News

Displaying 151 to 200 of 10000 results

artforum.com

Jan 16 2020
NEA Awards $27.3M to Projects in All Fifty States, District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico
The National Endowment for the Arts announced the first grant recipients of the 2020 fiscal year. The federal agency will award $27.3 million to 1,187 projects in all fifty states, the District of
Read More
The New York Times

Jan 16 2020
BTS Announces Global Arts Project Featuring Antony Gormley
BTS Announces Global Arts Project Featuring Antony Gormley
A new series of projects by international artists will be shown in five cities across the world.
Read More
The New York Times

Jan 16 2020
Exploring the Solar System Anew at the Hayden Planetarium
The American Museum of Natural History’s first new space show since 2013 is a head-spinning adventure that makes a statement about the fragility of Earth.
Read More
The New York Times

Jan 16 2020
Martin Luther King Jr. Day: 8 Places in New York to Remember His Legacy
Martin Luther King Jr. Day: 8 Places in New York to Remember His Legacy
At events across the city, you can commemorate King’s achievements or follow his example of activism and service.
Read More
artforum.com

Jan 16 2020
Philippa Snow on You’s second season
UNTIL VERY RECENTLY, the 1991 film L.A. Story was hands-down the best satire of Los Angeles as told from the perspective of a man experiencing a possible psychotic break. Harris K. Telemacher—a TV
Read More
artforum.com

Jan 16 2020
ICA Miami and LA MoCA Among New Andy Warhol Foundation Grantees
The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts is awarding $3.93 million to forty-six organizations from nineteen states for its fall 2019 grant cycle. The funds will support visual arts programs,
Read More
The New York Times

Jan 16 2020
What to See Right Now in New York Art Galleries
Nicky Nodjoumi’s dreamy serial paintings; Albert Oehlen’s “mirror paintings”; Clarity Haynes portraits of breasts; Kim Tschang-Yeul’s abstract brand of Pop Art
Read More
The Guardian

Jan 16 2020
'My life has been a struggle against the establishment': artist Rasheed Araeen

He’s written letters to the prime minister, joined the Black Panthers and spent a lifetime on art that can provoke, delight and be climbed on. Now, at 84, Araeen has opened a restaurant

• Warning: contains an image some may find disturbing

‘You won’t find anything interesting in my life. I’d rather talk about the work,” says Rasheed Araeen. It is quite the understatement. The 84-year-old Karachi-born artist is no stranger to incident. “My life in Britain has been my struggle against the establishment. It took many forms – within art, outside art, in writing, in performances, in writing letters to the prime minister,” is his own pithy summation.

He first wrote to Tony Blair after “there were ugly things spoken about the Muslims” following the July 2005 bombings in London. “One of the points they kept making was that Muslims were against modernism. They were backwards, uncultured, uncivilised. I wrote and said, ‘Here is an example of what Muslims have contributed to British modernism’.”

Continue reading...
Read More
The Guardian

Jan 16 2020
Conga and carnival: Havana's jazz festival – in pictures

New Orleans and Cuban musicians join in Havana’s annual jazz festival, defying Trump’s efforts to weaken US-Cuba relations

Continue reading...
Read More
The New York Times

Jan 16 2020
At a Sculptor’s Marrakesh Estate, a Menagerie of Whimsical Artwork
Jean-François Fourtou, known for his sculptures of animals, has channeled his creative energy to his 25-acre property in Morocco.
Read More
The Guardian

Jan 16 2020
Inside the odyssey: taking a closer look at Stanley Kubrick's 2001

At an expansive new exhibition in New York, the director’s defining science fiction opus is explored in detail with help from those who made it with him

Though the calendar reads 2020 we’re still waiting for the future promised in 2001. Stanley Kubrick’s 1968 film, created concurrently with Arthur C Clarke’s novel, is recognized as one of the most influential motion pictures ever made, endlessly scrutinized from both a story and production point of view. Both avenues are open to New Yorkers and visiting tourists from 18 January through 19 July at the Museum of the Moving Image adjacent to the Kaufman Astoria Studios in Queens.

Envisioning 2001: Stanley Kubrick’s Space Odyssey is an in-depth examination of how the New York-born director’s desire to make “the proverbial ‘really good’ science fiction film” (as Kubrick wrote to Clarke in a letter preserved under glass in the exhibit) led to “the ultimate trip”, as MGM’s marketing department called the movie once young people seized upon the heady, ambiguous film that exploded into sound and light to go “beyond the infinite” in its most notable sequence.

