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The Guardian

Oct 20 2020
Top Gun's jacket to Pretty Woman's boots: film memorabilia auction highlights – in pictures

Hundreds of rare props and costumes from more than 350 films, including Alien, Batman and Gladiator, will be going up for auction in early December

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The Guardian

Oct 19 2020
'My fascination with myself': Billy Childish's life story – in pictures

Family gatherings, naked bodies, in bed with Tracey Emin ... a new exhibition examines the punk polymath’s intimate side through five decades of his photographs

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The Guardian

Oct 19 2020
'Race is never far from the surface': Lesley Lokko on quitting New York

The Scottish-Ghanaian architect resigned as dean at the Spitzer school after less than a year citing ‘a lack of respect and empathy for black women’

When the Scottish-Ghanaian architect Lesley Lokko was appointed to head the architecture school at the City college of New York last year, her arrival was hailed as bringing “renewed energy and an exciting new vision” to the school. But after less than a year in the post, Lokko has resigned, citing a “crippling workload and lack of respect and empathy for black women”.

She became the dean of the Bernard and Anne Spitzer school of architecture in December 2019, after five years running the graduate school of architecture at the University of Johannesburg, the first such postgraduate school of architecture in Africa, which she founded in 2015. With 25 years of teaching experience across the UK, US and Africa, Lokko is widely regarded as one of the most progressive voices in architectural education. But the obstacles that she encountered in New York were unlike anything she had come up against before.

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artforum.com

Oct 19 2020
Tom Sachs
Acquavella Galleries is pleased to present an exhibition of recent paintings by Tom Sachs from 2019–20. Although painting has been a focus of the artist’s practice since the mid-1990s, “Tom Sachs:
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artforum.com

Oct 19 2020
Winston Roeth
“Light and dark, dry and wet, reflective and absorptive, these qualities give the different multiples of the painting a distinct visual rhythm...The rhythms change with the light and with the position
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The New York Times

Oct 19 2020
Europe’s Museums Are Open, but the Public Isn’t Coming Due to Pandemic
Europe’s Museums Are Open, but the Public Isn’t Coming Due to Pandemic
Attendance at some major institutions is a third of what it was last year. Their ability to cope depends almost entirely on how they are funded.
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The Guardian

Oct 19 2020
The Guerrilla Girls: 'We upend the art world's notion of what's good and what's right'

The art world rebels have spent 35 years fighting against sexism and inequality in the art world and they have only just begun

In 1984, a group of women in New York gathered outside the Museum of Modern Art as part of a protest. A group show, An International Survey of Recent Painting and Sculpture, was showing 165 artists, 152 male artists exhibited alongside just 13 women.

Outraged, they attended the protest, bringing placards and chanting outside the museum. But a handful of women within the larger crowd learned something.

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The Guardian

Oct 19 2020
The Billion Dollar Art Hunt review – the case that stumped the FBI

Crisscrossing tracks and clues make for high-stakes viewing in this BBC Four documentary about a sensational haul of art that vanished into thin air 30 years ago

Charley Hill is a retired detective for the Metropolitan police’s art and antiques squad. He helped to recover Edvard Munch’s The Scream after it was stolen from the Oslo National Gallery, and assorted other old masters, including a Vermeer, a Goya and a Titian – functioning as a one man A(rt)-Team. If you have a missing painting problem, if no one else can find it and if you can find him …

Last year he got a tipoff from one of the many contacts he has made in the shadows over the years about the location of 13 art works – including three Rembrandts, five Degas, a Manet and a Vermeer – that were stolen 30 years ago from the Isabella Stewart Gardner museum in Boston. They were, says his informant, a career criminal called Martin Foley, taken out of the US and have resided ever since behind the wall of a safe house somewhere in Dublin. The Billion Dollar Art Hunt (BBC Four), written and presented by the arts journalist John Wilson, follows Hill as he chases down the latest lead in a case that the FBI (and private hires, and hobbyists, and fellow retirees, and bloggers and assorted recidivists) have never ceased pursuing. The reward for their safe return now stands at $10m (£7.6m).

