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The Guardian

Jun 28 2017
Dreamers Awake review – a sublime anatomy of female surrealism

White Cube Bermondsey, London
From chair sex to ponytail ties, this captivating survey of work by more than 50 artists – from Louise Bourgeois to Lee Miller and Sarah Lucas – is brimming with visual puns, lewd gags, absurdity and horror

The word surrealism was coined by the poet Apollinaire a century ago, and refers above all to an art of juxtaposition, the concatenation of shockingly disparate elements, shorn of context, with the slippery, succinct logic of a bad dream. Little wonder it was Merriam-Webster’s word of 2016, owing to above average online searches.

Early surrealists sought to plunder unconscious forces; inevitably, sex was the main energy supplier. What this meant in practice was a prevalence of women’s bodies, appropriated and dismembered. Voiceless, limbless, headless, the surrealist woman reaches her apogee in Magritte’s The Rape, in which a face is formed from a torso, with breasts for eyes and a pubic grin.

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artforum.com

Jun 28 2017
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The Art Newspaper

Jun 28 2017
Arts Council England unveils first major grant programme since Nicholas Serota took over as chairman
Nicholas Serota (Image: © Pamela Raith)
Arts Council England has announced its first major grant programme since the former Tate director Nicholas Serota took over as chairman in February. Funding is being shifted away from the largest London arts organisations towards the regions.

The councils National Portfolio grants, which support local arts organisations, will total 409m a year from 2018 to 2022 (83% of this comes from government grant-in-aid and 17% from the National Lottery). A further 213m a year will go for other grants to arts organisations.

The National Portfolio will support 831 arts organisations. Of the 409m a year, 45m (11%) will go for the visual arts and 37m for museums (9%), with the remainder for theatre, music, dance, etc. Total portfolio spending will be up 12% on the current financial year. (Grants are set at the same level for each of the coming four years, which will mean a gradual fall in real terms after inflation.)

Until now museums had been funded through other streams, but 72 museums have now been brought into the National Portfolio. (There is a quite separate category of national museums, mostly London-based, which receive direct funding from the Department for Culture, Media and Sport.)

Inevitably there are losers as well as winners. The Arnolfini, a contemporary art gallery in Bristol, has lost all its grant because of recent financial and management problems. University of Cambridge Museums (including the Fitzwilliam) has been cut by 17%, Bristol Museums by 15% and University of Oxford Museums (including the Ashmolean) by 10%. Turner Contemporary, in Margate, has had its grant increased by 16%. The New Art Gallery Walsall, which was recently threatened with closure after its local authority considered ending its support, has had its Arts Council grant renewed. Firstsite, a contemporary gallery in Colchester, has also recently faced financial problems, but now has Arts Council funding confirmed.

The Arts Council has been increasingly concerned about regional inequality, with an overconcentration of spending in London. In the next four years, the proportion of spending in the regions will rise from 56% to 60%. Englands four largest recipients (Royal Opera House, Southbank Centre, Royal National Theatre and Royal Shakespeare Company) have accepted an average 3% reduction, with these savings mainly being channelled to smaller organisations outside London. The Southbank Centre, which includes the Hayward Gallery, is therefore losing 826,000 a year. The Arts Council will also require those receiving the largest grants to do more to support the rest of the sector.

The council is also concerned about diversity, particularly over ethnicity and disability. Its statement says that there are still numerous challenges, with only limited progress in museum leadership by disabled people or from BME (Black and Minority Ethnic) groups.

Alistair Brown, the Museums Associations policy officer, has welcomed the councils announced grants, particularly for small and medium-sized institutions. However, local authority museums have faced real-term cuts of 30% since 2010, and Arts Council funding cannot make up that shortfall.
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The Guardian

Jun 28 2017
The billionaire and the airport: could his last act in Mexico City ruin Carlos Slim?

In what is likely his last great urban intervention, the billionaire is constructing a massive new airport. The $13.4bn project is highly complex and controversial – can he pull it off?

It is sometimes hard to tell where Carlos Slim stops and Mexico City starts. He controls most of the mobile phone, landline and internet markets. His telecoms company, Telmex, installed the city’s surveillance cameras. Grupo Carso, his flagship infrastructure conglomerate, runs the city’s principal water treatment plant. His bank, Inbursa, is Mexico’s sixth largest. He even owns the city’s only aquarium.

