is part of a series highlighting government’s environmental quality goals

The environmental activist Greta Thunberg has been featured on a new Swedish postage stamp, in recognition of her work to “preserve Sweden’s unique nature for future generations”.

Thunberg, who turned 18 on 3 January, is pictured standing on a rocky cliff top wearing a yellow raincoat, with swifts flying around her, as part of a set by the artist and illustrator Henning Trollbäck titled Valuable Nature.

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The Guardian

Jan 13 2021
Tupac Shakur bares his torso: Danny Clinch's best photograph

‘When he changed his top, I saw his tattoos and said: “Oh man, we should try something without your shirt on”’

I started shooting the music industry in 1992 just as hip-hop was becoming more popular. Some people thought it was going to be a fad and not all photographers were interested in these jobs. But I was, so I began to work with a lot of hip-hop artists, shooting everyone from Public Enemy to LL Cool J.

Many of the artists come with a huge entourage – they bring the party with them. Sometimes that’s fun but other times it can get in your way. When I got the assignment to photograph Tupac from Rolling Stone magazine in 1993, I didn’t know what to expect. I knew Tupac had been in trouble recently, but I grew up not judging people until I met them. He showed up with just one other guy. He was on time and very cordial, he came in and shook my hand. He had a couple of different changes of clothes with him – he was very prepared. I think he knew that at the time Rolling Stone was not putting a lot of hip-hop in the magazine, so saw a great opportunity for himself and his music.

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The New York Times

Jan 13 2021
The Arts Are in Crisis. Here’s How Biden Can Help.
The Arts Are in Crisis. Here’s How Biden Can Help.
The pandemic has decimated the livelihoods of those who work in the arts. How can the new administration intervene and make sure it doesn’t happen again? A critic offers an ambitious plan.
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The Guardian

Jan 12 2021
Philippines' Taal volcano, one year on – in pictures

When Taal volcano, a popular tourist site in Batangas, erupted a year ago 5,000 people fled the island. It’s still considered dangerous. The government bans former residents from returning but some still live there in tents

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The Guardian

Jan 12 2021
Through the looking glass: Europe's captive primates – in pictures

These chimps, baboons and macaques look sombre as they stare out from their enclosures into Anne Berry’s camera. Her aim is to make viewers feel compassion with them

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The Guardian

Jan 12 2021
The Great British art tour: an image too risky for the Royal Academy

In the first of a new series, we’re bringing the art to you while Britain’s public art collections are closed. In partnership with Art UK we will each day be exploring highlights and hidden gems from across the country. Today’s pick: Stirling Smith museum’s Pipe of Freedom

The Pipe of Freedom was painted in 1869 by Thomas Stuart Smith, the artist and founder of the gallery in which it hangs today, the Stirling Smith Art Gallery and Museum, in central Scotland.

The painting celebrates the abolition of slavery in the US and depicts a formerly enslaved man as independent and free. The painting – considered radical at the time – is one of three portraits of black men by Smith, who painted them not as marginal figures but as the main subject occupying the centre of the canvas.

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artforum.com

Jan 12 2021
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artforum.com

Jan 12 2021
Ghada Amer
“The women I know”, focuses on a new body of works consisting of four moving portraits of female friends in Ghada Amer’s signature embroidered painting style, along with a black and white self-portrait.
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artforum.com

Jan 12 2021
Takis
White Cube Hong Kong is pleased to present an exhibition of works by the late Greek artist Takis (1925–2019) until 27 February 2021. Featuring sculptures drawn from a thirty-year period – from the end
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The New York Times

Jan 12 2021
Diego Rivera Mural to Get Landmark Status, Blocking Potential Sale
Officials unanimously voted to protect the $50 million artwork after the San Francisco Art Institute threatened to sell it to cover debts.
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The Guardian

Jan 12 2021
National Trust aims to save Yorkshire abbey from climate-linked flooding

A £2.5m scheme in the Skell Valley hopes to protect Fountains Abbey and the city of Ripon

Fountains Abbey, near Ripon, North Yorkshire, was originally set up by 13 Benedictine monks seeking refuge from the more extravagant, rowdy monks in York. Eight hundred years later, the abbey ruins and its gardens face another threat: the climate crisis.

The Skell Valley, where the ruins stand, has been flooded several times in recent years, raising fears that the UK’s largest monastic ruins are at risk of irreparable damage. Now a £2.5m National Trust project – aided by a £1.4m lottery grant – has been greenlit to improve the landscape’s resilience to changing weather.

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The Guardian

Jan 12 2021
'Brazilian horror story': internet melts down over sculptor's peculiar waxworks

Images of Arlindo Armacollo’s figures went viral after users unearthed video report about their exhibition in church

The first household name Arlindo Armacollo smothered in beeswax was Mother Teresa. Then came Albert Einstein, Pope John Paul II and a string of global luminaries who the entrepreneur-turned-artist admired.

“It might look simple, but to achieve this richness of detail was hard work,” a local television reporter gushed during a 2015 visit to Armacollo’s waxwork collection in southern Brazil. “The artist wanted to capture the character as well as the soul of each person.”

