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The Guardian

Feb 16 2021
Ruth E Carter: 'Nothing is set in stone until the camera starts rolling'

The Oscar-winning costume designer of Black Panther talks her illustrious career as well as her future, including what to expect from comedy sequel Coming 2 America

There were a number of historic breakthroughs as a result of Marvel’s blockbusting adventure Black Panther: the highest-grossing film from a black director, the highest-grossing film with a black lead and the first ever black winner for the best costume design Oscar.

The winner was Ruth E Carter, whose major moment of recognition came after a career filled with trailblazing work which is being celebrated in Ruth E Carter: Afrofuturism in Costume Design, a 40-year retrospective at the Scad Fash Museum of Fashion + Film in Atlanta.

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The Guardian

Feb 16 2021
Fantasies, flashbacks and frenzies: LensCulture art photography awards 2021 – in pictures

From suffocating images of isolation to refugees seeking solace in volleyball, this year’s winning images find humour, strength and beauty in a dismal year

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The Guardian

Feb 16 2021
Tights! Spatulas! Action! The madcap world of chain reaction videos

Need your hair cut? Cake served? No problem! Lockdown has led millions to discover the work of Joseph Herscher and friends, whose absurdly complicated ‘labour-saving’ machines reveal the potential for magic in the everyday

“It’s one thing to maim myself,” says Joseph Herscher. “But maiming someone else? I’m not sure I could live with that. At least I’d have it on tape, but it’d still suck to be killed by one of my machines.”

Herscher, 36, is a chain reaction artist who works out of his bedroom in a Brooklyn flatshare. He builds elaborate contraptions using everyday items in the style of Rube Goldberg, the madcap American cartoonist and inventor.

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The Guardian

Feb 16 2021
The Great British Art Tour: a flagship work from when Britain 'ruled the waves'

With public art collections closed we are bringing the art to you, exploring highlights from across the country in partnership with Art UK. Today: the Foundling Museum’s seascape by Charles Brooking

This dramatic painting by Charles Brooking hangs in the Picture Gallery of the Foundling Museum. Taylor White, treasurer of the Foundling Hospital at the time, commissioned the seascape in 1754. According to John Brownlow’s Memoranda or Chronicles of the Foundling Hospital, White had seen one of Brooking’s pictures in a shop.

Brooking painted this enormous picture – over three metres wide – in just 18 days, working in a room in the Foundling Hospital itself because his own garret studio was too small. The painting, Brooking’s largest, was intended to be a companion piece to Peter Monamy’s seascape An English Fleet in the Downs, which has been missing since the beginning of the 20th century.

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The New York Times

Feb 16 2021
Why a Canadian Artist's U.S. Exhibition Features Giant Emojis
The Canadian artist Divya Mehra’s first U.S. solo show takes a surprising look at mourning. She uses giant emojis to portray her devastation.
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artforum.com

Feb 16 2021
London’s National Gallery Slated for $35 Million Upgrade
Officials at London’s National Gallery have announced that the institution will receive a major upgrade of its public amenities ahead of its two hundredth anniversary, in 2024. Estimated to cost between
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artforum.com

Feb 16 2021
Guggenheim Signs Inaugural Bargaining Contract with Union
After a fraught span of over a year that saw New York’s Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum staff protesting in the streets and, shortly thereafter, the face of the museum lit up with slogans protesting its
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artforum.com

Feb 16 2021
Jackie Raynal talks about a life in movies
Jackie Raynal, the French director, editor, and former programmer of New York’s Bleecker Street and Carnegie Hall cinemas, first became involved in film when, riding through Paris on a Vespa in 1958
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artforum.com

Feb 16 2021
Cy Twombly Foundation Calls Louvre Restoration of Bronze Room an “Odious Affront”
The Cy Twombly Foundation has denounced the Louvre’s restoration of its Bronze Room, which houses a site-specific work by Twombly, and has demanded that the Paris institution restore the room to its
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The New York Times

Feb 16 2021
Superstudio: The Architects Who Dreamt of a Future With No Buildings
In the 1960s and ’70s, the Italian design collective Superstudio protested modern urban design by poking fun at the status quo and imagining its own utopias.
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The Guardian

Feb 16 2021
Unusually heavy snow blankets Athens – in pictures

Authorities have told residents particularly in the Greek capital’s northern and eastern suburbs to avoid leaving their homes

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The Guardian

Feb 16 2021
Pancake tortoises and a laptop sadhu – Shrove Tuesday's best photos

Guardian picture editors bring you the best news photography from across the globe.

