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The New York Times

Nov 09 2018
No Waiting to Play This ‘Godot’
No Waiting to Play This ‘Godot’
The highly physical Irish actor Aaron Monaghan came late to Beckett, and is young to portray Estragon. But the role fits (even if the shoes don’t).
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The New York Times

Nov 09 2018
Following Outcry, Washington Arts Council Reverses Course on Amendment
Following Outcry, Washington Arts Council Reverses Course on Amendment
An amendment to prohibit grant recipients from producing “overtly political” work was rescinded on Thursday, after criticism from arts groups.
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The Guardian

Nov 09 2018
Warhol meets his match and Martin Parr does the royals – the week in art

Warhol and Paolozzi hit Edinburgh, Martin Parr returns to Manchester, and the two-minute silence gets its own show – all in our weekly dispatch

Machine Gods: Art in the Age of Technology and Warhol and Paolozzi: I Want to Be a Machine
Modern art’s fascination with the age of mass production and information is explored in two shows that stretch across the 20th century from Picabia to Pop.
Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art, Edinburgh, from 17 November until 2 June.

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The New York Times

Nov 09 2018
The Week in Arts: Andy Warhol, Viola Davis, the Met’s Sleeper Hit
The Week in Arts: Andy Warhol, Viola Davis, the Met’s Sleeper Hit
With 350 pieces, the Warhol retrospective at the Whitney sets aside the icon’s persona and focuses on his art.
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The New York Times

Nov 09 2018
In Search of the Real Thing: China’s Quest to Buy Back Its Lost Heritage
In Search of the Real Thing: China’s Quest to Buy Back Its Lost Heritage
Chinese collectors flock to London to buy items from their country’s Imperial past, attracted by pieces with ownership histories that guarantee authenticity.
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The Guardian

Nov 09 2018
Milena Dragicevic’s Supplicant 10: party for the undead

The Canadian-Serb painter references various cultures and styles in this series of pale and shadowed portraits based on her friends

Milena Dragicevic’s 2008 series of small, identically sized paintings, Supplicants, are based on photos of female friends. Yet they are not portraits. The Canadian-Serb artist has said that using a face was a “simple starting point” for a painting, like a circle on a canvas.

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The New York Times

Nov 09 2018
Genesis P-Orridge Has Always Been a Provocateur of the Body. Now She’s at Its Mercy.
Genesis P-Orridge Has Always Been a Provocateur of the Body. Now She’s at Its Mercy.
The Throbbing Gristle and Psychic TV musician is battling leukemia. But after a lifetime of making challenging art, she isn’t done shocking the world yet.
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The Guardian

Nov 09 2018
Sex, supermodels and champagne: Guy Bourdin – in pictures

In 1987, Chanel asked the fashion master to shoot an ad campaign for its new watch. The strange, dreamlike images he produced are at Paris Photo this weekend, alongside other rare Bourdin photographs

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The Guardian

Nov 08 2018
Trafalgar pyramid? A look at an alternative London

These rejected architecture and transport plans give a glimpse of how different the city might have been

London has been the focus for some questionable urban design ideas over the years – from remaking Soho as a concrete office complex, to building a wheel-shaped airport that would have squatted over Kings Cross, to straightening the Thames.

Working with the rendering agency CG Orange, the developer Barratt Homes has superimposed 3D images of several proposals reported by Guardian Cities over Google Earth images of where they would have stood, and our design team has allowed you to switch back and forth.

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The Guardian

Nov 08 2018
Paris Photo international art fair – in pictures

Paris Photo is the largest international art fair dedicated to photography and is held each November in the capital’s Grand Palais. The fair comprises displays by up to 200 exhibitors from around the world, offering an unparalleled presentation of contemporary and historical photography, from modern masters to young talents.

The 22nd edition of Paris Photo takes place from Thursday 8 November until Sunday 11 November

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The Guardian

Nov 08 2018
Kerry James Marshall named most influential contemporary artist

American painter’s dealer, David Zwirner, tops ArtReview Power 100, with #MeToo third

Kerry James Marshall, the American figurative painter who set a record at auction this year for the most expensive work by a living black artist, has been judged the world’s most influential artist in an annual contemporary power list.

