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The Guardian

May 16 2020
Park and recreation - in pictures

Photographer Suki Dhanda captures the early morning beauty of London’s Hackney Marshes

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The Guardian

May 16 2020
‘It's our sanctuary’: gardens in lockdown, as seen by drone

Photographer Robert Ormerod uses his aerial camera to document how neighbours are finding solace in their green spaces. By Rhiannon Lucy Cosslett

Robert Ormerod had just moved house when lockdown began. “We lived in a flat before. We moved for a garden,” he says. “So when this kicked off, we couldn’t believe how lucky we were to have moved in time.”

As with most photographers, his ability to work has been limited, so Ormerod hit upon the idea of shooting his Edinburgh neighbours in their gardens. These outdoor spaces have been a boon for millions of families across the UK, who have over the past two months used their patch, however small, to get some fresh air, exercise, escape, grow their own food or get to know the wildlife.

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The Guardian

May 15 2020
20 photographs of the week

Physical distancing, lockdown and protests about the death of Ahmaud Arbery – the most striking photographs from around the world this week

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artforum.com

May 15 2020
Christine Sun Kim, Pedro Reyes Among Artists Creating Digital Billboards for NYC’s Essential Workers
Carrie Mae Weems, Christine Sun Kim, Duke Riley, Jenny Holzer, Pedro Reyes, and Xaviera Simmons are among the thirty-five artists and designers who are making works to display across digital screens
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artforum.com

May 15 2020
Niele Toroni
Opening May 16, 2020 Galerie Marian Goodman is pleased to announce an exhibition of new work by Niele Toroni. In keeping with the working method he defined in 1966, Toroni will display imprints of a
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artforum.com

May 15 2020
Schellmann Art
https://schellmannart.com/thonet200 “Thonet Reimagined ” celebrates the iconic furniture company’s 200th anniversary. Works by fourteen artists—created for this exhibition by invitation from Schellmann
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The Guardian

May 15 2020
Beatles photographer Astrid Kirchherr dies aged 81

Innovative German artist recorded group’s rise to fame after seeing them play in Hamburg

Astrid Kirchherr, the photographer whose shots of the Beatles helped turn them into icons, has died aged 81.

The Beatles writer Mark Lewisohn confirmed the news on Twitter, posting: “Intelligent, inspirational, innovative, daring, artistic, awake, aware, beautiful, smart, loving and uplifting friend to many. Her gift to the Beatles was immeasurable.”

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artforum.com

May 15 2020
Sotheby’s Contemporary Art Day Sale Smashes Previous Online Auction Record
The inaugural online Sotheby’s contemporary art day auction, which concluded on Thursday, May 14, netted $13.7 million—the highest total ever for an online sale at the auction house. The sum is more
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artforum.com

May 15 2020
Sotheby’s Contemporary Art Day Sale Breaks Previous Online Auction Record
The inaugural online Sotheby’s contemporary art day auction, which concluded on Thursday, May 14, netted $13.7 million—the highest total ever for an online sale at the auction house. The sum is more
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The New York Times

May 15 2020
Christie’s Gets Creative for 20th-Century Art Auction in July
The sale, which includes works that were to be sold in New York in May, will be a hybrid: in-person (where allowed) and online in a format tailored for the coronavirus era.
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The New York Times

May 15 2020
This Atlas of Art and Memory Is a Wonder of the Modern World
This Atlas of Art and Memory Is a Wonder of the Modern World
With nearly 1,000 images, Aby Warburg’s radical form of visual study is also an artwork itself. Now you can see it online.
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artforum.com

May 15 2020
"Southland"
Of all the Los Angeles streets, apartment facades, and interiors depicted in “Southland,” the modern 1960s-style living room in John Divola’s photograph X18F5, 2002, may seem the most familiar and
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The New York Times

May 15 2020
First Virtual New York Art Fair Brings Low Energy but Solid Prices
First Virtual New York Art Fair Brings Low Energy but Solid Prices
Frieze New York proved surprisingly robust, answering the question, “Can a fair survive online?”
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The Guardian

May 15 2020
Walks for art lovers, and artists who walk – the week in art

Wherever and however you are allowed to exercise, why not seek out public sculptures and monuments? Meanwhile, artists including Gilbert & George do their best to keep working – all in your weekly dispatch

Bottle of Notes by Claes Oldenburg and Coosje van Bruggen
Middlesbrough’s excellent MIMA remains closed like all galleries, but if you’re out for a walk you can see the city’s engaging sculpture created in homage to local boy Captain Cook by one of America’s great modern artists.
Centre Square, Middlesbrough.