Continue reading...
Read More
The Guardian

Jan 15 2020
Nothing Has Changed: a nostalgic view of modern America – in pictures

French photographer Larry Niehues has been capturing life in the US on 35mm film, from motels to diners and gas stations, to evoke the past by showing ‘all the beauty and destruction, the tradition and innovation, the loud cities and the quiet little spaces’. His work is published in the book Nothing Has Changed

Continue reading...
Read More
The Guardian

Jan 15 2020
Robbie Lawrence's best photograph: a woman praying in Georgia's Low Country

‘The chapel was built by enslaved people in 1896. The area had been a hotbed for fishing but the rivers are empty now and money is moving to the city’

In October and November 2017, the American writer Sala Elise Patterson and I travelled to the Low Country in Georgia. In recent years, politics has forced people to be polarised, but we figured that there would be a lot more contradictions, even in somewhere like rural Georgia, a place that was probably leaning Republican. We set out to interview people from both sides of the political tracks, and look for continuities, and the paradoxes of everyday life.

The Low Country is sprawling swamp land along the Ogeechee River, or Blackwater River as it is known. We spent months researching beforehand. One of the places we reached out to was St Bartholomew’s Episcopal Church in the hamlet of Burroughs. St Bartholomew’s is the last standing chapel of the Ogeechee River Mission and the oldest African American congregation in the Episcopal Diocese of Georgia. The chapel was built by enslaved people in 1896.

Continue reading...
Read More
artforum.com

Jan 15 2020
Lucas Museum of Narrative Art Acquires Major Archive of African American Film History
Filmmaker George Lucas’s new Museum of Narrative Art, which is currently under construction in Los Angeles’s Exposition Park, has acquired a significant collection of film posters, photographs, scripts,
Read More
artforum.com

Jan 15 2020
New Museum and Onassis Foundation to Open Space for Artists Working in Mixed Reality
The New Museum in New York and the Onassis Foundation are teaming up to create a new space for artists, filmmakers, and designers working in mixed reality. An initiative of the museum’s cultural incubator
Read More
The New York Times

Jan 15 2020
Some Collectors Take a D.I.Y. Approach; Others Call in the Pros
Some Collectors Take a D.I.Y. Approach; Others Call in the Pros
In this case, the art-lovers own storage and shipping centers that meet all their needs to rotate, hang and pack away their pieces.
Read More
artforum.com

Jan 15 2020
2020 Creative Capital Award Recipients Announced
Thirty-five artist projects centered on topics such as migration, surveillance, sexual abuse, and how to make museums agents of change have been named 2020 Creative Capital awardees and will share a
Read More
The New York Times

Jan 15 2020
Take a Look at These Rarely Seen Andy Warhol Photos
Photography was Andy Warhol’s secret weapon — the architecture of his oeuvre. A new show highlights many of his rarely seen images.
Read More
artforum.com

Jan 15 2020
Jyoti Dhar on the opening of the Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art Sri Lanka
THROUGHOUT SRI LANKA’S ART HISTORY, the people have been the keepers of knowledge. In place of national institutions and collections, artists, collectors, scholars, and gallerists have acted as repositories
Read More
artforum.com

Jan 15 2020
Frieze Hires Simon Fox as Its First CEO
Frieze, the media and events company that runs an eponymous magazine as well as four international art fairs-Frieze London, Frieze Masters, Frieze New York, and Frieze Los Angeles-announced today that
Read More
artforum.com

Jan 15 2020
Anne Haaning
Today, the extraction of both narratives and material resources is deeply intertwined with a seemingly indefatigable drive toward technological development. In the Danish artist Anne Haaning’s multimedia
Read More
artforum.com

Jan 15 2020
Mellon Foundation Gives $4 Million to Dance Theater of Harlem
The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation has gifted the Dance Theater of Harlem (DTH) $4 million, which, coupled with a matching grant of $1 million from the dance organization’s board of directors, brings the
Read More
The Guardian

Jan 15 2020
Portrait of the artist in the firing line: Abdul Abdullah on controversy, threats and rightwing hate mail

He’s been targeted by George Christensen and accused of advocating terrorism, but the Perth-born artist just wants to provoke critical thinking

As an artist, Abdul Abdullah wears his humour on his sleeve, but also on his skin. His tattoo of the Southern Cross encircles an Islamic crescent moon and star, and he got it for the purpose of Them and Us, his photographic self-portrait that won the 2011 Blake prize for human justice. In his 2013 work, Self-Portrait as an Ultra-nationalist, he wears a “Fuck off we’re full” T-shirt and an Australian flag. The same year, he made It Doesn’t Matter How I Feel, in which he’s painted black except for his hands, one of which is held in a thumbs-up, the other extending the middle finger. I could go on.

