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artforum.com

Apr 30 2022
Kaelen Wilson-Goldie on the art of Ruth Asawa
CAST YOUR MIND, if you can bear it, back to the disorienting first year of the pandemic. Late in the summer of 2020, a crackling moment of possibility broke through the leaden mood, albeit briefly,
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artforum.com

Apr 30 2022
Joaquín Torres-García
Joaquín Torres-García (1874–1949) was a roving messiah simultaneously ahead of and behind the curve—a didactic, derivative pioneer who sought nothing less than to beget a common language that could
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artforum.com

Apr 30 2022
Sandra Gamarra
The Museo de Arte de Lima (MALI) is among the few spaces that offer the city’s diverse audiences an overview of Peruvian art history. In recent months, MALI has modified its permanent exhibition by
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artforum.com

Apr 30 2022
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artforum.com

Apr 30 2022
Donna Huanca
Berlin-based Bolivian-American artist Donna Huanca, through a dimly lit indigo tunnel. It led to a wall illuminated by the projected hues of DOS, PIEDRA QUEMADA (CLAY), PARRAJO (Two, Burnt Stone [Clay],
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artforum.com

Apr 30 2022
Susan L. Aberth on “Supernatural America”
THAT AMERICA IS HAUNTED—by the specters of its genocidal and racist histories; by the lingering ghosts of personal and national trauma; and by the aura emanating from the unrelenting desires of its
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artforum.com

Apr 30 2022
Ed Halter on the Otolith Group
THE OTOLITH GROUP is a joint project between Anjalika Sagar and Kodwo Eshun, both lifelong Londoners of transcontinental heritage. Named for the delicate apparatus of the inner ear that senses balance
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artforum.com

Apr 30 2022
Peter Lunenfeld on “City of Cinema: Paris 1850–1907”
Curated by Leah Lehmbeck and Britt Salvesen, with Vanessa R. Schwartz THE DEATH OF CINEMA has been announced almost as often as the death of God. And why not link film to religion? For true cineastes,
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artforum.com

Apr 30 2022
Jordan Nassar
For his Los Angeles debut at Anat Ebgi in 2017, Jordan Nassar presented a selection of small cotton-on-canvas panels featuring silhouetted embroidered images of swelling, often mountainous terrain. Each
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artforum.com

Apr 30 2022
“Every Moment Counts: Feelings of AIDS”
How to tell the story of how art has been touched by a global epidemic? “Every Moment Counts: Feelings of AIDS” takes on the immense task of charting the impact of a disease that has lasted four decades
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artforum.com

Apr 30 2022
Maya Muñoz
It is through the mundane and the intimate that Maya Muñoz’s art invites enchantment. Her exhibition “Stills from a Year of Living Dangerously” presented more than one hundred acrylic paintings on paper
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artforum.com

Apr 30 2022
Barry Schwabsky on Rackstraw Downes
WHATEVER YOU THINK realism means, Rackstraw Downes is certainly some kind of realist—and, moreover, one whose elective subject matter is landscape. That in itself suggests a quixotic temperament in
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artforum.com

Apr 30 2022
Tobi Haslett on the Otolith Group
LAST SEPTEMBER, six Palestinian militants escaped from Gilboa Prison, a maximum-security facility off Route 71 in northern Israel. Five were from Islamic Jihad; the sixth was from Fatah. All had
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artforum.com

Apr 30 2022
Esther Kläs
Sublimely spare, the six sculptures and three drawings in Esther Kläs’s exhibition here transformed the gallery into a zone of tranquility, imbued with a simplicity and quietude that were a soothing
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artforum.com

Apr 30 2022
H. R. Giger
The sci-fi hellscapes of H. R. Giger (1940–2014) are curiously placid, as contemplative as they are ominous in their ashen airbrushed desolation. The Swiss artist, perhaps most famous for his creation
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artforum.com