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The Guardian

Feb 16 2021
An uncertain future for Japan’s love hotels – in pictures

With Japan’s rules on movement less restrictive than many other countries, its love hotels have fared relatively well during the coronavirus pandemic. But in a country where, according to government research, over 40% of men and women aged 18-34 have never had sex and with its current population of 126 million forecast to fall a third by 2060, the multibillion-dollar love hotel industry faces an uncertain future

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The New York Times

Feb 16 2021
The Haunted House of Soviets Gets a New Life
The Haunted House of Soviets Gets a New Life
Residents of Kaliningrad, Russia’s westernmost region, search for meaning in a building many see as an egregious architectural mistake. “It’s ugly, but it’s ours.”
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The Guardian

Feb 15 2021
Take your seats: unfiltered views of everyday life – in pictures

The photographers in new book But Still, It Turns create work that speaks to ‘the brilliant tangle of reality’. Curator Paul Graham talks us through them ...

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The Guardian

Feb 15 2021
The Great British Art Tour: A Chinese student in the bronze age

With public art collections closed we are bringing the art to you, exploring highlights from across the country in partnership with Art UK. Today’s pick: Dora Gordine’s portrait of Chia-Chu Chang, in Kingston

Dora Gordine was born into a Russian Jewish family in Latvia in 1895 and grew up in Estonia, where she first exhibited as a sculptor. It was while living and studying in Paris in the mid-1920s that she came across Chia-Chu Chang, a young Chinese student, and asked him to sit for a portrait. Chang had been studying in America and was travelling through the city on his journey home to China, so the sittings had to be completed remarkably quickly, in just three days. The head was cast in bronze at the prestigious Valsuani foundry in Paris and was first exhibited at the Salon des Tuileries in Paris in May 1926. It brought Gordine’s work to the attention of important art collectors and critics and helped establish her reputation as a sculptor of significant talent.

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The Guardian

Feb 15 2021
No logo, no likes: New York's offline DIY culture embraces lockdown limitations

From subversive newspapers to free gigs and galleries, a new kind of pandemic creativity is anti-consumerist and pro-community

New Yorkers who once thrived on chance encounters and interconnection with Manhattan’s pace and energy are beginning to find creative footholds in the abnormalities of pandemic life.

Expressions are varied, but each point to the embrace of a profoundly altered state and a DIY punk ethos featuring a partial rejection of commercial imperatives, branding, the internet and politics.

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artforum.com

Feb 15 2021
Indianapolis Museum of Art Faces Backlash Over Insensitive Job Posting
More than six hundred people have signed an open letter calling for the resignation of Charles Venable, director and CEO of the Indianapolis Museum of Art at Newfields, after it was revealed that the
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The Guardian

Feb 15 2021
'A great cover for their first album': Harry and Meghan's romantic rebellion against royal portraiture

The Sussexes’ baby announcement shared on Valentine’s Day is a confident image of defiance that seems to take us inside their love – granny must find it utterly baffling

The Duke of Sussex’s left foot steals the show. His knobbly toes shove themselves into the foreground, bulging out to rhyme with his wife’s baby bump. Misan Harriman, the Nigerian-born photographer and friend of Meghan who took the picture remotely from his home in Woking, has created an unbuttoned romantic pastoral that doesn’t so much rebel against royal portraiture as bring it to an end.

Producing babies has been the primary business of royalty since time immemorial. Harry and Meghan’s new child will be eighth in line to the British throne, but the picture tells us quite flamboyantly the Sussexes are not in Britain and have no desire to be. It is a confident image of defiance. A cup of California dreamin’. The garden looks semi-tropical. Harriman’s preference for black and white gives the sun-kissed lawn a lovely silvery glow that sets the couple almost in a vision of paradise. But at the same time, their intimate casualness – those toes again – is intended to show us they are anchored to the reality that matters.

