News

Displaying 1 to 50 of 10000 results

The New York Times

Oct 21 2021
For This Artist, the Medium Is the Body
Cassils adds a dance piece to a body of multidisciplinary work that interrogates gender and the treatment of transgender people.
Read More
The New York Times

Oct 21 2021
3 Art Gallery Shows to See Right Now
Kevin Beasley at the Performa Biennial; John Tsombikos and Enno Tianen’s long-distance collaboration; Candy Chang and James A. Reeves’s memorial art.
Read More
The Guardian

Oct 21 2021
The eccentricities of British subcultures – in pictures

Documentary photographer Sophie Green is fascinated by the idiosyncrasies of under-represented communities. Her solo exhibition Showtime runs from 23 October at Messums Wiltshire, and explores the realms of street car culture, banger racing and Gypsy fairs

Continue reading...
Read More
The New York Times

Oct 21 2021
5 Things to Do This Weekend
Our critics and writers have selected noteworthy cultural events to experience virtually and in person in New York City.
Read More
The Guardian

Oct 21 2021
Port city: London on the river – in pictures

A new exhibition examines the impact of the Port of London on our capital city, exploring the complex operations that have connected London to the rest of the world, from the final days of the 18th century to the creation of the huge London Gateway megaport at Thurrock in the Thames estuary

Continue reading...
Read More
The Guardian

Oct 20 2021
No sleep till Brooklyn: a red-eye view of New York – in pictures

Janet Delaney’s life in California was punctuated by last-minute flights she would take to NYC as a courier – where she’d cast a sleepy gaze across the city

Continue reading...
Read More
The Guardian

Oct 20 2021
‘Clay feels perverse’ – Theaster Gates on working on Obama’s library and going back to pottery

The superstar ‘social artist’ has revived derelict buildings and rescued a legendary record collection – but in lockdown, as two new UK exhibitions show, it was singing and throwing pots that made him happy

Theaster Gates likes to get his hands dirty. His two new London exhibitions are dedicated to clay, and in one there’s a film of him singing with great gusto as he throws a pot. So it feels a shame not to be meeting one to one, but via laptop. The artist decided at the last minute to stay at home in Chicago while the shows were mounted, directing things on Zoom. (He finally made it to the UK this week; on Thursday he will give a talk with potter Magdalene Odundo.)

“I’m really mindful of my health and of the truth of these contagious times,” he tells me. “I just wanted to give myself time to be in the best shape so my body would be as resistant as possible. Even if the world is opening up, I’m happy to move slower.”

Continue reading...
Read More
The New York Times

Oct 20 2021
The Return of the Shadowman
The Return of the Shadowman
A stealth artist from Seattle has been replicating the ’80s street art of Richard Hambleton throughout Manhattan. Is this a tribute, a marketing tool — or both?
Read More
The Guardian

Oct 20 2021
Ten projects chosen for ‘once-in-a-lifetime’ UK festival of creativity

Unboxed, derided by some as festival of Brexit, draws on arts, science, engineering, technology and maths

An epic scale model of the solar system and an “almost indescribable” artwork that is seen with closed eyes are included in a highly ambitious programme of live and digital events in UK towns and cities next year.

Unboxed: Creativity in the UK – formerly known as Festival 2022 and derided by some as a “festival of Brexit” – draws on arts, science, engineering, technology and maths in a government-backed £120m celebration of ingenuity.

Continue reading...
Read More
The New York Times

Oct 20 2021
Revolutionary Model Turned Uncompromising Painter
Suzanne Valadon taught herself to paint while modeling for Renoir and Toulouse-Lautrec. A revelatory new survey at the Barnes Collection shows what she learned.
Read More
artforum.com

Oct 20 2021
Barbara Hammer
This presentation of Barbara Hammer’s work and archive, “Tell me there is a lesbian forever…,” begins in 1968, when the experimental cineast discovered 8-mm film. A few years later, she discovered women:
Read More
artforum.com

Oct 20 2021
Zineb Sedira
In Zineb Sedira’s three-channel video Mother Tongue, 2002, several generations of the artist’s family—including herself, her mother, and her daughter—participate, at times, in an awkward discussion
Read More
artforum.com

Oct 20 2021
Studio Museum in Harlem Announces 2021–22 Artists in Residence
The Studio Museum in Harlem, New York, has announced the three latest participants in its prestigious artist-in-residence program. Filmmaker Cameron Granger, painter Jacob Mason-Macklin, and textile
Read More
artforum.com