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artforum.com

Jan 12 2021
Miami Dade College Museum Accused of Censoring Forensic Architecture Exhibition
Miami Dade College’s Museum of Art and Design faces allegations that it censored the work of London-based research group Forensic Architecture (FA), whose major exhibition “True to Scale” opened at the
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artforum.com

Jan 12 2021
Luke Libera Moore on Cyberpunk 2077 (2020)
THE MOST WIDELY ANTICIPATED VIDEO GAME of the past several years, Cyberpunk 2077, was finally released in the twilight of 2020. Served up in over thirty countries across all major gaming platforms,
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artforum.com

Jan 12 2021
Gordon Parks
Jack Shainman Gallery is pleased to announce “Gordon Parks: Half and the Whole.” As a photographer, film director, composer, and writer, Gordon Parks (1912–2006) was a visionary artist whose work
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artforum.com

Jan 12 2021
VIA Art Fund Announces Record $1.5 Million in 2020 Grants
VIA Art Fund has announced its 2020 grant recipients, among whom the nonprofit will distribute $1.5 million, the largest disbursement it has made to date. The funds will be awarded to artists, collectives,
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The New York Times

Jan 12 2021
Blanton Museum Redesign Aims to Raise Its Profile
Blanton Museum Redesign Aims to Raise Its Profile
The $35 million initiative at the University of Texas museum, led by the firm Snohetta, features a Carmen Herrera mural commission.
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The New York Times

Jan 12 2021
Moynihan Train Hall: It’s Stunning. And, a First Step.
Moynihan Train Hall: It’s Stunning. And, a First Step.
A $1.6 billion transformation of a post office has given the city a lofty, light-filled steel, glass and marble cathedral, our critic writes.
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The Guardian

Jan 12 2021
Painted rock snakes preserved as bright mementoes of dark year

Lines of creatively painted stones are being relocated and turned into permanent features across the UK

When she first suggested it, she didn’t realise it would get so big. Andree Paterson had been coordinating the hiding and seeking of painted stones for local children via Facebook for a few years now. But when lockdown came to her home town of Kirkcudbright, south-west Scotland, there was a call for something bigger and brighter.

And so Rainbow, the Kirkcudbright stone snake, began. Over the weeks it grew around the St Cuthbert’s church wall, and grew longer again, stretching to 255 metres (837ft) of hundreds of painted stones by July. It attracted summer visitors to admire the stones, and rock artists of all ages to add their own contributions.

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The Guardian

Jan 12 2021
Want to understand the Capitol rioters? Look at the inflamed hate-drunk mobs painted by Goya

The horrific visions of the Spanish painter are about to go on display at New York’s Met. Americans should flock to this timely show – because no artist better captured collective delusion and mass fanaticism

The macabre art of Francisco Goya, the first truly modern artist, is due to be exhibited at the Metropolitan Museum in New York next month and there could hardly be a more urgent moment for Americans to look at his images. For, over 200 years ago, this Spanish artist perfectly captured the kind of collective delusion and mass fanaticism that swarmed the US Capitol last week. The mob of Trump supporters who assaulted the home of American democracy were as inflamed as the crowd who march with crazed eyes behind a manic musician in The Pilgrimage to San Isidoro, as dangerous as the hate-drunk crowd in The Second of May 1808, spellbound by their goat-headed charismatic idol.

And then there’s The Burial of the Sardine, in which a delirious crowd cavort around a huge banner of a madly grinning face. At first glance, it seems to be a joyous carnival scene, but look closer and the intensity of their rite becomes unsettling as you notice that face on the banner, their vacant lord of the dance. It has a definitive Trumpian air.

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The Guardian

Jan 12 2021
Western Sahara's diplomatic opening – in pictures

US plans to open a consulate in Western Sahara mark a turning point for the disputed territory. US recognition of Morocco’s authority over the land frustrates indigenous Sahrawis seeking independence but others see the future US consulate as a boost for Western Sahara cities like Dakhla

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The Guardian

Jan 11 2021
American girl behind the camera: the pioneering work of Ruth Orkin – in pictures

A new auction marks 100 years since the birth of US photographer Ruth Orkin, who travelled the world making waves in an industry dominated by men

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artforum.com

Jan 11 2021
Doug Aitken
Regen Projects is pleased to present “Flags and Debris,” an exhibition of new work by Los Angeles-based artist Doug Aitken. The works form an ecosystem of interconnected mediums, mixing dance, performance,
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artforum.com

Jan 11 2021
Raven Halfmoon
Ross + Kramer is pleased to announce the New York debut solo exhibition of Raven Halfmoon, entitled Okla Homma to Manahatta. Halfmoon is a citizen of the Caddo Nation, a tribe based in Oklahoma. During
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artforum.com

Jan 11 2021
Wayne Thiebaud
“[Painting] is a wonderful combination of memory, imagination, and direct observation. A lot has to do with yearning. Primarily, what I’m interested in and always have been is this wonderful, personally
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artforum.com

Jan 11 2021
on her Top Ten
For her Top Ten, author Torrey Peters imagines a model for gender transitioning through the stories of divorced women. Peters splits her time between Brooklyn, New York, and rural Vermont. She is the
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The New York Times

Jan 11 2021
First Inventory of Damage to U.S. Capitol Building Released
First Inventory of Damage to U.S. Capitol Building Released
The damage was largely limited to broken glass, busted doors and graffiti, the report said.
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artforum.com

Jan 11 2021
New Year Brings New Art Spaces to Australia
Australia will welcome a slew of new art institutions this year, along with several refreshed galleries slated to open following renovation. Of these, a number are expected to open before the summer.
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artforum.com

Jan 11 2021
Expo Chicago Postpones 2021 Edition
Expo Chicago has announced that it is postponing its in-person art fair, planned for April, becoming the first international art fair to push back a 2021 IRL event. No new dates have been announced for
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