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The New York Times

Feb 15 2021
The Sinking of a Bust Surfaces a Debate Over Denmark’s Past
An artists’ group, criticized as vandals for dumping the bust of an 18th-century king, Frederik V, into Copenhagen Harbor, says it wanted to draw attention to Denmark’s role in slave trading.
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The Guardian

Feb 15 2021
The inselbergs of Egypt's White desert – in pictures

The unusual rock formations are scattered across the landscape of Egypt’s White desert, about 300 miles from Cairo

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The Guardian

Feb 14 2021
The Great British Art Tour: filters and a facelift – a 17th-century selfie

With public art collections closed we are bringing the art to you, exploring highlights from across the country in partnership with Art UK. Today’s pick: Leamington Spa’s Self-Portrait by Candelight by Schalcken

Godfried Schalcken was already famous in his homeland of the Dutch Republic when he sailed for England in 1692. Celebrated for his small, intricately detailed nocturnal scenes, Schalcken hoped to grow his following across the Channel in the court of King William and Queen Mary and vie for the position of official portrait painter to the Crown.

This self-portrait acted as his visual CV. Aware that no other portrait painter in England at that time could rival his mastery of light and shade, Schalcken bathes the scene in candlelight, promoting his unique skill. He identifies himself as the author of this work by blatantly pointing to the artist’s palette in his left hand. Light shimmers off the red silk swag and Schalcken’s silk slashed doublet, recalling the portraits of Anthony Van Dyck. In this way, Schalcken claims his place in a distinguished line of Dutch artists working as court painters in England.

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The Guardian

Feb 14 2021
'We wanted people to see we exist': the photographer who recorded lesbian life in the 70s

She toured America photographing women like herself, at a time when being out could cost you your job, home and family. As Eye to Eye, a book of her groundbreaking work is republished, Joan E Biren, known as JEB, recalls why the images were so vitally important

“The thing that’s really hard for people to understand today,” says Joan E Biren, “is that in the 70s, it was impossible to find authentic and affirming images of lesbians. They didn’t exist.” Biren, or JEB as she is better known, is widely regarded as the first lesbian photographer to compile a book of photographs of lesbians for lesbians.

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The Guardian

Feb 14 2021
The Guardian view on open-air art: the way forward | Editorial

Sagacious arts organisations are looking alfresco for a return in the spring

With most of the UK emerging from a cold snap, the idea of taking culture outdoors can seem a little optimistic just now. Not that that stopped early modern Londoners, who entertained themselves mightily on the Thames when winter held it frozen for months at a time, as visualised with such verve by Virginia Woolf in her novel Orlando.

Nevertheless spring will come, summer will come – and so too will come continued restrictions on large gatherings indoors, and perhaps also outdoors. That likelihood has already been anticipated by the cancellation of the 2021 Glastonbury festival. Such cultural events, unlike TV and film production, have not been underwritten by a government-backed insurance scheme. Planning such a huge event as Glastonbury with confidence, under the distinct possibility of cancellation, clearly presented an impossible risk for organisers.

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The Guardian

Feb 14 2021
From Chris Hemsworth's mansion to the Wynne prize: Otis Hope Carey's art of the ocean

He’s a professional surfer who twice won the Australian Indigenous Surfing Titles, but his artwork is riding equally big waves

Some people call him the rainbow lorikeet because he flies so high over the water. When Otis Hope Carey is surfing, when he is in the ocean, he is home. Coming down a wave, down those blue-green walls, he seems to dance. An important spiritual symbol of the Gumbaynggirr people, the ocean – called “gaagal” in that language – and the country around it is where Carey came from and where he will go.

His parents first brought him to the beach, at Coffs Harbour, when he was a week old. The pro surfer, painter and father, now 32, has never really left it.

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The Guardian

Feb 14 2021
A shadow history: the unseen photographs of Elliott Erwitt

Known for portraits of the likes of Jackie Kennedy and Che Guevara, a book of previously unpublished work reveals the 92-year-old maverick’s incredible range

At 92, Elliott Erwitt is one of the grand old men of photography. Over a 70-year career he has amassed an archive that comprises around 600,000 images, the most well known possessing a quiet, witty charm that one of his friends, Henri Cartier-Bresson, once described as “a smile from his deeper self”.

Self-effacing and defiantly old fashioned in his views, Erwitt has long been out of step with the drift of contemporary photography, insisting that it is a craft rather than an art form. He once described himself as “a professional photographer by trade and an amateur photographer by vocation”, which somewhat underplays the acute compositional skill that informs his best-known images – including a visceral portrait of a grief-stricken Jackie Kennedy at her husband’s funeral and a furious Richard Nixon prodding Soviet leader Nikita Khrushchev in the chest during their famously heated debate in Moscow in 1959.

