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artforum.com

Nov 19 2020
Garrett Bradley on the making of Time (2020)
Artist Garrett Bradley talks about visualizing hope, and how love is a form of resistance, in her documentary Time (2020).  Her multichannel video installation, America (2019), is on view at the Museum
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The Guardian

Nov 19 2020
Thanks to music and art, I found more hope than grief in lockdown | Cat Woods

The very nature of artists is to investigate and explore the world, and I feel so grateful that they did, even under immense financial and emotional pressure

What did you spend lockdown doing? If it was anything like my lockdown, it involved live-streaming DJs, bands and theatre and live, intimate performances by solo musicians from their bedrooms. I’ve caught up on a lot of books I might otherwise have claimed I was too busy to read.

So it’s thanks to art and artists that I’ve found more reason for hope and excitement the past few months than I have found reasons for grief. The very nature of artists is to investigate, question and express something essential of the mood of the world – or just their world. And through this period, musicians, artists, dancers, choreographers, writers, games developers and everyone with a creative outlet has continuing to work, to create, to innovate and to share their creative talents under immense financial and emotional pressure.

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The New York Times

Nov 19 2020
Smithsonian Museums Are Latest to Shutter as Virus Surges
Smithsonian Museums Are Latest to Shutter as Virus Surges
Eight D.C.-area institutions that had reopened to the public will again temporarily close their doors, starting Monday.
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The New York Times

Nov 19 2020
4 Art Gallery Shows to See Right Now
4 Art Gallery Shows to See Right Now
Jonathan Lyndon Chase’s cowboy paintings; objects with personality; Catalina Ouyang’s sculptural grotesques; Jordan Nassar’s new textile works.
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artforum.com

Nov 19 2020
TARWUK
For their debut exhibition here, the Croatian-born artists Ivana Vukšić and Bruno Pogačnik Tremow—who work together as the collaborative entity TARWUK—present an astonishing assortment of drawings,
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artforum.com

Nov 19 2020
Tina Rivers Ryan on Aldo Tambellini
THE BEST ART I SAW on my “Grand Tour” of 2017 wasn’t in Venice, or Münster, or Kassel. It was in Karlsruhe, at ZKM’s major retrospective of Aldo Tambellini—the media artist whose seven-decade career
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The New York Times

Nov 19 2020
5 Things to Do This Weekend
Our critics and writers have selected noteworthy cultural events to experience virtually or in person in New York City.
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The Guardian

Nov 19 2020
Josephine Harris obituary

My friend Josephine Harris, a gifted glass engraver and painter whose life was shaped by her deep love of art, has died aged 89. A unique friend to many, she enjoyed a special bond with those who shared this love.

In 1948 Josephine enrolled at the Plymouth College of Art where she developed an observant eye and a talent for drawing. In 1958 she moved to London, in anticipation of gaining a place at the Royal College of Art, which, sadly, did not materialise. Instead she took a job working behind the scenes at the Royal Academy of Art as secretary to the keeper of the schools. Here she became a familiar figure, scuttling from the front office to the schools at the rear of the building, notices to students in hand, each one addressed in her beautiful italic handwriting.

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artforum.com

Nov 19 2020
Pace Gallery Announces London Expansion
As other London galleries or would-be galleries scrap their plans or close their outposts in response to the double whammy of Covid-19 and a looming no-deal Brexit, the blue-chip Pace Gallery has
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artforum.com

Nov 19 2020
Susan Dackerman to Step Down as Director of Stanford’s Cantor Arts Center
Susan Dackerman, director of Stanford University’s Cantor Arts Center, is leaving her post under pressure, the San Francisco Chronicle reports. Dackerman’s departure comes on the heels of an independent
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The New York Times

Nov 19 2020
3 Art Gallery Shows to See Right Now
Leilah Babirye’s luminous sculptural figures, Luigi Ghirri’s vintage photographs, and Paul Chan’s Wittgenstein drawings
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The Guardian

Nov 19 2020
'Indigenous fashion is the future. It’s time for First Nations people to reclaim it'

Australian fashion is taking notice of the country’s oldest design traditions – and we’re only just scratching the surface

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The Guardian

Nov 19 2020
Anthony Hill obituary

Artist, mathematician and leading theoretician of the British constructionist movement

Anthony Hill, who has died aged 90, was a singular, but not solitary, figure in the art world. An artist under two names, and a mathematician and writer under more than one alias, he was a member of the constructionist group of geometrical abstract artists that emerged in Britain in the mid-1950s, and was its leading theoretician.

