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artforum.com

Jan 19 2020
Miz Cracker Visits: Lisa Yuskavage
Miz Cracker visits celebrated painter Lisa Yuskavage at her studio in Gowanus, Brooklyn.
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The Guardian

Jan 19 2020
Smashed cars and Chinese chewing: the five masterpieces of video art

Half a century ago, an art form flickered into life as mavericks from Nam June Paik to Bill Viola took up technology to transform the way we see the world

I was a bright-eyed young curator with a passion for the unconventional when video art first took off. Lured by its galvanising pandemonium, I jumped into its wide-open terrain. It was the mid-60s and portable equipment had just started appearing in shops. Although the gear was rudimentary, activist mavericks ran with it, suddenly able to storm a medium that had until then been the exclusive domain of broadcast TV.

I was working at the Museum of Modern Art in New York and, keeping my ear to the ground, would attend events in alternative spaces housed in low-rent, rundown buildings across the city. I would race up splintery staircases just as artists rushed down them with newly completed videotapes tucked under their arms. I watched works on TV monitors and navigated my way through mazes of cables and cobbled-together equipment to experience “site-specific installations” – an unfolding new art form showing live feeds or prerecorded videos on carefully arranged TV sets.

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The New York Times

Jan 19 2020
Park Avenue Armory Celebrates Women’s Suffrage With 100 Artists
Park Avenue Armory Celebrates Women’s Suffrage With 100 Artists
To mark 100 years since the ratification of the 19th Amendment, the Armory and a group of 10 cultural institutions are commissioning works from women.
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The Guardian

Jan 19 2020
Minha casa é sua casa: The family who turned their Lisbon home into a hotel

In a 1900s building in Lisbon, António Costa Lopes and Filipa Fortunato have created an intimate hotel that feels like a family home – because it is one

Over the years, Casa Fortunato in Lisbon has been many things to many people. The first floor was originally a doctor’s home, while the ground floor was divided into several shops, their glass facades facing the wide, tree-lined street. After the second world war, it served as a meeting place for the city’s Japanese community; then, from the 1960s, Lisbon diners flocked to its marble entrance when it became a fashionable restaurant. By the 1990s a financial company had put paid to that, redecorating the rooms in global-business beige.

Ten years ago, António Falcão Costa Lopes and his brother Alexandre moved the Lisbon outpost of their architecture firm here (their main office is in Angola) and the building’s fortunes took an upward turn. It is still owned by the family who had it built in the early 1900s, but under the Costa Lopes’ expert eye, various repairs were gently suggested and carried out and the building began to regain a cohesive character.

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The Guardian

Jan 19 2020
‘Part-science lab, part-playground’: how kids made museums take fun seriously

From London to California, architects are helping museums provide interactive learning experiences that can’t be found on screen

Last year, the Hoxton-based architecture practice AOC set up the Open Studio at the V&A Museum of Childhood in nearby Bethnal Green, east London. The 147-year-old institution was set to be renovated and initial consultation of local schoolchildren had found that they wanted the space turned into the “most joyful museum in the world”. AOC set up the Open Studio to find out how this could be done. It was a test-lab of forums and workshops for children and families, a space where visitors were encouraged to hold objects from the V&A’s collection and answer questions such as: “What is a museum?”

Geoff Shearcroft, who is co-founding director of AOC and led the Open Studio, said consensus among children was that a museum is “a place for collecting and looking at objects”. But they also thought the top attractions at the Museum of Childhood were “playing on the rocking horse, the sandpit, running up and down the ramp and having an ice cream”.

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The Guardian

Jan 19 2020
Ruth Asawa: A Line Can Go Anywhere; Benode Behari Mukherjee: After Sight – review

David Zwirner, London
Posthumous celebrations of two undervalued but extraordinary 20th-century artists give them both the recognition they deserve

It hardly seems possible that there could be a major 20th-century artist still ripe for rediscovery, but so it seems with the Japanese-American sculptor Ruth Asawa (1926-2013). Her work comes as a complete surprise, and not only because she has never been shown in this country before. Everything Asawa made was so original, and fashioned mainly out of wire – an art of pure visual joy.