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The Guardian

Feb 14 2021
‘Astonishing’ dig reveals domestic life in the iron age

A large settlement, a Roman villa and many household objects are among the discoveries at an ancient site in Oxfordshire

When archaeologists began excavating land near the iron age hillfort at Wittenham Clumps, a famous Oxfordshire landmark, they were hopeful of unearthing something of interest because the area has been occupied for more than 3,000 years. But nothing prepared them for the excitement of discovering an extended iron age settlement, with the remains of more than a dozen roundhouses dating from 400BC to 100BC – as well as an enormous Roman villa built in the late third to early fourth century.

The structures would have remained buried beneath the sprawling green landscape if not for a decision by Earth Trust, the environmental charity that cares for it, to redevelop its visitor centre. Investigating the archaeology was part of the planning application.

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The Guardian

Feb 14 2021
London's bridges are falling down: how politics has failed the capital's crossings

The £150m repair of Hammersmith Bridge, closed since 2019, is mired in squabbling – and it’s just one of many across the UK that need work

Toby Gordon-Smith can see the district of Hammersmith from his flat. In normal times it takes him a few minutes to get there in his wheelchair. His cannabidiol products business is there, with the accessible tube station that he needs to get to the rest of London. The station is the reason why he moved to the area, but now it might as well be in another city. For he lives in Barnes, on the south side of the River Thames, opposite Hammersmith, and the bridge that connected them is closed for safety reasons – to vehicles since April 2019, and to pedestrians, cyclists and wheelchair users since last August. Although it is nearly two years since the first closure, there is still no clear plan for fixing the bridge.

There are thousands of stories like Gordon-Smith’s. For children in Barnes who go to schools in Hammersmith, what was once a 15-minute walk is now a tortuous three-mile journey along a towpath regularly flooded by the tide, up flights of steps on to a railway bridge (which makes cycling difficult) and through an ill-lit park with high rates of crime. Or they can take a long bus ride, which means getting up at 6am, if you’re going to beat the rush-hour traffic. The area’s main hospital, Charing Cross, is on the north side of the river, so those of its staff who live to the south, and patients needing such things as chemotherapy, now have to make gruelling journeys of an hour or more each way. Ambulances face potentially lethal delays.

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The Guardian

Feb 14 2021
A gritty take on the theme of love – in pictures

Deanna Templeton has a unique perspective on the theme of love and its symbolism, particularly the heart. Her new book, Love You published by Nazraeli Press, is the perfect antidote to the often saccharine images associated with Valentine’s day

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The Guardian

Feb 13 2021
The big picture: Juno Calypso's honeymoon for one

The London-based photographer took a trip to a lovers’ hotel in Pennsylvania and allowed alter ego Joyce the run of the place

“If I’m in need of inspiration for new images,” Juno Calypso has said, “I’ll go on eBay. My key search words are ‘sexy’ and ‘pink’ and ‘mask’. I’ll start in the hair and beauty section and then move on to electronics, followed by a long browse in the wedding department.”

It was a similar kind of search that led her to the honeymoon hotel in which this picture is taken. Having come across a couples-only “land of love” resort in Pennsylvania, the London-based photographer saved up and booked herself in for a solo week. Calypso left her room only to take advantage of the all-you-can-eat breakfast and dinner. Otherwise, conjuring the persistent alter ego of her work (whom she thinks of as “Joyce”), she took advantage of the heart-shaped hot tub in her room, and surveyed herself in the mirrored ceiling, which had reflected lovers every week since the 1970s.

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The Guardian

Feb 13 2021
Grayson and Philippa Perry: 'Fantasy isn't all unicorns and rainbows – it's a refuge'

Their art club on Channel 4 inspired millions last year. On the eve of series two they talk about hitting their 60s, lockdown, therapy… and Grayson’s missing alter ego

Interviewing Grayson and Philippa Perry is a bit like sticking your hand into a basket of kittens: they’re playful and fascinating but you can never be quite sure where one ends and the other begins, or whether they’re going to nip. It’s the run-up to the second series of Grayson’s Art Club, and they’re sitting side by side in what must currently be the world’s best-known artist’s studio.

More than a million people a week tuned into the Channel 4 series last year, and I’ve joined the couple on Zoom to talk about the imminent second season. Grayson has positioned himself half off screen and Philippa’s hand keeps popping into view, trailing a red thread. What are you doing, I ask? “Let’s say I’m doing the mending,” she replies, briskly.

