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artforum.com

Feb 19 2020
New York Public Library Acquires Archive of Sound Art Pioneer Maryanne Amacher
The Brooklyn-based nonprofit Blank Forms has announced the formation of the Maryanne Amacher Foundation and the donation of the American composer and sound artist’s archives to the New York Public
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The New York Times

Feb 19 2020
Donald Marron’s Art Collection to Be Sold Privately
Donald Marron’s Art Collection to Be Sold Privately
Auction houses had been competing for the sale of the collection. Three galleries, Acquavella, Gagosian and Pace, will sell his works as well as present an exhibition this spring.
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artforum.com

Feb 19 2020
Lauren Gault
In 1907, the Irish-born inventor and scientist Martha Craig published an esoteric science-fiction novel titled The Men of Mars under the pseudonym Mithra, a name that invoked the ancient Roman deity
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artforum.com

Feb 19 2020
Bronx Museum Hires Jasmine Wahi as Holly Block Social Justice Curator
The Bronx Museum of the Arts announced today that Jasmine Wahi has been named the Holly Block Social Justice Curator for exhibitions in 2021. Wahi is a codirector of the New Jersey nonprofit Project
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The Guardian

Feb 19 2020
Pop art painter Peter Saul: 'What's the matter with me? Who knows'

The 86-year-old artist, seen as one of the fathers of the Pop Art movement, discusses his career of political provocation

In 1966, Peter Saul went to a protest in San Francisco. He wore a suit and a tie so he wouldn’t get arrested – and it worked.

“People were getting punched to the ground around me, but nobody would touch me, I looked proper,” he said to the Guardian. “Maybe they thought I was an FBI agent, or something. It was dangerous to protest the Vietnam war, but I didn’t get intomuch trouble.”

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The Guardian

Feb 19 2020
'Dear God, please send me to hell': Derek Jarman prints sold in fundraiser

Prints of letter, being made public for first time, offered for sale to save late artist’s Dungeness cottage

If there were a choice, Derek Jarman implored God, then could he please go to hell. And if the almighty insisted on reincarnation then “please promise me that I will be queer”.

The heartfelt, witty prayers of the late artist, director and film-maker about his impending death are revealed in an artwork that is being made public for the first time.

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The Guardian

Feb 19 2020
David Parsons obituary

David Parsons, who has died aged 76, was an award-winning multimedia artist and teacher, whose work was exhibited and collected internationally. His palette was broad and innovative, adding photography and film in the 1970s and 80s, and computer-based art in the 90s, to the fine art and painting he had studied in the 60s. He won Arts Council awards across four decades.

The son of Dot (nee Hughes) and Tom Parsons, David was born in Birmingham. His father, an engineer, hoped his son might take over the family business making parts for the motor industry, but both parents recognised David’s talent for art and supported his studies at Birmingham College of Art and Design (1959-63), and the University of Newcastle upon Tyne (1963-65).

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artforum.com

Feb 19 2020
Janet Cardiff and George Bures Miller Win Wilhelm Lehmbruck Prize
Canadian artists Janet Cardiff and George Bures Miller have been awarded the Wilhelm Lehmbruck Prize in honor of their life’s work, “which has opened up new perspectives for sculpture in the twentieth
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The Guardian

Feb 19 2020
Madrid church ceiling restored to glory after centuries under plaster

Ornate ceiling of Santa María la Blanca church is among finest and oldest in Spain

In a quiet corner of north-east Madrid, past the tattoo parlour, round the corner from the post office and near the Latin American grocery, a masterpiece of medieval craftsmanship is bathed in February sunlight for the first time in centuries.

Above the chancel of Santa María la Blanca, a small, bustling parish church in Canillejas, sits an ornate wooden ceiling of stars and leaves that is among the finest, and oldest, in Spain.

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The Guardian

Feb 19 2020
Half house, half tent: the startling Spanish villa that breaks all the rules

UK-based architects Space Popular have a reputation for clashing colours and computer game imagery. Now the rising duo have built their first house – and it’s been confusing the locals

A bright-green steel frame perches on a steeply sloping site north of Valencia, Spain, projecting out from the hill above a busy main road. It forms a large 3D grid, some of its spaces filled with white cubic volumes, others left empty as if still awaiting their final function.

“People kept asking if it was going to be a supermarket,” says architect Fredrik Hellberg, standing beneath the 10-metre-high frame. It’s a fair question: in Nueva Santa Barbara, a new suburb where houses are variously neo-Moorish, Spanish rustic or developer modern, this startling new home is unlike any other for miles around.