Born in rural California, Asawa’s first exposure to art teaching came when her family and other Japanese-Americans were detained in internment camps during the second world war. After hostilities ended, she studied art at the famously experimental and non-hierarchical Black Mountain College in North Carolina. She began with ink drawing, both figurative and abstract. But in 1947, a Mexican craftsman taught Asawa how to weave baskets out of wire, and this knowledge inspired her own unique structures.

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The Guardian

Jan 19 2020
Your pictures: share your photos on the theme of ‘dry’

Wherever you are in the world, this week we’d like to see your pictures on the theme ‘dry’

The next theme for our weekly photography assignment, published in print in the Observer New Review is ‘dry’.

Share your photos of what dry means to you – and tell us about your image in the description box.

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The Guardian

Jan 19 2020
London’s new Centre for Music? Don’t hold your breath…

The delay to the London Symphony Orchestra’s planned new home is growing. And unrest in Iran could trouble a V&A show

Wanted: a philanthropist to cough up about £145m towards London’s proposed Centre for Music. For that amount – about half the total cost of what will be the London Symphony Orchestra’s new home – you’ll get naming rights. The plan for the centre was put forward in 2015, just as Simon Rattle was announced as the LSO’s new music director. It is to be built on the site of the existing Museum of London, at the western edge of the City – 500 metres from the Barbican, the LSO’s longtime base.

But only last Monday did the museum finally submit its planning application for its own new location, at the disused end of London’s Smithfield market. Assuming the City corporation gives the green light later this year to the stylish proposed design, the museum will begin the very complicated process of transforming the historic market buildings before it can move.

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The Guardian

Jan 18 2020
The big picture: Alfred Eisenstaedt’s people-watching at the opera
A moment’s inattention at a La Scala premiere made just the shot the pioneering photojournalist needed

Alfred Eisenstaedt, the prime mover of candid photojournalism, took this picture at the La Scala opera house in 1933. Eisenstaedt was experimenting with a new Leica camera that allowed him to do away with much of the clunky paraphernalia of his craft. That night, at the gala premiere of Rimsky-Korsakov’s The Legend of the Invisible City of Kitezh, he was looking for a way to find some intimacy among the theatre’s grand architectural curves.

Scanning the boxes in the upper tiers of the opera house he saw a young woman whose attention to the progress of the Russian epic on stage did not seem absolute. Better still, the box next to her was empty. Eisenstaedt was an unobtrusive man, only 5ft, and he inveigled his way into the empty box and got his shot. “Without the girl there would have been no picture,” he said.

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The Guardian

Jan 18 2020
Eye candy: Jarvis Cocker on the joy of vintage sweet wrappers

The vivid packaging of yesteryear hooked children with images of space travel, pop stars and smoking, as seen in a new book showcasing the bounty of avid collector John Townsend

Before we get on to aspects of design, let’s just take a little time to think about what these wrappers actually contained. A generation of children raised on bubble gum, fizzy drinks and sweet cigarettes – in the days before sugar tax, when E numbers were a signifier of quality and sophistication. It’s a wonder any of us who lived through this era have any teeth left at all.

All these products were aimed at kids – but they gave a peculiar foretaste of the adult world we could expect to grow up into. It would seem the main thing we were expected to do as adults was smoke – the aforementioned sweet cigarettes, coconut tobacco (my personal favourite), liquorice pipes and grotesque chocolate cigars. Career options, meanwhile, were law enforcer, space explorer, racing driver, footballer or pop star. Failing that, you could always become a monster. No wonder we couldn’t wait to grow up.

