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The Guardian

Mar 22 2020
Your pictures: share your photos on the theme of ‘relief’

Wherever you are in the world, this week we’d like to see your pictures on the theme ‘relief’

The next theme for our weekly photography assignment, published in print in the Observer New Review is ‘relief’.

Share your photos of what relief means to you – and tell us about your image in the description box.

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The Guardian

Mar 22 2020
Titian: Love, Desire, Death review – wild at heart

National Gallery, London
The great Venetian artist took Ovid’s Metamorphoses and made them miracles of expression, reunited here for the first time in centuries – for now, behind closed doors

Titian – painter of kings, king of painters – was carried off by the virulent pandemic that devastated Venice in 1576. He was working at home in Cannaregio when a fever overtook him in the last days of August. His body was buried in the church of the Frari, for which he was painting his gravely beautiful Pietà, accompanied by a written plea for mercy for himself and his son Orazio. Orazio died too, not many weeks later.

Among the works left in the studio, it seems, was a painting called The Death of Actaeon, one of seven pictures commissioned by Philip II of Spain. Titian had an open brief; he chose to depict scenes from classical mythology, mainly drawn from Ovid’s Metamorphoses. Actaeon has, alas, stumbled on a naked goddess, completely by accident, while out hunting with his friend in a wood. He is now being punished for his glance.

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The Guardian

Mar 22 2020
Who will lead the BBC on the other side of the virus crisis? | Richard Brooks

Meanwhile, with the West End in lockdown, theatre streaming services are in the spotlight

By the time this virus crisis has subsided, the next boss of the BBC should be sorted, since Tony Hall is meant to leave in June. There are now calls for Peter Bazalgette to throw his hat in the ring as the most senior and respected figure in the industry. A former president of the Royal Television Society and current chairman of ITV, Bazalgette has worked in television for more than 40 years, initially at the BBC before becoming an extremely successful producer and creator, with hits like Ready Steady Cook. He ticks many boxes to become the next director general at a time of crisis, especially over future funding. Bazalgette would also bring outsider experience and insider knowledge to an institution that needs radical reform.

But he has been telling friends he is too old, at 66. Really? He is still very active, enthusiastic and clear-headed. It is the BBC board that picks the next DG, and two grands fromages on the board, Nick Serota, former director of the Tate, and Steve Morrison, the veteran TV executive, really count. Maybe the public-spirited Bazalgette (he chaired Arts Council England from 2012 to 2016 and currently sits on several arts and research bodies) can be persuaded, though I suspect Tim Davie, chief executive of BBC Studios, remains the more likely candidate. But Bazalgette has another chance of “running” the Beeb. A new chair of its board, which is a No 10 Downing Street appointment, is to be announced later this year. And politically, he is more right than left

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The Guardian

Mar 22 2020
Nick Cave's inspiration: pictures and notes from his archive

A scrapbook of rarely seen photos and sketches traces Nick Cave’s transformation from Aussie teenager into an international artist

What you see in this book lives in the intricate world constructed around the songs, and which the songs inhabit,” writes Nick Cave in his introduction to Stranger Than Kindness. “It is the material that gives birth to and nourishes the official work.”

That intricate world includes drawings, lists, collages, scribbled notes and lyrics, found photographs and several handmade books, creased and stained, sometimes in his own blood. Therein the sacred and the profane, the biblical and the pornographic, exist side by side as they have done in Cave’s songs for about 40 years of often frantic creativity. There are pin-ups alongside devotional images of saints, sketches of nude female torsos alongside portraits of the madonna, and there are hand-written, home-made dictionaries listing arcane words, such as anchorite (a recluse), and autogamy (self-fertilisation).

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The Guardian

Mar 22 2020
The big picture: a special branch in Finland
Ville Lenkkeri’s photograph captures his sorrow at having to cut down a beloved tree from his childhood

Ville Lenkkeri took this photograph in 2013. The great birch tree, which stood behind his family’s summerhouse in Finland, had been a fixture in his life since childhood. When he was away from the house, he had a sense that it would watch over the place in his absence. And when he saw it once again he was reminded of some “magical and eternal strength”. The photo was taken on the day that Lenkkeri had to chop the tree down.

He had noticed that it had started to wither and rot from within two years earlier, but had resisted admitting that “its eternity was about to come to an end”. That summer, however, he decided that “felling the giant was a more honourable way to let it go”.

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The Guardian

Mar 21 2020
Northern stars: Wakefield's mining life - in pictures

Illustrator and mural artist Seanna Doonan “grew up singing songs about the miners’ strike and other historical and social struggles”. Based in Wakefield, she depicts “parts of the city that no longer exist, such as buildings, pubs and markets”. These artworks use a combination of ink printing, paint and digital colour to encapsulate everyday working-class life, evoking, she says, “many emotions in local people”.

