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artforum.com

Oct 08 2020
Gabriel Orozco at Marian Goodman Gallery
Gabriel Orozco talks about working under lockdown in Tokyo and how he borrows influence from nature in his work. His latest exhibition is on view at Marian Goodman Gallery in New York through October
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artforum.com

Oct 08 2020
TANK Shanghai
From 16 July, 2020 through 31 January, 2021, TANK Shanghai presents “More, More, More,” a large-scale international exhibition featuring new commissions and existing artwork by 31 domestic and international
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artforum.com

Oct 08 2020
D’Ette Nogle
For her Berlin debut, American artist D’Ette Nogle takes Sigmar Polke’s 1963 painting Schrank (Wardrobe) as inspiration and title, developing his one line and two keyholes into a three-room presentation
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The New York Times

Oct 08 2020
Guggenheim’s Top Curator Is Out as Inquiry Into Basquiat Show Ends
Guggenheim’s Top Curator Is Out as Inquiry Into Basquiat Show Ends
An independent investigation found no mistreatment of a Black curator, Chaédria LaBouvier, but the chief curator, Nancy Spector, who is white, is leaving after 34 years.
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The Guardian

Oct 08 2020
'It should be about the duck': ire as new US nature stamps feature hunting gear

US artists, hunters and conservationists concerned stamps promote the idea that conservation always involves hunting

Each year, the country’s most talented wildlife artists submit their waterfowl-themed artwork to the US Fish and Wildlife Service’s (USFWS) annual contest to determine an image for the following year’s federal duck stamps. But this year’s entries look a little different.

In May, the USFWS announced a new, permanent theme for the stamps, which help fund wetland conservation: waterfowl hunting. That’s why this year’s submissions featured imagery of birds along with dispensed shotgun shells, duck calls lost among tall reeds, and hunters with rifles aimed at blue skies, as Audubon magazine first reported.

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artforum.com

Oct 08 2020
New Red Order on channeling complicity toward Indigenous futures
New Red Order (NRO), a public secret society that works with networks of informants and accomplices to create grounds for Indigenous futures, models itself in contradistinction to an older, extant secret
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The New York Times

Oct 08 2020
Amy Sillman’s Breakthrough Moment Is Here
Amy Sillman’s Breakthrough Moment Is Here
A walk through the artist’s new show offers a master class in how abstraction can capture the fraught spirit of 2020.
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artforum.com

Oct 08 2020
Guillaume Simoneau
When Canadian artist Guillaume Simoneau was a young boy, his family took in orphaned crows and his mother photographed her children’s surprisingly tender interactions with the birds. Across the world
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artforum.com

Oct 08 2020
New Red Order, Never Settle: Calling In, 2020
New Red Order, Never Settle: Calling In, 2020, video, sound, color, 3 minutes 57 seconds. Recruitment video.
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artforum.com

Oct 08 2020
Curator Nancy Spector Departs Guggenheim as Investigation into Basquiat Show Ends
Nancy Spector, the museum’s artistic director and chief curator, will be departing New York’s Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum after a 34-year career there to “pursue other curatorial endeavors and to finish
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The New York Times

Oct 08 2020
4 Art Gallery Shows to See Right Now
Ficre Ghebreyesus’s artistic legacy; Steve Mumford’s combat-zone drawings; Manal Kara’s adoring gaze; Cheyenne Julien’s iridescent paintings.
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artforum.com

Oct 08 2020
Art Matters Announces 2020 Grant Recipients
New York–based nonprofit Art Matters today announced 37 recipients of its 2020 grants. Each will be awarded a fellowship of $5,000. The grants are awarded annually to artists or collectives working in
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The Guardian

Oct 08 2020
Miranda July's teenage obsessions: 'Bikini Kill were gods'

The Kajillionaire director on the allure of dripping honey, Jane Campion and Spike Lee, sex, lies and videotape, and her brother’s woodwork

I can’t cite the artist, but my parents took me to see this performance in Berkeley, California, where I grew up. It was rare that we saw art – my parents were writers, and we didn’t spend a lot of time in museums. It was a bag hanging from the ceiling, it must have been made out of resin, filled with what turned out to be honey. Picture a cow’s udder as big as your arms can stretch. And very slowly, it thinned at the bottom with the weight of the honey and then broke and the honey slowly came pouring out. It’s not abstract because it’s an actual bag of honey – but it was certainly abstract in that a lot of what I was feeling I couldn’t put into words, though it was strong and specific nonetheless. It was a kind of longing. It’s luxurious and you wanna be part of it or touch it; it reminds of you of something that makes you wanna cry. That you could communicate that way rather than intellectually, like my parents were so good at doing, was very radical to me.