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The Guardian

Jan 18 2020
The magic of mushrooms in arts – in pictures

“I noticed so many artists working with fungi,” says curator Francesca Gavin, “I wanted to learn why.” This has led to a new Somerset House show, Mushrooms: The Art, Design and Future of Fungi (30 January to 26 April), a 130-year cultural history featuring artists and designers including Cy Twombly, Carsten Höller, Beatrix Potter, Tom Dixon and Takashi Murakami.

“I want people to leave the show inspired by fungi,” Gavin says, “and with a little more knowledge of their importance to the planet’s survival.”

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The Guardian

Jan 18 2020
The best home makeovers – it's not all big windows and knocking through

The Don’t Move, Improve! awards celebrate London’s most innovative architectural home renovations, from twisting walls to chequerboard floors

Archaeologists of the future, should they find themselves sifting through the rubble of early 21st-century London, will find a distinctive layer. It will contain taps and door handles of Nordic design and manufacture, long sections of structural steel and the remnants of sliding glass doors. There might be chairs designed by mid-20th-century Danes, if they haven’t rotted away: by Arne Jacobsen in the older part of the layer, by Hans Wegner in the later.

From this evidence the archaeologist will know that they are looking at a period that started around the dawn of the Blair era and continues until the present. It’s a long enough time – almost a generation – but one in which a remarkably consistent style of home improvement, a sort of metropolitan vernacular, has grown up. It is well represented in the shortlist for the Don’t Move, Improve! award for home makeovers, now in its 10th edition, and the subject of a forthcoming exhibition at the gallery space of New London Architecture. The winner will be announced on 11 February.

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artforum.com

Jan 18 2020
Harry Burke around Condo London 2020
“WE FOUND A CAFE with friendly staff and pleasant, inexpensive food,” recounts the unnamed, flâneuring narrator of Patrick Keiller’s 1994 film London, “but there was no sign of anyone writing poetry.”
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The Guardian

Jan 18 2020
How Linder went from Orgasm Addict to Chatsworth House

The art maverick first made her name in the punk era with collages fusing fashion and pornography, and a major retrospective proves her work still provokes

It’s not easy to celebrate female sexuality and vaginas on public transport, but Linder, the British artist known for her uncompromising photomontages, managed it at Southwark Underground, a station that sees 16.7 million people pass through its barriers each year. The 85m-long billboard she installed there last November – a luscious and cinematic sequence of roses, lips, female faces, food and Roman votaries that emerged from research into local figures and places and the archive of London Transport – is called The Bower of Bliss. And that, as it happens, is a quaint old phrase for vagina. “It suddenly came back to me when I was filming at Chatsworth last year,” she says of the term she had first discovered years before in an issue of Oz magazine edited by Germaine Greer. The work is a reminder that women don’t just need safe spaces but joyful ones, too.

Sex and pornography can loom large in the work of Linder. Among her best known are those where super-tanned 70s Playboy nudes are embellished with explosions of flowers; and naked women in coquettish poses have an electric heater, or a clock, or a Victoria sponge for a head. Linder, who changed the spelling of her first name as punk exploded in mid-70s Manchester (“It felt more European”), has been busy. She spent much of 2018 as artist-in-residence at Chatsworth House, digging through the history of that stately Derbyshire pile to create a film, an exhibition and even a fragrance. “It’s such a treasure house. There are parcels in the attic that have never been opened,” she says, though a more 20th-century discovery was Debo, Duchess of Devonshire’s adoration of Elvis. She also had an exhibition of her finely scalpelled montages at Nottingham Contemporary and created a film and a flag for Glasgow Women’s Library.

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The Guardian

Jan 18 2020
Pedal power: behind the scenes at Bristol's Temple Cycles – in pictures

Temple Cycles is an independent firm inspired by Britain’s long tradition of bicycle manufacture, which has blossomed from a one-man startup into a thriving business in the space of six years.

Mears’ mission is to create sustainable products that will last a lifetime. He has opened a shop on Brick Lane in Shoreditch; and there is a thriving online business, especially in Europe. But the heart of the company remains in Bristol, in the workspace where his small team continue in their quest to create high-quality bicycles, each made to order – and built to last.