He is No 2 in the 17th edition of the ArtReview Power 100, pipped to the top spot by his dealer, the gallery owner David Zwirner.

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The New York Times

Nov 08 2018
22 Art Exhibitions to View in N.Y.C. This Weekend
22 Art Exhibitions to View in N.Y.C. This Weekend
Our guide to new art shows and some that will be closing soon.
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The New York Times

Nov 08 2018
Jeff Koons Is Found Guilty of Copying. Again.
Jeff Koons Is Found Guilty of Copying. Again.
A French court found that Mr. Koons’s 1988 sculpture “Fait d’hiver” breached the copyright of the creator of a 1985 advertising campaign.
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The New York Times

Nov 08 2018
After Strife in Berlin, Chris Dercon Is to Run the Grand Palais in Paris
After Strife in Berlin, Chris Dercon Is to Run the Grand Palais in Paris
The former head of Tate Modern had to resign from his last job after protests. France’s culture ministry said he will take over one of the country’s largest exhibition spaces.
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The Guardian

Nov 08 2018
From dolls to magazine covers: how early black designers made their mark

In a new exhibition, the work of African American designers in Chicago is celebrated from editorial and product design to the first black-founded ad agency

The first known African American female cartoonist was Jackie Ormes, who not only penned cartoon strips throughout the 1940s and 1950s, but designed a black doll called the Patty-Jo doll, which was released in 1947.

Related: Betye Saar: the artist who helped spark the black women's movement

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The Guardian

Nov 08 2018
Vast Nicholas I portrait unveiled as Russians storm palace

Painting is one of 300 works at Buckingham Palace show exploring links between British royals and Romanovs

A bewilderingly vast painting of the Russian emperor Nicholas I which he commissioned and had placed in an ornate frame has gone on public display for the first time.

The 1847 painting by Franz Krüger was a gift to Queen Victoria, who had it placed in the principal corridor of Buckingham Palace. In the 1920s it went to Windsor and in the 1930s it was taken down and rolled up, never to be seen until now.

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The New York Times

Nov 08 2018
Jenny Holzer Creates Mobile Exhibition for World AIDS Day
Jenny Holzer Creates Mobile Exhibition for World AIDS Day
As a part of “#LightTheFight,” a collaboration with the New York City AIDS Memorial, Ms. Holzer has created a fleet of message-bearing trucks.
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The Guardian

Nov 08 2018
Knock, knock! Would you swap doormats with a stranger?

Italian artist Alex Urso’s new work relies on acquiring the welcome mats of open-hearted Londoners. We join him to see how friendly Brexit Britain really is

Rat-a-tat-tat! There’s someone at your door … but not someone you’re expecting. Rather, it’s a young Italian man and he’s asking a rather bizarre question: would you like to swap doormats with him?

What would you do next? Invite him in for a cup of tea to hear more about his proposal? Or shoo him away and alert Neighbourhood Watch that there’s a weirdo in the area?

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The New York Times

Nov 08 2018
Critic’s Notebook: Wes Anderson, Curator? The Filmmaker Gives It a Try
Critic’s Notebook: Wes Anderson, Curator? The Filmmaker Gives It a Try
Mr. Anderson and his partner, Juman Malouf, were given free rein in Austria’s largest museum. But you can’t make an exhibition as you would a movie, our critic writes.
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The Guardian

Nov 07 2018
Nudes, maids and the Eiffel Tower: classic French photography – in pictures

The French humanist movement of the 1930s changed photography for good. A new exhibition at Paris Photo showcases the greats, including Henri Cartier-Bresson, Willy Ronis, and Martine Franck

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The Guardian

Nov 07 2018
Rankin's best photograph: a supermodel in a cow mask

‘I didn’t think models were being treated as people. So we borrowed a farm, put some in masks – and shot them in a cow barn then a pigsty’

This was taken at a time when I was becoming a little jaded about fashion. It’s a commentary on the way I thought some models were treated, right in front of me. I felt they weren’t being treated like people. I had done another project, Breeding, about how models have an almost homogenous look, with everything equal and in particular proportions. So I suppose I was already interested in livestock as a theme.