It is the first completed building by Space Popular, a young London-based practice founded by Hellberg and his partner, Lara Lesmes, in 2013 in Bangkok, where for five years they taught architecture. Working in the Thai metropolis gave them the rare luxury of being able to afford bespoke craftsmanship, even on limited budgets, allowing them to have every element of their first interior projects handmade to their designs, from furniture to fittings. Their work for a local spa chain features tubular steel chairs in minty green with yellow leather seats, pink marble countertops and baby-blue reclining loungers with a retro-futuristic feel. It takes pleasure in both natural and synthetic textures, combining diaphanous pleated curtains with raw concrete, leather and glossy resin floors.

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The New York Times

Feb 19 2020
There Are No Pictures, but This Art Podcast Is Thriving
There Are No Pictures, but This Art Podcast Is Thriving
The gallerist Robert Diament and the actor Russell Tovey founded Talk Art as gossipy chat. Now it’s a global hit.
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artforum.com

Feb 19 2020
Barozzi Veiga to Design New Miami Home for Oolite Arts
Oolite Arts, formerly known as ArtCenter/South Florida, has selected the Barcelona-based firm Barozzi Veiga to design its Miami headquarters. Located at 75 NW Seventy-Second Street, the new permanent
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The Guardian

Feb 19 2020
Karen Knorr's best photograph: repose in a gentlemen’s club

‘There’s a frisson of postcoital tenderness. But homosexuality was very much taboo in these circles’

I took this shot in Brooks’s, a gentlemen’s club in London, in 1982 during the Falklands war. Margaret Thatcher’s government had been looking relatively weak. The Falklands offered her an opportunity to cement her position, and war bought her a second term. To photograph this hidden world of power and aristocratic privilege at this pivotal moment was eye-opening.

The image was published in a series called The Gentlemen with a quote below: “The recapture of the territory is no more than an Appetiser to the big Match.” It quotes Sandy Woodward, the British commander who ordered the HMS Conqueror to bomb and sink the General Belgrano, an Argentinian cruiser. His words captured something of the time – the sabre-rattling of a certain class of people.

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artforum.com

Feb 19 2020
Eugene Hernandez Succeeds Kent Jones as Head of New York Film Festival
Eugene Hernandez, cofounder of the film industry website IndieWire, has been named director of the New York Film Festival (NYFF), which will hold its fifty-eighth edition from September 25 to October
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The New York Times

Feb 19 2020
Library of Congress Acquires Harlem Photographer’s Collection
The institution purchased nearly 100,000 images by Shawn Walker, who also donated recordings, artifacts and papers documenting the Kamoinge Workshop.
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artforum.com

Feb 19 2020
Seattle Art Fair Names Seattle Deana Haggag Artistic Director
Deana Haggag, the president and CEO of the Chicago-based national arts funding organization United States Artists (USA), has been appointed artistic director of the sixth edition of the Seattle Art
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The Guardian

Feb 18 2020
Derek Jarman and friends in Dungeness – unseen pictures

An exhibition of mostly unseen photographs and film of Derek Jarman and his inspirational former Dungeness home, Prospect Cottage, opens at the Lucy Bell Gallery at the end of this month. Featuring his friends and fellow filmmakers, 25% of all sales go towards the Art Fund’s campaign to save Prospect Cottage and Jarman’s legacy. The exhibition runs from 29 February until 31 March.

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The Guardian

Feb 18 2020
Laia Abril: the photographer bearing witness to rape

In a devastating exhibition, the Spanish artist depicts the clothes women, girls – and some men – were raped in. She talks about how her work reveals an epidemic of sexual violence – and how she copes

Annabella Sciorra is in court testifying about the night Harvey Weinstein knocked on her door. She alleges he raped her as she tried to fight him off. “‘No! No! But I mean, there was not much I could do at that point – my body shut down.” Over the years, the court hears, she has experienced what she now recognises as “dissociative states”, drinking too much and cutting herself.

What shocks me is how none of this shocks me. It is a familiar story. Weinstein’s team attempt to destroy her in court. Why didn’t she go to the police? Why did she take so long to speak out? Why didn’t she ask a co-star such as Sylvester Stallone to protect her? Yes, she was really asked this. Weinstein denies the charges. The jury started their deliberations on Tuesday.

