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The New York Times

Oct 27 2020
Ming Cho Lee, Fabled Set Designer, Is Dead at 90
Ming Cho Lee, Fabled Set Designer, Is Dead at 90
His work in theater, dance and opera helped redefine American stage design.
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The Guardian

Oct 27 2020
Once upon a time in Hackney: 80s photos of poverty, protest – and partying

In the 80s, a group of residents were given cameras to document the London borough. Now, their work has come to light showing the passionate spirit of a lost era

In 2016, Andrew Woodyatt started working at the Rio cinema in Dalston, Hackney, London. Handed a large bunch of keys, and blessed with a healthy curiosity, he started to explore the Rio’s basement rooms, which had been used for years for storage. Among the broken hoovers and discarded paperwork, he started to come across negatives – local street scenes shot on film strips, which seemed interesting enough to save. Then he hit the jackpot. Opening a rusty filing cabinet, he found 10,000 frames, mounted on glass slides and neatly organised into folders, some with labels such as “NHS”, “Greenham Common” and “Colin Roach”. “I just thought ‘Wow!’” says Woodyatt, who also lectures at Goldsmiths, University of London.

Woodyatt had stumbled across the remains of the Rio Tape/Slide Newsreel Group, a project that ran at the Rio from 1982 until 1988, facilitated by a young woman called Sandra Hooper. The aim of the project was simple – to give local people audio equipment, cameras and training so they could make newsreels about their area, which would be shown at the cinema before the films. Only a couple of the newsreels have survived and none of the audio recordings, but the photographs are a thought-provoking dive into a tumultuous time in Hackney – and in Britain.

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The Guardian

Oct 27 2020
Between art & fashion: photographs from the collection of Carla Sozzani

Over more than 40 years, Carla Sozzani, the noted Italian editor, publisher and collector, assembled one of the country’s most important photography collections. Sozzani was a key figure in fashion, art and design in Italy, and her archive includes work by Erwin Blumenfeld, Steven Mesiel and Peter Lindbergh.

Between Art & Fashion is on display as part of PHotoESPANA at CentroCentro in Madrid until January 2021

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The Guardian

Oct 27 2020
Glampons, Miss World flareups and loo roll laureates – Unfinished Business review

British Library, London
This intriguing history of the women’s movement – from leg-liberating bicycles to the poems Sylvia Pankhurst wrote on prison toilet paper – doesn’t neglect the struggle’s contradictions and blind spots

“We are not beautiful,” say the words on the leaflet, alongside a picture of a raging, cigar-smoking vixen with hairy legs. “We are not ugly,” they continue. “WE ARE ANGRY.” This leaflet was part of the protests against Miss World contests in the 1970s. It features in Unfinished Business, an exhibition that traces the history of the women’s movement through its signature, headline-grabbing flareups, but also through its imagery, philosophy and artefacts, with one eye always on the work left to do.

You can’t help but be struck by the vastness of the terrain: this movement needed its engineers as much as its crusaders, its poets and comedians as much as its scientists. It took a village, in other words, and then a load of other villages. It would be glossing the reality to say that it took all women, but it took enough of us that to tell its history means running headlong into an inconvenient truth: the trouble with women is we don’t all agree.

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The Guardian

Oct 27 2020
Look of the Irish: the communities captured by Tony O'Shea – in pictures

Four decades of work by the Irish photographer feature in a new photobook. His dignified images, according to his former editor Colm Tóibín, offer ‘a hesitant window into the soul’

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The Guardian

Oct 26 2020
The meaning of leaf: an autumnal tour of England's arboretums

Planted by specimen collectors in the 18th and 19th centuries, arboretums are a ‘living library of trees’ that have become an invaluable public resource for recreation and education

Autumn’s blaze of glory, all flame-red leaves and burnt-gold foliage, offers an opportunity to marvel at the brilliance of the natural world before hunkering down for winter. Though, as nature goes into hibernation, forests, woods, parks and arboretums can often feel alive with walkers, joggers and families exploring them.