“I’m a seventh-generation Australian and I’ve got the Australian sensibility of relentlessly giving people shit,” he says innocently.

Continue reading...
Read More
The New York Times

Jan 15 2020
Museum Director Forced Out Amid Harassment Complaints
Museum Director Forced Out Amid Harassment Complaints
Joshua Helmer was removed at the Erie Art Museum after a New York Times article about complaints during his tenure at the Philadelphia Museum of Art.
Read More
The Guardian

Jan 15 2020
John Baldessari obituary
American conceptual artist who cremated all his paintings in 1970 and later effaced the images of public figures with stick-on dots

A recent episode of The Simpsons saw America’s favourite dysfunctional cartoon family take a step back in time. In one scene, the young Marge Simpson, a reporter on the Springfield Shopper, interviews a local conceptual artist about his change of subject from mouths to noses. “So,” rasps Marge, “you’ve moved into painting giant schnozzes.” “Marge,” the artist replies, “the mouth has had its day. It’s time to find out what the nose knows.” The artist in question, who voiced his cartoon character himself, was John Baldessari, who has died aged 88.

Unusually for a conceptual artist, the maker of the (real) series titled Noses & Ears, Etc. (2006), was known for his sense of humour. His Wrong series (1966-68), of intentionally faulty snapshots – one showed a palm tree apparently sprouting from the artist’s head – each incorporated (and broke) a rule from a photographic manual.

Continue reading...
Read More
The New York Times

Jan 15 2020
In Afghanistan, Being an Artist Is a Dangerous Job
Despite the perils, Afghan artists have consistently portrayed their country and its many facets.
Read More
artforum.com

Jan 15 2020
National Endowment for the Humanities Awards $30.9 Million to 188 Humanities Projects
The National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) will distribute $30.9 million to 188 humanities projects in forty-five states and the District of Columbia as part of its latest grant cycle. NEH chairman
Read More
The Guardian

Jan 15 2020
Jak Kilby obituary

My friend Jak Kilby, who has died aged 72, was a freelance photographer who documented the early years of the free jazz and free improvisation scene in London with great diligence and empathy. Following his mid-life conversion to the Muslim faith and his adoption of the name Muhsin, his camera was also trained on the Islamic world: its buildings, its people, its struggle.

Born to Leslie Kilby, a bus driver who later worked as a manager in a TV company, and Dorothy (nee Gossett), John (Jak) was educated at Malory school in Lewisham, south London. By the late 1960s he was a familiar figure at the Little Theatre Club in Covent Garden and at other places, where young musicians were developing a new musical language.

Continue reading...
Read More
artforum.com

Jan 15 2020
Stan Douglas to Represent Canada at 2021 Venice Biennale
The National Gallery of Canada announced today that the Vancouver- and Los Angeles–based artist Stan Douglas will represent Canada at the Fifty-Ninth Venice Biennale. Known for his installations, films,
Read More
The New York Times

Jan 15 2020
Ed Ruscha: He Up and Went Home
Ed Ruscha: He Up and Went Home
The artist on the Oklahoma roots of his new show, that $52.5 million painting, and meeting Walt Disney.
Read More
The Guardian

Jan 14 2020
'This is an ugly work': Trump's giant empty head descends on Ballarat

Want to get inside the US president’s head? Callum Morton’s ‘very confronting’ public artwork offers that peculiar pleasure

What’s inside Donald Trump’s head?

In a sculptural depiction of the US president’s head by the Australian artist Callum Morton, which popped up in Ballarat on Wednesday, not much.

Continue reading...
Read More
The Guardian

Jan 14 2020
Life, death and Jimmy the Volvo: Gus Powell's family photos – in pictures

The photographer talks us through Family Car Trouble, his new book documenting ‘the arrival of children, the departure of a father – and the maintenance of a difficult 1993 Volvo 940 Turbo station wagon.’

Warning: this article includes a graphic image some readers may find disturbing

Continue reading...
Read More
The Guardian

Jan 14 2020
The case for ... making low-tech 'dumb' cities instead of 'smart' ones

High-tech smart cities promise efficiency by monitoring everything from bins to bridges. But what if we ditched the data and embraced ancient technology instead?

Guardian Cities is concluding with ‘The case for ...”, a series of opinion pieces exploring options for radical urban change. Read our editor’s farewell here

Ever since smartphones hooked us with their limitless possibilities and dopamine hits, mayors and city bureaucrats can’t get enough of the notion of smart-washing their cities. It makes them sound dynamic and attractive to business. What’s not to love about whizzkids streamlining your responsibilities for running services, optimising efficiency and keeping citizens safe into a bunch of fun apps?

