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artforum.com

Feb 14 2020
Silvia Lara Wins Deutsche Bank Frieze Los Angeles Film Award
Frieze and Deutsche Bank have named Silvia Lara the winner of the inaugural Deutsche Bank Frieze Los Angeles Film Award, which grants $10,000 to emerging, Los Angeles–based filmmakers between the ages
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artforum.com

Feb 14 2020
Ariana Reines on love and visitations
I WAS IN LOVE WITH TWO PEOPLE and I had traveled to their country to be near them.  I already had a lover, with whom I had been suffering a disappointment, and I had just completed a large and
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artforum.com

Feb 14 2020
Kim Gordon: “Earthquake”
Kim Gordon’s “Earthquake.”
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artforum.com

Feb 14 2020
Leslie-Lohman Museum Selects Chitra Ganesh for Fourth QUEERPOWER Commission
The Leslie-Lohman Museum of Art in New York has commissioned Brooklyn-based artist Chitra Ganesh to create the next iteration of its annual site-specific installation, QUEERPOWER, which will take up
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artforum.com

Feb 14 2020
Dino Saluzzi: Bandoneón Tierra Adentro
Dino Saluzzi’s Bandoneón Tierra Adentro.
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The New York Times

Feb 14 2020
Cooper Hewitt Chief Was Forced Out After Probe of Her Wedding
Cooper Hewitt Chief Was Forced Out After Probe of Her Wedding
Caroline Baumann resigned as director of the design museum following an investigation into how she procured her wedding dress and the space for the ceremony.
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The Guardian

Feb 14 2020
'There is life outside of London': converts to Leeds sing its praises

Art, culture, nature and property prices are tempting people away from the capital

In the past five years the number of Londoners moving up to Leeds has risen by 58%, from 2,720 in 2013 to 4,296 in 2018. Home to several universities and a cosmopolitan population, Leeds boasts a flourishing cultural scene, quality nightlife and large-scale regeneration that has transformed the West Yorkshire city in recent years.

Beyond the Victorian architecture of the city centre, there are leafy suburbs of Victorian terraces and high-rise apartment buildings. With average house prices around £182,700, 62% lower than the capital, Leeds is proving attractive to first-time buyers, families and renters alike.

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The Guardian

Feb 14 2020
Hyperphantasia: a trip through the California desert – in pictures

Australian photographer Kate Ballis is drawn to the Modernist architecture and landscapes of California. She roves through Palm Springs, Joshua Tree National Park, Arizona, the Atacama Desert and the Uyuni Salt flats with a converted full-spectrum mirrorless camera and infrared filters, which bathe her photographs in pink and purple hues. These hyperreal images look as though they have been plucked from a dollhouse or diorama. Her latest exhibition, Hyperphantasia, is on display at Arthouse Gallery in Rushcutters Bay until 29 February 2020.

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artforum.com

Feb 14 2020
Vivian Crockett Joins Dallas Museum of Art as Assistant Curator of Contemporary Art
The Dallas Museum of Art (DMA) has named Vivian Crockett assistant curator of contemporary art. Crockett currently serves as a Joan Tisch teaching fellow at the Whitney Museum of American Art in New
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artforum.com

Feb 14 2020
Insolvent Unseen Amsterdam Fair Leaves Artists Unpaid, Sets Sights for Fall Opening
Less than two weeks after Unseen, the Dutch company that runs the photography fair Unseen Amsterdam, https://www.artforum.com/news/dutch-photography-fair-unseen-amsterdam-declares-bankruptcy-82083
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artforum.com

Feb 14 2020
Insolvent Unseen Amsterdam Fair Leaves Artists Unpaid, Sets Sights on Fall Opening
Less than two weeks after Unseen, the Dutch company that runs the photography fair Unseen Amsterdam, https://www.artforum.com/news/dutch-photography-fair-unseen-amsterdam-declares-bankruptcy-82083
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artforum.com

Feb 14 2020
Elisabeth Wild (1922–2020)
Swiss Austrian painter and collagist Elisabeth Wild-who began her career painting landscapes and still lifes but turned to fabulist collaged abstractions sourced from the pages of magazines in later
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The Guardian

Feb 14 2020
The war on trolls, punk's cutting edge and the big birds of books – the week in art

Art bites back at cyberbullies, Hockney shows early promise and the critic who shattered a $20,000 work in glass – all in your weekly dispatch

Linderism
The photomontage genius of Manchester punk brings her cutting blade to gentle Cambridge.
Kettle’s Yard, Cambridge, until 26 April.