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artforum.com

May 15 2020
Austrian Culture Minister Steps Down Following Criticism over Pandemic Response
Austrian Culture Minister Ulrike Lunacek tendered her resignation on Friday following backlash and frustration over her response to the Covid-19 pandemic, reports the Austria Press Agency. A member of
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The New York Times

May 15 2020
Paintings that Demolish the Myths of What a Home Should Be
Naomi Safran-Hon’s textured paintings of abandoned houses hint at our entangled and contradictory relationships to the places we live.
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artforum.com

May 15 2020
Daily Drawings: Week Four
As people around the world stay indoors to curb the spread of Covid-19, Artforum has invited artists to share a drawing—however they would like to define the word—made in self-isolation. Check back each
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artforum.com

May 15 2020
Phillips Names Jonathan Crockett Chairman of Asia
Phillips has appointed Jonathan Crockett chairman of Asia. Since Crockett joined Phillips as deputy chairman of Asia in May 2016, he helped establish the auction house’s regional headquarters in Hong
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The Guardian

May 15 2020
Peter Beard’s Snows of Kilimanjaro: a mirror for human behaviour

The American artist reworked his 1972 photograph to mark the Tsavo national park tragedy, in which thousands of elephants died of starvation in the early 70s

Peter Beard took the epic photo at the centre of this collage in 1972, when he was working on new material for the 1977 edition of his celebrated photobook The End of the Game. In isolation, a careening elephant against the backdrop of Kilimanjaro seems to channel the awe felt by European settlers such as his early idol, writer and big-game hunter Karen Blixen.

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The Guardian

May 15 2020
How do we know Monet painted this outdoors? The great British art quiz

The National Gallery in London has set today’s quiz, which allows you to explore the collections of museums closed due to coronavirus – while answering some tricky questions

This quiz is brought to you in collaboration with Art UK, the online home for the UK’s public art collections, showing art from more than 3,000 venues, by 45,000 artists. Each day, a different collection on Art UK will set the questions.

Today, our questions are set by the National Gallery in London, which houses one of the greatest collections of paintings in the world. It contains over 2,300 works and represents all major western European painting traditions, with works by Van Eyck, Raphael, Leonardo, Michelangelo, Turner, Rembrandt, Degas, Cézanne, Van Gogh, Monet, Rubens, Velázquez and Titian. These pictures belong to the public and entrance to see them is free.

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The Guardian

May 14 2020
Christopher Thomond explores Holcombe Hill - photo essay

Guardian photographer Christopher Thomond has spent the last few weeks of coronavirus lockdown exploring Holcombe Hill in Greater Manchester - where he met local residents while exploring its multitude of paths, bridleways and moorland

“They say on a clear day you can see the Kremlin from here,” quipped the dog walker who had paused momentarily as he crossed the moor back towards home. The friendly passerby was clearly exaggerating but the views from Holcombe Hill are certainly far reaching. Below, nearly 3 million people are spread out across the Manchester conurbation and beyond, with the tallest buildings clearly definable on the city’s rapidly changing skyline.

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The New York Times

May 14 2020
John Singer Sargent’s Drawings Bring His Model Out of the Shadows
John Singer Sargent’s Drawings Bring His Model Out of the Shadows
Sketches by the great portraitist, shown together for the first time, illuminate the contribution of his African-American muse, Thomas McKeller.
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The New York Times

May 14 2020
The Art Collections Are Real; the Owners Are Not
Fanny Pereire is the curator behind many eye-popping paintings you see in movies and TV shows like “Succession” and “Mrs. America.”
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artforum.com

May 14 2020
NADA’s New Profit-Sharing Digital Art Fair to Launch Next Week
The New Art Dealers Alliance (NADA) announced on Thursday that it plans to launch a new digital art fair to support member galleries that have been impacted by the Covid-19 pandemic. Titled FAIR, the
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The New York Times

May 14 2020
Keeping a Distance, From Everything but Nature
Keeping a Distance, From Everything but Nature
As warm weather beckons, New York City residents are slowly venturing back outdoors. We suggest some spots families can enjoy while staying safe.
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artforum.com

May 14 2020
Michael Rey
In a recent virtual talk with students at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, artist Michael Rey spoke of his work ZOPTUN (Astrolopico) (all works 2020) as a personal breakthrough. Here he created
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artforum.com

May 14 2020
US Mayors Petition Congress for Arts Funding in Next Federal Relief Package
Twenty-three mayors of cities across the United States have signed a joint letter to Congress urging the government to provide more aid to artists, arts workers, and cultural organizations in the next
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The Guardian

May 14 2020
Zoom with a view: how lockdown art classes are booming online

Quarantine has led to a rise in those with and without artistic experience heading online for a range of immersive classes

On 30 March, Big Bang Theory star Jim Parsons posted a selfie on Instagram holding up a painting of two vases – which he made himself.