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The Guardian

Feb 13 2021
What’s in a surname? The female artists lost to history because they got married

A new biography of the painter Isabel Rawsthorne highlights how talented women have often missed out on the recognition they deserved

Generations of female artists, composers and writers have been lost to history because their names changed after marriage. According to growing academic consensus, the conventional switch of surnames at the altar has erased a key cultural legacy. And the story of the painter and designer Isabel Rawsthorne, told in a new biography, is among the first to make this powerful argument.

A star of the London art scene in the late 1940s and 50s, Rawsthorne was billed as one of five key artists to watch alongside Francis Bacon and Lucian Freud. Yet her striking paintings are now attached, piecemeal, to the three other names she used. As a result, she appears simply as a string of footnotes, best known as the muse of her famous lovers, the sculptors Jacob Epstein and Alberto Giacometti.

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The Guardian

Feb 13 2021
The edible art of sourdough faces – in pictures

Five years ago, Swedish designer and stylist Linda Ring experienced total burnout. After a few months doing nothing, she tried to adopt a slower lifestyle. “I started baking sourdough, but as it’s my nature to try to make everything beautiful, I began experimenting.”

Ring’s loaves became canvases for portraits and landscapes, scored into the raw dough. “You never know how the bread or the pattern will turn out, it’s enormously satisfying when I take it out of the oven and see.”

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The New York Times

Feb 13 2021
How Japonisme Forever Changed the Course of Western Design
How Japonisme Forever Changed the Course of Western Design
In the late 19th century, Japanese aesthetics and craftsmanship overtook Paris, inspiring a movement that would radically transform Europe’s visual culture.
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The New York Times

Feb 13 2021
French Mayor Opens Museums, Defying Coronavirus Orders
French Mayor Opens Museums, Defying Coronavirus Orders
Cultural institutions in France have been clamoring to reopen for months. They found an unlikely champion in a far-right civic official in Perpignan.
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artforum.com

Feb 12 2021
Milford Graves (1941–2021)
Groundbreaking free-jazz percussionist and polymath Milford Graves died today of congestive heart failure at the age of seventy-nine, as reported by NPR’s Lars Gotrich. Described by composer and
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The Guardian

Feb 12 2021
Cambodia is turning the tide on looted statues, but some things cannot be returned | Ashley Thompson and Stephen Murphy

While we celebrate the repatriation of $50m of ancient Khmer objects, the damage to Cambodian society is permanent

At the end of January, the Cambodian Ministry of Culture and Fine Arts announced the most significant return ever of stolen antiquities to south-east Asia: more than 100 ancient Khmer objects with an estimated value of $50m assembled over the course of six decades by Douglas Latchford.

At his death in August 2020, Latchford was facing federal charges in the US for the alleged key role he played since the 1960s in the looting and trafficking of Khmer antiquities from Cambodia and Thailand. The investigations had begun to lay bare the direct links between the building of south-east Asian art collections in the west – including at some of America’s most revered cultural institutions – and the brutal destruction of the Khmer cultural heritage on the ground. His daughter inherited the collection and consented to their spectacular return. Latchford, a British citizen by birth, operated out of Bangkok and London. Though the full extent of the Latchford family Khmer antiquities holdings is still unclear, it is understood that it was split between these two locations.

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artforum.com

Feb 12 2021
Alex Da Corte to Design Met Rooftop Commission
The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, has invited multidisciplinary artist Alex Da Corte to create a site-specific sculptural installation for its Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Roof Garden. The work,
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artforum.com

Feb 12 2021
LA MoCA Restructuring; Klaus Biesenbach to Become Artistic Director
The Los Angeles Museum of Contemporary Art has announced that it is restructuring and that Klaus Biesenbach, who has served as the institution’s director since 2018, will assume the role of artistic
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The Guardian

Feb 12 2021
20 photographs of the week

The military coup in Myanmar, the impeachment trial of Donald Trump, Serena Williams at the Australian Open and the enduring impact of Covid-19: the most striking images from around the world this week

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artforum.com

Feb 12 2021
Tim Portlock on software cities and the new American sublime
Tim Portlock’s immersive digital cityscapes—rendered using 3-D computer gaming and special effects software—attempt to make real the discrepancy between the ideology of American exceptionalism and
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The New York Times