Oct 20 2021
Artists Withdraw from Havana Biennial as Boycott Looms
Nearly half a dozen participants have pulled out of this year’s Havana Biennial as a gesture of support for the many artist-activists who remain jailed by the government, Hyperallergic reports. Said to
Read More
The Guardian

Oct 20 2021
The Guardian view on Little Amal: telling the unpalatable truth | Editorial

The puppet’s journey from Turkey to the UK charmed audiences – but also discomfited them. And that’s the point

This week, a 3.5-metre tall puppet called Little Amal landed at Folkestone. From there she is travelling to London, Coventry and finally Manchester. Since July she has taken an 8,000km journey through Turkey, Greece, Italy, Switzerland, Germany, Belgium and France, following the route that a child migrant from Syria might. Her journey provides “an opportunity for people to be sympathetic and imagine what it would be like to be her”, David Lan, one of the project’s organisers, has said.

As a piece of theatre Little Amal is an extraordinary thing: incredibly simple, almost naive in conception, and yet utterly epic in execution. Hers (somehow it is impossible to say “its”) has been a tremendous, and deeply touching, journey – an intervention in the long and difficult debate about refugees that powerfully foregrounds simple human empathy rather than policy points or dry arguments. Along the way she has been greeted joyfully by crowds, sent letters by Belgian school pupils, blessed by the pope and, on Sunday, will celebrate her birthday at the V&A in London with local children and a great deal of cake. But there has been a darker side, too: she has also been pelted with stones, protested against, and denied access to a village of Greek monasteries. Little Amal, as a work of art, has been welcomed by audiences, and delighted them. She has also discomfited them, even repulsed them. In other words, as Lan has pointed out, her presence has allowed a kind of re-enactment of the attitudes displayed to real refugees.

Continue reading...
Read More
The Guardian

Oct 20 2021
Egypt detains artist robot Ai-Da before historic pyramid show

Sculpture and its futuristic creator held for 10 days, possibly in fear she is part of spying plot

She has been described as “a vision of the future” who is every bit as good as other abstract artists today, but Ai-Da – the world’s first ultra-realistic robot artist – hit a temporary snag before her latest exhibition when Egyptian security forces detained her at customs.

Ai-Da is due to open and present her work at the Great Pyramid of Giza on Thursday, the first time contemporary art has been allowed next to the pyramid in thousands of years.

Continue reading...
Read More
artforum.com

Oct 20 2021
Jayne Wilkinson on the Momenta Biennale de l’image
QUESTIONS OF CARE and ecological entanglement have dominated art discourse for several years but seem to have grown in urgency of late, as the pandemic forced a renegotiation of relationships, and
Read More
The New York Times

Oct 20 2021
A ‘Holy Grail’ of American Folk Art, Hiding in Plain Sight
A collector’s keen eye — and willingness to knock on a stranger’s door — led to the rediscovery of a sculpture by a renowned stone carver, William Edmondson.
Read More
The New York Times

Oct 20 2021
British Museums Face Covid’s Long-Term Effects
British Museums Face Covid’s Long-Term Effects
Months of closures during the pandemic have caused financial havoc for art venues, and many expect to be strapped for years. At the Victoria and Albert Museum in London, the virus’s impact is clear.
Read More
The Guardian

Oct 20 2021
How our art critic ended up in the Beano: The Art of Breaking the Rules – review

Somerset House, London
From Viz to the fourth plinth to David Bowie, the perennially upstart comic’s influence rampages on – and even our own Adrian Searle can’t get off scot-free

What should a critic do? I’m sure there must be rules: don’t take backhanders from galleries. Don’t get too intimate with artists, especially not dead ones. Declare any conflicts of interest (no conflict, no interest, I always say). Keep up to date and don’t be late, and wear black at all times. I could go on. The public expects certain standards, and a degree of aloof hauteur from the arbiter of taste – it adds gravitas and readers like a touch of disdain; it gives one’s judgments that extra little bit of critical oomph.

But what if the critic has somehow found themselves on the streets of Beanotown? The artist I’m up against is Dennis the Menace, straight out of the pages of the comic. Thanks to the Beano, and artist and curator Andy Holden, my carefully constructed critical persona has been for ever ruined. Drawn by the Beano’s Nigel Parkinson, my all-too-recognisable cartoon avatar has been inserted into the storyline of a Beano strip, reviewing the very exhibition I now find myself standing in.