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The Guardian

Oct 08 2020
The arts aren't a luxurious hobby, Rishi Sunak. They're a lifeline for millions

Find another job, says the chancellor. But our sector provides hope – and billions for his own exchequer

  • Tim Burgess is lead singer of the Charlatans

When ITV News tweeted on Tuesday that Rishi Sunak had said that “musicians and others in [the] arts should retrain and find other jobs”, the arts world figuratively saddled up its steeds and prepared to descend on 11 Downing Street with flaming torches. But then came what is known in the music world as a big “rewind in the house”.

After much uproar, ITV deleted the tweet and said it had been misleading – but thespians were already orating, and Liam Gallagher was already halfway out of his jacket, looking for a scrap. What had Sunak actually said, then?

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The Guardian

Oct 08 2020
London members' club invites musician Gaika to explore slavery links

Artist is descendant of family enslaved by former owner of House of St Barnabas

The descendant of a family enslaved by a British plantation owner in Jamaica has been invited to take part in an art project at a private members’ club in London that is delving into its own history and connection to slavery.

The House of St Barnabas, which was rebuilt by Richard Beckford, a Bristol MP who enslaved hundreds of people and owned more than 3,650 hectares (9,000 acres) of land in Jamaica, has invited the musician and artist Gaika to create a work that helps “address the house’s links to slavery”.

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The New York Times

Oct 08 2020
Is There a Place for the President of the Confederacy?
Is There a Place for the President of the Confederacy?
Moving troubled monuments to museums for context may sound like an easy answer, but the story of trying to send a statue of Jefferson Davis back to his hometown shows how difficult that really is.
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The Guardian

Oct 08 2020
Fragile Planet: documenting the impact of the climate crisis – in pictures

Fragile Planet is a record of the dramatic changes that are shaping our planet. Containing more than 230 photographs, the book documents the effects of climate systems and forces of nature on our world alongside striking images that show their impact

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The Guardian

Oct 08 2020
Once more unto the beach: artists’ plan to boost the UK seaside

With coastal towns severely affected by coronavirus, one creative duo are planning a string of artist-led festivals in October half-term to lure people back to the seaside

Can the arts help save the seaside? The organisers of a new multi-town festival planned for October half-term (26 October-1 November) are hoping they can.

Billing itself as “a coastal call to arms”, Back & Fill was created by writer and artist Dan Thompson and designer Kate Kneale of Margate-based studio HKD as a response to the economic damage done to seaside towns by the coronavirus crisis. Working with a small team of volunteers furloughed from their jobs, the pair have invited local people involed in the creative arts to put on performances, exhibitions and other events to lure people to the seaside for one last autumn fling.

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The Guardian

Oct 08 2020
700-year-old drunken princes scroll fetches £32m in Hong Kong

Painting by government official Ren Renfa bears seals of several Chinese emperors

A 700-year-old Chinese painted scroll from the Yuan dynasty has fetched HK$306.6m (£32.2m) at an auction in Hong Kong.

The 2-metre (6.6ft) Five Drunken Princes Returning on Horseback is by Ren Renfa, a renowned Chinese artist and government official.

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The Guardian

Oct 08 2020
Lost stash of 400 erotic drawings by Duncan Grant comes to light

Explicit works by 20th-century gay artist were secretly passed from lover to lover for decades

An extraordinary stash of more than 400 erotic drawings by Duncan Grant that was long thought to have been destroyed has come to light, secretly passed down over decades from friend to friend and lover to lover.

Grant was a key member of the Bloomsbury group and one of the most celebrated and successful British artists of the mid-20th century. As a gay man he lived the first 82 years of his life as a criminal.