The experience of lockdown has changed many people’s relationships with nature and will undoubtedly extend our interaction with the arboreal beyond the traditional leaf-peeping season. Outdoor trends, such as forest bathing, awe-walks and even park strolls, have become a lifeline to many, and now the UK’s most spectacular spaces set aside for trees – arboretums – are seeing record numbers of visitors.

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artforum.com

Oct 26 2020
Malangatana Ngwenya
Across the forty-six expertly selected works in this survey on the artist Malangatana Ngwenya (1936­–2011) are hundreds of eyes—eyes “so big,” as the writer Luís Bernardo Honwana would say, that they
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artforum.com

Oct 26 2020
Frederick Weston (1946–2020)
Artist, fashion designer, and poet Frederick Weston, who explored the queer body, mass media, and accumulation in elaborately intimate collages and designs, has died of cancer at seventy-four years old.
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The New York Times

Oct 26 2020
How Long Can N.Y.C. Museums Survive at 25 Percent Capacity?
How Long Can N.Y.C. Museums Survive at 25 Percent Capacity?
Visiting during the pandemic can feel a bit lonely. Museum directors worry that will persist far into 2021.
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The New York Times

Oct 26 2020
East Germany’s Love Affair With Angela Davis
An exhibition looks back at a point in the 1970s when the philosopher and activist was a state-promoted hero behind the Iron Curtain.
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The New York Times

Oct 26 2020
Jona Frank: Between Reality and Fantasy
Jona Frank: Between Reality and Fantasy
From André Breton to Alison Bechdel, memoir writers have turned the genre upside down. Now a photographer recreates her troubled suburban childhood in a book, casting a movie star — Laura Dern — as her mother.
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artforum.com

Oct 26 2020
Baltimore Museum of Art Loses $50 Million Planned Gift Over Deaccession
The furor over the Baltimore Museum of Art’s (BMA) deaccessioning of three major works—by Brice Marden, Clyfford Still, and Andy Warhol—continues, with two former board chairs announcing the withdrawal
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The Guardian

Oct 26 2020
Thousands of waterbirds flock to Australia's Lake Cowal – in pictures

At approximately 21km long, Lake Cowal is the largest natural inland lake in New South Wales. After years of drought it began filling in March this year, and native and migratory waterbirds started returning to its wetlands. Above-average rainfall throughout the winter months have now filled the ephemeral lake to 40% of its surface area

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The Guardian

Oct 26 2020
JMW Turner sketch for The Fighting Temeraire on display for first time

Restored draft will accompany the final work in Tate Britain exhibition in London

A once filthy, fungus-covered preparatory sketch by JMW Turner for one of his most glorious paintings has been restored and gone on display for the first time next to the finished work.

Turner’s The Fighting Temeraire has been lent by the National Gallery to Tate Britain for a landmark exhibition exploring what it meant to be a modern artist during his lifetime.

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artforum.com

Oct 26 2020
Kochi-Muziris Biennale Postponed to 2021
The fifth edition of the Kochi-Muziris Biennale, which was to open December 12 of this year, has been pushed back to November 1, 2021, organizers announced Sunday. Preparations for the four-month-long
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artforum.com

Oct 26 2020
Andrew Pasquier on Ragnar Kjartansson’s The Sky in a Room
IN THE SIXTEENTH CENTURY, San Carlo al Lazzaretto was built as a field altar that permitted plague victims to eat of the body and drink of the blood in open air. Two Fridays ago, the church was hemmed
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The Guardian

Oct 26 2020
Wall of the wild: animals on the US-Mexico border – in pictures

Mexican photographer Alejandro Prieto has captured the diverse wildlife threatened by Donald Trump’s barrier, winning a number of awards, including the Fritz Pölking prize, with his project Border Wall

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The Guardian

Oct 26 2020
Turner’s Modern World review – a roaring, wondrous whirlpool of a show