Originally due to go on display at The Hepworth Wakefield. Prints available to buy on seannadoonanillustration.com

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The Guardian

Mar 21 2020
Aussie rules: an old Melbourne bookshop transformed into a modern family home

A designer has breathed new life into a narrow building that was once the city’s first feminist book store

When Kate Challis’s husband was a student in Melbourne in the 1990s, he bought a copy of Margaret Atwood’s novel The Handmaid’s Tale from the city’s first feminist book store. On a busy street in the then-gritty district of Fitzroy, Shrew women’s bookshop was one of the few places in the city that sold Atwood’s work. Today, that same narrow shop, former centre of feminist and LGBTQ radicalism, is home to Challis, a designer with a PhD in art history, her husband, and their 11-year-old son. It is one of a row of 16 original shops that were built in 1892, of which four remain.

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The Guardian

Mar 21 2020
20 photographs of the week

Social distancing, self-isolation and life before and after lockdown – the best photography from around the world.

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artforum.com

Mar 20 2020
Ana Mendieta Estate Sues Sotheby’s over Rediscovered Work
The estate of Ana Mendieta, the groundbreaking Cuban American artist who often used her body and organic materials such as earth, fire, and blood to create feminist and sometimes violent artworks, is
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The New York Times

Mar 20 2020
10 Binge-Worthy Art Podcasts in the Age of Coronavirus
10 Binge-Worthy Art Podcasts in the Age of Coronavirus
Plugging into the art-world conversation while museums and galleries are closed.
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artforum.com

Mar 20 2020
Robert Zhao Renhui
In Robert Zhao Renhui’s oversize black-and-white photographs, flocks of birds seem to emerge from the prints’ surfaces like pieces of sculpture. These monochromatic murmurations, conveyed by tones that
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artforum.com

Mar 20 2020
Jaynelle Hazard Named Executive Director and Curator of Greater Reston Arts Center
The Greater Reston Arts Center (GRACE) in Reston, Virginia, has appointed Jaynelle Hazard as its new executive director and curator. Hazard joins the institution from the Workhouse Arts Center in Lorton,
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artforum.com

Mar 20 2020
Desert X Site in Saudi Arabia to Become Permanent Arts Hub
After the close of the inaugural edition of Desert X AlUla, a free, site-responsive exhibition held in the Al-Ula region of northwestern of Saudi Arabia from January 31 to March 7, the Royal Commission
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artforum.com

Mar 20 2020
Kahlil Joseph Wins 2020 Eye Art & Film Prize
Amsterdam’s Eye Filmmuseum has named American filmmaker Kahlil Joseph the winner of this year’s Eye Art & Film Prize, an annual $29,500 award established to support artists whose practices span film
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artforum.com

Mar 20 2020
Charitable Organizations Team Up to Launch $75M Fund for New York Nonprofits
A number of New York–based foundations, companies, and philanthropists have banded together to launch a $75 million emergency fund to provide relief to arts and cultural nonprofits as well as to social
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The New York Times

Mar 20 2020
What Happens When We Lose the Art That Brings Us Together?
What Happens When We Lose the Art That Brings Us Together?
Going online is one answer, but it’s not so simple.
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The Guardian

Mar 20 2020
Art books to self-isolate with, from Patti Smith to Lucian Freud – the week in art

Picasso’s inner beast, a sizzling take on Bacon and Buñuel’s last breath are among our art biographies to curl up with – all in your weekly dispatch

Just Kids by Patti Smith
Stuck at home and want to read a vivid book that’s more living art than dead art history? An eyewitness memoir might do the trick. They don’t come better than Patti Smith’s beautifully written, utterly intimate and frank account of her love for Robert Mapplethorpe. This not just one of the best books you can read on contemporary art but a classic of American literature.
Just Kids is published by Bloomsbury.

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The New York Times

Mar 20 2020
How Two Children Are Keeping Their Father’s Design Legacy Alive
How Two Children Are Keeping Their Father’s Design Legacy Alive
A pair of Pennsylvania homes constructed by the Japanese-American furniture designer George Nakashima have become an enduring testament to midcentury folk craft.
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artforum.com

Mar 20 2020
Alliance of American Museums Appeals to Congress for $4 Billion in Covid-19 Relief
The Alliance of American Museums (AAM), a nonprofit museum advocacy association that represents botanic gardens, aquariums, presidential libraries, and zoos, in addition to museums dedicated to art,
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The Guardian

Mar 20 2020
Traditional French soap-maker Savonnerie de la Licorne – in pictures

As coronavirus continues to spread around the world, the Marseille tradition of soap-making is enjoying a renaissance, as the French public rediscovers this essential local product

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The New York Times

Mar 20 2020
A British Shoe Designer’s Vase Collection
A British Shoe Designer’s Vase Collection
Nicholas Kirkwood’s first encounter with a blown-glass Ettore Sottsass piece six years ago ignited an ardor for their whimsical, childlike aesthetic.
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artforum.com