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The Guardian

Oct 08 2020
Affordable art – in pictures

All these prints are under £200 and sold by independent shops invested in interesting ideas or good causes

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The Guardian

Oct 07 2020
Braids, betrayal ... and a mission to Mars: Bronx photo fundraiser – in pictures

The Bronx Documentary Center’s sixth annual photo auction benefit offers the chance to snap up shots of mystical horse therapists, nomadic reindeer herders – not to mention a New York subway kiss

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artforum.com

Oct 07 2020
María Berrío at Victoria Miro
María Berrío discusses “Flowered Songs and Broken Currents,” an ongoing exhibition at Victoria Miro that chronicles the aftermath of tragedy in a fictional Colombian fishing village. In a series of
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artforum.com

Oct 07 2020
Gabriel Orozco
For this exhibition, Orozco presents a new series of tempera paintings, and a selection of new watercolor collages which expand upon his Suisai series, begun in 2016. All of the works were completed
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artforum.com

Oct 07 2020
Adrián Villar Rojas
Galerie Marian Goodman is pleased to announce its first major exhibition by Adrián Villar Rojas. It is perhaps one of the most comprehensive interventions in the history of the gallery in Paris,
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artforum.com

Oct 07 2020
Activist Group P.A.I.N. Denounces Proposed Purdue Pharma Settlement
Activist Group P.A.I.N. (Prescription Addiction Intervention Now), led by artist Nan Goldin, has spoken out regarding a planned settlement between the Department of Justice and Purdue Pharma that would
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The New York Times

Oct 07 2020
The Artist John Newman Says a Fake Check Scam Cost Him $12,000
A payment for a pair of drawings by Newman showed up in his bank account — then vanished a few days later.
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artforum.com

Oct 07 2020
Renata Poljak
In the late nineteenth century, the discovery of gold in Tierra del Fuego, the archipelago extending from the tip of South America, curiously spurred a mass emigration from the Dalmatian island of Brač,
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The New York Times

Oct 07 2020
T. Rex Skeleton Brings $31.8 Million at Christie’s Auction
T. Rex Skeleton Brings $31.8 Million at Christie’s Auction
A 40-foot-long dinosaur fossil named Stan was the headliner at an auction of Impressionist and Modern art worth more than $300 million.
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The New York Times

Oct 07 2020
The Artist Charles Gaines Creates a Fellowship for Black Students
The Artist Charles Gaines Creates a Fellowship for Black Students
The project, at CalArts, where he has been a longtime member of the faculty, will cover at least two-thirds of the cost of an M.F.A. student’s tuition.
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artforum.com

Oct 07 2020
Berlin’s Humboldt Forum Details December Opening Plans
The eagerly awaited Humboldt Forum, Europe’s largest culture complex, which occupies a sprawling reconstructed royal palace at Berlin’s center and is home to the city-state’s ethnological collections,
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The Guardian

Oct 07 2020
Against the odds: Melbourne's NGV announces major Triennial for December

The inaugural Triennial in 2017 remains the National Gallery of Victoria’s most popular exhibition. If restrictions lift, its follow-up will bring a large-scale show to a city yearning for it

You’ll remember the skulls, if nothing else.

Even if you weren’t one of the 1.23 million people who attended the National Gallery of Victoria’s inaugural Triennial in 2017, you will have seen Ron Mueck’s colossal installation, Mass: enormous piles of oversized skulls scattered across a gallery space and dutifully Instagrammed by every attendee with a smartphone.

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The Guardian

Oct 07 2020
Gods, nipples, Warhol and wickedness – Sin review

National Gallery, London
From provocative Renaissance nudes to church-goer Andy Warhol’s pleas for repentance, this absorbing show reveals how western attitudes to desire became so tangled

This free exhibition, which peppers up works from the National Gallery collection with a handful of spunky loans, reveals how much has changed since the 19th century, when the dazzling Venus – lit up in this show by a Tracey Emin neon – had her erect nipple painted out.

In Bronzino’s Allegory with Venus and Cupid, painted in about 1545, the goddess of love cavorts naked with her adolescent son Cupid, who is subtly squeezing that nipple between long slender fingers. Both their bodies are smooth as silk. Their passion holds back time – literally. Father Time is one of a strange crowd of envious onlookers who are helpless to defeat sexual love.

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The Guardian

Oct 07 2020
How UK community projects are fighting isolation caused by coronavirus

Projects from freewheeling lullabies to food growing are fostering a sense of togetherness during the pandemic

From doorstep violin concerts and roving broadcasts of lullabies to cycling for people with disabilities, communities across the UK are finding new ways to come together to address the isolation caused by the coronavirus pandemic.

