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artforum.com

Oct 12 2020
David Hockney
Spread over the gallery's three spaces, the forthcoming exhibition “Ma Normandie” at Galerie Lelong & Co. in Paris will present a dozen of new and recent paintings as well as a series of inkjet prints
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The New York Times

Oct 12 2020
Cuomo Unveils Statue of Mother Cabrini
Cuomo Unveils Statue of Mother Cabrini
A year after a dispute between New York City and the state, a memorial to the patron saint of immigrants is dedicated in Manhattan.
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artforum.com

Oct 12 2020
Julie Tolentino Wins 2020 Queer|Art|Prize for Sustained Achievement
Performance artist, dancer, activist, and radical caregiver Julie Tolentino—founder of the storied Clit Club, a queer, pro-sex nightclub that floated throughout various Manhattan locations from 1990 to
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artforum.com

Oct 12 2020
Tom Gores Departs LACMA Board Over Prison Telecom Connection
Billionaire private equity mogul and Detroit Pistons owner Tom Gores has resigned from the Los Angeles County Museum of Art’s board of directors after the activist groups Color of Change and Worth Rises
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The New York Times

Oct 12 2020
Spirit Halloween Rises from the Dead. Again. And Again.
Spirit Halloween Rises from the Dead. Again. And Again.
The retailer inspires songs and memes with its near-guaranteed seasonal reappearance each fall. But can it survive this year?
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The Guardian

Oct 12 2020
Revamped nuclear bunker wins museum of the year award

Gairloch in Scotland becomes one of five UK museums to share prestigious prize

With 2ft-thick concrete walls and bombproof doors, the ugly nuclear bunker in north-west Scotland was meant to be a place for tracking Soviet aircraft at the height of the cold war.

Fortunately, the planes never turned up and the bunker has instead become the unlikely home for a museum telling the story of Gairloch, a coastal village 75 miles from the nearest town.

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artforum.com

Oct 12 2020
Ho Rui An
Ho Rui An’s first solo exhibition in Southeast Asia delves into the compromises that the East made to achieve capitalist modernity—and the repercussions thereof. The performance-turned-installation Asia
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The Guardian

Oct 12 2020
Indigenous Peoples’ Day: the latest US billboard project to send a message

Across the US, artist-designed billboards are set to send an important message to coincide with an important day of remembrance

Many might know today as Columbus Day, which celebrates the Italian explorer’s arrival to America in 1492. But to many others, today is Indigenous Peoples’ Day, a counter-event that honors Native Americans whose lives were destroyed by colonial rule.

Indigenous Peoples’ Day has been celebrated since it was first introduced in 1977 at an indigenous conference but took over a decade to be officially acknowledged and remains overlooked.

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The Guardian

Oct 12 2020
Furlough fraud, snooping and firings: architects speak out over lockdown exploitation

Endless hours, home-surveillance, fear of reprisals – complaints in this already stressful industry have soared during Covid-19. We speak to distraught workers

For Maria Gomez, the nightmare began when she couldn’t get her boss out of her bedroom. “It felt like he was in there 24/7,” she says, “always watching my every move.” She was used to architecture’s punishing lifestyle, working late nights and weekends, and she had adjusted to the additional stresses of working from home during lockdown. But she hadn’t expected to be monitored via her computer webcam all day every day, with her meetings with clients secretly recorded by her bosses.

“I only realised I was being monitored when something I said was later quoted back to me in a team meeting,” she says. “And another recording of me was used in a presentation. It was completely insane. It felt like being back at school, with added hyper-surveillance.”

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The Guardian

Oct 12 2020
Margaret Nolan - actor, artist and Goldfinger title sequence star - dies aged 76

Actor who began as a glamour model went on to appear in the James Bond film before taking numerous roles in 1960s and 70s TV

Margaret Nolan, the actor best known for appearing in the title sequence for Goldfinger and for a string of appearances in TV shows in the 1960s and 70s, has died aged 76. Film-maker Edgar Wright, who directed Nolan in her final film role, in the forthcoming Last Night in Soho, reported the news on social media.

Nolan, who was born in 1943 in Somerset, first appeared on film under the name Vicky Kennedy in “glamour” shorts by the then notorious Harrison Marks, appearing in his naturist film It’s a Bare, Bare World. She soon graduated to more mainstream films, with a noticeable role in the Beatles film A Hard Day’s Night (as the girl accompanying Wilfrid Brambell in a casino), and the James Bond film Goldfinger, as the masseuse Dink. Nolan also appeared in Goldfinger’s celebrated title sequence, wearing a gold bikini and with images projected on her skin – though in the film itself it was Shirley Eaton who played Jill Masterson, the girl smothered to death by gold paint.