Continue reading...
Read More
artforum.com

Oct 20 2021
Azza El Siddique and Teto Elsiddique
Azza El Siddique and Teto Elsiddique’s exhibition, “fire is love, water is sorrow – a distant fire,” vibrates with “traces of a still-trembling past,” a line from a text written by Teto prior to his
Read More
The Guardian

Oct 20 2021
An arrest at the George Floyd protests: Mel D Cole’s best photograph

‘As soon as I took this shot, I knew it was special – something pretty much all Black people could relate to. This man was arrested for daring to question authority. I’ve been arrested for the same thing’

I took this on the first day of the protests in Foley Square, New York, following the murder of George Floyd. I’ve witnessed protests before but nothing like this. It was intense, volatile and angry. People were sick and tired – and ready to fight for their rights.

The video of his killing came at a specific moment. People were already angry after the shooting of Ahmaud Arbery in Georgia. And in New York, a viral video of a white woman who called the police about a Black birdwatcher had made people even angrier. But when that video appeared, something changed. Black people knew it could have happened to any of us.

Continue reading...
Read More
The New York Times

Oct 20 2021
The Curious, Astounding Collection of the Magician Ricky Jay
The Curious, Astounding Collection of the Magician Ricky Jay
Illusionists, cardsharps, charlatans and human cannonballs enliven a trove of rare books, posters and ephemera now going to auction at Sotheby’s.
Read More
The New York Times

Oct 20 2021
‘He Raises the Bar for Me’: 4 Artists on the Influence of Bob Thompson
The painter’s painter, who died young in 1966 after an all-too-brief career, still casts a long shadow. he continues to inspire Peter Doig, Rashid Johnson, Naudline Pierre and Henry Taylor.
Read More
The Guardian

Oct 20 2021
Captivate! The best of 90s fashion photography – in pictures

Claudia Schiffer, one of the original supermodels, has embarked on her latest creative project. Captivate! Fashion Photography from the 90s, showcases landmark imagery and supermodels from the golden era of fashion. The anthology, curated by Schiffer herself, includes legendary photographers Arthur Elgort, Ellen von Unwerth, Herb Ritts and Richard Avedon among others, and accompanies an exhibition, also curated by the supermodel, which opened in Dusseldorf last month

Continue reading...
Read More
The Guardian

Oct 20 2021
Little Amal’s journey: the puppet that crossed Europe – in pictures

Since leaving Turkey in July, Little Amal, a 3.5 metre (11ft 5in) tall puppet of a nine-year-old Syrian girl, and her entourage of about 25 people have navigated Covid border restrictions to walk across Europe to the UK. Amal, whose name means hope in Arabic, was created by Handspring, the company that made the equine puppets in War Horse. The puppet represents the millions of children forced to leave their homes in desperate situations. The global pandemic has made them more vulnerable than ever

Continue reading...
Read More
The New York Times

Oct 20 2021
In Washington, a Beloved Birthplace for Artistic Giants
In Washington, a Beloved Birthplace for Artistic Giants
At the Walla Walla Foundry, one of the largest contemporary fine-art foundries in the world, all sorts of artistic behemoths rise. Yet it’s little-known outside of the art world.
Read More
The New York Times

Oct 20 2021
A Witch’s Brew of an Exhibit Enters the Modern Age in Salem
The “Salem Witch Trials: Reckoning and Reclaiming” exhibition at the Peabody Essex Museum draws parallels between the country’s most infamous example of mass hysteria and current culture.
Read More
The Guardian

Oct 19 2021
Fair play: Tom Wood’s visions of Ireland – in pictures

Born to a Catholic mother and Protestant father, Wood’s family were forced to emigrate to England – but their return trips inspired him like nowhere else

Continue reading...
Read More
The Guardian

Oct 19 2021
‘It began with cider’: how a group of young parents transformed a Somerset harbour

From pub nights to hard hats, the locals-run Onion Collective made East Quay arts centre in Watchet, Somerset, a reality

Walk along Watchet’s harbour front and you’d be forgiven for thinking a jumble of colourful containers had been blown in off the sea by a particularly severe storm. But this bizarre, piratical encampment featuring a candy-striped triangular roof and boxes on stilts is actually the new East Quay arts centre, a community-driven project whose origins are as unlikely as the form of the building itself. Where once a development of luxury seaside flats was proposed, a group of local women have instead created a remarkable complex of galleries and studios, with a restaurant, classroom, geology workshop, print studio and paper mill – as well as some quirky holiday rentals to boot.

“We wanted to change the sense that there are no opportunities here,” says Georgie Grant of the Onion Collective, the community interest company behind the £7m project. “Rather than see the usual kind of commercial development that has no community benefit, we wanted to empower people to shape the place themselves.”