In the caption, Parsons told his followers that he created the artwork with the help of an online art class. “They’re doing live classes via zoom and, quite to my delight, I was not only able to figure out how to use zoom, but I also painted this in the process!” he wrote. “No museums are asking to display my first still life painting, but I feel just a little bit more peaceful from the process … and I got to see real life other people who were also taking the class – a real gift right now!”

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The New York Times

May 14 2020
The New Museum Is Offering Strange Stories for Trying Times
The conceptual artist Maurizio Cattelan conceived of the “Bedtime Stories” series as a way to foster a sense of connection during the coronavirus crisis.
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artforum.com

May 14 2020
MoMA Weighs in on Oslo’s Y-block, Picasso-Muraled Icon Fated for Demolition
Plans to demolish an empty government building in Oslo graced with a pair of Pablo Picasso–designed murals have caught the attention of New York’s Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), which has intervened in
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The New York Times

May 14 2020
The Daily Call That 200 Arts Groups Hope Will Help Them Survive
The Daily Call That 200 Arts Groups Hope Will Help Them Survive
In a sign of the pandemic’s toll, New York’s cultural institutions, large and small, feel compelled to share their woes and tactics in strategy sessions.
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artforum.com

May 14 2020
Eskenazi Museum of Art Appoints Lauren Richman Assistant Curator of Photography
The Sidney and Lois Eskenazi Museum of Art at Indiana University has hired art historian Lauren Richman as assistant curator of photography. The new position was created with a grant from the Henry Luce
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artforum.com

May 14 2020
Museum of the African Diaspora Benefit Auction Raises over $450,000
The Museum of the African Diaspora (MoAD) in San Francisco, which was forced to lay off staffers and make other cutbacks when it closed temporarily in March because of the Covid-19 crisis, has successfully
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artforum.com

May 14 2020
Following Paddle8 Bankruptcy Filing, Former CEO Sued for $1 Million
A group of unnamed creditors are suing online auction house Paddle8’s former chief executive Valentine Uhovski for $1 million, in addition to legal fees and interest, reports the
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The Guardian

May 14 2020
Artists struggling to work amid coronavirus, says Rachel Whiteread

Sculptor is backing UK fund giving upcoming artists £5,000 as lockdown takes its toll

Visual artists are struggling to produce work and concentrate on projects along with the rest of the population, the Turner prize-winning sculptor Dame Rachel Whiteread has said.

Even though artists often worked alone in their studios, the lockdown was taking a heavy toll financially and creatively, she said.

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The Guardian

May 14 2020
Powderfinger, Paul Kelly, Adam Liaw and more: the best live streams for Australia and beyond

The Brisbane band’s one-off reunion is just one of many big things happening on a small screen near you. Here’s what’s coming up

15 May: Join us for the first Guardian Australia book club event on Friday! Launching at 1pm, the Zoom stream will feature Phosphorescence author Julia Baird in conversation with Michael Williams. To register click here, or stay tuned for the video highlights.

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The Guardian

May 14 2020
What Comes After Farce? by Hal Foster review – oppositional art in the age of Trump

Long known for his optimism, the renowned art critic now faces the question: how to belittle a political elite that cannot be embarrassed?

During the mid-1980s, when Hal Foster established himself as one of the leading art critics in the anglophone world, many were flummoxed by his optimism. Amid the new regime of union-busting deregulation instituted by Thatcher and Reagan, the assumption in Foster’s Marxist academic milieu was that contemporary art had shed its radical convictions. Avant garde experiments that mounted a frontal attack on bourgeois culture, such as dada and surrealism, were passé. In their place, a financialised society had filled the galleries with glorified consumer products: kitschy, toothless and historically amnesiac. Against this grim appraisal, Foster insisted on the political importance of such postmodernists as Hans Haacke and Barbara Kruger, who enacted a form of subversion more subtle and effective than the “abstract and anarchistic” avant garde. He claimed that such art could do two things its utopian forerunner couldn’t: expose the contradictions of capitalism via rigorous critique, and puncture its ideological armour through playful yet penetrating mockery.

Foster’s latest collection of essays, however, spotlights the impotence of these techniques in the age of Trump. The “hermeneutics of suspicion” – a critical method that reveals the tension and instability behind seemingly stable constructs – is useless against a political establishment that flaunts its own contradictions. Mockery has become a gift to “leaders who thrive on the absurd”. And critique itself threatens to redouble the “nihilism of the neoliberal order” by engendering a state of cold detachment that reflects our alienated society. Meanwhile, formal aesthetic practices that seemed progressive during the 1990s have since been co-opted by a rapacious commercial art world. The Foster that emerges from this conjuncture is perhaps more jaded than the one we’ve come to know. “If all this sounds dire,” he writes towards the end of the preface, “it is.”