In Hull and London, artist Luke Jerram has used 40 illuminated bikes equipped with surround sound speakers to bring performances of local people’s favourite lullabies to their front doors. The songs are woven into a 30-minute composition, which is broadcast around the city at dusk by local cyclists. The next stop for the project is Bristol.

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The Guardian

Oct 07 2020
Frieze fair goes virtual as art crowd stays home due to Covid

Frieze thinks outside of tent with online-only events and African art fair at London’s Somerset House

London’s art world usually comes alive in the first week of October as the international art fair crowd arrives in the capital for Frieze week. Last year, 125,000 visitors attended Frieze and Frieze Masters. But in 2020 the parties aren’t happening; the jet-setters are – for the most part – staying away and there will be no Frieze tent.

“We need to think outside of the tent,” said Eva Langret, Frieze London’s artistic director who takes charge this year. Langret has said she feels like a jilted bride as her inaugural Frieze has become a largely virtual affair because of the Covid-19 pandemic.

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The Guardian

Oct 07 2020
'I used to do the piracy': memories of an 80s Wolverhampton video rental shop

Dawinder Bansal’s film Jambo Cinema tells the story of her father’s video store – including classifying films based on how angry the characters looked on the cover

Dawinder Bansal is trying to pinpoint exactly when she realised that she’d been part of a criminal enterprise. Aged eight, she’d taken on some work for her family’s video rental store in Wolverhampton. “And it wasn’t until years later when I was talking about my past with a friend, that I thought: ‘Oh my god, I used to do the piracy, that was me! I was the chief pirate officer!’”

It’s a tale she recounts in her charming short film Jambo Cinema (co-directed with Anthony Davies), which tells the story of her parents emigrating to the UK from the Punjab in India (via Kenya) and setting up shop in Wolverhampton – first an electrical store, then adding Bollywood rentals to the mix. In 10 minutes the film manages to cover immigration, Thatcherism, grief and much more. And it’s also honest enough to confess to some of her dad’s more, shall we say, Del Boyish leanings – struggling to turn a profit from his rentals, he asked his two daughters to sit at home and watch the films while recording them on several VHS machines at once.

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The Guardian

Oct 07 2020
Brian Adams' best photograph: three men in an Inuit steam house

‘Many Inuit villages don’t have running water so most homes have a steam house. They go in and just sweat it out’

This was taken in Quinhagak, Alaska, in 2015. I was documenting daily Inuit life. The idea was to travel from Quinhagak, on the south-western coast, to Utqiaġvik (formerly Barrow) way up in the north, then across to the Canadian border in the east. I’m from Alaska and have been working as a photographer across the state since I was 20. I had a bank of images in my mind I knew had never been shot. I had never seen, for example, a contemporary photograph of Alaskans in a steam house. But I didn’t expect to get a shot of three men sitting in one right off the bat.

When I walked past, I just waved. They said, “Hey!” and I kept walking. I thought there was no way they were going to say yes to a photo. But I realised if I didn’t go back and ask, I would regret it for the rest of my life. And they said: “Yeah, go ahead.” The men – from left, Robert White, William Sharp and John Sharp – were laughing, but I was mostly in shock, since they were so cool with it.

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The Guardian

Oct 07 2020
Giant refugee puppet to walk from Syria to UK in public art event

Co-production from The Jungle and War Horse teams aims to dramatise refugee children’s stories

A giant puppet of a nine-year-old refugee girl will travel 4,971 miles (8,000km) from the Turkey-Syria border through Europe to the UK in what is being billed as one of the most ambitious public artworks ever attempted.

The Good Chance team behind The Jungle, the celebrated dramatisation of refugee life in Calais, is teaming up with the creators of the War Horse puppets to present an adventurous work that will last from April to July next year.

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The Guardian

Oct 07 2020
'Like hitting a roadblock': five college students face the pandemic – a photo essay

Coronavirus has raised new challenges for low-income students working full-time and raising children

Story and photos by Rachel Bujalski

College is back in session, and there has been no lack of stories documenting an unusual year for young students living in dorms across the US.