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The Guardian

Oct 11 2020
Flickers and Fukushima: Japanese and Korean talent at Photo London – in pictures

Depopulated cherry blossom landscapes and embroidered fingers feature as Japan’s Kana Kawanishi Gallery goes under the spotlight at Photo London

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The Guardian

Oct 11 2020
Weird, wacky and utterly wonderful: the world's greatest unsung museums

A bullring full of blood, a house full of sweet wrappers, a power station full of sculpture, a roundabout full of plants … Hilton Als, Mary Beard, Russell Tovey and more pick their alternative favourite museums

Jessie Burton, novelist
A tourist might more prosaically call this the world-famous bullring of Seville. I lived in Andalucía in my 20s and the culture of bullfighting was unavoidable. I had a kid in my class who, at 16, was a trainee fighter. Whatever your thoughts on the ethics, I defy you not to be captivated by this building and the exhibits within its corridors. It’s a living museum, as bullfights still take place. Standing in the middle of the empty 12,000-seater ring is a hair-raising experience, especially when you notice the wooden panels scarred by horns. The toreador costumes – all camp and skintight glory, butterfly colours and braiding – belie the fully equipped emergency room, a place of blood loss and death since 1749. The matador prayer chapel, the equipment, the bulls’ heads and the black and white photographs seem like relics of a faded world – until you leave and see posters advertising the next fight.

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artforum.com

Oct 11 2020
Daphne Wright
Daphne Wright’s work maneuvers things into well-wrought but delicate doubt. Shifting between tautness and mess, it sets imagery, materials and language in constant metaphorical motion. “A quiet mutiny
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artforum.com

Oct 11 2020
Ariana Papademetropoulos
Vito Schnabel Projects presents “Ariana Papademetropoulos: Unweave a Rainbow,” the first New York City solo exhibition for the Los Angeles-based artist. “Unweave a Rainbow” will debut a new series of
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artforum.com

Oct 11 2020
Miz Cracker interviews Laurie Simmons on her art
Miz Cracker talks with artist Laurie Simmons about her early black and white photography and how questions of gender inform her process.
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artforum.com

Oct 11 2020
Cecily Brown
Opening at Paula Cooper Gallery on Thursday, October 15, 2020, is a one-person exhibition of new work by Cecily Brown—the artist’s second with the gallery. Painting with a diverse palette, from warm
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artforum.com

Oct 11 2020
Barry Le Va
Emblematic of Le Va’s installations of the late 1960s, the meat cleaver works were iconoclastic for their aggressive materiality and enigmatic elegance. They followed Barry Le Va’s now mythic felt floor
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artforum.com

Oct 11 2020
Avni Sethi Wins Vera List Center’s Jane Lombard Prize for Art and Social Justice
The Vera List Center for Art and Politics at New York’s New School has named Avni Sethi as the recipient of the 2020–2022 Jane Lombard Prize for Art and Social Justice. Sethi was awarded the $25,000
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The Guardian

Oct 11 2020
The gangster vanishes: twist in hunt for world’s largest haul of stolen art

Irish criminal disappears after leading BBC film crew to gang behind infamous Boston heist

Some of the most precious paintings in the world, a billion-dollar haul including work by Vermeer, Rembrandt, Degas and Manet, were stolen from a gallery in Boston, Massachusetts, in an audacious heist 30 years ago. But now, just as a British detective closes in on what he believes are the best clues so far to the masterpieces’ hiding place, his key contact, an Irish gangster, has disappeared.

Martin “the Viper” Foley, a well-known convicted criminal who has operated on the fringes of gangland political violence in Ireland for half a century, has suddenly dropped out of negotiations, according to Charles Hill, a leading art sleuth. And Foley’s promise to reunite the public with these great works, including Vermeer’s The Concert, the most valuable missing artwork in the world, has vanished with him.

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The Guardian

Oct 11 2020
A piece of Fleet Street history: Katharine Whitehorn's desk for sale

Pioneering columnist’s 60s design classic to be auctioned to aid Alzheimer’s charity

They were inspiring and entertaining words that helped set the tone for more than just one era of social change. Katharine Whitehorn’s 60 years of provocative, useful and funny journalism and books were all typed up at a large wooden desk in a busy family living room.