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The Guardian

Jan 18 2020
Illuminating: the making of Bert Frank's luxury lighting – in pictures

Robbie Llewellyn and Adam Yeats met by chance at a London lighting shop, and soon found they shared a vision. Llewellyn’s design ideas and Yeats’s industrial knowledge have been beautifully combined to create Bert Frank.

In Yeats’s presswork factory in Clerkenwell, London – a high-end metalwork enterprise that has been in existence for more than a century – old-school manufacturing techniques and cutting-edge technology are used to produce the brass and copper shapes layered with alabaster, marble, smoked glass and bone china, that have become Bert Frank’s hallmark design

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The Guardian

Jan 18 2020
Working with the master glassmakers of Italy – in pictures

The Veneto region of Italy is home to some of the greatest glassmakers on the planet. For the most part, they’re located on the small island of Murano, where names such as Salviati, Seguso and Barovier & Toso have established their reputations over centuries.

But there’s a new team in town: Wonderglass, launched in 2013 by father-and-son team Christian and Maurizio Mussati, to create furniture and lighting that blends craft with innovation.

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The Guardian

Jan 18 2020
Off the wall: the enduring impact of the printed poster

The visual history of protest – and promotion – would be nothing without ink and paper

A t New York’s recently opened Poster House museum, three exhibits sum up the poster’s impact on life and culture. At one end is an ad by Raymond Savignac for French soap brand Monsavon. In the gallery next to it are hand-painted Ghanaian film posters – a rich tradition sadly falling victim to the lurid charms of digital printing. Downstairs is a display from the Women’s Marches in the US.

Despite the rise of digital media, posters have retained their popularity. We like their immediacy, simplicity, the tactile quality of ink on paper. They have nostalgic appeal and a link to important cultural moments. They are satisfying to make, and nice to put on a wall.

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The Guardian

Jan 18 2020
20 photographs of the week

The erupting Taal volcano, bushfires in Australia, airstrikes in Syria and unrest in Lebanon – the best photography in news, culture and sport from around the world this week

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artforum.com

Jan 17 2020
Bruno Racine to Lead Pinault’s Venice Museums
French billionaire François Pinault has appointed museum veteran Bruno Racine director of the Palazzo Grassi and the Punta della Dogana in Venice. The eighty-three-year-old Pinault-whose luxury conglomerate
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The New York Times

Jan 17 2020
Klimt Painting Found in Museum’s Wall Is Authentic, Experts Say
Klimt Painting Found in Museum’s Wall Is Authentic, Experts Say
Gardeners found the painting in the wall of the Italian museum it was stolen from almost 23 years ago.
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The New York Times

Jan 17 2020
The Outsider Art Fair 2020: 7 Must-See Exhibits
Our critic explores Yuichiro Ukai’s pen-and-marker dinosaurs and samurai, ceramic animals from the Peruvian Amazon and the photography of Vivian Maier.
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artforum.com

Jan 17 2020
Howard University Gifted 152 Works of African American Art
Howard University in Washington, DC, has received a gift of 152 African American artworks from the collection of arts patron Patricia Turner Walters. Valued at more than $2.5 million, the donation
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artforum.com

Jan 17 2020
Robert William Burke Jr. (1948–2020)
Robert William Burke Jr., a distinguished gallerist and collector, died on January 3 at his home in Paris at seventy-one years old. Known by his middle name, Burke was the adopted son of Robert William
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artforum.com

Jan 17 2020
Brazilian Secretary of Culture Fired for Quoting Nazi Propaganda in Speech
Brazil’s far-right president, Jair Bolsonaro, fired his secretary of culture, Roberto Alvim, after Alvim released a video on his Twitter account on Thursday, January 16, in which he quotes a speech by
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artforum.com