Since Watchet’s working harbour closed in the 1990s, seeing mass job losses, it has been struggling to recover. A marina opened in 2001 to try to boost the economy, but the closure of the local paper mill in 2015 took a fifth of the town’s jobs with it. The area now has the lowest social mobility in England, with around 25% of young people going to university, compared with 50% nationally.

When plans for a big mixed-use development on the harbour front by Urban Splash were scuppered by the 2008 financial crisis, Grant and her gang of fellow young parents saw their chance to do something different.

“It began with cider,” says Jess Prendergrast, recalling how the women’s Thursday evening pub nights turned into plotting how to take over the site for something more useful. “We realised there were a lot of people like us in Watchet – overqualified and underemployed, who’d had successful careers in London and then moved to the coast to have kids. If we pooled our energies we could do something for the better of the town.”

Prendergrast and her sister Naomi Griffith, who grew up at a nearby zoo, Tropiquaria, joined forces with Grant and another friend Rachel Kelly in 2012 to form the Onion Collective – so-named for the vegetable’s many layers, and its rural, earthy connotations. (The group has also been known to make grown men cry). With backgrounds in economic consultancy, marketing and TV production, they made for a formidable team, since joined by others with experience in arts education, tourism and sustainable development. Now numbering 22, they fund their endeavours through consultancy work, helping other communities and councils around the country realise their plans.

After conducting town-wide consultations in 2013, and convincing the council to give their alternative plan a go, they raised money for a feasibility study and secured a whopping £5.3m from the government’s Coastal Communities Fund, the largest such grant awarded.

Continue reading...
Read More
artforum.com

Oct 19 2021
Emma Enderby Named Chief Curator of Haus der Kunst
Emma Enderby has been announced as the new chief curator of Munich’s Haus der Kunst (HdK), Artnews reports. Enderby since 2017 has served as curator at New York nonprofit space the Shed, where she
Read More
The Guardian

Oct 19 2021
Owen Luder obituary
Architect and consultant behind the design for the Gateshead centre and multistorey car park featured in the 1971 film Get Carter

In one of the most striking scenes from the film Get Carter (1971), Michael Caine’s character, Jack Carter, throws the businessman Cliff Brumby off the top of a huge multistorey car park in Gateshead.

The film’s director, Mike Hodges, was a friend of the design architect Rodney Gordon, and the scene was shot before the building opened in 1969. However, the 12-storey megastructure of shops, pubs and a market, variously called the Treaty Centre or Trinity Square, and dominated by its landmark car park, owed its genesis to Gordon’s boss, the architect and consultant Owen Luder, who has died aged 93.

Continue reading...
Read More
artforum.com

Oct 19 2021
Izabella Scott at Frieze London
“THAT’S WHAT ARTWORKS ARE BEST FOR, aren’t they?” said Grayson Perry, posing in front of a painting by Sarah Sze. “Backdrops for photos!” It was Monday of Frieze week, and the British artist appeared
Read More
artforum.com

Oct 19 2021
Claire Tabouret on risk, love, and her new work in Paris
Claire Tabouret’s art has a feverish feel, something fervid roiling below the grave expressions of her composed subjects. Often inspired by internet deep dives, the French-born, Los Angeles–based
Read More
artforum.com

Oct 19 2021
Saul Steinberg
Illustrator Saul Steinberg (1914–1999) believed his work to be self-evident, “something intellectual that must be perceived in a fraction of an instant.” (“The sort of people who need explanation deserve
Read More
The Guardian

Oct 19 2021
Remembering the first women of the Royal Academy | Letter

Angelica Goodden notes that two founder members were women, two centuries before Dame Laura Knight became an Academician

Lara Feigel isn’t quite accurate in saying that Dame Laura Knight was the first female Royal Academician (The life less ordinary of artist Laura Knight, 14 October). In 1767, when England was a more European country than it has sadly become since, that honour went to two female painters, the founder members Angelica Kauffman and Mary Moser, both Swiss by birth but enthusiastically adopted by the British establishment.

Sir Joshua Reynolds, the first president of the Royal Academy of Arts, would later describe foreign artists as contributing to the “manure” that was needed to speed up the nation’s artistic growth, provided they were “of fair moral character”. Zoffany’s famous picture of the Royal Academicians shows the men gathered around a nude life model while the two women are present only as portraits hanging on the wall, so giving graphic form to the ambivalence many felt about this advanced philosophy, though the uncharacteristically harsh expression he gives Kauffman may signal their joint indignation at her exclusion.