Founded by Victor Pasmore, the group was inspired by modernist movements in prewar Europe, seeking to offer a rational, geometrically based aesthetic in opposition to the widely promoted American abstraction. Hill’s attitudes and practice, however, were far from limited to those of a single artistic tendency.

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The Guardian

Nov 19 2020
Angelina Jolie to direct biopic of photographer Don McCullin starring Tom Hardy

Star to adapt autobiography of celebrated war photographer, who covered crises in Vietnam and Northern Ireland

Angelina Jolie is to direct a biopic of photojournalist Don McCullin, starring Tom Hardy.

The film, which is being adapted by ’71 screenwriter Gregory Burke from McCullin’s autobiography, Unreasonable Behaviour.

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The Guardian

Nov 19 2020
Queens of the Royal Shakespeare Company – in pictures

As Helen Mirren looks back at her career in a Talking Shakespeare event online on 23 November, we celebrate some of the stars’ regal performances for the RSC

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The New York Times

Nov 19 2020
Derek Fordjour, From Anguish to Transcendence
Derek Fordjour, From Anguish to Transcendence
Woven into his new work at Petzel Gallery are lessons drawn from his own journey to art stardom, and from a year of Black grief.
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The Guardian

Nov 19 2020
Steve McCurry’s previously unseen images – in pictures

The storied travel photographer’s 40-year career has taken him to every corner of the globe. His new book, In Search of Elsewhere, contains a collection of images never seen before. Here, he selects some of his favourites

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The Guardian

Nov 18 2020
Next stop, Wigan Pier! One man's Orwell odyssey – in pictures

It’s more than 80 years since George Orwell wrote The Road to Wigan Pier. The artist Timothy Foster retraced his steps to capture the town’s tensions and humour during tumultuous times

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The Guardian

Nov 18 2020
One Caravaggio coming right up! Adam Lowe, the art world's master faker

From the tomb of Tutankhamun to Raphael’s Sistine masterpieces, Adam Lowe makes perfect copies for governments and galleries the world over. But he’s not a forger – he’s a liberator

The grandest spaces in the whole of the mighty Victoria and Albert Museum are the Cast Courts, built high enough to hold a full-scale replica of Trajan’s Column in Rome, which is colossal even in two pieces. No less imposing are the London museum’s 19th-century copies of Michelangelo’s David, not to mention its duplicates of Viking carvings and even the entire front of a Spanish cathedral. All these casts, which were recently cleaned, are a curious spectacle. Why did the Victorians create such a comprehensive “virtual art” collection? To make a clever point about a copy being just as good as the real thing – or simply to bring great work to the people?

But there’s one exhibit here that brings the world of the fake, and all the questions the subject provokes, up to date: an eerily precise 3D print of a nude statue of Pauline Bonaparte, sister of French military leader Napoleon, by the neo-classical artist Canova. This lovely replica is the work of British-born, Madrid-based artist and tech pioneer Adam Lowe. By placing it here, the V&A is recognising that Lowe is reinventing the much misunderstood practice of copying. Indeed, Lowe takes the fine art remake to such heights of accuracy, sensitivity and detail that even experts are fooled. Far from being derided as cynical forgeries, though, his copies are hailed by this and other museums as opening up new ways of understanding and enjoying masterpieces.

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The Guardian

Nov 18 2020
UK museums and galleries fear Covid poses existential threat

Art Fund survey finds only half have received any form of emergency funding

British museums and galleries are suffering with strained resources and dwindling visitor numbers caused by the pandemic, putting their futures at risk, according to research.

Art Fund’s survey of museums, galleries and historic houses paints a gloomy picture, with 60% of respondents saying they are facing an existential threat, and revealing that only about half have received any form of emergency funding.