Now that desk, a piece of classic Danish design as well as vintage Fleet Street history, is to go under Bonhams the auctioneer’s hammer to raise money for a charity that cares for people with Alzheimer’s disease.

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The Guardian

Oct 11 2020
'It's pretty messed up': Americans’ deadly love for tigers

Steve Winter, commended for his photographs of US private ‘zoos’, reveals the dark side of Netflix’s Tiger King

More tigers are now held in captivity in the United States than survive in the wild in Asia. That is the grim statistic that underpins Americans’ growing appetites for posing for pictures with big cats and their offspring, a desire that is today being met by thousands of tigers that are caged and displayed in private roadside zoos across the US.

Young tigers are taken from their mothers just after their birth and bottle fed and handled by humans. Then they are used as props until they are about 12 weeks old when they become too dangerous to hold. Many develop bone and joint problems because they were removed so early from the adult female and not given proper nutrition. At the same time, mother tigers are returned to cages to provide future supplies of cubs. “This is done repeatedly,” says wildlife photographer Steve Winter. “It’s inhumane.”

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The Guardian

Oct 11 2020
Young minds, wise visions: art helps children to make sense of coronavirus lockdown

The Way I See It, depicting the impact of the coronavirus, is to feature on the Google Arts & Culture platform

A is for Annoyed, B is for Bored and C is for Confused: an alphabet of lockdown feelings created by Rivers, a 14-year-old from Gateshead, is just one of a dazzling range of 200 responses from young people to the Covid-19 crisis to be launched online on 16 October on a leading international art site.

The lockdown alphabet is to appear alongside 15-year-old Louis’ painting of a spotty teenage face, bathed in ghoulish green light, and a short film made by Maisie, a 15-year-old from Northumberland, as she nervously awaits yet another Zoom call.

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The Guardian

Oct 11 2020
Bruce Nauman review – prophetic visions

Tate Modern, London
The US artist’s video and neon installations have lost none of their power to confound and dazzle, as this almost unbearably tense retrospective shows

Midway through the gruelling vaudeville at Tate Modern, among the clamour of shrieking clowns, gagging mouths and tortured violins, you suddenly come upon yourself. Or rather, the ghost of yourself. A video monitor appears to be recording your approaching footsteps. But up close, the screen is only showing the view around the next corner, where another monitor irresistibly beckons. Turn that corner and you glimpse your own departing back, spectral and black on the screen. For a moment, you hardly know whether you’re coming or going.

Nor should you know. There is no comfort in the art of Bruce Nauman, no resting place for the confounded brain – not even when his methods are openly declared. What could be clearer, for instance, than a bright neon sign? One Hundred Live and Die is the baldly descriptive title of an epochal work from 1984, a wall of neon instructions that flash on and off: Laugh and Die, Play and Live, Speak and Live, Play and Die. They confront you with all the inanity of the Walk/Don’t Walk signs on US streets.

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The Guardian

Oct 10 2020
The big picture: a hands-on Martin Luther King

Leonard Freed’s image of the civil rights leader is a rare optimistic moment in a series on racial injustice in 60s America

There are many things to focus on in this picture of Dr Martin Luther King Jr’s joyous homecoming, having received the Nobel peace prize, but your eye can’t help but be drawn to the hands that grasp his. King’s was the voice of the US civil rights movement but human touch was seminal to his message; solidarity was about linked arms, shoulder-to-shoulder physicality. The determination of the women who crowd the car to clutch at his outstretched fingers speaks not of star-struck celebrity but of a desire to share strength and to receive it.

This photograph, taken in Baltimore in 1964, was the centrepiece of Leonard Freed’s book Black in White America, itself a fundamental document of those years, now republished to mark another pivotal juncture in the struggle for racial justice. Freed travelled his segregated country for two years between 1963 and 1965, looking hard at the division that defined it. Some of those pictures – of a corridor of black hands reaching through prison bars, of mass rallies demanding an end to police brutality – could have been taken this summer.

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The Guardian

Oct 10 2020
The Holocaust and slavery – both need a fitting memorial

It would be invidious to set up a rivalry between them, so why are their monuments being treated so differently?