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artforum.com

Feb 18 2020
David Adjaye and Cai Guo-Qiang Win 2020 Noguchi Award
Ghanaian-British architect David Adjaye and Chinese artist Cai Guo-Qiang have been named the winners of the 2020 Isamu Noguchi Award, an annual prize given to those who “share Noguchi’s spirit of
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artforum.com

Feb 18 2020
England’s Arts Organizations Face Funding Cuts Following “Disappointing” Diversity Report
Following the release of a https://www.artscouncil.org.uk/sites/default/files/download-file/ACE_DiversityReport_V11_1.pdf 2018–19 report by Arts Council England (ACE) on the diversity of the country’s
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The New York Times

Feb 18 2020
The Scottish Designer Who’s Trading in Fashion for Furniture
The Scottish Designer Who’s Trading in Fashion for Furniture
Having stepped back from the whirl of the fashion calendar, Jonathan Saunders is returning to his first love with a collection of minimalist furniture.
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artforum.com

Feb 18 2020
Kim Westfall on traumatic cuteness and social reproduction
The New York–based artist Kim Westfall’s cheeky compositions of tufted yarn contend with the banality of selfhood. Her works find humor in the insatiable human ambitions for uniqueness and authenticity,
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artforum.com

Feb 18 2020
Cooper Hewitt Trustees Defect after Museum Ousts Director
Six trustees of the Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum in New York have resigned following https://www.artforum.com/news/director-of-cooper-hewitt-smithsonian-design-museum-resigns-82137 the
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artforum.com

Feb 18 2020
Christopher Knight Wins $50,000 Lifetime Achievement Award
Los Angeles Times art critic Christopher Knight has received the Dorothea and Leo Rabkin Foundation Lifetime Achievement Award for his contribution to art journalism. This is the second edition of the
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artforum.com

Feb 18 2020
High Museum of Art Names Monica Obniski Curator of Decorative Arts and Design
The High Museum of Art in Atlanta announced today that Monica Obniski has been appointed curator of decorative arts and design. Obniski currently serves as curator of twentieth- and twenty-first-century
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artforum.com

Feb 18 2020
Jenny Waldman Appointed Director of UK’s Art Fund
Art Fund, the UK charitable organization based in London, has named Jenny Waldman its new director. Waldman comes to the institution after helming 14-18 NOW, the UK’s official arts program for the First
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The New York Times

Feb 18 2020
Who Was Carlo Scarpa?
Who Was Carlo Scarpa?
His reimagining of ancient public buildings made him an Italian icon, but the 20th-century architect is perhaps best understood through the private homes he designed.
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artforum.com

Feb 18 2020
Pérez Art Museum Miami Awards Daniel Lind-Ramos $50,000 Pérez Prize
Pérez Art Museum Miami (PAMM) has selected Puerto Rican artist Daniel Lind-Ramos as the recipient of the second annual Pérez Prize, a $50,000 award which honors recent achievements in artistic innovation.
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The New York Times

Feb 18 2020
Jordan Casteel Won’t Let You Look Away
Her colossal paintings depict people of color at a scale that makes them impossible to ignore. Now nearly 40 canvases come to the New Museum.
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The Guardian

Feb 18 2020
French prosecutors investigate Russian artist over sex video

Pyotr Pavlensky and girlfriend face possible charges over scandal involving politician

French prosecutors have placed a Russian artist and his girlfriend under investigation over the leaking of a sex video that brought down a close ally of Emmanuel Macron.

Pyotr Pavlensky and Alexandra de Taddeo are facing charges of invasion of privacy and publishing images of a sexual nature without consent over the leaking of the video that forced Benjamin Griveaux to end his campaign to become mayor of Paris.

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The New York Times

Feb 18 2020
What’s Better Than One Family Home in New Zealand? Three of Them
Julian Robertson loves visiting New Zealand’s North Island. To make room for his three sons and their children, he is building them their own homes.
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The Guardian

Feb 17 2020
The Ten Commandments as told by presidential figures – in pictures

In her new photo series, artist Dina Goldstein has created tableaux that match a different president to one of the Ten Commandments. She hopes the images will bring ‘visual shock, incongruity, irony and metaphor to inspire discourse and insight into how American society has gone so astray’

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The Guardian

Feb 17 2020
London's 'oldest tavern' threatened with demolition – archive, 18 February 1911

18 February 1911: Surveyors are already busy taking measurements for a new thoroughfare that could threaten Cloth Fair’s Dick Whittington

Less than twenty years ago the Church of St Bartholomew-the-Great, Smithfield, was partly occupied as a fringe factory, and in another corner was a blacksmith’s forge. St Bartholomew’s Close, which includes part of Cloth Fair, reflected the fallen state of the church, its ancient houses being mainly given up to poverty and shabby shops. The Earl of Warwick’s house, which still bears the Warwick arms, is let out in single apartments.