In 2015 Slim’s companies accounted for 6% of the entire country’s GDP, according to the Mexican media outlet El Universal. These holdings run parallel to a vast network of strategically located retail properties. But more than anywhere or anyone else, the 77-year-old tycoon and sometime world’s richest man has grown with the capital. Like a ghost in a shell, Carlos Slim has become part of Mexico City’s urban fabric.

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The New York Times

Jun 28 2017
A Canopy of Knitted Light at MoMA PS1
Take a 360-degree tour through “Lumen,” Jenny Sabin’s photoluminescent installation at MoMA PS1. Ms. Sabin won the museum’s Young Architects Program.
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artforum.com

Jun 27 2017
FILM: Hollywood Medium
Tony Pipolo on Pacho Velez and Sierra Pettengill’s The Reagan Show
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The New York Times

Jun 27 2017
Richard Benson, Photographer and Printer, Dies at 73
Mr. Benson believed in the painterly impact of reproducing the work of photographers like Irving Penn, Lee Friedlander and Helen Levitt on an offset printing press.
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The Guardian

Jun 27 2017
The V&A's £55m new courtyard: 'Like a Marbella beach bar airlifted to South Ken'

Amanda Levete’s dazzling new porcelain piazza brilliantly reunites the museum with the Kensington streets. But the giant new jewellery box of a gallery lurking below ground is the real star of the show

A blinding sheet of white light bursts through the stone colonnade of the V&A, casting a glow across the grey paving stones of Exhibition Road. Catching the sunlight on its 11,000 handmade porcelain tiles, the museum’s new courtyard seems to burn with a molten luminosity, signalling the climax of its most ambitious building project in a century.

“Our aim was to bring the city into the museum and take the museum out on to the street,” says architect Amanda Levete, standing in the centre of her dazzling white piazza, behind a pair of big black sunglasses. “We saw it as an urban project as much as a cultural project.”

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The New York Times

Jun 27 2017
Christie’s Owner Unveils Plans for Private Paris Museum
François Pinault’s contemporary art collection will be housed in one of Paris’s historic rotundas, which is being renovated by the architect Tadao Ando.
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The Art Newspaper

Jun 27 2017
Christie’s Impressionist and Modern sale falls short of goal but beats last year’s result by nearly 500%
Christie's global president Jussi Pylkkänen presides over the sale of Vincent Van Gogh's Le moissonneur (d’après Millet, 1889), which fetched £24.2m (Image: courtesy of Christie's)
What a difference a year can make: In 2016, the evening before the the UKs historic Brexit vote on 23 June, the 33-lot Impressionist and Modern Art evening sale at Christies totalled 21.8m hammer (25.6m with fees). The problem? A dearth of big-ticket consignments, attributed to both poor oil prices and trepidation over the potential pullout from the European Union. Although the political situation globally remains uncertain, the art market has not shown parallel signs of wavering, and the 27 June sale bettered its 2016 total by 483%, says Jay Vincze, the houses head of Impressionist and Modern Art, or 130.8m hammer (149.5m with fees).

Although Christieswhich recently pared back its contemporary schedule in Londonbeat Sothebys, the take fell short of the houses pre-sale estimate of 141.3m to 191.7m, due largely to the failure of Egon Schieles 1915 townscape Einzelne Huser (Huser mit Bergen), which carried a 20m to 30m estimate. A late Monet abstraction, Saule pleureur (1918-19), also fell short of a punchy 15m to 25m pitchalthough the reserve was apparently far lower, as it got away at 7.8m (8.9m with fees).

The markets confidence was undoubtedly boosted by strong spring sales in New York in May, when the houses Impressionist and Modern evening sale made $289.2m (with fees), the highest total in the category in seven years. Moreover, the field has seen the return of broad participation from Asia. The global president, Jussi Pylkknen, observed that there was barely a picture in there that didnt have Asian interest in it by 7pm.

With just two lots of 32 passed, quality, not quantity was key. While there was no double record-setter as at Sothebys last week, two works made over 30m, and one over 20m.