Apr 30 2022
Sanaa Gateja
Sanaa Gateja is renowned for mural-scale tapestries, which he usually makes by working with more than fifty collaborators in his studio. This was not possible during the lockdowns of 2020, so he shifted
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artforum.com

Apr 30 2022
Aleana Egan
Aleana Egan’s recent exhibition “Sampler” gathered ten works, including sculptural pieces made between 2007 and 2021 and two new paintings created during the pandemic. Not quite among the latter was
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artforum.com

Apr 30 2022
Judit Reigl
I asked a young painter to join me on my first visit to this survey of five decades of Judit Reigl’s work. Though my friend’s art jumps between figuration and blankets of monochrome color, she was
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artforum.com

Apr 30 2022
Annabeth Marks
As arguments for analog experience, Annabeth Marks’s abstract pictures are utterly convincing. Meticulously made with hand-mixed pigments and a devotion to detail, each is an intricate investigation of
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artforum.com

Apr 30 2022
Erika Balsom on Ruth Beckermann’s MUTZENBACHER
AT THE START of Ruth Beckermann’s MUTZENBACHER (2022), text appears over an image of the repurposed industrial space that will serve as the film’s sole setting. It announces a casting call: The
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artforum.com

Apr 30 2022
Tim Griffin on the art of Virginia Overton
PROBABLY THE OBSERVATION by Virginia Overton cited most often by writers came on the occasion of her 2013 exhibition at Switzerland’s Kunsthalle Bern. Wishing to tease out the artist’s thoughts on
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artforum.com

Apr 30 2022
Hannah Stamler on Suzanne Valadon
A SELF-PORTRAIT from 1911 shows Suzanne Valadon at work, presumably creating the image before us. Holding a paint-streaked palette, she turns slightly to the right with lips pursed and eyes narrowed,
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artforum.com

Apr 30 2022
Issy Wood shares her top ten
Issy Wood is an artist and musician who lives in London. Her paintings have been shown in galleries and museums worldwide. Wood’s fourth book, But Who’s Counting?, was published by Carlos/Ishikawa last
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artforum.com

Apr 30 2022
Ed Halter and Tobi Haslett on the Otolith Group
MILITANCY, COLONIALISM, the “subjunctivity” that Samuel R. Delany identified as key to science fiction, the possibilities of the essay-film: Certain concerns and themes may be traced across the career
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artforum.com

Apr 30 2022
Sasha Frere-Jones on the art of Éliane Radigue
“I ONLY HAVE ONE TRICK,” Éliane Radigue told me a few years ago. “It is the cross-fade!” She pulled her fingers apart as if stretching taffy and laughed. She was sitting on the couch in her apartment
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artforum.com

Apr 30 2022
Rashaad Newsome
For “Assembly,” Rashaad Newsome boldly transformed the Park Avenue Armory into a multisensory video game-cum-twenty-first-century reboot of Paris Is Burning. With the show’s title nodding toward a
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artforum.com

Apr 30 2022
Anne Ryan
Anne Ryan (1889–1954) was a novelist, a poet, a painter, and, perhaps most importantly, a collagist, although her collages are also poems, composed not of words but of exquisitely articulated shapes
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artforum.com

Apr 30 2022
Cristine Brache
At the bottom of a long flight of stairs, a floor below Baxter Street on the edge of Manhattan’s Chinatown, Cristine Brache’s quietly elegiac presentation “Bermuda Triangle” bathed Anonymous Gallery’s
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artforum.com

Apr 30 2022
Joan Semmel
Joan Semmel’s “Skin in the Game” at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts—her first retrospective—evinced a sustained, fearless, and lively studio practice, which the artist has maintained for more
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artforum.com

Apr 30 2022
Yu Ji
Over the past few years, Yu Ji invited men to her studio to pose for her, asking them to test the limits of their bodies—to strain, to exhaust themselves, to go perhaps beyond their physical capacities—as
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artforum.com

Apr 30 2022
Jacques Douchez and Norberto Nicola
Texture, volume, and depth were fundamental characteristics of the twenty-six tapestries, hung from the ceiling and surrounded by mirrorclad walls, in “Os pássaros de fogo levantarão voo novamente. As
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artforum.com