But many of today’s students don’t fit that profile: they work full-time, they’re parents, and they come from low-income households. During the pandemic, life got even harder for these students – many of them lost access to campus-based healthcare, faced unexpected living expenses, and struggled with the sudden shift to online studies.

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The Guardian

Oct 07 2020
The history of art is full of female masters. It's time they were taken seriously | Rhiannon Lucy Cosslett

The very fact that baroque painter Artemisia Gentileschi has a major exhibition shouldn’t be remarkable – but it is

There’s something about the feeling of finally standing in front of a painting that you have only known through the pages of books. It is not just the psychological shifting of dimensions (they are usually bigger, or smaller, than you imagined), but a sort of stirring recognition: “There you are.”

The surge of emotion I felt standing in front of Susannah and the Elders – painted by a 17-year-old Artemisia Gentileschi in the same year she was raped by the artist who was hired by her father Orazio to teach her – was as powerful as any I have felt in my life. In it, a nude Susannah twists away from the two old letches with horror and disgust; unlike many of the nudes painted by male artists, her body is not an exercise in containment, static and mannered as though it could have been carved from marble: it is living, moving flesh.

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The Guardian

Oct 06 2020
From UFOs to empty clothes: the best new talent at Photo London - in pictures

Eco-selfies, masked men, beat poets … the online festival’s Discovery section showcases talent from emerging galleries and young artists

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artforum.com

Oct 06 2020
Magdalena Abakanowicz and Anselm Kiefer
Marlborough Gallery is pleased to present an exhibition of artwork by Magdalena Abakanowicz and Anselm Kiefer that is at once timely and representative of a particular historical thread throughout
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artforum.com

Oct 06 2020
Austyn Weiner
These paintings have been made through a pandemic, through a civil unrest in my country, and now through fires ablaze all around me. The title “Nobody's Baby” eludes to a longing for guidance, and a
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artforum.com

Oct 06 2020
Stephen Friedman Gallery
Stephen Friedman Gallery presents a special exhibition in October 2020 in celebration of its twenty-fifth anniversary. Taking place in both galleries on Old Burlington Street in Mayfair, its home since
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artforum.com

Oct 06 2020
Ibrahim Mahama
White Cube is pleased to present an online solo exhibition of recent jute sack paintings by Ibrahim Mahama. In these works, Mahama continues his interrogation of the principle that by engaging with
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artforum.com

Oct 06 2020
Ralph Lemon and Fred Moten Among 2020 MacArthur “Genius” Grant Winners
Cultural theorist Fred Moten and choreographer Ralph Lemon are among this year’s cohort of MacArthur “Genius” grant winners, all of whom will each receive a no-strings-attached prize of $625,000,
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The New York Times

Oct 06 2020
Mona Chalabi’s Week: Rewatching ‘Succession’ and Cooking ‘Disgusting’ Meals
Mona Chalabi’s Week: Rewatching ‘Succession’ and Cooking ‘Disgusting’ Meals
Ms. Chalabi, an illustrator, got through a self-imposed quarantine by binge-watching “The Duchess” and reading the graphic novel “Moms.”
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The New York Times

Oct 06 2020
In Some Fancy London Houses, a New Model for the Art World
In Some Fancy London Houses, a New Model for the Art World
Cromwell Place, a venture in which international galleries share temporary space in a dedicated complex, hopes to be a winning alternative to fairs in the age of coronavirus.
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The Guardian

Oct 06 2020
Damien Hirst review – just when you thought it was safe to go back in the water

Newport Street Gallery, London
Shark tanks, cow’s heads, feasting flies and pill bottles … Hirst’s death-obsessed early work hits home just as hard now disease is all around us

There was widespread disgust a couple of years ago when Damien Hirst unveiled paintings consisting of thousands of butterflies trapped in acrylic. All I can say is, if you share that revulsion at the use of dead animals to make art, you may want to avoid this spectacular survey of his early work.

It begins with a shark sliced in sections, each preserved in its own tank of formaldehyde. But that’s nothing, even if you’ve noticed this appears to be a juvenile tiger shark, killed before it could breed. I say appears – the gallery just calls it a “shark”. The double freezer in the next room is where things really get creepy. Peer inside and dead eyes stare back at you from a closely packed heap of severed cows’ heads. Like a frightened child, I had to ask a staff member if they are real. They are. A small herd has been slaughtered just for this. What passing-bells for these who die as cattle?

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