Tate Britain, London
From the most devastating depiction of the slave trade ever to an erotically-charged shipwreck, JMW Turner’s heart-stopping maelstroms of sea and steam and smoke made him a true visionary of his age

It’s not standard practice for curators to draw attention to a masterpiece they failed to borrow. But right in the middle of Tate Britain’s roaring whirlpool of a Turner exhibition is a reproduction of his 1840 painting Slave Ship (Slavers Throwing Overboard the Dead and Dying, Typhoon Coming On). Apparently, it has become too frail to make the transatlantic journey from Boston’s Museum of Fine Arts – another twist in the story of the most devastating work of art ever made about the British slave trade. So, instead of passing over its no-show, the exhibition demands you pause to mourn it – and what it depicts.

This painting belongs at the heart of Turner’s Modern World even though it’s just here as an idea, a concept, with an excerpt from David Dabydeen’s poem Turner next to the repro. That’s because this exhibition presents Turner as a passionate and engaged painter of modern life. It shows how alive he was to the liberations and oppressions of his revolutionary age. Born in London in 1775, into a world ruled by aristocrats and monarchs where the horse was the fastest thing on earth, Turner lived to see the coming of trains, steamships, political reform and photography – and the abolition of the slave trade.

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The Guardian

Oct 25 2020
Sarah Sze's cosmic constellation: 'It could be dashed away in a moment'

The American sculptor’s work is so celebrated that France opened its borders to her mid-pandemic. Yet her largest ambition is to show the fragility of Earth itself

One click and the image on my laptop judders. When it reasserts itself, I’m looking at what appears to be an explosion frozen in time. Glittering embers hang impossibly in mid-air while images slither across: a glimpse of blue sky, rainbow refractions, a knife scraping yellow chalk.

I’m in London. Sarah Sze – who is trying to give me a flavour of her latest creation via her iPad – is inside the Fondation Cartier in Paris, where she and her assistants are erecting the installation, her first there for over 20 years. She walks through to the next room and passes the camera over a bright-white circle of crushed salt on the floor, surrounded by tiny piles of scrunched-up tin foil and bottles of water.

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The Guardian

Oct 25 2020
From Faith No More to faith healing: Melbourne’s Festival Hall sold to Hillsong Church

Purchase of beloved building by evangelical church sparks backlash, with some musicians vowing to boycott venue, which will remain open to outside performances

Melbourne’s beloved music venue, Festival Hall, has been purchased by the evangelical Christian church Hillsong.

The concert hall, which has hosted world-famous acts including the Beatles and Frank Sinatra, and more recently Lorde and Ed Sheeran, has been up for sale for more than three years.

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The Guardian

Oct 25 2020
Arctic: Culture and Climate review – visions of a vanishing world

British Museum, London
Indigenous art, ornate tools and captivating photography bring the past and threatened present of a rich region alive

There is a vision, in this magnificent show, of the strange hinterland where Arctic ice melts into the snow-covered ocean. There is no obvious distinction, indeed the water’s edge is all but invisible. What you see is a series of dark boats drawn on sledges across a white plane dotted with walruses and long-legged birds. All the images are inky black, exquisitely carved into the tusk of one such walrus, caught on exactly this kind of boat. Its ivory is beautifully used to stand in for the all-encompassing Arctic whiteout.

Carved around 1900 by a celebrated Iñupiat artist known as Happy Jack, this is not just a graceful engraving-cum-sculpture. It shows life as it was lived on Alaska’s freezing Seward Peninsula, long lines of huskies pulling kayaks, tents and vessels across the gliding ice. Children learned from these images, elders discussed them and now here we are in the future looking back at this body of knowledge carved into the tusk of a long-dead walrus that once swam in those dark seas. Man and beast, life and art: all are fused in this object.