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The New York Times

Feb 14 2020
Paraguay’s Response to Modernist Architecture? Clay, Mud and Timber
Paraguay’s Response to Modernist Architecture? Clay, Mud and Timber
A new generation of builders is devising daring structures that celebrate natural materials, push for eco-consciousness — and argue for a more democratic future.
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The Guardian

Feb 14 2020
Landscapes, languor and limbs: the other side of Dorothea Lange

Migrant Mother, Lange’s image from the Depression, came to define her – but a new book reveals a more intimate, strikingly modern side to the great photographer

‘Some things you do get a life of their own,” Dorothea Lange once told an interviewer. “They cut loose from the person who made them.” She was referring to her photograph Migrant Mother, in which she distilled the collective trauma of the Great Depression into a single, hauntingly intimate portrait of Florence Owens Thompson, a sharecropper’s wife.

Taken in 1936, it became one of the most famous images of the 20th century, but the way it came to define her work made Lange ambivalent about the role – and limits – of documentary photography.

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artforum.com

Feb 14 2020
"Unexpected Encounters"
At least sixty tons of recyclable glass gravel cover the gallery floors of “Unexpected Encounters,” transforming the space into a veritable moonscape or postapocalyptic wasteland. Rarely exhibited
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artforum.com

Feb 14 2020
MoMA Names Clément Chéroux Chief Photography Curator
The Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) in New York announced today that Clément Chéroux will join the institution as its next chief curator of photography. He will be responsible for the Department of
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The Guardian

Feb 14 2020
The real star of Bong Joon-ho’s Oscar-winner Parasite? The house

Four carefully crafted sets give the appearance of a luxurious labyrinth of burnished wood and crystal-clear glass – a perfect location for menace and suburban depravity

Pretty much every actor in Parasite puts in a note-perfect performance, but as the film unfolds there’s no doubting the star of the show. The house where the bulk of the action takes place – a gloriously opulent modernist building, shot to ensure no gleaming surface or painstaking furniture arrangement goes unnoticed – is truly a thing of wonder. Bong Joon-ho’s big-screen creations to date include amphibious man-eating mutants and genetically modified superpigs, but this pad might just top the lot.

Within the film, this is the home of the well-to-do Park family and brainchild of a hotshot celebrity architect; in real life, it’s the result of four carefully crafted sets and lots of clever editing. The upshot is the appearance of a luxurious labyrinth of burnished wood and crystal-clear glass, all towering tastefully over the best-kept lawn this side of Wisteria Lane. Bong’s film imparts many vital lessons, and chief among them is that there are few things in life more pleasing than a perfectly positioned coffee table.

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The Guardian

Feb 14 2020
Own a Guardian classic photograph: Ching Ching greets Chia Chia, 1981

This week the photograph in our weekly archive print series is one shot by Frank Martin in December 1981 of two pandas being reunited at London Zoo


In September 1974, two adolescent pandas left Beijing for Britain, a gift from Chairman Mao Zedong to the then prime minister, Edward Heath. Within three weeks of the animals’ arrival, visitor numbers to London Zoo doubled, to 16,000 a week. But despite high hopes for the pair breeding, they showed no romantic interest in one another. So, in 1981, they were separated for nine months while Chia Chia, the male (right), was ferried to Washington on an unsuccessful mating mission. The Guardian photographer Frank Martin was at London Zoo to capture the moment they were reunited at the end of the year.Words: Hannah Booth

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The Guardian

Feb 14 2020
Love lines: the Book Illustration Competition longlist

This year’s prize from the Folio Society and House of Illustration called for images to accompany love poetry from Imtiaz Dharker, Emily Dickinson and John Donne. Here are the chosen entries, and the inspiring poems

Imtiaz Dharker

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The Guardian

Feb 14 2020
Beverly Pepper obituary

Sculptor whose works in metal, both vast and more delicate, were inspired by ancient civilisations

In 1962, when Beverly Pepper was invited to take part in an artist residency at a metalworking factory in the Italian town of Piombino, they asked if she could weld. “Of course,” she lied, quickly seeking out a local handyman to teach her the basics. That crash-course led to a six-decade career in which metal became the American artist’s primary material.

As well as iron and bronze, Pepper, who has died aged 97, was the first to use Corten steel (which weathers attractively outdoors) in art, before more famous male peers such as Donald Judd and Richard Serra. She employed these industrial materials on a range of scales, from vast land art projects to delicate, plinth-based sculpture. Curvae, a 2012 series of steel works, each over a metre in height, is typical in how the red-brown weathered surface of the material blends with the landscape. The connection to nature is reinforced as each piece of metal curls off the ground like a dropped leaf.

