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artforum.com

Nov 16 2020
Marlene McCarty on the US presidential election
Artforum has invited artists to share a text, image, or video in the immediate wake of the United States presidential election and will be posting their contributions throughout the next week. (
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artforum.com

Nov 16 2020
Pace Launches Internal Investigation Following Workplace Abuse Allegations
Just days after Pace Gallery on Friday announced that it had begun a legal investigation of Douglas Baxter and Susan Dunne, two of its top dealers, according to Artnet News, Baxter, a president of the
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The New York Times

Nov 16 2020
Academy Museum Gives Debbie Reynolds Her Due as a Costume Conservator
Academy Museum Gives Debbie Reynolds Her Due as a Costume Conservator
When the “Singin’ in the Rain” actress was alive, the film academy turned up its nose at her fabled costume collection. Now it has gone to her son with hat in hand.
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artforum.com

Nov 16 2020
Jitish Kallat
The punning parenthetical in the title of Jitish Kallat’s virtual exhibition “Circadian Study (contact tracing)” alludes to both its predominant medium, drawing, and, with the now-familiar term for
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artforum.com

Nov 16 2020
Jil Weinstock Named Director of Baxter St at CCNY
New York arts nonprofit Baxter St at the Camera Club of New York has named Jil Weinstock director of the organization. Weinstock, who will assume her new post on November 19, was previously artistic
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artforum.com

Nov 16 2020
Marina Xenofontos
The materials and techniques on view in “But we’ve met before,” Cypriot-born artist Marina Xenofontos’s first solo exhibition at Hot Wheels Athens, offer traces of cultural memories—not through any
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artforum.com

Nov 16 2020
Ivan Kožarić (1921–2020)
Modernist sculptor Ivan Kožarić, a leading figure of contemporary Croatian art for more than six decades, and who repeatedly defied convention through playful, sometimes impossible encounters in public
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The Guardian

Nov 16 2020
Manchester prepares for fall of its 'Berlin Wall'

Tadao Ando’s modernist work in Piccadilly Gardens has divided opinion since 2002

To some it is a modernist masterpiece for which “any other city in the world would give their right arm”. To others, it is a concrete carbuncle that should never have been installed on what was once Manchester’s lushest square.

Work was set to begin on Monday to demolish the Japanese architect Tadao Ando’s only UK work after sceptics won the battle over what has been called the Mancunian Berlin Wall.

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The Guardian

Nov 15 2020
Dougie Wallace's Bus Response – in pictures

Dougie Wallace’s depictions of London through snapshots of its iconic red buses reveal how the city has coped with the Covid-19 lockdowns, and how it is struggling to get back on its feet

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artforum.com

Nov 15 2020
Gagosian
Gagosian is pleased to present an exhibition of paintings, photographs, and works on paper from the 1970s by Jay DeFeo (1929–1989), organized in association with the Jay DeFeo Foundation. DeFeo produced
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The New York Times

Nov 15 2020
A Chagall Curtain Needs a New Home With a Tall Ceiling
A 65-foot-tall stage curtain that the artist created for the Metropolitan Opera in the 1960s will go up for auction Tuesday at Bonhams.
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The Guardian

Nov 15 2020
A family feud, a mystery firm and the Botticelli masterpiece that quietly vanished

Whereabouts of $10m painting are unknown as legal fight over its ownership continues

It is a masterpiece of the Italian Renaissance depicting one of the most celebrated images in civilisation.

Reportedly once owned by Imelda Marcos, Madonna and Child (1485), from the studio of Sandro Botticelli, was valued at $10m when it was the subject of a lengthy court case to prove ownership.

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The Guardian

Nov 15 2020
The bigger picture: should British museums sell to stay afloat?

As galleries auction off treasures to retain staff and plug cash gaps left by Covid, the art world is divided on ethics of disposal

Going up close to a great work of art, perhaps to Auguste Rodin’s full-height sculpture of a shy Eve, is a rare pleasure in a neighbourhood gallery, especially since opening hours are now restricted by the pandemic. The Southampton City Art Gallery is one of those municipal buildings with perhaps more than its fair share of unexpected treats due to the bequest of a local chemist and businessman called Robert Chipperfield. He died rich in 1911, instructing his legacy to be spent on filling up a new gallery with top-notch pieces like Eve.