Apr 30 2022
Alina Tenser
The work of Alina Tenser inhabits a notional space at the juncture of a Montessori school and the Container Store. Her sculptures, performances, and videos suggest playtime scenarios of experiential
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artforum.com

Apr 30 2022
Emily Oliveira
How thin is the veil between our world and the next? Emily Oliveira’s exhibition “Red Velvet, Orange Crush” examined this numinous terrain for felicitous cracks, where a quick glance between astral
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artforum.com

Apr 30 2022
Alix Vernet
Throughout Manhattan’s East Side neighborhoods, a certain type of building, constructed as the nineteenth century met the twentieth, still stands in all of its bygone grandeur. Architecture historian
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artforum.com

Apr 30 2022
John Stezaker
The basement of the Palazzo Caracciolo di Avellino, home to the Fondazione Morra Greco, is a dark, cavernous space with a vaulted tuff ceiling resembling the mouth of a tunnel. The air is heavy with
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artforum.com

Apr 30 2022
“Staple: What’s on Your Plate?”
“Staple: What’s on Your Plate?” the inaugural offering at Jeddah’s new Hayy Jameel art center, was a rigorous, generous show; spending time with it felt like taking a spoon to an avocado to scoop at
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artforum.com

Apr 30 2022
Merrill Wagner
The two bodies of work by American artist Merrill Wagner, shown on two floors, appeared so distinct as to be almost irreconcilable. Downstairs, glossy fields of dark browns and greens on large steel
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artforum.com

Apr 30 2022
Bruce Hainley on André Cadere’s Itinerant Art
>  He’s spent his whole life waiting for luck, looking for signs of it with a kind of fatalism, and he supplements this fatalism with the best skills of a shrewd hunter and gatherer, picking up booty
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artforum.com

Apr 30 2022
David Rimanelli introduces a portfolio of paintings by Pierre Molinier
> In painting I was able to satisfy my leg and nipple fetishism. —P. Molinier I WAS SHOWING A FRIEND some pictures by cross-dressing painter-photographer Pierre Molinier, and we were arrested by
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artforum.com

Apr 30 2022
Michelle Stuart
When Michelle Stuart inaugurated her studio practice in the late 1960s, feminism and art had barely discovered one another. An expanding interest in ecosystems was just beginning to take root in
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artforum.com

Apr 30 2022
Carlos Motta and Tiamat Legion Medusa
Fixing a set of emerald-green and darkly mesmerizing eyes on the camera for a 2022 video in this exhibition, Tiamat Legion Medusa, the titular subject of the piece, asserts, “I don’t want to die looking
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artforum.com

Apr 30 2022
“Shell”
Cloud, 1974–78, a body-size construction by Nicola L. (1932–2018), is a large, wall-mounted rectangle of cotton canvas measuring five feet high and three feet wide. From it hang five pockets of fabric
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artforum.com

Apr 30 2022
Dorothea Tanning
The show here by Dorothea Tanning (1910–2012), “Doesn’t the Paint Say It All?,” was being billed by Kasmin as “the most comprehensive solo presentation of her work for US audiences in decades.” It was,
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artforum.com

Apr 30 2022
Samara Golden
Samara Golden’s got guts. The manifold meanings of this terse visceral word—whether it refers to one’s corporeal intuition, a vigorous form of bravery and conviction, a gnawing anxiety that twists inside
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The Guardian

Apr 30 2022
The Tree of Trees jubilee sculpture is yet another mound of ill-judged public art | Rowan Moore
Thomas Heatherwick has been compared to Michelangelo, but this cartoon version of nature is no David

The Tree of Trees, an object to be erected outside Buckingham Palace for the Queen’s jubilee, is, according to the studio of its designer, Thomas Heatherwick, a “sculpture” that “seeks to put the importance of trees and nature at the heart of this historic milestone”. Here I’ll pass by the abuse of metaphors (do milestones have hearts?) but not of trees, this being another case of certain designers’ mania for picking them up, moving them around and putting them where they don’t want to be.