In the past decade affairs have improved a little in the Close, and many of the picturesque little features of the maze of courts and alleys are brightened with new paint, and flowers struggle up in window boxes and in tiny gardens fenced with green palings in the small stone-paved blind alleys.

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The New York Times

Feb 17 2020
6 Cooper Hewitt Trustees Resign After Director’s Removal
6 Cooper Hewitt Trustees Resign After Director’s Removal
The board members said they should have been consulted before the Smithsonian asked Caroline Baumann to resign after an investigation.
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The New York Times

Feb 17 2020
‘Beautiful Project’ at the Met: Stories of Southern Black Girlhood
An exhibition opens up important conversations about gender, race and the authority of the photographic gaze.
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The Guardian

Feb 17 2020
Arts bodies threatened with funding cuts over lack of diversity

Arts Council England figures show BME and disabled people under-represented in sector

Arts organisations and museums in England are being warned they will lose public funding unless they meet “stretching” targets to create and attract more diverse workforces and audiences.

An annual report from Arts Council England (ACE) paints what its chair, Sir Nicholas Serota, called “a disappointing picture” when it comes to diversity, a year after he said many organisations were “treading water”.

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The New York Times

Feb 17 2020
Here Lies the Skull of Pliny the Elder, Maybe
Here Lies the Skull of Pliny the Elder, Maybe
The Roman admiral and scholar died during the eruption of Mount Vesuvius in 79 A.D. Might this really be his cranium?
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artforum.com

Feb 17 2020
Alessandro Scarabello
The title of Alessandro Scarabello’s sixth exhibition here, “I Still Paint,” is both ironic and emblematic. The artist has always immersed himself in the language of painting, pushing his practice to
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The Guardian

Feb 17 2020
Masculinities review: men laid bare from boardroom to battlefield

Barbican, London
From Taliban fighters in kohl and Hollywood Nazis to the bones of Masahisa Fukase’s late father, this timely show of photography shows maleness at its most touching, tragic and extreme

In 1972, the French singer Charles Aznavour recorded What Makes a Man a Man. Had Nan Goldin not already used it in her haunting audio-visual installations, the song would make a great soundtrack to this timely group show.

Its aim, according to curator Alona Pardo, is to explore how masculinity is “experienced, performed, coded and socially constructed” in photography and film from the 1960s to the present. It’s an ambitious undertaking, given the plurality of subversive masculinities that have have emerged since the 60s, and because of the resilience of certain forms of traditional ultra-male power, from the boardroom to the battlefield.

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artforum.com

Feb 17 2020
Parisian Mayoral Candidate Drops Out after Artist Pyotr Pavlensky Leaks Explicit Videos
Russian dissident artist Pyotr Pavlensky, who sought asylum in Paris after fleeing Russia in 2017, has unexpectedly become a major player in the French city’s mayoral race. According to the
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The Guardian

Feb 17 2020
V&A Museum of Childhood to close for £13m revamp

London museum will shut in May and reopen in 2022 with new spaces that are ‘less about nostalgia’

The V&A’s Museum of Childhood is to get a £13m revamp to create spaces that are less about nostalgia and more about encouraging young people to change the world.

Details and concept drawings were revealed on Monday of a radical re-imagining of what the building in Bethnal Green, east London, should be.

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artforum.com

Feb 17 2020
Leandro Erlich
In “Both Sides Now,” the Argentina-based artist Leandro Erlich presents deceptive installations that fuse and confuse fictional and real space, prompting us to question what we see versus what we believe.
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artforum.com

Feb 17 2020
Alessandro Bianchi Appointed General Manager of Milan’s Pirelli HangarBicocca
Pirelli HangarBicocca, the nonprofit foundation and contemporary art complex in Milan, has named Alessandro Bianchi as its next general manager. Bianchi comes to the institution with nearly two decades
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artforum.com

Feb 17 2020
Online Gaming Company Founder Gifts $3 Million to James Turrell’s Roden Crater Project
American billionaire Mark Pincus, founder of the online gaming company Zynga, has donated $3 million to Roden Crater, a largescale Land artwork that artist James Turrell has been creating within a
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The Guardian

Feb 16 2020
'Blackness is not a straitjacket on the imagination': the photography of Dawoud Bey

A new retrospective at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art examines the photographer’s transformation over 50 years

In his five-decade-spanning career, the photographer Dawoud Bey has made steady reinvention a pillar of his image-making.