Just over a decade ago the city considered selling valuable works including its Rodin sculpture, then worth just over £1million, to fund other projects, but the sale was stopped by a petition and a stern warning from the Tate, which had an advisory role.

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The Guardian

Nov 15 2020
The rise and rise of ugly buildings

An inelegant new neighbour to Foyles bookshop on London’s Charing Cross Road is typical of buildings whose components seem to have met on a blind date. So how do they end up like this?

It would have looked good in the drawings: a balanced elevation of horizontals and verticals, solid and void, given depth with concave and convex panels, animated with patterns of roses in low relief. Echoes were possibly intended of the great Chicago architect Louis Sullivan, who in the late 19th and early 20th centuries invested his pioneering structures with delightful ornament. Echoes, too, of Caruso St John and other contemporary architects, who for a decade or so have been reviving a Sullivanesque use of pattern.

Yet this nine-storey creative industries development (plus four storeys underground), now rising in Charing Cross Road in London, doesn’t have the grace that this description suggests. Called Ilona Rose House, it is placed where Foyles bookshop once was, before that famous literary institution moved to a site next door. The new building’s inelegance is partly a matter of scale, for as with almost every new commercial building its volume has been amped up to maximise valuable floorspace. It is also a matter of detail – those rose patterns look mechanical and dead, and conspicuous joints between the panels give it an unsubstantial, just-bolted-together feel.

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The Guardian

Nov 15 2020
On my radar: Jay Bernard's cultural highlights

The poet on logic puzzles, sweetcorn ribs and listening to Idles on repeat

Jay Bernard (who uses the non-binary “they”) is a British artist, writer and poet born in Croydon, London in 1988. They studied English at Oxford University and, in 2005, were named a Foyle young poet of the year. Their multimedia performance work Surge: Side A, which explores the New Cross fire of 1981, won the 2017 Ted Hughes award for new poetry. Bernard’s short film Something Said won the best experimental category at Aesthetica short film festival and best queer short at Leeds international film festival. Their 2019 poetry collection Surge (Chatto & Windus) was shortlisted for various prizes including the TS Eliot prize and the RSL Ondaatje prize, and most recently, the Sunday Times young writer of the year award.

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The Guardian

Nov 15 2020
Celebrating Black NHS nurses through the decades – in pictures

The NHS is one of only two things that hold Britain together as a community. The second being the BBC. During Covid-19 these two national treasures have become our guiding strength. Black people have been an integral part of the NHS since the 40s. I am very proud to say my mother worked for the NHS for more than 35 years before she retired. These institutions are worth fighting for.

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The Guardian

Nov 15 2020
I want to focus on possibilities, on young, emerging talent

The artist and film-maker introduces his special issue of the Observer New Review, coinciding with the premiere of his Small Axe anthology on BBC One

I often find myself asking: “What’s it all about, Alfie?” I am a son, brother, husband, father, uncle, cousin and friend. I am a Londoner, who grew up in a working-class environment on the White City estate in Shepherd’s Bush, but I live in Amsterdam. Again, what’s it all about? When I was a child, my mother got money from my grandfather to put down on a house in Ealing, in the suburbs. This got us out of the inner city and into an environment of parks, greenery and possibility.

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The Guardian

Nov 14 2020
‘I need complete freedom’: Maggi Hambling responds to statue critics

Some see a new statue commemorating Mary Wollstonecraft as an affront to the pioneering feminist, but its creator says she is used to controversy

Maggi Hambling, the renowned British artist who outraged a large section of the general public and many feminists last week, to say nothing of the surprised residents of a north London community, has defended her right to artistic freedom.

Her new statue commemorating Mary Wollstonecraft was unveiled last week, the culmination of a 10-year campaign to mark the groundbreaking feminist philosopher who started her writing career and established a girls school in Newington Green in the late-18th century. But Hambling’s work sparked a furious reaction. Rather than a statue of Wollstonecraft, she produced an abstract sculpture which features a small, naked silver woman.