People always call me a fashion photographer, but really I’m a commercial portrait photographer. I’ve never felt I fully belonged in the fashion world, particularly the churning business side of it all. You hear these ridiculous things, like someone saying: “I have to fly this dress on Concorde!” Why would you ever have to fly a dress on Concorde?

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The Guardian

Nov 07 2018
Heritage at Risk list adds knights' cave and Grimsby's Kasbah

Historic England register also adds Huddersfield’s first infirmary and ‘an almost perfect Victorian museum’

A centuries-old church that counted George Eliot as a worshipper and survived a devastating night during the wartime blitz is one of 242 new entries to England’s Heritage at Risk register.

The register also now includes one of the oldest purpose-built museums in England, as well as Grimsby’s Kasbah area, and the church in Salford where the suffragette leader Emmeline Pankhurst married in 1879.

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The New York Times

Nov 07 2018
Show Us Your Wall: Terrence McNally Cherishes the Light in Art. Until It Goes Out.
Show Us Your Wall: Terrence McNally Cherishes the Light in Art. Until It Goes Out.
“A great work is one you never get tired of — you find new value in it every day.” So says this playwright, who has a taste for lyrical realism.
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The New York Times

Nov 07 2018
What to See in New York Art Galleries This Week
What to See in New York Art Galleries This Week
Maruja Mallo’s Surrealist works get a long-overdue survey; Neil Goldberg makes the personal political; and Martha Edelheit’s paintings and drawings of the sexually permissive ’60s.
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The New York Times

Nov 07 2018
Matter: In Cave in Borneo Jungle, Scientists Find Oldest Figurative Painting in the World
Matter: In Cave in Borneo Jungle, Scientists Find Oldest Figurative Painting in the World
A cave drawing in Borneo is at least 40,000 years old, raising intriguing questions about creativity in ancient societies.
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The New York Times

Nov 07 2018
G.I. Joe, Mickey Mouse and Captain America Walk Into … a Display
G.I. Joe, Mickey Mouse and Captain America Walk Into … a Display
Heroes come to life at the Library of Congress this week by way of a major comics, toys and memorabilia collection.
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The New York Times

Nov 07 2018
Mario Segale, Developer Who Inspired Nintendo to Name Super Mario, Dies at 84
Mario Segale, Developer Who Inspired Nintendo to Name Super Mario, Dies at 84
Mr. Segale rented a warehouse near Seattle to Nintendo in the company’s early days, and once berated its president about unpaid rent.
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The Guardian

Nov 07 2018
Queen Victoria's mourning dress among items in Disease X exhibition

Show at Museum of London highlights continued vulnerability of big cities to disease epidemics

The mourning dress worn by Queen Victoria after the death of her grandson from Russian flu is to go on display for the first time, as part of an exhibition highlighting the ongoing threat from epidemics.

The tiny black silk and crepe dress was made for the diminutive queen in 1892 following the death of Prince Albert Victor, known as Prince Eddy, who was 28 and second in line to the throne when he was struck by the illness a month before his wedding.

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The Guardian

Nov 07 2018
Death threats and denunciations: the artists who fear Bolsonaro's Brazil

Some have employed security guards. Others have fled. With Jair Bolsonaro about to take power, many artists in Brazil fear the censorship and intimidation they currently endure are about to get much worse

Wagner Schwartz received the first death threat two days after lying naked on the floor of a museum in São Paulo. It was October 2017 and the Brazilian artist had invited members of his audience, which included children, to adjust his body: move a limb, roll him over, that kind of thing. This was for a dance piece called La Bête, a work he had already staged many times at home and abroad. So it was a shock to suddenly find himself the target of an increasingly emboldened network of rightwing and evangelical Christian groups.