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The New York Times

Feb 14 2020
Grown-Up Art at a Children’s Museum, but It’s Still Playtime
Visitors to “Inside Art” can make their own work and collaborate with other artists. The show is just one of several activities available during school break.
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The Guardian

Feb 13 2020
Sony world photography awards shortlist and finalists

The World Photography Organisation has revealed the finalist and shortlisted photographers in the professional competition for its 2020 awards. Works by the finalists will go on display this April at Somerset House, London

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The New York Times

Feb 13 2020
What to See Right Now in New York Art Galleries
Daniel Rios Rodriguez’s spiral assemblages; Hannah Levy’s perspective-altering sculptures; Anne Minich’s enigmatic paintings; Pieter Hugo’s portraits from the edge.
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The New York Times

Feb 13 2020
MoMA Names New Chief Photography Curator
MoMA Names New Chief Photography Curator
Clément Chéroux, of the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art’s Pritzker Center for Photography, will fill the role.
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The New York Times

Feb 13 2020
As Virus Tightens Grip on China, the Art World Feels the Squeeze
As Virus Tightens Grip on China, the Art World Feels the Squeeze
Movie theaters have closed, art fairs have been canceled and orchestra performances called off as the epidemic has curtailed travel and foot traffic on the mainland and beyond.
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The Guardian

Feb 13 2020
Rubbish mixtape: fan reunited with cassette 25 years after losing it

Stella Wedell astounded to spot tape in exhibition of art made out of plastic marine debris

A music fan has been reunited with a cassette tape she lost while on holiday 25 year ago after it washed up on a beach hundreds of miles away.

Stella Wedell was 12 when she took the tape on a Spanish holiday to listen to songs by the likes of Pet Shop Boys, Shaggy and Bob Marley on her Walkman.

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artforum.com

Feb 13 2020
Miho Dohi
Small-scale, lightweight, and delightfully off-kilter amalgams of yarn, paper, wire, wood, and other humble materials abound on walls and tables at Galerie Crèvecoeur, marking the Kanagawa, Japan–based
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The New York Times

Feb 13 2020
14 Art Exhibitions to View in N.Y.C. This Weekend
14 Art Exhibitions to View in N.Y.C. This Weekend
Our guide to new art shows and some that will be closing soon.
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artforum.com

Feb 13 2020
Jacob Mason-Macklin
A trio of black faces confronts visitors at the entrance to Jacob Mason-Macklin’s solo exhibition “Pure Hell.” Depicted from the shoulders up, each painted figure wears a white cowboy hat and exudes
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The New York Times

Feb 13 2020
The Wild, Anti-Authoritarian Art of Peter Saul
The Wild, Anti-Authoritarian Art of Peter Saul
The painter’s biting critiques shape his five-decade retrospective at the New Museum.
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The New York Times

Feb 13 2020
Into the Black Forest With the Greatest Living Artist
Into the Black Forest With the Greatest Living Artist
How does Anselm Kiefer conjure such brutal beauty, such overwhelming gravity? To find out, the novelist Karl Ove Knausgaard followed him back to the source.
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artforum.com

Feb 13 2020
House of Representatives Approves Plan to Build New Women’s History Museum
As cultural institutions across the United States organize programming in celebration of the centennial of the ratification of the nineteenth amendment, which granted women the right to vote, the House
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The New York Times

Feb 13 2020
In Trippy Times, Bill Graham Took Care of Reality
In Trippy Times, Bill Graham Took Care of Reality
America’s best-known rock promoter brought local acts like the Grateful Dead to the national stage. A new exhibition in Manhattan shows how he did it.
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The New York Times

Feb 13 2020
Empathy and Artistry: Rediscovering Dorothea Lange
Her indelible images came to represent the Great Depression. Now a revelatory exhibition at MoMA confirms her place in the pantheon of American photographers.
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The New York Times

Feb 13 2020
Robert Irwin’s Ambient Odyssey
Robert Irwin’s Ambient Odyssey
After seven decades of experimentation, the artist produces “Unlights,” a confounding wonder — and possibly “my swan song.”
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The Guardian

Feb 13 2020
Say it with Banksy? Valentine’s gift catapults house to street art fame

Artwork depicting girl firing bunch of flowers appears in street artist’s home city

A beguiling piece of street art depicting a girl firing a bunch of flowers into the air using a catapult has appeared on the side of a house in Bristol, the home city of Banksy.

The artist has not confirmed the work as his but it caused crowds to gather and prompted the owner of the building to worry about how to protect what may turn out to be a valuable work.

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artforum.com

Feb 13 2020
Etel Adnan
Accordion-style books in an accordion-centric city: Music has rarely felt as relevant to Etel Adnan’s works as in “Leporellos,” an exhibition titled after the term for this type of folding booklet.
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artforum.com

Feb 13 2020
ICA Miami Welcomes Seven New Members to Its Board of Trustees
The Institute of Contemporary Art (ICA), Miami, has added seven new members to its board of trustees: Daniel Berkowitz, Michele Beyer, Suzi Cordish, Andi Potamkin, Andre Sakhai, Roz Stuzin, and Alex
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The New York Times