There’s no concrete definition of a smart city, but high-tech versions promise to use cameras and sensors to monitor everyone and everything, from bins to bridges, and use the resulting data to help the city run smoothly. One high-profile proposal by Google’s sister company, Sidewalk Labs, to give 12 acres of Toronto a smart makeover is facing a massive backlash. In September, an independent report called the plans “frustratingly abstract”; in turn US tech investor Roger McNamee warned Google can’t be trusted with such data, calling the project “surveillance capitalism”.

Continue reading...
Read More
The Guardian

Jan 14 2020
Blenheim Palace to display paintings of 'broken England' by Cecily Brown

British artist to show new work exploring ‘nation in turmoil’ at Churchill’s birthplace

Paintings of a broken, divided, dystopian England are to go on display at one of the nation’s most magnificent stately homes, where Sir Winston Churchill was born.

Blenheim Art Foundation announced on Wednesday that Cecily Brown, a member of the YBA generation (Young British Artists) of the early 1990s, would be the next contemporary artist to present work at Blenheim Palace in Oxfordshire.

Continue reading...
Read More
artforum.com

Jan 14 2020
Artists Pen Letter Protesting MoMA’s Ties to Controversial Donors
Almost half of the artists currently featured in MoMA PS1’s exhibition “Theater of Operations: The Gulf Wars 1991–2011” have signed an open letter urging New York’s Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) and PS1
Read More
artforum.com

Jan 14 2020
Cornelia Parker
Cornelia Parker makes art about gravity: how to elude it, how we cannot. In many of the installations, sculptures, and films surveyed here, the English artist emphasizes a fragmented, paralyzed sense
Read More
artforum.com

Jan 14 2020
Keith Haring Foundation Awards $1 Million to Performance Space New York
Performance Space New York has entered a major new partnership with the Keith Haring Foundation, which has awarded the organization a $1 million grant in support of the creation of a new two-year
Read More
artforum.com

Jan 14 2020
Front International Reveals Theme, Title, and Artistic Team for 2021 Edition
FRONT International, the Cleveland triennial for contemporary art, has announced details of its 2021 edition, which will take place across three cities in northeast Ohio from July 17 through October 2,
Read More
artforum.com

Jan 14 2020
Jesper Just on recoding the body in his new video installation, Corporealités
Jesper Just distorts rituals of movement through video and performance—two media he pairs in perverse combinations to destabilize museum architecture and to create plangent moving images that echo with
Read More
The Guardian

Jan 14 2020
How do you follow heroin lasagne? The artist who wants you to dice his veg

He’s injected pasta with drugs and let goats loose in a gallery. Now Darren Bader is putting food on plinths and asking visitors to turn it into tasty salad. We try to find out why

Before answering my questions about Fruits, Vegetables; Fruit and Vegetable Salad – his new exhibition opening at the Whitney Museum of American Art – New York-based artist Darren Bader says that he has a specific (read: irreverent) style and he hopes it’s not too much of an annoyance. I tell him it’s not an annoyance at all and start with an easy one: Where do you get your ideas? “Oh, you know, the magical world of ideas,” he replies.

His exhibition, which takes place on the eighth floor of the Whitney, comprises a previously untitled work that the museum acquired in 2015 but has never displayed until now. When viewers emerge from the lift on the eighth floor, they will discover a cornucopia of fresh fruit and vegetables, each variety presented as a sculpture on its own wooden plinth. Four times a week, museum staff will collect the ripened fruit and vegetables and – according to Bader’s instructions – make a salad. The slicing and dicing will be captured on film and projected in the empty gallery, after which the salad will be served to viewers. Staff will then replenish the plinths with fresh produce, and so the process will continue.

Continue reading...
Read More
The New York Times

Jan 14 2020
I.C.P. to Reopen at Essex Crossing
A four-story, 40,000-square-foot space will bring the photography center’s exhibition and education spaces together under the same roof.
Read More
artforum.com

Jan 14 2020
MacDowell Colony Awards Fellowships to Eighty-Seven Artists
The MacDowell Colony in Peterborough, New Hampshire, has named the eighty-seven artists who will receive fellowships for the organization’s upcoming winter and spring residency program. Seventy-six
Read More
The Guardian

Jan 14 2020
The Sistine Chapel in Sussex – painted by the Michelangelo of Goring-by-Sea

How did a church in a quiet Sussex borough end up with an astonishing, hand-painted copy of the world’s most famous ceiling? Deacon Gary Bevans talks us through his creation

The Sistine Chapel is easy to find. Just follow the A259 through Goring-by-Sea until you see the low, spireless red brick English Martyrs Church. Enter this Catholic place of worship – and look up.Above the simple wooden pews, laid out in bold yellows, greens, pinks and blues, you can see God dividing the land and waters, making the sun and Earth, reaching out a powerful finger to spark life into Adam.