In 2005, a proposal was put forward to build something lacking in this country – a national memorial to the victims of slavery that would also honour their contribution to the prosperity of Britain. The organisers of the project, named Memorial 2007 after the bicentenary of abolition of the British slave trade, felt it would be good to place it near the Houses of Parliament, the location where the laws were passed that both enabled the trade and eventually ended it.

They proposed to place it in Victoria Tower Gardens, a quiet green space just upriver from the Palace of Westminster that contains the Buxton memorial fountain, a Victorian Gothic structure named after the abolitionist MP, Thomas Fowell Buxton. The Royal Parks, the body that manages Victoria Tower Gardens, along with some of the best-known green spaces in London, politely rejected the proposal. The gardens, it said, were “an important community green space”, and it did not feel that they could “accommodate a further memorial at this location”.

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artforum.com

Oct 10 2020
Runo Lagomarsino, A line can now be drawn, 2020, carved wood and iron stirrup from 19th century South America, motor and electricity, 7 3/4 × 6 × 7 1/3".
* carved wood and iron stirrup from 19th century South America, motor and electricity, 7 3/4 × 6 × 7 1/3".
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artforum.com

Oct 10 2020
Tanya Akhmetgalieva
The blurred edges of reality form the center of Tanya Akhmetgalieva’s practice, in which weighty metaphysical issues are handled with a light, neo-Pop touch. Visitors to this exhibition, which spans
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The Guardian

Oct 10 2020
Duncan Grant's erotica is a blast of defiant joy in tough times for the arts | Barbara Ellen

Recently discovered drawings are a relief from Rishi Sunak’s cold message to artists

An inspiring story has surfaced about the re-emergence of more than 400 erotic drawings by the late Bloomsbury artist Duncan Grant, who lived most of his life as a criminalised gay man.

The drawings, thought to be destroyed, have been offered to the Charleston Trust, which manages Grant’s former East Sussex retreat. And what images they are: defiantly subversive and explicit multiracial homoerotica, bursting with passion, flesh, joy, love, freedom and everything else gay people were legally barred from experiencing and expressing at the time. The underlying message of Grant’s paintings is still uplifting in 2020: art will always find a way, whatever the obstacles, hardships and dangers.

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The Guardian

Oct 10 2020
Mesmerising urban photography – in pictures

The self-taught Spanish photographer Andrés Gallardo Albajar first began capturing the silhouettes, colours and shadows of urban architecture in his home town of Tallinn, Estonia, in 2013. “I really enjoyed approaching the architecture from different angles and playing with different compositions,” he says. “I immediately knew I’d do another series of photographs in the next city I’d visit.”

Urban Geometry (published on 15 October by Hoxton Mini Press) reveals the results of his adventures, featuring buildings from Bilbao to Beijing, Stockholm to Seoul.

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artforum.com

Oct 10 2020
David Graeber’s Unaccomplishments
YOU SHOULD READ HIM, remember him. He is an important person and thinker. More than that, he was kind. He did good things for many people and opened many paths. He was helpful and generous. He was
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The Guardian

Oct 10 2020
On my radar: Russell Tovey's cultural highlights

The actor on David Byrne’s kooky show, the joy of mountain walks and a moving memoir by a gay Muslim

Actor Russell Tovey was born in Essex in 1981. He had his big break in 2004 as one of The History Boys in Alan Bennett’s award-winning stage play and subsequent film. He has since appeared in a number of acclaimed TV shows including Being Human and Him & Her, and was nominated for a 2020 Critics’ Choice award for best supporting actor in Years and Years. Tovey is also an art lover, and in 2018 launched the podcast Talk Art with gallerist Robert Diament co-hosting. He stars in Neil Cross’s drama The Sister on ITV later this month.

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The Guardian

Oct 10 2020
Joana Choumali: 'I set my imagination free on the photographs'

The prize-winning Ivorian photographer captures the energy of dawn in images shot in African cities then embroidered

Joana Choumali’s interest in photography began when, as a child in Abidjan in Ivory Coast, her family hired a local studio photographer to take a family portrait. “I was fascinated by how he handled the camera and the lighting as well as the way he directed us,” she recalls. “It was almost like a ceremony. I remember asking him so many questions. That tacit communication and connection with other people through photography was what interested me the most. I wanted to do the same.”