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artforum.com

Oct 19 2020
April Freely Appointed Executive Director of Fire Island Artist Residency
April Freely has been named the new executive director of the Fire Island Artist Residency, the New York organization founded in 2011 as the first residency to provide resources exclusively to emerging
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artforum.com

Oct 19 2020
Enzo Mari (1932–2020)
Firebrand Italian designer Enzo Mari has died today at the age of eighty-eight, in Milan’s San Raffale hospital. A towering and radical figure in the design world, Mari was as well known for his volatile
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artforum.com

Oct 19 2020
Honoré d’O
The Belgian Conceptual artist Honoré d’O spent the first few months of the coronavirus lockdown in a twelfth-century Romanesque church in Ghent, where, through multiple interrelated interventions inspired
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The New York Times

Oct 19 2020
Richard Avedon’s Wall-Size Ambitions
The celebrated photographer made striking group portraits that he hoped would signal a new level of rigorous intention. Why didn’t the art world notice?
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artforum.com

Oct 19 2020
Jennifer Rose Sciarrino
In Jennifer Rose Sciarrino’s solo show “for Swan,” the artist proposes a science-fiction conceit for a series of sculptures that resemble composite organisms. Cast-glass works in glimmering shades of
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The New York Times

Oct 19 2020
At 77, Howardena Pindell Exorcises a Chilling Memory From Childhood
At 77, Howardena Pindell Exorcises a Chilling Memory From Childhood
The artist’s first new video in 25 years, on view at the Shed, mines the history of violence against African-Americans.
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artforum.com

Oct 19 2020
"FAKTURA (FOR A NERVOUS SPIRIT)"
The term Faktura—which translates literally  to “facture” but encompasses a wider understanding of surface—traces back to Latvia’s avant-garde. In the last year of his life, the Riga-born artist and
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The Guardian

Oct 19 2020
Station to station: imaginative works from Magnum's print sale – in pictures

From the disappearance of Andy Warhol to the march of Martin Luther King Jr, these ‘works of imagination’ are up for sale for just $100

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artforum.com

Oct 19 2020
Tuan Andrew Nguyen on Crimes of Solidarity (2020)
Tuan Andrew Nguyen has in recent years emerged as a maker of hybrid films that conjure national memories of displacement like magic spells, their layered narratives exerting a mesmeric pull on
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The Guardian

Oct 18 2020
Landscape photographer of the year 2020 – in pictures

From dramatic seascapes to misty woodlands, to urban street scenes, cityscapes and detailed closeups, the winning photographs in the Landscape photographer of the year awards aim to inspire visitors to explore and discover the wonders of Britain’s countryside. A shot of Woolland Woods on a spring day in Dorset made Chris Frost the 13th overall winner

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The Guardian

Oct 18 2020
The floating church: inside the holy vessel bringing salvation to Hackney hipsters

The area around London’s Olympic Park is a regeneration hothouse with micro-breweries, tech startups, speakeasys and spas. Now their spiritual needs are being met – with a beautiful chapel on a barge

A narrowboat moored to the towpath is offering passersby a “Shamanic ritual spa experience”. Its roof is decorated with an assortment of gongs, which are bonged occasionally by a man in a homemade cape. Across the water bobs a floating speakeasy cocktail bar that advertises a craft-beer-and-cheese-pairing cruise. Further along, diners are enjoying Szechuan aubergine with cashew cream in a Dutch barge that’s been converted into a restaurant. Beside it, a canoe hire company is running team-building paddleboarding expeditions.

As any Hackney Wick local will tell you, this corner of east London has changed drastically since the Olympic Games landed here in 2012. And this shift hasn’t just affected the kind of boats moored along the towpath. The once gritty edgeland of car-breaking yards, slaughterhouses and mountains of knackered fridges has long been swept away, replaced with all the trappings of hipster-infused regeneration. Tech startups now rub shoulders with microbreweries, while fresh rows of new-build warehouse-style apartments are accompanied by novel floating lifestyle concepts. But the latest arrival to the Lee Navigation moorings takes a more unexpected form.

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The Guardian

Oct 18 2020
Prado's first post-lockdown show reignites debate over misogyny

Exhibition exploring how women have been treated in art world runs into criticism

The last face that meets visitors to the Prado’s first post-lockdown exhibition is one of the very few that appears to look the spectator squarely in the eye.

The cool gaze of the Portuguese-Spanish artist María Roësset – free of guilt, shame, saccharine virtue or predatory intent – comes as something of a relief after the sanctimonious, salacious and often sad series of pictures that precede it.

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The Guardian

Oct 18 2020
'Something magical': mother-daughter artist duo on reviving the lost art of weaving

For Ngugi/Quandamooka women Sonja and Elisa Jane Carmichael, their works are a link to millennia-old traditions of North Stradbroke Island

The first works you see as you come down the stairs into the Art Gallery of South Australia’s Tarnanthi exhibition – the gallery’s annual show of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander art – are large cyanotype prints.