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The Guardian

Nov 14 2020
'Treasure trove' of unseen Ted Hughes and Seamus Heaney writing found

Affectionate friendship between the two poets and artist Barrie Cooke, united by a love of fishing, revealed in a collection of correspondence that was believed lost

A “treasure trove” of unseen poems and letters by Ted Hughes, Seamus Heaney and the artist Barrie Cooke has revealed the depth of a close three-way friendship that one Cambridge academic has described as a “rough, wild equivalent of the Bloomsbury group”.

Cooke, who died in 2014, was a leading expressionist artist in Ireland, and a passionate fisherman. Fellow fishing enthusiast Mark Wormald, an English fellow at Pembroke College, Cambridge, came across his name while reading Hughes’s unpublished fishing diaries at the British Library. He visited Cooke in Ireland, and discovered the close friendship between the three men.

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The New York Times

Nov 14 2020
Klaudio Rodriguez Named Director for the Bronx Museum of the Arts
Klaudio Rodriguez Named Director for the Bronx Museum of the Arts
After two stints as de facto director, Klaudio Rodriguez gets the top job, joining a growing group of Latino leaders of art museums.
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The Guardian

Nov 14 2020
2021 Lavazza calendar: the new humanity – in pictures

With the world feeling more distant than ever, photographers were this year called on to translate their vision of the new humanity into images seen through their own eyes. David LaChapelle and Steve McCurry are among those who contributed

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The Guardian

Nov 14 2020
New museum in Nigeria raises hopes of resolution to Benin bronzes dispute

Artefacts held by British Museum and other western institutions were looted by British forces in 1897

A new museum designed by Sir David Adjaye is to be built following the most extensive archaeological excavation ever undertaken in Benin City, Nigeria, raising hopes of a resolution to one of the world’s most controversial debates over looted museum artefacts.

The kingdom of Benin, in what is now southern Nigeria and not to be confused with the modern-day country of Benin, was one of the most important and powerful pre-colonial states of west Africa.

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The Guardian

Nov 14 2020
'Truth and lies have eroded': why an artist took over a billboard at the US-Mexico border

Stefan Brüggemann’s latest project, launched on election day, tackles the ideas of fact and deception

The artist Stefan Brüggemann woke up at his London apartment last Wednesday to Donald Trump declaring he had won the presidency. It was, of course, a lie. “The second I turned on YouTube, I saw him and Mike Pence declare victory,” Brüggemann says.

It was a moment that epitomized the political climate in which the Mexican-German artist had launched his latest project, which tackles the interchangeability of fact and deception. On the day of the US election Brüggemann unveiled two neon words – “Truth” and “Lie” – perched on a billboard at the US Mexico border.

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The New York Times

Nov 14 2020
Rome Tracks Down the Man Behind All That Graffiti. No, It’s Not Banksy.
Rome Tracks Down the Man Behind All That Graffiti. No, It’s Not Banksy.
The tagger known as Geco is not as famous as the British provocateur, but he has made a name for himself in Italy.
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The Guardian

Nov 13 2020
20 photographs of the week

The US election, lockdown in London, flooding in the Philippines, and rising cases of Covid-19: the most striking images from around the world

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artforum.com

Nov 13 2020
Felipe Rivas San Martín
Homosexuality was decriminalized in Chile 1999, around the same time that the concept of “sexual diversity” entered the national consciousness. For thirteen years, LGBTQIA+ artist and activist Felipe
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artforum.com

Nov 13 2020
Koo Jeong A
Since the early 1990s, the subtle, mesmerizingly ethereal works of Koo Jeong A have sought to intensify the spectator’s perceptive capacities and defamiliarize quotidian surroundings. In Oslo, 1998,
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artforum.com

Nov 13 2020
Longlati Foundation to Open in Shanghai, Pledges $450,000 Annually to Support Young Chinese Artists
The Longlati Foundation, a new private nonprofit organization founded by Singapore investor David Su and Chinese artist Chen Zihao, will open May 2021 in Shanghai and will provide 3 million yuan ($
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artforum.com

Nov 13 2020
Statue Commemorating Mary Wollstonecraft Elicits Passionate Responses
“I do not wish women to have power over men; but over themselves.” So wrote eighteenth-century British feminist Mary Wollstonecraft in 1792. However, one woman, though inanimate, has recently proven
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The New York Times