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The New York Times

Nov 18 2020
Craigslist Pig Couch: Where Is It?
We did find out where it is, though.
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The New York Times

Nov 18 2020
5 Art Accounts to Follow on Instagram Now
A look at a photographer who follows graffiti artists, a student chronicling Black art, a collective devoted to social justice and more.
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The New York Times

Nov 18 2020
Director of Mass MoCA, Playground for Artists, Moves On
Director of Mass MoCA, Playground for Artists, Moves On
After three decades, Joseph C. Thompson feels ready to let go (sort of).
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The New York Times

Nov 18 2020
A Festival of New Asian Art, Seeking a Direction
“We Do Not Dream Alone,” the first Asia Society Triennial of contemporary art, is in search of a reason for being.
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artforum.com

Nov 18 2020
Serpentine Taps Yesomi Umolu as Director of Curatorial Affairs and Public Practice
Yesomi Umolu has been appointed director of curatorial affairs and public practice for London’s Serpentine Galleries, the institution announced today. Umolu is the first person to occupy the newly
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artforum.com

Nov 18 2020
Anonymous Was a Woman Names 2020 Award Recipients
New York–based organization Anonymous Was a Woman (AWAW) has named ten recipients of its 2020 awards. The awards, unrestricted grants of $25,000 apiece, are made to woman-identifying artists over the
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The Guardian

Nov 18 2020
A thimble solution to stuck-together pages | Brief letters

BSA revival | Gary Younge | Lowry’s plan | Stuck-together pages

My husband read your article on the BSA with great nostalgia (BSA to be reborn as electric motorcycle maker thanks to Indian billionaire, 16 November). His aunt, Ada Deeming, worked as industrial matron there throughout the second world war and got an MBE for her work with the wounded and relatives of the dead. Due to her contacts, she was able to buy him a top-of-the-range tricycle, and he hopes that maybe electric trikes will form part of the resurrected company’s portfolio.
Margaret Squires
St Andrews, Fife

• I can’t be alone in being delighted to find Gary Younge back in the Guardian (Counted out: Trump’s desperate fight to stop the minority vote, 17 November). The clear statements, researched statistics, relevant quotes and thought-provoking questions all make essential reading for anyone trying to grasp US voters and politics today.
Carol Jones
London

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The Guardian

Nov 18 2020
Lost in the thick Sheffield fog: Johny Pitts' best photograph

‘My grandad worked in a steel factory after fighting in Burma. After work one day, he got lost in fog on the way home, sat down on a bench and cried’

In my part of Sheffield, during the winter months, there is this thick fog that shrouds the streets. This photograph is one of dozens I’ve taken in Firth Park fog over the years, and always evokes a story my mom told me about my grandad, who died when she was 12. He’d returned from the second world war after fighting behind enemy lines in Burma, and was back working in a steel factory. After finishing work one day, the fog was so bad that he couldn’t find his way home, so he just sat down on a bench and burst into tears. I wonder: did the fog also symbolise a feeling of being lost in life for him? It does for me.

From the vantage point of 2020, perhaps this image chimes with the Black Lives Matter moment, or the unpeopled streets we’ve become so accustomed to, but I see it as a relic from the rubble of Tony Blair’s Britain; it was taken just three months before New Labour lost the 2010 general election to the Tories. What began as an optimistic, forward-thinking vision for this country had slowly soured, following 9/11, the ensuing wars on terror and in Iraq, and the global financial crisis, when it turned out that unfettered free-market globalisation couldn’t solve all our problems. David Blunkett, New Labour’s home secretary and MP for Firth Park’s constituency at the time, said in 2002 that local schools were being “swamped” by asylum seekers. He was talking specifically about some of my friends when he said that – kids, not creatures.

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The Guardian

Nov 18 2020
'Some of the darkest places in the world': Joaquin Phoenix on a photobook about slaughterhouses

In Hidden, 40 photographers go inside factory farms and abattoirs to create a global indictment of the meat industry

  • Warning: contains images you may find upsetting

Slumped in the darkness of a narrow corridor lies a pig with hopeless eyes. Each strand of hair is defined, and every line, wrinkle and crease on its body seems to express the cruel conditions of its life. The photo, by Finnish photojournalist Kristo Muurimaa, is just one of the many shocking images compiled in the photo book Hidden. Created by photojournalist and animal rights activist Jo-Anne McArthur, Hidden sheds light on industrial scale factory farms and slaughterhouses and is an indictment of the meat industry.