During La Bête, a four-year-old girl, encouraged by her mother, lifted Schwartz’s hand and then his foot, while another slightly older girl touched his head. These moments were caught on video and uploaded to Facebook. “The creators of this page,” says Schwartz, “put a caption on the video saying the museum incited paedophilia and that I was a paedophile. From this moment on, people who did not know me or the work decided La Bête was a threat.”

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The Guardian

Nov 07 2018
The bygone British dog show – in pictures

Nostalgic photographs by Shirley Baker capture the quirkiness of owners and their canine companions at that quintessential British event: the dog show. From pekingese to poodles, Dog Show 1961-1978 (Hoxton Mini Press) explores the relationship between humans and their dogs

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The New York Times

Nov 06 2018
Cannupa Hanska Luger Wins New $50,000 Arts Prize
Cannupa Hanska Luger Wins New $50,000 Arts Prize
The artist is the inaugural winner of the Museum of Arts and Design’s Burke Prize for contemporary craft.
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The New York Times

Nov 06 2018
Robert Indiana Estate to Sell Art Valued at Up to $4 Million
Robert Indiana Estate to Sell Art Valued at Up to $4 Million
The executor of the estate, which is involved in several legal issues, said the money will go to pay lawyers and repair the artist’s leaky house.
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The New York Times

Nov 06 2018
His Three Loves: Photography, Art History and Lisa
His Three Loves: Photography, Art History and Lisa
A plain glass vase, a few simple flowers. The photographer Abelardo Morell offers a paean to his feelings — and evokes a cavalcade of art heroes.
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The New York Times

Nov 06 2018
Sex, Surrealism and de Sade: The Forgotten Female Artist Leonor Fini
Sex, Surrealism and de Sade: The Forgotten Female Artist Leonor Fini
She rejected art's traditional roles for women, and spent her life blurring the lines of gender and sexuality. So why is she so little-known?
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The New York Times

Nov 06 2018
‘Master Race’ Comic Book Story Comes Up for Sale
‘Master Race’ Comic Book Story Comes Up for Sale
The original pages of an influential tale from 1955 published by EC Comics, illustrated by Bernie Krigstein, is at auction.
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The New York Times

Nov 06 2018
The Week in Arts: Bryan Cranston in ‘Network,’ Lucas Hedges in ‘Boy Erased’
The Week in Arts: Bryan Cranston in ‘Network,’ Lucas Hedges in ‘Boy Erased’
Ah, fake news and fury — a Broadway adaptation, starring Cranston, of the 1976 film feels rumblingly prescient now.
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The New York Times

Nov 06 2018
Martha Rosler Isn’t Done Making Protest Art
Martha Rosler Isn’t Done Making Protest Art
The artist’s work has been canonized, and feminist slogans are enshrined on T-shirts, but where does that leave her? A retrospective at the Jewish Museum takes us on her journey.
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The Guardian

Nov 06 2018
Philippines: five years after Typhoon Haiyan

Typhoon Haiyan hit the Philippines in November 2013 and left more than 7,360 people dead or missing. It damaged or swept away more than 1.1m houses and injured more than 27,000 people. More than 4 million were displaced. Five years on, photographer Ted Aljibe has revisited the scenes of the disaster where it struck Tacloban City

Typhoon Haiyan was one of the strongest tropical cyclones ever recorded. Relief efforts were slow following the typhoon and Tacloban, was devastated. All that remained was a mess of debris, its buildings reduced to rubble, 4,000 people in the city died.

The cost of rebuilding was estimated around $5.8bn. A year on, thousands of people were living in temporary shelters and four million people were still displaced

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The Guardian

Nov 06 2018
'It's a neverending story': inside the amazing world of Larry Bell

As the 78-year-old artist premieres a new exhibition, he talks about an extensive career filled with experimentation and discovery

Larry Bell’s cubes, arguably the star of the artist’s newly opened Institute of Contemporary Art Miami show, Larry Bell: Time Machines, sound so simple. Each consists of six panes of glass assembled into a box, but the effects of their sometimes smokey, sometimes iridescent surfaces “do improbable things to light that your eyes aren’t used to seeing”, according to Bell: they enhance the inherent ability of glass to reflect, transmit, and absorb light. The process that makes that possible is even more complex.