Continue reading...
Read More
The Guardian

Oct 19 2021
LS Lowry’s The Auction to be sold at Sotheby’s

Lancashire artist’s 1958 painting expected to fetch up to £1.8m next month

In a clear case of life imitating art, a painting by LS Lowry depicting a packed auction house with the gavel about to come down on a sale is to be sold at Sotheby’s next month. It is estimated to reach up to £1.8m.

The Auction, a large-scale work completed in 1958, is one of only a handful of interior scenes by the Lancashire-born painter who became one of the UK’s most cherished artists.

Continue reading...
Read More
The New York Times

Oct 19 2021
Revisiting the Great Chicago Fire of 1871
Revisiting the Great Chicago Fire of 1871
Among the surprises in a new exhibition at the Chicago History Museum: streets paved with wood, an unusual heat wave and exoneration for Mrs. O’Leary’s cow.
Read More
The Guardian

Oct 18 2021
6Mois award for photojournalism – winners and finalists

6Mois, the biannual photojournalism review, has announced the winners and finalists for its €10,000 award, chosen from 177 applications from 40 countries. Almost half of the finalists are from non-European countries, and the award is shared between two winners from Morocco and Venezuela

Continue reading...
Read More
The Guardian

Oct 18 2021
20 favourite jumps to celebrate World Ballet Day – in pictures

For World Ballet Day, Guardian photographer Tristram Kenton has selected twenty of his favourite balletic jumps. Fans will have the opportunity to stream content, including morning classes and rehearsals, previews of upcoming performances and some of ballet’s biggest stars at work, from many of the world’s top ballet companies

Continue reading...
Read More
artforum.com

Oct 18 2021
Shuruq Harb
The showstopper of Shuruq Harb’s “Ghost at the Feast” was a freestanding wall full of names and dates, 207 of them in total, placed flush on small rectangular plates made of steel, paint, and vinyl.
Read More
artforum.com

Oct 18 2021
“The Light Comes from Within”
I’m fed up with the trend of all-women shows. So many of them are put together carelessly, with curators assuming a shared gender to be enough common ground to justify an exhibition. Delightfully, that
Read More
artforum.com

Oct 18 2021
Dora Budor
While Salento, the heel of Italy’s boot, is known for its coastline and baroque architecture, until the mid-twentieth century the region’s economy was centered on tobacco. At the industry’s peak, more
Read More
artforum.com

Oct 18 2021
Miquel Mont
Miquel Mont is what one could call, in Spanish, a secreto a voces: literally, a well-known secret, a somehow elusive artist, curator, writer, and teacher whose work is nevertheless frequently mentioned
Read More
artforum.com

Oct 18 2021
Louise Bonnet
For “Bathers,” her first solo exhibition in France, Louise Bonnet has unveiled seven new paintings in oil. In lieu of the breast milk that features in some of her recent work, water, rendered across
Read More
artforum.com

Oct 18 2021
Lili Reynaud-Dewar Wins 2021 Prix Marcel Duchamp
Installation and performance artist Lili Reynaud-Dewar has been announced as the winner of this year’s Prix Marcel Duchamp, France’s most prestigious art prize. She received the award, which comes with
Read More
artforum.com

Oct 18 2021
Patrick Lee to Helm Frieze Seoul
Frieze has named Patrick Lee as the director of its inaugural Seoul edition, to launch in 2022. He will assume his new role in early November, roughly ten months ahead of the fair’s September 2 opening.
Read More
The New York Times

Oct 18 2021
Banksy’s Shredding Artwork Is Auctioned for $25.4 Million at Sotheby’s
Banksy’s Shredding Artwork Is Auctioned for $25.4 Million at Sotheby’s
“Love Is in the Bin,” originally titled “Girl With Balloon,” was resold. It had been partially shredded after it was bought at a Sotheby’s auction in 2018.
Read More
artforum.com

Oct 18 2021
Emanuele Marcuccio
The exhibition “SEP 2021” centers on “Portrait of a Young Man in Brussels,” (all works 2021), a series of eight modest photographs taken by Marc Asekhame for the artist Emanuele Marcuccio. The titular
Read More
artforum.com

Oct 18 2021
Hardeep Pandhal and Jagdeep Raina
On view as part of the two-artist show “You migrate, we migrate, you displace, we displace,” Jagdeep Raina’s Club Kali, 2020, is a piece of bone-white muslin finished in lilac, silver, and gold phulkari,
Read More