McArthur and 39 photographers from 16 countries who contributed to the book are unflinching and unapologetic about what they reveal. “My best images are those when I am up close with a wide angle: the calf in the wheelbarrow, being put into a crate; the rabbit, ears back, visibly next in line for slaughter,” says McArthur.

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artforum.com

Nov 18 2020
Enzo Mari and Lea Vergine (1937–2020, 1932–2020)
I SAW THEM FOR THE LAST TIME a few months before the lockdown. I went over to give Lea a copy of my book on Mario Merz, which she wanted as a gift, and with a dedication. They weren’t well. Enzo was
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artforum.com

Nov 18 2020
Michael Hall Named Artistic and Executive Director of New York’s Art Students League
The Arts Student League announced today that Michael Hall will become its new artistic and executive artistic director. Hall succeeds Michael Rips, who after three years departed the Manhattan-based
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artforum.com

Nov 18 2020
Andy Warhol Foundation Arts Writers Grant Announces 2020 Grantees
The Andy Warhol Foundation Arts Writers Grant has named the twenty-two writers who are the recipients of its 2020 grants, which this year total $675,000. The grantees are divided into three categories—articles,
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The Guardian

Nov 17 2020
Storms, skaters ... and an 'all ears' corn man: how locals see California – in pictures

Over 100 California-based photographers came together to document their home state, from the properties of tech billionaires to festivals for ‘blessed’ cats

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The New York Times

Nov 17 2020
Nearly a Third of U.S. Museums Remain Closed by Pandemic, Survey Shows
Nearly a Third of U.S. Museums Remain Closed by Pandemic, Survey Shows
An industry group says that the financial state of the country’s museums “is moving from bad to worse.”
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artforum.com

Nov 17 2020
Enzo Mari
Triennale Milano’s exhibition for Enzo Mari, planned before the artist’s death last month at age eighty-eight, is joined by another unexpectedly commemorative show at Galleria Milano, its first
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artforum.com

Nov 17 2020
Olga and Oleg Tatarintsev
Located in two capacious spaces on the second and fortieth floors of Moscow’s Mercury City Tower, gallery ILONA—K, the latest addition to Moscow’s art scene, opened with “Drowning by Numbers,” a
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The Guardian

Nov 17 2020
Baron Wolman obituary

Rolling Stone photographer who captured classic images of the most influential musicians of the 1960s and 70s

Almost as much as the music, the mystique of rock’s golden age resides in the timeless images captured by the photographers of the era. One of rock’n’roll’s pioneering lensmen was Baron Wolman, who was the first staff photographer for Rolling Stone magazine when it launched in San Francisco in 1967. It typified the anarchic spirit of the time that Wolman’s initial assignment for the magazine was to photograph the Grateful Dead, in the aftermath of their arrest by a squad of narcotics agents.

Wolman, who has died in New Mexico aged 83, later reflected that “everyone was approachable and appreciative in those days”, and with his wife Juliana (nee Sakowsky), a dancer he had met at university and married in 1963, lived in the same Haight-Ashbury district as the Grateful Dead and many other luminaries of San Francisco’s 1967 Summer of Love. Just as the music was in a state of fevered self-invention, so was the art of photographing the artists and their audiences, and Wolman enjoyed a level of access to his subjects that would become impermissible as music turned into a huge business controlled by contracts and lawyers. “It went from an intimate experience to being a major corporate experience,” Wolman noted.

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artforum.com

Nov 17 2020
Art Basel Hong Kong and Frieze Los Angeles Postpone 2021 Events
The effects of the continuing Covid-19 crisis are beginning to spill into 2021, with Art Basel Hong Kong and Frieze Los Angeles both announcing the postponement of events originally scheduled for the
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The Guardian

Nov 17 2020
Neon nights: the living art of fireflies – in pictures

Photographer Kei Nomiyama captured dreamy, long-exposure images of fireflies in the mountains of Shikoku Island – the smallest of Japan’s four main islands

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The Guardian

Nov 17 2020
Milkman to Mark Twain: online exhibition celebrates telephones in literature

Crossed Lines connects with bookworms and technology buffs in era when phones central for communication

They can be objects of romance or harbingers of doom. They can provide plot twists, shocks, horror, comedy or character. Now the role of the telephone in literature, from the 19th century to the present day, is being celebrated in an online exhibition, Crossed Lines.