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The Guardian

Oct 24 2020
The big picture: magical realism in everyday Dublin

Tony O’Shea’s bewitching image, taken on the upper deck of a city bus, finds the magic in the everyday

The Irish writer Colm Tóibín was first introduced to the photographs of Tony O’Shea when he was an editor at a magazine called In Dublin back in the late 1970s. O’Shea was in the habit of coming to the magazine’s office every other Friday with a cardboard box containing a fortnight’s black-and-white prints, pictures he’d taken around the city’s streets. The photographs, Tóibín observed, in the introduction to their landmark collaborative book of 1990, Dubliners, “were like nothing I’d ever seen”. He looked forward to O’Shea’s arrival, and each time, though the magazine might be going to press, found himself “taking the cardboard box away with me, looking through the photos again and again on my own and wondering about them”.

It was Tóibín who first sent O’Shea out on Dublin buses for a story to capture the life of the city from the upper deck. You would never say of O’Shea’s pictures that anything was typical of his work, but this photograph taken in 1989 of two boys and the kestrel is a memorable example of the magical realism that he so often seemed to locate in the everyday. Strange animal spirits are everywhere apparent in his pictures: raggedy boys stand on horseback on city streets, hounds are held at bay on misty bogland; in a famous series, Dublin housewives carry Christmas turkeys home from a side-street butcher, heads and necks and beaks dangling at their knees.

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The New York Times

Oct 24 2020
Reimagining Lady Liberty’s Torch to Meet This Moment
Reimagining Lady Liberty’s Torch to Meet This Moment
In her first New York solo exhibition at Madison Square Park, Abigail DeVille conjures a long line of freedom fighters.
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The Guardian

Oct 24 2020
Wheel talk: Berlin's discarded shopping trolleys – in pictures

After growing up in rural Switzerland, photographer Luca Ellena was struck, after moving to Berlin, by how many things littered the city’s streets. He decided to photograph every trolley he saw and three years later he has more than 600 images, the best of which have been collected in his first book, Einkaufswagen.

‘The waste of resources when trolleys are simply discarded,’ he says, ‘and the way most people don’t even see it, for me, is representative of our times.’

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The Guardian

Oct 24 2020
Inner visions: inside the homes of the world’s most creative people

From Zandra Rhodes’s Rainbow Penthouse, to Grace Coddington’s Long Island retreat, what do the homes of top creatives reveal about them?

Colour has always played a central role in the career of designer Zandra Rhodes throughout her more than 50 years as a self-described “notorious figurehead of the UK fashion industry”. The designer’s trademark pink hair and outrageous clothes are as colourful as her home, the so-called Rainbow Penthouse, which she bought in 1995 on Bermondsey Street in southeast London. Her apartment sits on top of the Fashion and Textile Museum, founded by Rhodes in 2003. Mexican architect Ricardo Legorreta rejuvenated the warehouse building, incorporating a split-level, two-bedroom home. The lower level houses the bedrooms, galley kitchen and textile print room.

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The Guardian

Oct 24 2020
Claire Wilcox: 'When I look at clothing, I’m thinking about narratives’

The V&A’s fashion curator has written an acclaimed memoir about her life among the many dresses, hats, shoes and other items the museum houses

Claire Wilcox thinks she makes for a highly unlikely fashion curator. “It’s a bit embarrassing, really,” she says. “I’m always complaining to friends that I haven’t got a thing to wear.” Ask what piece of clothing she most aches to own – you can have anything, I say, irrespective of cost or rarity – and she will talk not of Balenciaga or Schiaparelli, but of “Dorelia John-style peasant blouses.” (Dorelia McNeill, a painter and artist’s model, lived with Augustus John and his wife, Ida, in a menage a trois that sometimes took up residence in a Gypsy caravan). For the record, today she looks a touch Cossack in black lace-up boots whose provenance she cannot quite recall, matching trousers from Cos and – oh dear – a hand-printed shirt that she bought from the shop in the Victoria and Albert Museum, which also happens to be the institution where she has worked for the last 20 years.