Nov 13 2020
Inspiration From South of the Border Moves Center Stage in Houston
Inspiration From South of the Border Moves Center Stage in Houston
A new building at the Museum of Fine Arts showcases works by Latin American and Latino artists, many of whom are rarely shown in the United States.
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artforum.com

Nov 13 2020
Michael Rakowitz on the US presidential election
Artforum has invited artists to share a text, image, or video in the immediate wake of the United States presidential election and will be posting their contributions throughout the week. I AWOKE
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The Guardian

Nov 13 2020
'Until recently, this work was in a shed': NGA surveys 120 years of art in search of gender parity

In staging the country’s largest-ever exhibition of art by women, the National Gallery of Australia hopes to give a whole new lesson in art history

Being asked to serve dinner. That’s a key memory for Adelaide artist Margaret Worth of a landmark 1968 exhibition of Australian abstract art, The Field, at the National Gallery of Victoria (NGV). Worth was an artist of excellence herself, and married to Sydney Ball, whose work showed in The Field.

The curators knew she was a painter when they visited the couple’s home but “just asked her to serve dinner”, says Elspeth Pitt, a curator of Australian art at the National Gallery of Australia (NGA) in Canberra.

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The New York Times

Nov 13 2020
John Waters Will Donate His Collection to the Baltimore Museum of Art
John Waters Will Donate His Collection to the Baltimore Museum of Art
The filmmaker will donate 372 works to the Baltimore Museum of Art. His collection tends toward the perverse, the ironic and the cheerfully nihilistic — and much of it is still here on his walls.
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The Guardian

Nov 13 2020
That's one virus gone by Christmas | Brief letters

The Cobblers | Dominic Cummings | Women in sculpture

Your writer from Northampton complained that his team’s FA Cup tie with Oxford United was ignored (Letters, 11 November). Given that the Cobblers were in fact playing non-league Oxford City and lost 2-1, I should think he would be quite pleased at the Guardian’s silence on the matter.
Steve Carden
Brighton, West Sussex

• Just before the consequences of Brexit hit, Dominic Cummings jumps ship (Dominic Cummings to leave Downing Street role by Christmas, 13 November). The rat.
Pete Bibby
Sheffield

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The New York Times

Nov 13 2020
The Word at MoMA Is ‘Rotation, Rotation, Rotation’
The Word at MoMA Is ‘Rotation, Rotation, Rotation’
On Saturday, the museum opens with changes to 20 of its 60 permanent collection galleries. A critic’s guide to the standouts on each floor.
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artforum.com

Nov 13 2020
ektor garcia
ektor garcia’s site-responsive exhibition is a humble, poetic offering for Chicago’s Pilsen neighborhood, the heart of the city’s Mexican community. His installation features handmade ceramics that
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The New York Times

Nov 13 2020
A New Museum to Bring the Benin Bronzes Home
The architect David Adjaye discusses his plans for an institution to house the looted treasures on their to return to Nigeria.
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The New York Times

Nov 13 2020
Thieves Grab Nazi Memorabilia in Museum Heists, Puzzling Police
Thieves Grab Nazi Memorabilia in Museum Heists, Puzzling Police
Rare uniforms and other items have been stolen in a spate of robberies at war museums in Denmark and the Netherlands.
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The Guardian

Nov 13 2020
Abstract fantasies and a naked everywoman – the week in art

Walter Price will have you trying to fill in the blanks while Maggi Hambling’s tribute to Mary Wollstonecraft caused a furore – all in your weekly dispatch

Walter Price
New York painter Walter Price unveils warmly coloured, apparently abstract fantasies that on closer inspection are full of horses, people and places that have you trying to fill in the blanks and interpret his stories.
The Modern Institute, Glasgow, until 16 January.

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The Guardian

Nov 13 2020
Virginia Woolf statue fundraiser flooded with donations after Wollstonecraft controversy

Campaign to fund statue by sculptor Laury Dizengremel of the author in Richmond receives thousands of pounds after naked Wollstonecraft statue divides public

After the controversial unveiling of a naked statue honouring Mary Wollstonecraft this week, plans to erect a public monument to a fully-clothed Virginia Woolf have gained fresh momentum.