The edges of the deep blue cotton gently flutter, capturing a sense of the life of the ocean that surrounds North Stradbroke Island in Queensland. These prints, by Ngugi/Quandamooka artist Sonja Carmichael and her daughter, Elisa Jane Carmichael – who goes by the name Leecee – express the life of the island. The life in weaving, in shucked shells, in fallen leaves, in sharp white relief against the blue.

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The Guardian

Oct 18 2020
Shalom Schotten obituary

The graphic designer Shalom Schotten, who has died aged 86, worked closely with artists such as David Hockney to design art book covers for Thames & Hudson, where he worked for five decades.

Schotten’s role was not easy as he had to please both publisher and the author, or the artist subject of the book. Naturally, he had his own convictions as to what would make the most aesthetically pleasing design and the best advertisement for the book. Despite this, artists such as Lucian Freud, David Bailey and Hockney found him a pleasure to work with.

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The New York Times

Oct 18 2020
A Mysterious Autograph Hound’s Book Is Up for Auction
A Mysterious Autograph Hound’s Book Is Up for Auction
With Mary Todd Lincoln, Mark Twain and even Oscar Wilde, a mystery remains: How did Lafayette Cornwell get all these people to autograph his book?
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The Guardian

Oct 18 2020
‘Greatest threat in a generation’ faces UK’s heritage buildings

Government’s planning reforms will favour new builds over repurposing old structures

Britain’s architectural heritage is facing a “once-in-a-generation” threat, the head of one of the country’s foremost conservation groups is warning.

Joe O’Donnell, the new director of the Victorian Society, predicted that sweeping changes proposed for the planning system will encourage the demolition of old buildings at a time when heritage groups, reeling from the impact of Covid, have limited resources to protect them.

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The Guardian

Oct 18 2020
Kai Althoff Goes With Bernard Leach; Nalini Malani: Can You Hear Me? – reviews

Whitechapel Gallery, London
The provocative German painter plumps for quantity over clarity, while a son-et-lumière by Indian artist Nalini Malani is simply stunning

Kai Althoff has been the enfant terrible of German painting for almost quarter of a century. It is a curious pose for a man in his middle 50s, but his shows are still designed to bemuse and provoke. Althoff is both as good and as bad as he wants to be, showing the cack-handed alongside the accomplished, the dumb against the tender, the delicate gouache beside the cruddy oil, sometimes painted on what look like chunks of old carpet. He never wants your eye to settle.

Born in 1966, in Cologne, Althoff gave up art school to run a bar, co-found a band and produce dance music in the 90s. He gained early notoriety from peeing on a series of his own canvases before they were sold. This acute ambivalence persists, notably in a letter he wrote to his agent in 2012 explaining that he wasn’t showing anything at the international Documenta show because life had intervened. The letter, needless to say, became the exhibit.

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The Guardian

Oct 18 2020
Weather Photographer of the Year 2020 – in pictures

Snow, lightning and tornados were among the natural phenomena captured in the 7,700 entries to the Royal Meteorological Society’s Weather Photographer of the Year awards. Here is a selection of some of the best

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The Guardian

Oct 17 2020
Artist Rachel Whiteread urges young: don't give up on your dreams

Turner prize winner reveals how drawing gave her comfort in lockdown

Rachel Whiteread, one of Britain’s leading visual artists, has urged creative young people to hold on to their dreams and skills in the face of the pandemic and spoken of the solace she has found in drawing.

“I really want people to carry on doing what they were doing. It is important they don’t give up on their dreams, and they follow through with what they have trained for,” Whiteread told the Observer. She was commenting on an advertisement put out last week by a government partner organisation encouraging artists and performers to consider switching to a career in “cyber”.

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The Guardian

Oct 17 2020
The big picture: my mum was a mail-order bride

Diana Markosian captures the dissonance between the California her mother knew from American soap operas and what she found when she arrived

In 1996 Diana Markosian’s mother, Svetlana, decided she had to abandon her life in Moscow. Since the collapse of the Soviet Union and the collapse of her marriage she had been dreaming of a new start in California, which she mostly knew from the soap opera Santa Barbara. Through an agency, she advertised to be a mail-order bride and, having chosen a new partner, Eli, from a stack of replies, left her home and got on a plane with her two children. Diana was seven years old.

Santa Barbara was not how Svetlana imagined it. And neither was Eli, who was waiting at Los Angeles airport with a bunch of flowers – 20 years older, and a hundred pounds heavier than in the photograph he had sent. They married anyway and lived together for eight years. Diana was asked to call Eli “Dad” and did not see her own father again until she was in her 20s.