Feb 12 2021
A New, Safe Home for the Louvre’s Unseen Treasures
A New, Safe Home for the Louvre’s Unseen Treasures
An ultramodern conservation center in northern France is a haven for flood-threatened items from the museum’s central Paris basement.
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The Guardian

Feb 12 2021
Heroes and villains in urban development | Letters

Franklin Medhurst’s plan to preserve and rebuild Stockton’s Georgian town centre was derailed by the murky web of corruption around John Poulson, writes Hilary Cashman – while John Griffiths says the Poulson scandal was not confined to northern England

Oliver Wainwright’s feature about Stockton-on-Tees (Bulldoze the high street and build a giant park: is Stockton the future of Britain?, 11 February), does not mention the man who fought valiantly in the 1960s to save it from decline: Franklin Medhurst, a second world war hero and visionary town planner, whose forward-thinking Teesside Plan was derailed when the self-interest of local politicians combined with the murky web of John Poulson corruption to wreck his team’s proposals for a better Teesside. Stockton would have been its cultural centre, with its much-loved Georgian and Victorian high street preserved for the enjoyment and pride of citizens and visitors.

Frank stood up to the planners and councillors who proposed to replace it with a cut-price concrete desert. He surveyed local opinion, and reported that the public did not want the town’s old buildings pulled down. The politicians’ revenge was savage – Frank was sacked. He never lost his idealism or activism – in 2016, when he was 96, his anti-Brexit letter to the Guardian went viral.
Hilary Cashman
Stockton-on-Tees, County Durham

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The Guardian

Feb 12 2021
Beautiful murals by a feminist collective | Letter

Nigel Young draws readers’ attention to Few and Far Women in the US

On street art, Jonathan Jones (The more satirical street murals are, the less they resemble great art, 5 February) may be correct that urban murals, as an art form, have been a predominantly male phenomenon. He believes we need a female street art star.

In a decade of transition from graffiti to a muralist art tradition, an alternative has emerged in the United States. Rather than there being a focus on an individual star, like Banksy, since 2011 a feminist collective of mural artists from all over the continent has emerged, called Few and Far Women.

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The Guardian

Feb 12 2021
Lust, heartbreak and suggestive sculpture: was this art's greatest love triangle?

For Valentine’s Day, we look at how the interweaving passions of three American greats – Cy Twombly, Jasper Johns and Robert Rauschenberg – were as mesmerising as their art

The sensual American graffitist Cy Twombly, who lived in Italy from the late 1950s until his death in 2011, lushly inscribed his epic canvases with love poetry – Shelley and Keats, Cavafy and Catullus. The work was like an abstract expressionist Valentine’s card. He even used hearts and roses in his work, as well as penises, breasts, anuses and vaginas. But who was his Valentine?

The answer is as epic and enigmatic as Twombly’s art. In the early 1950s he met a young artist called Robert Rauschenberg and they became lovers. On one occasion while they were studying at the avant-garde art school Black Mountain College, he saved Rauschenberg from drowning in a lake. It was no accident: Rauschenberg had attempted suicide. Twombly followed him into the water unhesitatingly. How’s that for romantic?

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The New York Times

Feb 12 2021
The Makers Keeping the Ancient Art of Weaving Alive
Through thoughtful collaborations with Mexican artisans in Oaxaca and elsewhere, contemporary designers are helping to evolve — and protect — one of the world’s most enduring handicrafts.
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The New York Times

Feb 12 2021
Living in a Private House With a Public Meaning
Living in a Private House With a Public Meaning
A dining room with historic murals in Kennebunkport, Maine, connects its current owners with the past.
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The New York Times

Feb 12 2021
Presidents’ Day: 5 Ways to Make It Meaningful This Year
Presidents’ Day: 5 Ways to Make It Meaningful This Year
With kids off from school, here are suggestions for delving into our nation’s complex history with virtual museum visits, D.I.Y. tours and fun movies (Lincoln as a vampire slayer?).
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The Guardian

Feb 12 2021
Magic in Manhattan and an evil soundscape – the week in art

Photography behind bars, an apocalyptic masterwork and the prize at the forefront of modern art – all in your weekly dispatch

John Moores Painting prize
This prize has been keeping painting in the picture of modern art since the 1960s, with David Hockney and Peter Doig among previous winners. The shortlisted artists this year are Kathryn Maple, Michele Fletcher, Robbie Bushe, Steph Goodger and Stephen Lee.
Walker Art Gallery, Liverpool, available online

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