It’s Michelangelo’s masterpiece all right, superbly replicated by the Sussex church’s deacon, Gary Bevans. Created between 1987 and 1993, his achievement seems all the more remarkable now that digital reproductions of the original are having a bit of a moment. HBO’s The Young Pope and its follow-up The New Pope both use hi-tech digital copies, as does Netflix’s The Two Popes. Yet Bevans’ version is hand-painted. That makes it a human story – and a human masterpiece.

Continue reading...
Read More
artforum.com

Jan 14 2020
Getty Museum Receives Major Gift from Arts Patrons Maria Hummer-Tuttle and Robert Tuttle
The J. Paul Getty Museum in Los Angeles announced that the Los Angeles­–based philanthropists Maria Hummer-Tuttle and Robert Tuttle have made a “transformative” gift that will allow the institution to
Read More
The Guardian

Jan 14 2020
Sir Roger Scruton obituary

Philosopher, writer and political thinker with controversial views on education, hunting and architecture

Roger Scruton, who has died of lung cancer aged 75, was a philosopher and a controversial public intellectual. Active in the fields of aesthetics, art, music, political philosophy and architecture, both inside and outside the academic world, he dedicated himself to nurturing beauty, “re-enchanting the world” and giving intellectual rigour to conservatism.

He wrote more than 50 books, including perceptive works on Spinoza, Kant, Wittgenstein and the history of philosophy, and four novels, as well as columns on wine, hunting and current affairs, and was a talented pianist and composer.

Continue reading...
Read More
The New York Times

Jan 14 2020
Poland Urged to Look for Nazi-Looted Art Still Held in Its Museums
Despite the Polish government’s efforts to recover cultural objects lost during World War II, researchers say its museums hold stolen items left behind by the Nazis.
Read More
The Guardian

Jan 14 2020
Buy a classic sport photograph: Olga Korbut seeks perfection

The latest of a Guardian Print Shop series featuring classic sports images from the likes of Gerry Cranham, Mark Leech and Tom Jenkins – yours to own for just £55 including free delivery

Olga Korbut’s performance on the uneven bars at the 1972 Olympics in Munich, pictured here by Gerry Cranham, was a thing of beauty. The 30-second display featured what became known as the “Korbut flip” – an inconceivable, whirling sequence in which she daringly backflipped off the high bar, then propelled herself backwards off the low bar via her hips. It was so innovative that when the judges scored her routine 9.80 out of 10, placing her second overall, there were howls of disapproval from the crowd. They believed the 17-year-old Soviet gymnast, the darling of the Games, should have become the first to score a perfect 10 at the Olympics. Instead, that honour went to the great Nadia Comaneci four years later. Korbut did at least claim gold medals in three other disciplines at the Games, though her flip was later outlawed for being too dangerous.

Continue reading...
Read More
The Guardian

Jan 14 2020
Daniel Libeskind: ‘Frank Lloyd Wright inspired me to go beyond the obvious’

The renowned architect, known for his work on the World Trade Center site and Berlin’s Jewish Museum, was inspired by an unconventional honeymoon

In the summer of 1969, for our honeymoon, my wife Nina and I rented a car and went on a strange adventure around the United States to see the buildings of Frank Lloyd Wright. We didn’t know how to drive, so we got together with two other young men, a Jehovah’s Witness and a very religious Swedish Lutheran. Since we were too poor to stay in hotels, we slept mostly in the station wagon, Nina and I on a plastic inflatable mattress in the back and the two men in the front. How she stayed married to me, I don’t know.

The trip was supported by a fellowship from the Cooper Union, my architecture school in New York, and it was entirely focused on Wright’s buildings. From New York, we took a Greyhound bus down to St Louis, to the Mississippi. Then we drove all over the country before ending up at a design conference in Aspen. Nina at that time was too young to have even a glass of wine, so in the evening, as we talked about the buildings we had seen, she would be drinking Coca-Cola. I remember it as a very strange initiation, both to marriage and architecture. Fortunately, she is such a wonderful person and didn’t think I was crazy.

Continue reading...
Read More
The Guardian

Jan 13 2020
Street kissers, street kittens: Bruce Davidson's new Britain – in pictures

In 1960, the photographer was sent to the UK to shoot a country and a people emerging from postwar austerity into a new era. He perfectly captured the customs and traditions often overlooked by the British themselves

Continue reading...
Read More