Mar 20 2020
Hundreds Petition NYC to Aid Galleries Amid Covid-19 Pandemic
More than six hundred arts professionals are https://www.change.org/p/covid-19-relief-for-nyc-art-galleries-artists-and-art-workers calling for New York City to provide disaster relief to nonprofits,
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The Guardian

Mar 20 2020
Helmut Newton's Retro Verseau: a study in erotic ambiguity

The German-Australian photographer plays with domination and submission in this high-art fashion shoot

This signature 1979 Helmut Newton shot casts the 19-year-old gay supermodel Gia Carangi with Robin Osler, who leans over her like an elegantly lecherous lizard in Yves Saint Laurent’s Le Smoking tux.

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The Guardian

Mar 19 2020
Livestreaming schedule: music, art, literature and events from Australia and beyond

As the coronavirus crisis roils on, creatives and cultural organisations are moving their work online. Here’s what’s coming to a monitor near you

21–22 March: Members of the beleaguered live music scene have banded together to create Isol-Aid, a “socially (media) distanced music festival” featuring 74 Australian musicians including Angie McMahon, Julia Jacklin, Stella Donnelly, Alice Skye, Didirri and heaps of others. The two-day festival will run from midday to midnight on Saturday and Sunday, with artists streaming 20-minute sets from self-isolation live on their Instagram accounts. It’s free but viewers are encouraged to stream or buy merchandise to support artists, and donate to a fundraiser set up by Support Act.

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The Guardian

Mar 19 2020
From vermin to fashion: 'These people hate cane toads so much they want a piece'

Designers, jewellers and artists are turning northern Australia’s noxious pests into handbags, high heels and even fetish masks

Lia Tabrah, who runs the fashion label Vermin with Perina Drummond, didn’t realise how strongly Australians feel about cane toads.

The designer started creating handbags made from the pest’s skin a few years ago, assuming “it would be a niche thing – maybe tourism, maybe [for the] European market”. Now she and Drummond have curated a toad-themed exhibition for Melbourne design week. Covid-19 precautions have now closed the show, but Tabrah says Vermin has a waiting list of orders for “handbags, man bags, wallets and stubby coolers”.

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artforum.com

Mar 19 2020
Cannes Film Festival Postponed
The seventy-third Cannes Film Festival will no longer take place from May 12 to May 23, https://variety.com/2020/biz/festivals/cannes-film-festival-postponed-late-june-dates-being-considered-1203539435/
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artforum.com

Mar 19 2020
Conservators at Major Dutch Museums Donate Face Masks to Medical Workers
As the coronavirus outbreak worsens across the globe and the supply of protective equipment dwindles, the conservators at the Stedelijk Museum, the Rijksmuseum, and the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam—which
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artforum.com

Mar 19 2020
Monika Maurer-Morgenstern
Sometimes you just need to have a quiet word with yourself. German artist Monika Maurer-Morgenstern’s works conjure such a psychological space: a many-colored penetrating self-dialogue, by turns calming
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The New York Times

Mar 19 2020
This Artist Got His Start as an I.C.U. Nurse
This Artist Got His Start as an I.C.U. Nurse
Nate Lewis developed a visual language in the rhythms of EKGs. Now, his intricate works on paper take the scalpel to society.
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The New York Times

Mar 19 2020
Romare Bearden’s Rarely Seen Abstract Side
Although famous for figurative works, the American modernist had a little-known foray into abstract painting that included some of his best work.
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The New York Times

Mar 19 2020
Met Museum Prepares for $100 Million Loss Due to Coronavirus
Met Museum Prepares for $100 Million Loss Due to Coronavirus
The Met’s executives say the coronavirus outbreak makes painful layoffs likely for every cultural institution.
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artforum.com

Mar 19 2020
Maria Fernanda Cardoso Awarded NSW Visual Arts Fellowship
Maria Fernanda Cardoso, the Colombia-born, Sydney-based artist who creates nature-inspired sculptures and installations comprising unconventional and organic materials, has been named the recipient of
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artforum.com

Mar 19 2020
Bonhams Announces Closures Following Staff Complaints
Following an article published by https://www.artnews.com/art-news/news/bonhams-los-angeles-auction-coronavirus-1202681426/ Artnews detailing staff complaints about the working conditions at Bonhams
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The New York Times

Mar 19 2020
Take a (Solo) Stroll. Your Next Art Fix May Be Around the Block.
Take a (Solo) Stroll. Your Next Art Fix May Be Around the Block.
In these challenging times, New York City’s small delights can offer a respite. Our critic reflects on a few old friends while practicing social distancing.
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The Guardian

Mar 19 2020
DIY curators let loose on huge online collection of British art

Public invited to create own exhibitions from 216,000 paintings and sculptures

For anyone who feels they could do a better job than the art professionals who choose what we see at exhibitions comes a game-changing project: curate your own show.