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The Guardian

Oct 17 2020
Rare mammoth tusk sculpture on show for first time in Arctic display

Exhibition at British Museum features newly finished Sakha sculpture

Ancient mammoth tusk is a seriously niche material to work in, but there is one place where the skills and carving techniques involved are still passed down the generations.

A major new British Museum exhibition, Arctic: Culture and Climate, which starts this week in London, will feature an extraordinary piece of “very rare” sculpture, one that details an arcane ritual and has been completed in collaboration with the Sakha people of north-eastern Russia.

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The Guardian

Oct 17 2020
Thrills and spills: vintage beer mats – in pictures

When he was young, designer Adam Kimberley would often wake up with beer mats stuffed in his pockets after a night out. When he went on to study graphic design he found his drunken souvenirs inspiring, and two years ago, he began Instagramming a daily mat at @beerstainedpulp.

“They’re a great source of visual communication,” he says, “part of the history of design, print and advertising and a record of popular culture.”

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artforum.com

Oct 17 2020
Marianne Wex (1937–2020)
Marianne Wex, whose short career as an artist yielded enduring contributions to women’s and gender studies as well as the field of conceptual photography, has died at age eighty-three in her native
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The Guardian

Oct 17 2020
On my radar: John Cooper Clarke's cultural highlights

The poet on vintage TV, elegant writing about architecture and Dylan’s endearing take on the Great American Songbook

John Cooper Clarke is a performance poet, comedian and presenter who rose to fame in the 1970s as one of the first “punk poets”. He was born in Salford in 1949 and his third album, Walking Back to Happiness, released in 1979, featured the UK top 40 song Gimmix! (Play Loud). Clarke has toured with Linton Kwesi Johnson, and performed alongside the Sex Pistols, Joy Division and Buzzcocks. He released his first poetry collection, Ten Years in An Open Necked Shirt, in 1983 and has appeared on TV shows including Would I Lie to You? and 8 Out of 10 Cats Does Countdown. His memoir, I Wanna Be Yours, about growing up in a Salford suburb, is published this month.

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The Guardian

Oct 17 2020
Banksy confirms hula-hoop girl mural in Nottingham is his

Artwork showing girl playing with a bicycle tyre appeared on street corner last week

Banksy has posted a picture of a mural of a girl hula-hooping on social media, ending speculation over whether he was behind the work.

The mural appeared on a wall on Tuesday on the corner of Rothesay Avenue in Lenton, Nottingham.

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The Guardian

Oct 17 2020
Choirs and comedians among recipients of £76m Covid arts aid

Almost 600 cultural groups across England to benefit from latest funding round

Comedy clubs, circuses, choirs and theatres across England are in line to receive a share of £76m of government funding for the cultural sector.

The Military Wives Choirs, Somerset House and Kneehigh Theatre in Cornwall are among the 588 organisations that will share the latest round of grants of up to £1m as part of the £1.57bn Culture Recovery Fund.

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The Guardian

Oct 17 2020
From Warhol to Steve McQueen: a history of video art in 30 works

Starting with experimental film in the 60s, video art has revolutionised the art world. We celebrate the medium through its most groundbreaking pieces

Video art emerged in tandem with experimental film during the 1960s, as lively, open-ended alternatives away from the centre. Practitioners with contrarian agendas and backgrounds in disparate fields – music, performance, literature, visual art and the moving image – took to experimenting with audiovisual configurations. Feeling unconstrained, they explored consumer tools alone in their studios, or in the supportive environment of artist-run, nonprofit spaces.

During this early phase, contemporary art museums concentrated on concrete, commodifiable forms, namely painting and sculpture. Many considered the moving image anathema, horrified by how sound would invade adjacent sacrosanct white-cube spaces. Yet by the late 1990s, museums were finally contemplating video and media as exhibitable art forms.

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The Guardian

Oct 17 2020
Not all doom and gloom: UK cultural highlights for autumn

From books to ballet, from big to small screen, from art to theatre, there is much to enjoy despite the pandemic

Autumnal days are drawing in and Covid-19 restrictions are tightening. But it is not all doom and gloom. The world of culture is fighting back, aiming to boost the spirit of a nation. Here are just a few highlights to look forward to.