Readers of books, plays and poems were invited to send in their favourite references to telephones in literature, and almost 100 examples, from the earliest models to smartphones, were submitted from across the world.

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The Guardian

Nov 17 2020
L’Enfant et les Sortilèges review – Vopera's brilliant updating of Ravel finds wit and relevance

Available online
A rebellious home-schooled child goes on a nightmare cartoon journey of self-discovery in this ingeniously designed video fantasy take on Ravel’s opera

L’Enfant et les Sortilèges, the fantaisie-lyrique in two parts that Ravel composed in the 1920s to a libretto by Colette, is an intricate, fragile piece of theatre, and an ambitious choice for the debut production from Virtual Opera. But directed by Rachael Hewer with designs by Leanne Vandenbussche, and with the London Philharmonic conducted by Lee Reynolds in his own reworking of the luminous score for just 27 players, it’s one of the most successful online operas I’ve come across over the last nine months.

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The Guardian

Nov 17 2020
'This is our truth': the world's first graphic novel made by homeless people

A new crowdfunded book aims to challenge perceptions of homelessness – and change the lives of the people who wrote it

“It is easy to look down on homeless people,” says former rough sleeper Mitchel. “We’re not taught to respect each other in society and if we can have a reason to disregard people, it is like a default to ignore others.”

Mitchel slept on the streets of central London for almost three years, and has also spent time in night shelters and hostels. Now he’s one of the contributors to what is being described as the world’s first graphic novel created by people affected by homelessness, and hopes the book will help change perceptions and encourage empathy.

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The Guardian

Nov 16 2020
From Che Guevara to lockdown: photo book tells story of Madrid

Work features images by some of the most famous photographers of the past century

One warm June weekend 61 years ago, a scruffily bearded Argentinian on his way from Cuba to Cairo stopped over in Madrid. With almost a day to kill between flights, he did what any tourist of the time would have done: explored the city, visited a bullring, had breakfast and did a little shopping.

He was, however, no ordinary tourist. A photograph taken very early that Sunday morning shows the unmistakable figure of Che Guevara standing in boots, beret and battle fatigues, one hand hooked over his belt and the other clutching a newspaper.

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The Guardian

Nov 16 2020
Daring to be diverse: the changing face of fashion photography - in pictures

Fashion is currently taking a look at itself in the mirror. By touching on themes of womanhood, immigration and diversity, these four female photographers are helping drive through positive changes

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The Guardian

Nov 16 2020
Nasa’s SpaceX Crew-1 mission – in pictures

SpaceX has launched four astronauts to the International Space Station on the first full-fledged taxi flight for Nasa by a private company. Three Americans and one Japanese astronaut on the Dragon capsule will remain at the orbiting lab for the next six months until their replacements arrive in April 2021

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The Guardian

Nov 16 2020
Holbein exhibition at the Victoria and Albert Museum – archive, 17 November 1943

17 November 1943: The last 11 years of his life were spent in England, and it was during those years that he made most of the remarkable portrait drawings he is remembered for

Holbein died in London about 400 years ago — the precise date is uncertain. The last eleven years of his life were spent in England, and it was during those years that he made most of the remarkable portrait drawings for which he is mainly remembered in England. Basle may think of him as a painter of religious pictures and a designer of stained-glass windows, but to us he is a draughtsman, and the exhibition that opened to-day at the Victoria and Albert Museum stresses that side of his genius.

Related: Hans Holbein, portraitist extraordinaire

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artforum.com

Nov 16 2020
Mudam Luxembourg
Mudam Luxembourg – Musée d’Art Moderne Grand-Duc Jean presents the launch of “Me, Family,” an online platform presenting works by 24 artists from 14 countries. Accompanied by a new publication, public
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artforum.com

Nov 16 2020
Glenn Brown
For his fifth exhibition with Galerie Max Hetzler, “And thus we existed”, Glenn Brown will present a selection of new and recent paintings, drawings and sculptures. Acid pigments and winding lines create
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