Jan 17 2020
Sasha Frere-Jones on Warp and ECM
IN 2019, WARP RECORDS TURNED THIRTY AND EDITIONS OF CONTEMPORARY MUSIC (ECM) HIT FIFTY. The connection felt superficial, and then it didn’t, though I couldn’t immediately figure out why. Both of these
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The New York Times

Jan 17 2020
She’s Your Guide to the Sound World of Fluxus
She’s Your Guide to the Sound World of Fluxus
Gelsey Bell, a wide-ranging singer, composer and scholar, is leading listening sessions of works from the MoMA sound archives.
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The Guardian

Jan 17 2020
'We cannot let this issue go': the artists taking a stand against child separation

An ambitious new project brings together over 100 artists who have used the accounts of detained migrant children to create work with an urgent purpose

In June last year, a group of volunteer lawyers, doctors and mental health experts visited a US Customs and Border Protection facility in Clint, Texas, which held migrant children separated from their families at the border. Their task was to record the accounts of the unaccompanied minors, some as young as toddlers, in government custody to assure the US was not in violation of the Flores agreement, a 1997 legal settlement that requires the federal government to provide minimum basic levels of care to detained migrants under 18. The conditions the volunteers witnessed there – children sleeping on concrete floors, toddlers in stained clothing denied access to showers, sleeping mats next to filthy open toilets, children chilled to the point of illness – so appalled them that they filed a lawsuit against the federal government, and told their stories publicly.

Related: Abortion is Normal: the emergency exhibition about reproductive rights

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The Guardian

Jan 17 2020
What, no fatberg? Fischli Weiss explore a Swiss sewer – review

Sprüth Magers, London
The duo’s video shot from a robot burrowing through the pipes beneath Zurich is reminiscent of birth, or a colonoscopy

The high point or, more accurately, the low point of this small exhibition of Swiss artists Peter Fischli and David Weiss at Sprüth Magers, is in the London gallery’s basement. Kanalvideo journeys through the sewers beneath the streets of Zurich, the camera mounted on a robotic vehicle that inspects the tunnels for blockages and leaks. The video is a full hour’s slow and silent burrowing along the cylindrical pipes. What turns and manoeuvrings the unseen robot has to make as it traverses junctions and turns have been edited out, so the journey appears seamless, smooth, unhurried and inexorable. Projected on the end wall of an otherwise empty room, the camera, mounted on the robot, takes us on an apparently interminable trip.

Kanalvideo may lack the complexity and ingenious pyrotechnics of Fischli and Weiss’s best known, and much imitated, The Way Things Go, or the pathos and humour of the pair’s rat-and-bear videos (in which the artists, dressed in animal costumes, encounter the human as well as the natural world), but it has unexpected mystery and magic. We have no idea of the size of the tunnel, as the camera passes over the riffles, rapids and pools of water flowing through the bottom of the pipe, until at one point a rat appears, clambering away from the light as the camera approaches. As we approach junctions in the tube, light catches the rims of sections of pipe where they join, a glowing corona against the blackness of the receding tunnel. After a bit you forget where you are, and think instead of an eye’s pupil staring back from the screen, or views of an eclipsed sun. I think about life’s journey, of being born and of a colonoscopy, and of that Swiss clinic where people go to die.

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artforum.com

Jan 17 2020
Ten Museums Selected for AAMD’s Paid College Internship Program
The Association of Art Museum Directors (AAMD) has chosen ten art museums to host interns in 2020. In its second year, the paid internship program was established to engage with college students from
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artforum.com

Jan 17 2020
Desert X Releases Artist List for Controversial Exhibition in Saudi Arabia
Desert X AlUla, the inaugural outdoor sculpture exhibition taking place in Saudi Arabia from January 31 to March 7, 2020, has released its list of participating artists. Cocurated by Saudi curators
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artforum.com

Jan 17 2020
Honolulu Biennial to Become a Triennial
The Honolulu Biennial Foundation (HBF) is restructuring and will relaunch as a triennial, now opening in February 2022. Melissa Chiu, the director of the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, was
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The Guardian

Jan 17 2020
Painting found inside Italian gallery wall confirmed as a Gustav Klimt

Gardeners discovered Portrait of a Lady while clearing ivy at gallery in Piacenza

A painting found hidden in an Italian gallery in December is an authentic Gustav Klimt piece stolen almost 23 years ago, experts have confirmed.