Nevertheless, it seems to have been written in the stars that she would one day end up here in London’s South Kensington, thinking about buttons and ballgowns; about how, as she puts it, fashion exists “in the folds of time”, its roots always in the past, but also in the present, too, since human beings will never not need clothes. It all goes back to her childhood. First, there was the haberdashery her parents ran not so very far away in West Kensington: as a girl, she would often accompany her mother to work, spending her days among the paper patterns and the knitting wool, the rolls of rickrack and bias binding. Then there was the junk shop in Pimlico her father opened after she graduated from university. “He let me do his windows for him,” she says. “And I had grandiose ideas. I used to create these extraordinary stage sets with my brother, with columns and swags and mirrors. When people came in, you could tell they were thinking, ‘Oh, but the inside looks nothing like the window’ and I would get furious if he sold anything from the window because it would ruin my display.” Ever since, she has been the kind of person who gets “star-struck by objects rather than people”. Should she follow someone on the street, as she has occasionally been known to do, it will be their clothes she’s interested in, not their face.

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The New York Times

Oct 24 2020
Neo Rauch’s New Rule: ‘Never Answer a Critic’
Neo Rauch’s New Rule: ‘Never Answer a Critic’
Neo Rauch’s provocative statements drew him into a nasty public dispute. He now wants to put that behind him.
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The Guardian

Oct 24 2020
The best culture you may have missed in 2020

From Latvian animation to space rock, our writers reveal their hidden gems in film, art, gaming and more

Southern Journey (Revisited)
In the dark days of lockdown, it’s hard to believe the big outdoors actually exists. But that’s what you get with this lovely music documentary, which followed in the footsteps of celebrated musicologist Alan Lomax and British folk singer Shirley Collins on their landmark 1959 odyssey, recording rural American folk music in the field just as the major roots revival was taking off in urban coffee houses. Film-makers Rob Curry and Tim Plester do their own bit of cultural archaeology, looking up children and grandchildren of the original artists, and filming performances by modern-day folk artists. A breath of musical fresh air. Andrew Pulver

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The Guardian

Oct 23 2020
20 photographs of the week

Conflict in Nagorno-Karabakh, the US elections, demonstrations in Santiago, and the enduring impact of Covid-19: the most striking images from around the world

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artforum.com

Oct 23 2020
Cezary Poniatowski
Hung low around an assortment of dollhouse sculptures and other objects, Cezary Poniatowski’s black and brown pleather reliefs command the room in his exhibition “Welcome to Itchy Truths.” Poniatowski
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The Guardian

Oct 23 2020
Polish pro-choice protesters march against new law – in pictures

Pro-choice protesters marched in cities across Poland on Friday as public anger rose over a ruling banning almost all abortion in the country

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artforum.com

Oct 23 2020
Kunstmuseen Krefeld Sued by Heirs for Return of Mondrian Paintings
German institution Kunstmuseen Krefeld is facing a lawsuit filed in US District Court by the heirs of Piet Mondrian demanding restitution of four of the artist’s paintings loaned to the museum in 1929
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artforum.com

Oct 23 2020
Laurent Montaron
French artist Laurent Montaron’s debut exhibition in Lisbon maps a threshold between nature and technology where belief systems and superstitions interfere with electronics. In installations, photographs,
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artforum.com

Oct 23 2020
Bill Cunningham
For decades, many turned straight to the style section of the New York Times’ Sunday edition to pore over the vast arrays of tiny images the ubiquitous photographer Bill Cunningham shot at galas, at
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artforum.com

Oct 23 2020
Artist Collective Claims Responsibility for Stolen Beuys Sculpture
German artist collective Frankfurter Hauptschule has announced that its members are responsible for stealing a Joseph Beuys sculpture from an exhibition in Oberhausen, Germany, and delivering it to the
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The Guardian

Oct 23 2020
Are we nearly there yet? How Margaret Calvert steered Britain into the fast lane

Her revolutionary road signs upset the old guard – but the design doyenne put her foot down and made history. At 84, can she reinvent our railways?