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The Guardian

May 14 2020
How do we know this family liked blancmange? The great British art quiz

Norfolk Museums Service as setting today’s quiz, which allows you to explore the collections of UK art institutions closed due to coronavirus – while answering some tricky questions along the way

This quiz is brought to you in collaboration with Art UK, the online home for the UK’s public art collections, showing art from moer than 3,000 venues and by 45,000 artists. Each day, a different collection on Art UK will set the questions.

Today, our questions are set by Norfolk Museums Service, which consists of 10 museums across the beautiful county of Norfolk.

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The Guardian

May 13 2020
Fragility on the frontline: life inside NHS hospitals – in pictures

Lewis Khan spent four years with unprecedented access to London’s healthcare system. His book Theatre captures the cleaners, the surgeons and the scrub nurses – and their unique bond with patients

All profits from Theatre will go to the NHS

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The Guardian

May 13 2020
Frontline hero: the Rocky Mountain GP who healed America

As doctors battle coronavirus across the globe, we recall how one tireless Colorado medic became a hero in the 1940s – thanks to the stunning work of legendary photographer W Eugene Smith

In September 1948, an American physician working in Kremmling, a remote rural community in Colorado, briefly became a national celebrity, appearing on television and radio to talk about the demanding nature of his work. The reason for his fame was a striking photo essay by the pioneering American photographer W Eugene Smith, which appeared in the 20 September issue of Life magazine.

Entitled Country Doctor, the series opened with a brooding portrait of the subject, medical bag in hand, striding purposefully across a field beneath glowering storm clouds. In another more intimate image, fraught parents hug each other as they watch an emergency procedure being carried out on their injured infant.

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The New York Times

May 13 2020
Five Artists to Follow on Instagram Now
Cultural hosts Lu Zhang and Herb Tam, “Corona Daze” poetry, printable exhibitions by Tiger Strikes Asteroid, Google street views.
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artforum.com

May 13 2020
Yerba Buena Center for the Arts Creates Hotline to Help Financially Struggling Artists
The Yerba Buena Center for the Arts (YBCA) in San Francisco has launched a new digital platform and hotline to help artists and cultural workers struggling due to the Covid-19 pandemic. Called the 
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artforum.com

May 13 2020
UK Galleries Anticipate a June Reopening as Museums Remain Shut
Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s new plan for reopening the British economy, which was broadcast on Sunday, has been met with confusion and frustration across the United Kingdom due to its vague and
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The Guardian

May 13 2020
'Hyper-resolution' image of Rembrandt painting aids restoration restart

Lockdown delays restoration of The Night Watch, but it can be viewed online in ‘minute detail’

The Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam has posted online the most detailed photograph ever taken of Rembrandt’s The Night Watch, revealing every brushstroke and random fleck of paint.

The so-called hyper-resolution image was launched as the museum announced a delay to the completion of the painting’s restoration, which was begun last year and live-streamed to a global audience.

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The New York Times

May 13 2020
When Manhattan Was Mannahatta: A Stroll Through the Centuries
From lush forest to metropolis, the evolution of Lower Manhattan. Our critic walks with Eric W. Sanderson of the Wildlife Conservation Society.
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artforum.com

May 13 2020
Nancy Stark Smith (1952–2020)
NANCY STARK SMITH: You have gone. I didn’t think it would end like this. But this isn’t about you—it’s about me. I’m all I have left of you. For forty-eight years I depended on you for my supply
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The New York Times

May 13 2020
My Weekend Binge Online at Frieze
My Weekend Binge Online at Frieze
The virtual art fair tries to condense 160 galleries onto your phone screen. Can art hold your attention amid the infinite scroll?
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The Guardian

May 13 2020
Portrait of studious woman revealed to be of Millicent Fawcett

Painting of suffragist working at her desk was misidentified as Royal Holloway ex-principal

A Victorian painting of a studious young woman working at her desk has emerged as a lost portrait of one of the most important figures in the British women’s rights movement history, the suffragist Millicent Fawcett.

The artwork in the collection of Royal Holloway, University of London, has long been identified as a depiction of another pioneer, but far less well-known figure, Dame Emily Penrose. There is even a plaque on its frame saying it is Penrose.

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artforum.com

May 13 2020
Howard Hampton on what to stream in quarantine
IN CONFINEMENT, the captive mind cycles like a broken karaoke machine. Little Caesar’s last words bleed out over vintage Doors: “Mother of mercy, is this the End?” Is this perilous moment the inevitable
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artforum.com

May 13 2020
New York Public Library Acquires Archive of Dancer and Choreographer Martha Graham
The New York Public Library for the Performing Arts has acquired the archive of influential dance artist Martha Graham (1894–1991). During her long and illustrious career, Graham created 181 choreographic
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