The Portrait of a Lady was one of the world’s most sought-after stolen artworks before it was found concealed in a wall of the Ricci Oddi modern art gallery, the same gallery from where it went missing in the northern city of Piacenza.

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The Guardian

Jan 17 2020
A Picasso-Pollock mashup and Dalí's Hollywood haunts – the week in art

Alex Israel enters the surrealist’s ghostly head, Art & Language put their spin on art history, and Susan Hiller flips a coin to start her London Jukebox – all in your weekly dispatch

Art & Language
The conceptual art pioneers merge Picasso’s Guernica with Jackson Pollock’s drips in a provocative visual “essay” on the history of modern art.
Sprovieri, London, from 17 January until 13 March.

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The New York Times

Jan 17 2020
Gillian Anderson Listens to Fleetwood Mac and Loves Toni Morrison
Gillian Anderson Listens to Fleetwood Mac and Loves Toni Morrison
The London-based actress finds time for cultural enrichment between starring in “Sex Education” and “The Crown.”
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The Guardian

Jan 17 2020
Piccadilly Gardens: can Manchester's 'unsafe' city centre be transformed?

Council promises to turn magnet for anti-social behaviour into ‘family-friendly’ civic space

At 5.30pm in Manchester’s Piccadilly Gardens, three police officers are gathered around a wheelchair parked in front of a gold postbox commemorating Team GB’s Olympic cycling success. Sitting in the chair, bent double, is a tiny woman with one leg. “Can you sit up, love?” the officers ask, coaxing her gently upright. They know her name. “We just wanted to check you were OK.” She mumbles that she’s fine. As they head off towards the statue of Queen Victoria, the woman immediately slumps forward again.

On a bench near the tram tracks, another drug casualty is frozen – a different kind of statue. He is holding a rolled-up cigarette, long extinguished in the evening drizzle. In a doorway by a branch of Greggs, three men with sleeping bags are sharing some pasties. In front of them, a preacher with a megaphone is telling commuters to repent or burn in hell. Outside Boots, two charity fundraisers working for Shelter flirt with commuters on their way up to Piccadilly station.

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artforum.com

Jan 17 2020
Aichi Triennale Exhibition Will Be Restaged in Taiwan Following Censorship Controversy
More than six months after an exhibition organized as part of the Aichi Triennale in Japan was shuttered following political and violent threats, the Taipei Museum of Contemporary Art in Taiwan announced
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The Guardian

Jan 17 2020
Buy a Guardian classic photograph: Girls walk in the snow, Pakistan, 2006

This week in our series of exclusive Guardian photography we have Dan Chung’s image from north Pakistan of young girls walking in the mountains following a devastating earthquake


The then Guardian photographer Dan Chung visited Kuz Ganrshal, a remote village in northern Pakistan, in January 2006, three months after a devastating earthquake. He travelled with Oxfam and a local organisation, the Shangla Development Society. These young village girls – colourful against the almost monochrome backdrop – were intrigued by the visitor, following Chung along the snowy mountain path. The village people refused to move to refugee camps after the earthquake, which destroyed nearly 40% of their homes, preferring to cram together with up to five families, along with their livestock, into single dwellings. Oxfam, the only aid agency to have visited the village at the time, distributed blankets, plastic sheets, mats, hygiene kits and tents.