Feb 13 2020
When a Mentor Said Tear Down Your Collection and Start Over, They Did
When a Mentor Said Tear Down Your Collection and Start Over, They Did
Would you make a purchase based solely on a JPEG from an artist’s Instagram page? No problem.
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artforum.com

Feb 13 2020
University of Texas at Austin Receives $10 Million for Blanton Museum and Public Art
The University of Texas at Austin has received $10 million from the private, Austin-based foundation Still Water in support of two major arts initiatives. The funds will be divided between the Blanton
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artforum.com

Feb 13 2020
MFA Boston Appoints New Curatorial Assistants
The Museum of Fine Arts (MFA), Boston, has hired Debra Lennard and Marina Tyquiengco as curatorial assistants in its Department of Contemporary Art. Lennard is a Ph.D. candidate at the Graduate Center
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The Guardian

Feb 13 2020
Vintage winter sport posters – in pictures

A selection of vintage ski and winter sports posters dating back to the early 20th century showcasing resorts from the Alps to Yosemite, from poster artists such as Emil Cardinaux, Dwight Shepler and Arthur Zelger, from a collection to be auctioned in New York

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The Guardian

Feb 13 2020
'The right has no trouble speaking their rage': artist Barbara Kruger on America in crisis

The conceptual artist has installed banners, billboards and stickers across Los Angeles for the city’s Frieze art fair

“Life is such a crapshoot,” says the artist Barbara Kruger. “It’s full of fortuitous moments and horrible tragedies – and everything in between.”

For this week’s Frieze art fair in Los Angeles, the conceptual artist has plastered the city with banners, billboards, and stickers emblazoned with provocative text in her signature all-caps Futura typeface. Pithy, politically charged questions such as “Who hustles” and “Who buys low” confront people traveling through downtown’s Union Station in English and Spanish. Meanwhile “Who buys the con?” addresses passersby of the 1930s-era CBS Radio building in Hollywood, which is now a working space.

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The Guardian

Feb 12 2020
Facing the future: teen photographers explore home, happiness and hair – in pictures

Shoreditch’s Autograph gallery is exhibiting new work by young London photographers – aged 16 to 19 – whose work examines identity, culture and community

• Common Ground is at Autograph Gallery, London, until 15 February

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The Guardian

Feb 12 2020
From first love to unfollowing – culture that sums up romance in 2020

A book redefining marriage, a riotous show about dating, the secret meanings of breakup songs and a sex show to put your back out … ahead of Valentine’s Day, our critics pick works that sum up passion in our turbulent times

From Adam and Eve in the book of Genesis to Shaughna making a play for Luke on tonight’s Love Island, human relationships have preoccupied us for millennia. So which are the books, films, songs and games that express romance in 2020?

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The Guardian

Feb 12 2020
Being an outsider artist is a noble pursuit – until nobody exhibits your work | Andrew Frost

Documentary on painter Keith Looby is a cautionary tale of rebellion becoming almost more important than what you stand for

The comedian Steve Martin once observed that the French have a word for everything. Indeed, a word in French with a very different usage than in English is ressentiment. This is the “sense of hostility directed towards an object which one identifies as the cause of one’s frustration”. This cause can be a person, an institution, a system of belief, almost anything at all, but whatever it is, ressentiment causes in turn a debilitating jealousy and a niggling sense of inferiority.

This ripe Gallic noun came to mind while watching Looby, a new documentary directed by Nick Garner and Iain Knight about the Australian painter Keith Looby.

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artforum.com

Feb 12 2020
Otis Kwame Kye Quaicoe
Otis Kwame Kye Quaicoe’s exhibition at Roberts Projects features an ensemble of paintings that, although clearly indebted to the colorful, virtuosic work of Barkley L. Hendricks and Kerry James Marshall,
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The Guardian

Feb 12 2020
The Leunig Fragments review – portrait of the cartoonist is a quasi-poetic cop-out

Reluctant subject and tentative director unite in a documentary that gives little insight into the cartoonist who ‘weaponised whimsy’

Watching the director Kasimir Burgess’ documentary about the veteran cartoonist Michael Leunig left me conflicted. I was impressed by several aspects of this film, including its poignant and heavy-hearted qualities, its unusual air of melancholia. But damn, it was a frustrating experience – revolving around a subject who is so private, and so unwilling to explore key areas of his life and legacy, that one wonders why he agreed to participate in the first place and what he thought the film would achieve.

The Leunig Fragments is more self-reflexive than most portraits of artists. Like the director Shirley Clarke’s classic 1967 experimental doco Portrait of Jason, its title indicates a limited impression of its subject, suggesting a glimpse – or in this instance a series of glimpses – rather than a full picture.

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artforum.com

Feb 12 2020
Blain|Southern to Close All Galleries
Blain Southern, the gallery founded by Harry Blain and Graham Southern in 2010, will permanently close its three locations in Berlin, London, and New York. Blain announced the news in an email on
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