In Taos, New Mexico, where the 78-year-old artist has lived since the early 70s, Bell operates his studio like a lab. At the center of it is his 14-ton vacuum deposition chamber, The Tank, a cold war-era behemoth of pipes and protruding wires. He acquired it in 1969, having had it built outside of Niagara Falls and shipped cross country to his then-studio in Venice Beach. For each cube, the glass panes go inside its iron belly, where the air pressure drops dramatically. Using jolts of electricity, the machine heats various metals – recently a lot of aluminum and silicon monoxide, but his ICA show has pricier early works in gold and chrome – until they melt and evaporate. Sitting in a wooden chair at a pancake-sized peephole, Bell observes as the metallic mist redeposits itself as a fine sheen on whatever’s in the chamber.

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The Guardian

Nov 05 2018
The fire and fury of Forest Finns – in pictures

Terje Abusdal documents Forest Finns, farmers in the forest belt along the Norwegian/Swedish border who use the ancient agricultural method of fire-fallow cultivation, in his book Slash & Burn

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The Guardian

Nov 05 2018
'Some of the most appalling images ever created' – I Am Ashurbanipal review

British Museum, London
Whether wrestling lions or skinning prisoners alive, the Assyrian king ran a murderously efficient empire. This is the art of war – and it’s terrifying

You have to hand it to the ancient Assyrians – they were honest. Their artistic propaganda relishes every detail of torture, massacre, battlefield executions and human displacement that made Assyria the dominant power of the Middle East from about 900 to 612BC. Assyrian art contains some of the most appalling images ever created. In one scene, tongues are being ripped from the mouths of prisoners. That will mute their screams when, in the next stage of their torture, they are flayed alive. In another relief a surrendering general is about to be beheaded and in a third prisoners have to grind their fathers’ bones before being executed in the streets of Nineveh.

These and many more episodes of calculated cruelty can be seen carved in gypsum in the British Museum’s blockbuster recreation of Assyria’s might. Assyrian art makes up in tough energy what it lacks in human tenderness. It is an art of war – all muscle, movement, impact. People and animals are portrayed as fierce cartoons of merciless force.

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The New York Times

Nov 05 2018
You Can See What? Neighbors Take Tate Modern to Court Over Privacy
You Can See What? Neighbors Take Tate Modern to Court Over Privacy
Owners of luxury apartments near the London museum have sued over a viewing platform they say offers a “relentless” invasion of privacy.
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The New York Times

Nov 05 2018
Chicago Pulls Kerry James Marshall Painting From Auction Following Criticism
Chicago Pulls Kerry James Marshall Painting From Auction Following Criticism
“Knowledge and Wonder” was to be sold at Christie’s on Nov. 15, but arts advocates and Mr. Marshall had criticized the move by the city of Chicago.
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The Guardian

Nov 05 2018
Tate Britain to hold major Van Gogh exhibition in 2019

Sunflowers, Self-Portrait and Starry Night Over the Rhône among works to be shown

Tate Britain is to hold its first Vincent van Gogh exhibition since a 1947 show that was so wildly popular that the gallery’s floors were damaged.

“I think our floors are more robust these days,” said Alex Farquharson, Tate Britain’s director, as details were announced of the major 2019 show, which will explore Van Gogh’s relationship with Britain and his impact on British painters in new ways.

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The Guardian

Nov 05 2018
Guns and poses: Deutsche Börse photography prize shortlist revealed

From Sandinistas in the 70s to a history of misogyny and the legacy of the Baader Meinhof gang, the nominees for the prestigious prize produce powerful, complex and intriguing work

This year’s Deutsche Borse photography prize shortlist is a considered choice of four artists whose approaches draw on documentary, archival appropriation and conceptualism. They are: Susan Meiselas for her retrospective exhibition, Mediations; Laia Abril for her deeply-researched book, On Abortion; Arwed Messmer for his archival exhibition, RAF: No Evidence and Mark Ruwedel for his show, The Artist and Society.