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artforum.com

Jan 17 2020
Frieze New York Announces 2020 Exhibitors, Kohn Gallery Now Represents Sophia Narrett, and More
Frieze has released the list of two hundred participating galleries for the ninth edition of Frieze New York, which will return to Randall’s Island Park from May 8 to May 10, 2020, with preview days on
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The Guardian

Jan 17 2020
Awol Erizku’s Beyoncé Pregnant: a pop Madonna

The singer resembles a Renaissance Virgin Mary but with a sexual edge in this Instagram photograph

Artist Awol Erizku’s 2017 portrait of Beyoncé pregnant with twins scored 10m likes when it landed on Instagram in 2017, the most an image had ever had on the platform.

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The Guardian

Jan 17 2020
What to see this week in the UK

From Waves to Beat Horizon, here’s our pick of the best films, concerts, exhibitions, theatre and dance over the next seven days

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The Guardian

Jan 17 2020
The healing power of Bauhaus at London's St Mary's hospital

The work of Josef and Anni Albers has given a bright, bold new look to a children’s intensive care unit

The role of art in hospitals rarely extends beyond hanging pictures on the wall. But for Josef and Anni Albers, art was always much more than that. Both pioneers of modernism, the couple met in 1922 at the Bauhaus school, an establishment with a revolutionary approach to art. Bauhaus blurred the boundaries between craft, design and fine art and championed the concept of gesamtkunstwerk: the complete work of art, typically in the form of a house.

But why not a hospital department? That was the thinking of the Albers Foundation which, since the couple’s deaths late last century, has worked to continue their legacy. “Josef and Anni both believed that what we experience through our eyes can divert and elate us in unparalleled ways,” explains Nicholas Fox Weber, the foundation’s director. Taking inspiration from the Albers’ geometric patterns and confident use of colour, the foundation has created a bold new look for the children’s intensive care unit at St Mary’s hospital, London.

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The Guardian

Jan 16 2020
Ickworth embraces enforced darkness to spotlight art collection

Rotunda at National Trust property exploits gloom from scaffolding to stage exhibition

A 200-year-old Italianate palace, hidden away in the Suffolk countryside and currently encased in more than 270 miles of scaffolding, is to hold an exhibition that is only taking place because it is undergoing £5m of conservation works.

Ickworth, a Georgian estate and one of the most photographed of all National Trust properties, will on Satuday open its magnificent but leaky Rotunda to show off world class works of art and objects which few people know are even there.

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The New York Times

Jan 16 2020
The Overlooked History of Women at Work
A Grolier Club exhibition explores 500 years of women as scientists, midwives, writers, activists, undertakers and more.
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The New York Times

Jan 16 2020
Philadelphia Mayor: Museum Should ‘Strengthen’ Sexual Harassment Policy
Philadelphia Mayor: Museum Should ‘Strengthen’ Sexual Harassment Policy
The mayor’s remarks come after a former Philadelphia Museum of Art boss was forced to resign from his Erie Art Museum post following a New York Times report.
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artforum.com

Jan 16 2020
Carnegie Museum of Art Appoints Four New Department Heads
The Carnegie Museum of Art (CMoA) in Pittsburgh announced four new senior leadership hires. The institution named Chris Fry as director of finance, Stefanie Mohr as director of marketing and engagement,
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artforum.com

Jan 16 2020
Philadelphia Museum of Art Faces Pressure from Lawmakers to Overhaul Harassment Polices
Following a https://www.nytimes.com/2020/01/10/arts/design/joshua-helmer-philadelphia-museum-art-erie-art-museum.html New York Times investigation that brought to light sexual harassment complaints
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artforum.com

Jan 16 2020
Carla Herrera-Prats (1973–2019)
I FIRST MET CARLA HERRERA-PRATS in the summer of 2008. I was invited to contribute an essay for her solo show at New York’s Art in General gallery, back when it was still just west of Chinatown on
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The New York Times

Jan 16 2020
When Art Begins at the Scene of a Crime
The Mexican artist Teresa Margolles makes unflinching art about violent death and its aftermath. Her newest photographs and installations are now in New York City.
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