This 21 metre-high steel structure will carry 350 small trees, planted in aluminium pots, which will be distributed around the country after the jubilee. It is approximately tree-shaped, but this awkward, angular construction is not much like an actual living organism. It is a tree emoji realised with structural engineering. It has strong vibes of the Marble Arch Mound, the disastrous artificial hill erected last year. Here, as there, a cartoon version of nature is placed in a London ceremonial space by people who don’t seem to have thought much about what it is that makes trees lovely.

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The New York Times

Apr 30 2022
Looking Inward, and Back, at a Biennale for the History Books
Looking Inward, and Back, at a Biennale for the History Books
Eyes are the key metaphor in the Venice Biennale’s central show of 213 artists, an unprecedented percentage of whom are women.
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The Guardian

Apr 30 2022
‘I feel very at home’: the UK schools keeping children in touch with their global roots

Emilia studies Polish culture and food. For Jayden, it’s maths and African history. Photographer Craig Easton captures the weekend schools where youngsters can celebrate their family heritage

Growing up, every Saturday morning while my school friends were out shopping, going to drama school or learning to dive at the local swimming pool, I would put on my shalwar kameez and head to my mosque’s weekend school. There, I would sit cross-legged on prayer mats with other young girls, our heads covered with soft chiffon scarves, listening intently to stories from Islamic history, before catching up on school gossip and that week’s Top of the Pops.

I was seven when I started going to the school in Bradford, and 15 when I left. It was the 1980s, and there were about 20 of us. Our parents all knew each other, most of the congregation was of Pakistani heritage, and most of the children second generation. We learned the basics of the Islamic faith, how to offer prayer in Arabic with English translation, how to read the Qur’an, and what being a Muslim required of us. We had sports days and speech competitions, went swimming and learned to cook. We navigated two cultures, and languages, weaving together English and Urdu.

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The Guardian

Apr 30 2022
Original Observer Photography

From a Rhode Island Beach to the Parisian streets – the best original photographs from the Observer commissioned in April 2022

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The Guardian

Apr 30 2022
Something for the weekend: film, music and more for May Day bank holiday

From a spot of Quadrophenia to a good innings with The English Game, our critics suggest art to inspire the best use of your extra day of free time

Early May coincides with the beginning of the cricket season and, weather permitting, the bank holiday allows for a long weekend of dozing off in the spring sun with a paperback in one hand and a lukewarm pint in the other. Richard Bean’s The English Game has far more to it, however, with the Sunday afternoon clash between the amateurish Nightwatchmen and their more talented (and diverse) opposition providing the focus for a darkly funny exploration of migration, religion and the long shadow of empire that appears additionally prescient in the wake of Brexit. AM

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The Guardian

Apr 30 2022
‘It looks like a river, but it’s actually the sea’: Jessica Auer’s best phone picture

A spontaneous snap in Iceland in the first week of lockdown has taken on a new significance for the Canadian photographer

Pre-pandemic, Canadian Jessica Auer split her time between Montreal and east Iceland. She was living in the former when the city announced its first lockdown in March 2020 and so, not knowing what lay ahead, she and her boyfriend, Zuhaitz, returned to Iceland. It’s here that their kitchen window faces a fjord 25km long and 1km wide. “It appears like a really wide river, but it’s actually the sea,” Auer says. “A kilometre across, or a little less, sits this mountain. It changes constantly with the seasons and the light. This photograph was taken at sunset.”

The mirror-image binoculars on each side of the sill are left out for guests, who immediately gravitate towards them when visiting. “The window has such a sublime view. The mountain is usually peaceful, but we’ve seen backcountry skiers on it occasionally. On the water, ships pass by, the birdlife is varied and porpoise appear most weeks,” Auer says. “Once a year, if we’re lucky, we see humpback whales.”

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