It is almost impossible to escape Margaret Calvert. She’s standing at every motorway junction, beaming out in bold, bright letters, and at the corner of every street, warning of potential hazards ahead. Now aged 84, and still busy in her studio, the designer jointly responsible for giving British roads their visual identity is the subject of a retrospective at the Design Museum.

“I’m not quite as slim as I was back then,” says the South African-born designer, standing in front of one of her famous school crossing signs on show in the exhibition. “But the hairstyle has remained the same.” Tasked with updating the previous sign, which had depicted a grammar-school boy in a cap leading a younger girl with a satchel across the road, she decided to flip it around and put the girl in charge. She modelled the silhouette on a photo of herself as a child. Her neat bob hasn’t changed much since – nor has her ability to lead the way.

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The Guardian

Oct 23 2020
Helmut Newton: The Bad and the Beautiful review – not-so fawning fashion doc

Director Gero von Boehm’s fascinating film includes the famed fashion photographer’s muses but also asks questions about his misogynist images

The intelligence and even-handedness of this documentary about the provocative fashion photographer Helmut Newton makes a change from the fawning tone you get in a lot of fashion films. It’s a flattering “authorised” portrait, featuring interviews with famous Newton muses Charlotte Rampling, Grace Jones and Claudia Schiffer. But director Gero von Boehm deserves points for not ignoring the “porno chic” controversy surrounding his more extreme fetishistic images of naked women. There’s a brilliant clip of Newton appearing as a guest on French TV alongside Susan Sontag, who accuses him to his face of being a misogynist.

The film benefits from terrific behind-the-scenes footage of Newton on the set of his shoots. “Don’t look poverty stricken. Look incredible!” he instructs a model. Newton himself looks as if he’s just stepped off a yacht in the French Riviera – a mischief-making youthful octogenarian, trim and tanned. He was born in Germany in 1920 into a Jewish family and fled the Nazis in 1938. In Australia, he met his wife, June, and in Paris made his name photographing a particular type of women – amazonians who projected sex and glamour. Men he had little time for; they were accessories – like a hat or a pair of shoes. Newton died in 2004 in a car accident in Los Angeles.

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The Guardian

Oct 23 2020
Electric Turner, a giant octopus and quantum photogravure – the week in art

Ray Harryhausen’s epic monsters, Cornelia Parker’s surreally beautiful afterimages and JMW Turner’s energy-infused observations of his contemporary life – all in your weekly dispatch

Turner’s Modern World
The energy and vertigo of a new world of steam and science electrifies the luminous mists of JMW Turner’s art. This exhibition follows his observation of contemporary life from harrowing depictions of the Napoleonic wars to his elegiac painting of a ship of the line at the end of its days, The Fighting Temeraire.
Tate Britain from 28 October until 7 March

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The Guardian

Oct 23 2020
Suzanne Perlman obituary | Philip Vann

Expressionist painter inspired by Goya and Van Gogh who was drawn to portraying ordinary people

The artist Suzanne Perlman, who has died aged 97, once said: “In my work I need to identify myself with the essence of things.” Such fierce focus as a visionary expressionist painter nourished her in a life of unforeseen and radical changes of circumstance. She was essentially self-taught, and it was following her arrival in the Dutch West Indies as a young Jewish refugee from Europe in 1940 that her art emerged with a consummate self-assurance.

Soon after arriving at the Caribbean island of Curaçao, and settling in its capital, Willemstad, Perlman was amazed to hear “ancient Hebrew melodies to welcome the Sabbath bride. It seemed a miracle.” These were emanating, it turned out, from a Sephardic synagogue founded in 1674 on the island, whose festivals and rituals became a key subject of her paintings.