Maggi Hambling’s Wollstonecraft sculpture in Newington Green, London, which depicts a silvery, naked woman, is intended to represent the “birth of a movement” rather than the writer known as the mother of feminism. But it has attracted a wave of criticism. The author Caroline Criado-Perez, who led the campaign for a statue of Millicent Fawcett in Parliament Square, described the decision-making process as “catastrophically wrong” and said the representation was “insulting” to Wollstonecraft.

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The Guardian

Nov 13 2020
Aldo Tambellini, experimental artist obsessed with black, dies aged 90

‘Titan’ of the 1960s New York scene, who developed his obsession during the war, received mainstream acclaim in his final years

Aldo Tambellini, the pioneering artist and film-maker who had an obsession with the colour black, has died aged 90. He will be remembered among other things for developing what he termed “electromedia” – the bringing together of multiple forms including strobes, dance, film, poetry and slide projection. “We have lost a titan,” said Stuart Comer, a curator at MoMA in New York.

Tambellini was born in Syracuse, New York, but grew up in Italy during the chaos of the second world war. After moving back to the US, he began his artistic career as a sculptor and painter, studying both at Syracuse University and the University of Notre Dame. But it was as a fixture on New York’s Lower East Side art scene during the early 60s that he began pushing boundaries, staging immersive multimedia performances and opening theatres in the East Village – the Gate and the Black Gate – that showed avant garde film-makers such as Kenneth Anger and Yayoi Kusama. The latter venue, converted from a loft space, was seatless, forcing viewers to sit on the floor. “You want the audience to be a part of it as much as you can,” he told the Tate in 2012.

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The Guardian

Nov 13 2020
'Cheeky and unadulterated': readers' favourite UK public art

We asked you to tell us about your much-loved pieces of public art across the country. Here are some of your suggestions

Rude Kids series in Liverpool by Dotmaster

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The Guardian

Nov 13 2020
The office block has had its day. But what will replace it? | Simon Jenkins

Cities emptied by the coronavirus can focus on cultural activities, while the countryside we flee to must be protected

Does a Christian need a church? Does a shopper need a shop? Does an office worker need an office block? We know these places help bring people together and can deepen the experience. But when the coronavirus has passed I believe the truth will be revealed. Technology means that we can perform most of these tasks from anywhere, including home.

After the first lockdown, surveys suggested that the office’s days were numbered. Since the 1990s, the internet has supposedly liberated white-collar workers from their desks, but it has taken a pandemic to truly break the ritual. When the initial lockdown ended in the summer and Boris Johnson ordered the nation back to work, surveys in July reported that most workers wanted to split their time between working at home and in the office. Even so, there was an assumption that most businesses would eventually return to almost pre-pandemic practices.

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The Guardian

Nov 13 2020
Before they were famous, part two: stars' early stage roles – in pictures

Tristram Kenton’s archive reveals more performers heading for the big time, including Rachel Weisz, Idris Elba, Daniel Kaluuya and Felicity Jones

Part one: Andrew Scott, John Boyega, Emily Blunt and many more

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The New York Times

Nov 12 2020
Sky Hopinka: Songs of the Earth and the Road
Sky Hopinka: Songs of the Earth and the Road
The Indigenous American artist and filmmaker is the subject of two concurrent shows. His work “rivals in visual and linguistic beauty any new art I’ve seen in some time,” our critic says.
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artforum.com

Nov 12 2020
Noël Dolla, Pascal Pinaud, Philippe Ramette
Pascal Pinaud and Philippe Ramette met at the Villa Arson, when Noël Dolla was a professor. During the period they were enrolled in Dolla's studio, disputation still informed the school's program[…]Since
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The New York Times

Nov 12 2020
David Easton, Architect for an American Gentry, Dies at 83
He was noted in the ’80s for his English-style manors, catering to an opulent clientele with a taste for grandeur.
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artforum.com

Nov 12 2020
Pace Gallery Accused of Fostering “Toxic” Workplace Culture
Multiple current and former employees of the blue-chip Pace Gallery have alleged that the gallery’s New York leadership promotes an abusive workplace culture, according to Artnet News. Cited prominently
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artforum.com

Nov 12 2020
Ron Nagle
This exhibition’s eponymous Lincolnshire Squire, 2018, is not a noble medieval courtier, as one might speculate, but rather a pint-sized sculpture. As is typical with Ron Nagle’s practice, some titles
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