Having studied graphic arts and then worked in an advertising agency in Morocco, Choumali rekindled her childhood fascination with photography in 2011, initially creating work that merged portraiture and documentary to explore “an Africa caught between tradition and modernity”. The images here, taken from her new series, Alba’hian (First Light of Morning), are among the highlights of the digital edition of Photo London, which opened last week. They continue to explore that cultural dynamic but in a much more conceptual way, having been created by overlaying her digital photographs with meticulously hand-embroidered patterns of dazzling colour and intricate design.

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The Guardian

Oct 10 2020
George Floyd, isolation and Zoom: hundreds of artists fuel pandemic exhibition in San Francisco

The reopened de Young Museum hosts 877 works by Bay Area artists telling the story of the moment

Nearly seven months after San Francisco became the first US city to enter a pandemic lockdown, its cultural institutions and nightlife are beginning to resurface.

As the city grapples with whether 25% occupancy caps will help or harm its beleaguered restaurant scene, its famed de Young Museum has unveiled a major new exhibition of 877 individual works, all by 722 Bay Area artists who submitted them during a frenzied, two-week window in June.

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The Guardian

Oct 10 2020
Purrfect match: cats and their human doubles

We all know someone who looks like their dog, but what about our feline friends? Photographer Gerrard Gethings set out to match moggies with their lookalikes – with uncanny results. By Kathryn Bromwich

If you’ve spent much time on the internet over the past decade, chances are you’ve seen some cats on there. Cats chasing their own tails. Cats attempting ill-judged jumps from one piece of furniture to another. Or, in the case of Gerrard Gethings, a cat who looked exactly like the actor David Schwimmer. “There’s something about the shape of Schwimmer’s face that’s quite interesting,” says the London-based photographer, “and the cat had exactly the same face. That pushed me over the edge, into thinking there was something in it.”

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The Guardian

Oct 09 2020
20 photographs of the week

Donald Trump returns to the White House, demonstrations in Santiago, conflict in Nagorno-Karabakh and the enduring impact of Covid-19: the most striking images from around the world

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The New York Times

Oct 09 2020
Return Looted Art to Former Colonies, Dutch Committee Tells Government
Return Looted Art to Former Colonies, Dutch Committee Tells Government
The Netherlands should show “a willingness to return” items taken without consent, a report said. But past experience shows the path from recommending restitution to actual return can be a long one.
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The New York Times

Oct 09 2020
Chinatown Museum Gets $3 Million After Fire Threatens Its Archives
Chinatown Museum Gets $3 Million After Fire Threatens Its Archives
The grant is a “game changer” for the Museum of Chinese in America, which was also shut down by the pandemic in March.
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artforum.com

Oct 09 2020
UK Government Awards Heritage Organizations $113 Million While Recipient National Trust Cuts 1,300 Jobs
Though word is still awaited as to when arts organizations including museums, galleries, theaters, and music venues will receive aid from the UK’s $1.73 billion bailout package revealed in July, the
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The New York Times

Oct 09 2020
A Gallery Resurgence in Chelsea
In the face of economic unknowns, the message from the city’s galleries is: we’re not taking this lying down. Roberta Smith on 16 of the neighborhood’s most riveting painting shows.
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artforum.com

Oct 09 2020
Hong Kong’s M+ Museum Pushes Opening to Fall 2021
The opening of M+, Hong Kong’s new museum of art and visual culture, has been long anticipated . . . and will continue to be, as the institution on Thursday announced that it would delay its opening,
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The Guardian

Oct 09 2020
Renaissance accountants remembered | Letters

Edward Fordyce on Luca Pacioli, the father of accounting and bookkeeping, and Barry Lewis on others who combined groundbreaking mathematical work with bean-counting

Tim Burgess makes a fine case for the arts (The arts aren’t a luxurious hobby, Rishi Sunak. They’re a lifeline for millions, 8 October). However, the assertion from Ravi Somaiya that he quotes – “Nobody remembers Renaissance accountants” – runs counter to the facts. Luca Pacioli (1447-1517) is widely known to this day as the father of accounting and bookkeeping.