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The Guardian

Oct 23 2020
2020 GDT European wildlife photographer of the year – winners

The winners of the European wildlife photographer of the year have been chosen in the competition’s first virtual award ceremony. Jasper Doest’s striking shot, A Monkey’s Mask, was declared overall winner

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The Guardian

Oct 23 2020
The Collage Atlas review – a gentle wander in sketchbook dreamscapes

iPhone, iPad (via Apple Arcade)
Beautifully hand-drawn scenes frame a mindful journey – although the motivational quotes could be more poetic

The Collage Atlas’s standout characteristic is obvious from first glance: everything you see in the game has been hand illustrated in pen and ink. As you walk, scenery materialises in black and white in front of you, intricate gates open at your approach and rain comes down in black lines. Stop stock-still at any point and you’re looking at an absurdly detailed sketchbook drawing. The art, design and ambient music were all created by John William Evelyn, whose talent is evident in every frame. From glasshouses to skyscapes, floating islands to underwater lighthouses, this picture-book world is consistently beautiful to look at and meander through.

There is much repetition of motifs and scenery: lanterns, crumbling theatre-prop moons, anchors, grandfather clocks. This is out of necessity, as every drawing is so elaborate, but it does sometimes make it hard to navigate the game’s abstract dream-world. Paper windmills planted in the ground or pillars of light show you the way to the next area, but when I tried to explore beyond the obvious path in search of secrets, the repeating patterns of arches and grass proved disorienting.

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The Guardian

Oct 22 2020
On the set of classic Ealing comedy The Ladykillers – in pictures

The much-loved British caper starring Alec Guinness is being reissued, 65 years on, fully restored from the original negative. It was shot at Ealing Studios and around King’s Cross in London, where photographers captured the stars relaxing on set

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The Guardian

Oct 22 2020
Modern Mary Poppins: inside the elite's nanny college – photo essay

The Italian photographer Guia Besana spent time with students at the world’s oldest childcare training institution, still favoured by the international elite. Her series explores the heritage of Norland College, and the individuals who aspire to work internationally as nannies and nursery nurses

Norland nannies have become a global status symbol: from the British royal family to George Clooney, the wealthy elite snap up the export of a single British school in Bath, for their children’s care, development and education. The students are dressed in modestly updated uniforms from the one donned by their 1892 counterparts, but the people who wear the uniforms today are considerably different.

At the prestigious Norland College in Bath, students follow a demanding programme that balances tradition and modernity in order to become the nannies of exception to the elite.

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artforum.com

Oct 22 2020
Donald Judd
David Zwirner is pleased to announce “Artworks: 1970–1994,” a survey exhibition devoted to Donald Judd that will be on view at the gallery’s West 19th Street location in New York. Presented concurrently
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The New York Times

Oct 22 2020
Brooklyn Botanic Garden Turns Over a New Leaf
Brooklyn Botanic Garden Turns Over a New Leaf
A wild meadow and woodland ‘ruin’ are now on exuberant display. The new, ecologically minded garden boasts shaggy clouds of vegetation.
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The New York Times

Oct 22 2020
Deana Lawson Wins Guggenheim’s Hugo Boss Prize
Deana Lawson Wins Guggenheim’s Hugo Boss Prize
Ms. Lawson, whose images combine regal poses with everyday scenes, is the first artist working in photography to win.
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artforum.com

Oct 22 2020
Marian Goodman Gallery to Shutter London Outpost, Launch New Programming Model
Marian Goodman Gallery will close its London venue by the end of the year and implement a different exhibition model in the city, the gallery announced today.   Named Marian Goodman Projects, the new
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artforum.com

Oct 22 2020
Sackler Family Members Settle Purdue Pharma Suit for $225 Million
The US Department of Justice yesterday announced that Sackler family members associated with Purdue Pharma will pay $225 million in civil penalties to settle a federal suit that saw the Stamford,
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The New York Times

Oct 22 2020
An iPad Studio Tour Finds Bruce Nauman Pushing Limits
Through the medium of the touchscreen, the pioneering American artist has found a channel to fuse his body and his work space.
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