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The Guardian

Oct 16 2020
20 photographs of the week

Conflict in Nagorno-Karabakh, Hurricane Delta makes landfall in Louisiana, demonstrations in Santiago, and the enduring impact of Covid-19: the most striking images from around the world

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artforum.com

Oct 16 2020
Duan Jianyu
Though small in scale, Duan Jianyu’s new solo exhibition, “Automatic Writing - Automatic Understanding,” covers the artist’s creative output from 2014 to 2020, giving viewers a sense of how her practice
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artforum.com

Oct 16 2020
Tamina Amadyar
Alongside large-format canvases—abstractions, never in more than two shades—Tamina Amadyar is showing watercolors for the first time. Figurative, multicolored, and intimate in scale, this new group of
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artforum.com

Oct 16 2020
Brooklyn Museum Continues Deaccessioning Spree
No doubt spurred on by the tremendous success of its first deaccession sale, which saw the institution reap $5.4 million ($6.6 million with fees), an amount considerably beyond its expectations, the
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The New York Times

Oct 16 2020
Parenting While Black: Titus Kaphar’s Starkly Powerful Works
A painter’s new show ventures away from the past, toward contemporary traumas in Black lives.
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The Guardian

Oct 16 2020
Casey Jenkins v Australia Council: when controversial art loses funding, what does it mean for culture?

The artist intended to self-inseminate over a live stream, in a work that could demystify queer parenthood. But after news got out, the grant was revoked

On 1 May 2020 the Australian performance artist Casey Jenkins received a $25,000 grant from the Australia Council to present a work, titled Procreate, at festivals in the UK and Chile.

But as the pandemic spread, international borders closed, and Jenkins – who uses they/them pronouns – sought a variation to the funding, proposing a new Covid-safe project instead: Immaculate. The work would feature a live stream of Jenkins – who hopes to fall pregnant – self-inseminating with donated sperm, while discussing their past experiences with conception.

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The New York Times

Oct 16 2020
After 75 Years and 15 Claims, a Bid to Regain Lost Art Inches Forward
After 75 Years and 15 Claims, a Bid to Regain Lost Art Inches Forward
Heirs of Baron Mor Lipot Herzog, a Hungarian banker whose collection of masterpieces was seized by the Nazis, are still pursuing its return.
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artforum.com

Oct 16 2020
Gabi Dao and geetha thurairajah
The term soothsayer is derived from late Middle English for a person who speaks truth, but its contemporary use is generally synonymous with a fortune-teller. Given as an exhibition title, in its
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The Guardian

Oct 16 2020
Chris Killip obituary
Photographer of working-class life during the decline of industry in north-east England

Chris Killip, who has died aged 74 from lung cancer, was one of Britain’s greatest documentary photographers. His most compelling work was made in the north-east of England in the late 1970s and early 80s and was rooted in the relationship of people to the places that made – and often unmade – them as the traditional jobs they relied on disappeared. In 1988 he published In Flagrante, a landmark of social documentary that has influenced generations of younger photographers. His friend and fellow photographer Martin Parr described it as “the best book about Britain since the war”.

Killip later said that he had unknowingly photographed the “de-industrialisation” of the north-east. He had set out to render meaningful the lives of those who had been marginalised by the end of traditional industry in the region – miners, shipbuilders, fishermen and the like – and he did so through acute observation and empathy. “In recording their lives, I’m valuing their lives,” he said later of his mainly unemployed subjects. “These people will not appear in history books because ordinary people don’t. History is done to them. It is not acknowledged that they make history.”

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artforum.com

Oct 16 2020
Linda Stark
Appearing on everything from erasers to emojis, the heart symbol is ubiquitous for good reason: The blood-pumping muscle’s vital function is an ideal metaphor for life and love. Yet it can also beat as
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artforum.com

Oct 16 2020
Montreal Museum of Fine Arts Names Successor of Ousted Director Nathalie Bondil
The Montreal Museum of Fine Arts (MMFA) today announced Stéphane Aquin as its new director, Artnews reports. Aquin, who is currently chief curator of the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden in
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The Guardian

Oct 16 2020
Chris Killip: recognition for a great photographer | Letter

Mark Haworth-Booth on ‘a remarkable talent and a very special human being’

Your article (Chris Killip, hard-hitting photographer of Britain’s working class, dies aged 74, 14 October) says “Killip was not given the recognition he deserved by major British art and photography institutions.”

On the contrary, Chris Killip’s first book – on the Isle of Man – was published in 1980 with support from the Arts Council. The master set of 69 photographs from which the book was printed was bought by the Victoria and Albert Museum (home of the national collection of the art of photography) in 1980.

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