His explorations of marginalized and misunderstood communities is the subject of a new retrospective at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. The exhibition is divided chronologically and thematically, an organization that underscores Bey’s ever-changing approaches to blackness.

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The Guardian

Feb 16 2020
A deeper Splash: the artist painting the pool cleaners David Hockney forgot

As Hockney’s cool pool dive goes for £23m, we meet Ramiro Gomez, the Mexican-American putting labourers, security guards, removal men and more back into the picture

David Hockney’s “splash” paintings are still making waves. A medium-sized canvas from the 1967 series, showing the aftermath of a dive into the clear blue waters of a California pool, just sold at auction for £23m. In the half-century since it was painted, the work has become synonymous with a languid LA lifestyle, from the glass-fronted house beyond the pool to the two perfect palm trees reaching into a sky empty of everything but blue. This is a secluded bolthole, an oasis from the world of noise, a place to drink and dive.

Yet what might the picture look like if its focus was altered, away from the entry into the pool made by that swimmer whose identity Hockney never knew (having based the picture on a photograph)? What if the attention was instead shifted towards the less fortunate guys who have to service the waters and make sure they’re clean enough for rich people to plunge into?

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The Guardian

Feb 16 2020
Andy Warhol's 1950s erotic drawings of men to be seen for first time

Collection lined up for major publication not displayed before due to homophobia artist encountered

Dozens of previously unpublished Andy Warhol drawings on the theme of love, sex and desire are to be seen for the first time. The pop artist’s foundation is releasing a major study of his depictions of young men in private moments, whether in a loving embrace or more explicit acts.

They date from the 1950s, when Warhol was a successful commercial illustrator but struggling to find recognition as a fine artist, long before he created paintings and prints of movie stars, soup cans and soap-pad boxes that turned him into one of the world’s most famous artists.

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The Guardian

Feb 16 2020
Putting men in the frame: images of a new masculinity

Women have spent centuries under the male gaze. Men, less so. As a new exhibition opens at the Barbican in London, Luke Turner ponders what today’s increasingly fluid notions of masculinity mean for us all

The male gaze can be harshest when directed at the self. Until puberty, I was blissfully unaware of my own body, aside from the odd graze or bee sting. But then, at the age of 11 or 12, my body became a contested space. In the steaming showers after PE, I compared myself unfavourably to others, both my classmates and what I saw in the wider culture. I’m sure I wasn’t alone in finding that infamous Coca-Cola window-cleaner advert (in which a shirtless man tantalises an office full of women) to be 30 seconds of highly triggering humiliation – and a (low-calorie) modicum of sweet revenge for all the years of men doing the same to women.

Yet watching the video again as I write this essay on how to explore the buffeted nature of modern masculinity against the physicality of the male body itself, I can easily recall that awkward, resentful twinge. For the past quarter-century or so, my life staring at men has been a complicated experience – a signal to arousal, yes, but also to fright and flight; to self-loathing at my own physical inadequacy.

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The Guardian

Feb 16 2020
All about Andy: extracts from Warhol – A Life As Art

In his new biography, the former chief art critic of the Washington Post sheds new light on the late 20th century’s defining artist

“Andy Warhol, prince of pop art” – that’s still how we pigeonhole the man often described as the greatest of the west’s postwar artists, even though pop only occupied the first three years of his fine-art career. In the quarter-century that followed, Warhol produced a vast range of work that has gone on to matter at least as much, if not more, to our culture. For better or worse, we’d not be quite where we are without his radical films, his society portraits – cool-eyed or caustic, depending on who you ask – or Interview magazine. The 1,000 pages of Warhol: A Life As Art, my new biography, offers the first definitive account of all that and more.

In the two excerpts that follow, we catch Warhol just as he has left pop art behind and is fishing for new ways to make his mark.

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The Guardian

Feb 16 2020
Steve McQueen review – don’t look away

Tate Modern, London
Whether exposing the horrors of a South African gold mine or probing Charlotte Rampling’s eye, McQueen is forever unflinching in his first major UK show for 20 years

Enter through the film-house gloom and you’re immediately plunged into deeper darkness. The screen before you seethes with obliterating blackness. A blurred face appears for half a second, and occasional glimmers hurtle upwards like sparks up a chimney. But other than the deafening crankshaft thrum, there is almost nothing to confirm that we’re going to hell in a mineshaft.

The TauTona mine in South Africa, otherwise known as Western Deep, is the world’s deepest gold mine. The miners have to descend more than three kilometres to reach the broiling depths, working the seams in the erratic light of their puny headlamps. Temperatures can rise to more than 80C.

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