The charity Art UK, which lists every publicly owned oil painting on its online database and is in the process of adding every sculpture, has announced details of a new curation tool.

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The New York Times

Mar 19 2020
The Extravagance of Less
The Extravagance of Less
In a tiny seaside Tuscan village, a minimalist architect and designer proves that living with little but history can be the richest existence of all.
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The Guardian

Mar 19 2020
In a spectacular fashion: the escapist world of Karl Lagerfeld's Chanel – in pictures

From a rocket in flight to a life-sized recreation of a ski chalet, the late designer will go down in history as the creator of epic moments of visual fantasy

All pictures: Simon Procter

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The New York Times

Mar 19 2020
To All the Snowmen We’ve Made Together
One collector’s obsession with photographs of winter’s most ephemeral friend.
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The Guardian

Mar 19 2020
Build, bulldoze, repeat: China's dizzying changes – in pictures

From bridges to flowers, from cities to gorges, Teresa Eng spent four years exploring her ancestral roots in China, capturing a country modernising at breakneck speed

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artforum.com

Mar 18 2020
The Met Predicts Closure Through July, $100 Million Shortfall
The Metropolitan Museum of Art, the first major New York institution to temporarily shut its doors in response to the coronavirus, is expecting the closure to last through July and is predicting that
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artforum.com

Mar 18 2020
Orian Barki and Meriem Bennani’s series from self-isolation
Artforum is pleased to host this https://www.instagram.com/meriembennani/?hl=en Instagram video by Orian Barki and Meriem Bennani, made while self-isolating because of COVID-19. Beautiful moment of
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artforum.com

Mar 18 2020
Orian Barki and Meriem Bennani, 2 Lizards: Episode 1, 2020
Artforum is pleased to host this https://www.instagram.com/meriembennani/?hl=en Instagram video by Orian Barki and Meriem Bennani, made while self-isolating because of COVID-19. Beautiful moment of
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The New York Times

Mar 18 2020
America’s Big Museums on the Hot Seat
America’s Big Museums on the Hot Seat
As the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston commemorate their 150th birthdays in a state of heightened scrutiny, our critic offers a five-point plan to save the souls of our venerable institutions.
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artforum.com

Mar 18 2020
Frieze New York Cancels 2020 Edition Amid Coronavirus Turmoil
Following the cancelation and rescheduling of major international art fairs, including Art Basel Hong Kong, Art Cologne, and Art Dubai, Frieze announced on Wednesday that it has called off the ninth
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The New York Times

Mar 18 2020
Frieze Cancels New York Art Fair Amid Coronavirus Concerns
Frieze Cancels New York Art Fair Amid Coronavirus Concerns
The move follows other art fair changes, like the cancellation of Art Basel Hong Kong and the early closing of Tefaf Maastricht.
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The New York Times

Mar 18 2020
She Tracked Nazi-Looted Art. She Quit When No One Returned It.
A researcher stopped working for a German museum after she says she lost faith in its commitment to return works with tainted provenances.
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The Guardian

Mar 18 2020
William Burke obituary

My friend William Burke, who has died of a heart attack aged 71, was a distinguished gallerist and collector whose passionate love of the arts led to close associations with many notable cultural figures. As an American in Paris, he was also an anglophile, who nurtured friendships and professional relations between New York, London and Paris.

Born in the small Bible belt town of Marianna, Arkansas, William was the adopted son of Robert Burke, a post office clerk, and his wife, Sarah (nee Stevenson). He grew up in a modest home, built by his father, in what was a poor community during the American civil rights era.

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The Guardian

Mar 18 2020
Alan Caiger-Smith obituary
Founder of Aldermaston Pottery who was a noted ceramic scholar

Alan Caiger-Smith, who has died aged 90, was the founder of Aldermaston Pottery, which employed an average of eight co-workers over 38 years, some 60 men and women passing through the pottery in a village more usually associated with atomic weapons. Caiger-Smith was the first among equals, his employees guided by his distinctive earthenware forms, evolved through the process of throwing and his understanding of historical Islamic ceramics.

His bowls, plates, teapots, goblets, albarelli, jugs and majestic tall jars, some over 4ft in height, were all tin-glazed white and decorated with brushwork that looked both abstract and calligraphic, often reduction fired to achieve lustre effects, in wood-fired kilns he designed and built himself. Aldermaston Pottery ran from 1955 until 1993, proof that a collaborative group of creative craftspeople could achieve economic success and artistic recognition alongside the economies of scale inherent in industrial production.

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The New York Times

Mar 18 2020
Art With the Flavors of Texas
Art With the Flavors of Texas
Local talent can be overlooked among the riches of Dallas. An exhibition seeks to change that.
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