Pacioli published his Summa de Arithmetica, Geometria, Proportioni et Proportionalita (which contains work on bookkeeping), in 1494. He is also known to have provided employment in the arts industry as a portrait of him dating from about 1495 and attributed to Jacopo de’ Barbari still exists. The Renaissance father of accounting has also been celebrated more recently in the name of an accounting software package, Pacioli 2000, published nearly 500 years after the accountant’s death.
Edward Fordyce
Twickenham, London

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The New York Times

Oct 09 2020
At a Reduced Frieze Week, a Focus on Black Art
At a Reduced Frieze Week, a Focus on Black Art
This year’s edition was less extensive because of the pandemic, but many shows reflected a new focal point in the art world.
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The Guardian

Oct 09 2020
Tracey Emin steals a kiss and Damien Hirst resurrects the dead – the week in art

Art’s original sinners, a challenge to white supremacy in painting, and falling in love with nature all over again – all in your weekly dispatch

Damien Hirst: End of a Century
This is a hugely entertaining and memorable epic trip to the 1990s when Hirst captured the dark mood of a fin de siècle. His personal collection of his own work is big enough to make a museum, his obsession with death once again urgent.
Newport Street Gallery, London, until 7 March.

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artforum.com

Oct 09 2020
Amy Taubin on the New York and Toronto International Film Festivals
FOR CINEPHILES, CRITICS, AND INDUSTRY FOLK, the end of summer is announced by three overlapping North American film festivals: Telluride, Toronto (TIFF), and New York (NYFF). I usually make do with
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The Guardian

Oct 09 2020
Back in the frame: the extraordinary artists Britain forgot

Combing through musty studios and garrets has become a way of life for specialists Liss Llewellyn, whose Hidden Gems exhibition lays bare museum-grade works that have fallen into oblivion – more often than not by women

In the months before Britain declared war on Germany, mural artist Evelyn Dunbar sat painting in her aunt’s Sussex garden. She captured the light falling through white blossom and green leaf on to the brown earth of a vegetable patch and the lawn it bordered. She painted the garden hedge running across the small canvas, thereby planting you – the viewer – firmly inside it, safe under a cloudless sky. As garden paintings go, it is a delightful scene of domestic sanctuary. And this month, for the first time since it was completed in 1939, the painting is to be exhibited in public, as part of Liss Llewellyn’s Hidden Gems online exhibition series.

Over the past three decades, Sacha Llewellyn and Paul Liss have carved out a niche as champions of the artists that Britain forgot. Specialising in painting but also sculpture, drawing and prints from 1880-1980, they have spent the last 30-odd years working with museums and institutions, and private collections. They’ve visited hundreds of musty studios, combed through archives and ferreted around garrets to root out the work of artists who, though lauded in their day, have since fallen into oblivion: from erstwhile prize winners and residents of the British School at Rome to the shyer contemporaries of luminaries such as Henry Moore or Eric Ravilious. A lot of their research leads nowhere, but it is predicated on the fact that falling out of popularity has very little to do with the quality of the work. “We are a bit like archaeologists,” says Liss. “We clear the debris that’s built up around someone.”

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The Guardian

Oct 09 2020
Artemisia Gentileschi’s Judith Slaying Holofernes: vision of vengeance

There’s a violent urgency to the 17th-century Italian painter’s most iconic work, which resembles a female version of David and Goliath

A weekly Guide column in which we dissect the influences and interpretations of a work of art

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The Guardian

Oct 08 2020
Pop-up space odyssey: how to do Frieze with no Frieze

Thanks to the pandemic, the art fair has gone online – but private galleries across London have put their best work on show regardless. Here’s how to see it all

In 2018, David Shrigley issued a laconic print for the Frieze art fair – News: People Gather in Large Tent – because, really, what could have been more mundane? Two year later, that’s wild behaviour that might get you a fine and a warning. Ergo: no tent, no wacky outfits, no gawping at plastic surgery, no labyrinth of samey-samey art, no gibbering art blindness.

Weirdly, despite my annual whinge that it’s a terrible way to see art (it is), I miss Frieze. For collectors there are online viewing rooms, but I’m nostalgic for the smell of paint and hyperbole. London’s galleries are open. Might the Frieze experience be reproduced freestyle?

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The Guardian

Oct 08 2020
Royal Society of Biology photography competition 2020 - in pictures

The Royal Society of Biology has released the shortlisted entries and winners for its Photographer of the Year and Young Photographer of the Year competition. This year’s theme was Our Changing World

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The Guardian

Oct 08 2020
6Mois photojournalism award – in pictures

The 6Mois award is for unique documentary and photojournalistic projects that surprise, challenge and move. Here we take a look at a selection of the finalists’ work. The jury awarded the top prize, a €10,000 grant, to Marco Zorzanello for his project examining tourism in the climate crisis era

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