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The Guardian

Nov 04 2018
Minnesota Experimental City: the 1960s town based on a comic strip

It had cars on rails, 100% recycling and a nuclear power station in the centre, all covered by a massive dome. So what went wrong with Athelstan Spilhaus’s vision of the future?

If Minnesota Experimental City had been a roaring success, you’d probably have heard of it. Perhaps you’d even be living there. You’d also have heard of its chief designer: Athelstan Spilhaus. The sci-fi name sounds too on-the-nose to be true, but Spilhaus was real and so, for a time, was his utopian brainchild – at least on paper. Originally from South Africa, by way of MIT, Spilhaus was a postwar polymath in the vein of Buckminster Fuller.

He seems to have been an expert in everything from engineering to urban planning to atmospheric science to oceanography. And, like Fuller, he believed that science and technology could solve most of humankind’s problems. If we could send a human into space, we could do anything. Spilhaus proposed such solutions weekly in his future-science comic-strip series Our New Age, which was widely syndicated in US newspapers from 1957 to 1973. Getting such visions off the paper turned out to be a different story, but an instructive one, as told in new documentary The Experimental City, directed by Chad Freidrichs.

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The Guardian

Nov 04 2018
The fashion photography of Marilyn Stafford - in pictures

As a freelance photojournalist based in Paris in the 1950s and early 1960s, Stafford covered fashion assignments from the established haute couture houses of the 50s to the birth of prêt-à-porter, moving to London in the 60s -where as one of a small number of female photographers she helped to pave the way for future women working on Fleet Street

  • Work on show at the Hull international photography festival 5-28 October, and at Lucy Bell Gallery, Hastings, from 28 October to 17 November
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The Guardian

Nov 04 2018
Guido Guidi: 'Many times I'm not looking when I press the shutter'

He photographs the in-between places, the ordinary and overlooked, rarely venturing far from his home in suburban Italy. Why do the results feel so monumental? We meet a modern master

Over the course of his 77 years, Guido Guidi has lived in the same neighbourhood just outside Cesena, a town in north-east Italy between Rimini and Bologna. It is flat, agricultural country, a landscape of straight lines: ploughed fields, a wide horizon, overhead wires, the long trundle of the old Roman road, the Via Aemilia, and the parallel rush of the A14 motorway. It is the landscape of his photographs, too, in which he has summoned up not the picture-postcard version of Italy, with its pretty countryside and medieval towns, but the peripheral, the overlooked and ordinary: the hastily built agricultural building by the highway; the straggle of buildings at the edge of town that the visitor usually rushes past. Even when he does venture into the centre – as in a series of images of Cesena from the early 1980s – he offers it up to the viewer as defiantly ungrand, shabby, a place like any other.

A new book, Per Strada (On the Roads), which is accompanied by a small exhibition in London, draws together more than 200 photographs from the 1980s and 90s of this closely observed territory. He might show the corner of a rather plain church with a municipal rubbish bin shouldering into the shot; or heaps of blackened, weeks-old snow in front of a dingy palazzo with a bricked-up window; or the shuttered, blinded facade of a tobacconist’s with a shadow playing delicately over it.

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The New York Times

Nov 04 2018
Queens Museum Looks to Liverpool for New Director
Queens Museum Looks to Liverpool for New Director
Sally Tallant, a British arts professional, will start next spring as the replacement for Laura Raicovich, who resigned after clashing with the museum’s board.
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The New York Times

Nov 04 2018
As Nigerian Fashion Booms, Women Lead Its Coverage
As Nigerian Fashion Booms, Women Lead Its Coverage
Spurred by the leadership of entrepreneurial women and Nigeria’s cultural cachet around Africa and the world, the country’s fashion magazine industry has found a receptive audience.
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