As anticipated, the star of the night was Max Beckmanns Hlle der Vgel (Birds Hell) (1938), estimated at a guaranteed 30m, which the dealer Larry Gagosian won, phone to ear, for 32m (36m with fees)a record for Beckmann and for any German Expressionist work. The luridly hued work, depicting a visceral scene of hellish torture, which Beckmann painted in exile in Amsterdam and Paris, is not commercial, but it is powerful.  


The painting was consigned by the New York-based dealer Richard Feigen, a longtime admirer of Beckmanns work, in whose New York apartment it had hung for many years. His decision to sell in London proved well founded, and Vincze says of the work: This is a magnificent painting, the like of which you will never see again on the market. Pylkknen added, It will be many, many years before that Beckmann price is broken. It will be like that leap that Bob Beamon did in the 1968 Olympics. (The US athlete set a long jump world record at the Mexico City Olympics, which remained until 1991.)

Close behind was an eminently prettier, if less unusual, portrait by Pablo Picasso, Femme crivant (Marie-Thrse) (1934). It sold at the lower end of a 30m to 40m estimate to a client on the phone with Xin Li, the deputy chairman of Christies Asia, at 31m (34.9m with fees).

Of the ten works painted by Van Gogh in tribute to his hero, Jean-Franois Millet, the luminous Le moissonneur (daprs Millet), from 1889, is the only one not held by a museum. Drawing rapid bidding from multiple corners, it sold at 21.5m (24.2m with fees) on the phone with David Kleiweg de Zwaan, of Christies New York, against a 12.5m to 16.5m estimate.

As at every evening sale these days, whatever the category, the night was a tale of the best and the rest, with a handful of lots making up the bulk of the bottom line. But evidence of bidders seeking value beyond the obvious brand names came with two new artist records. Firstperhaps a reflection of the De Stijl movements centenary this yearwas the 900,000 (1.1m with fees) paid for Georges Vantongerloos appealing 1930 Composition dans le carr avec couleurs jaune-vert-bleu-indigo-orang (est 350,000-450,000). Secondly, Dadaist Hannah Hchs intriguing 1922 painting Frau und Saturn, also sold for 900,000 (1.1m with fees), above an estimate of 400,000 to 600,000.

Tom Mayou, of London advisers Beaumont Nathan, described the Christies offering as a very solid lineup for London at this time of year. Smaller than the May sales in New York, this shows healthy progress from last year. Every sign is that were in an upward cycle.
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The New York Times

Jun 27 2017
First Public Showing of Monet, Rodin and Maillols From Gurlitt Trove
In Germany, a sampling of artworks owned by Cornelius Gurlitt, many suspected of having been looted by the Nazis, will be displayed this fall in Europe.
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The New York Times

Jun 27 2017
Newport Festival — for Art, Not Music — Draws George Condo and More
Dodie Kazanjian, a Newport, R.I., native who covers the art world for Vogue, has invited four artists to create works in three historic institutions.
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The New York Times

Jun 27 2017
Steven Cohen, Billionaire Collector, Gives $50 Million to MoMA
The foundation of Mr. Cohen and his wife, Alexandra, donated the money to the museum’s capital campaign, and a gallery will be named for them.
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The Art Newspaper

Jun 27 2017
Austrian court rules in favour of Franz West’s family in legal battle over estate
Franz West Photo: Markus Rössle, 2009 © Archiv Franz West
The family of the late Austrian sculptor Franz West won a legal victory today (27 June) in a five-year battle over the artists estate, when a Viennese court concluded that a new foundation established days before his death to manage his rights and assets was created without a proper contract. They were done in the hospital, just two days before he died and just hours before he had to receive medication, says the familys lawyer, Christoph Kerres of Kerres Partners.

Unless the foundation appeals the decision, the remaining art in the artists estate and the proceeds from any work already soldaltogether worth many millions of euros, Kerres sayswill be turned over to Wests two children and their legal guardian, Benedikt Ledebur.   

In 2012, just days before he died in Vienna of complications due to hepatitis, West signed paperwork authorising the formation of the Franz West Private Foundation. The organisation then claimed rights to the artists assets and royalties, which would have otherwise gone to Wests wife, artist Tamuna Sirbiladze, who died last year, and their two young children. The foundations director, Ines Turian, told the The Art Newspaper in 2016 that it considered itself the one and only legitimate representative of the artistic will of Franz West.

Those on the familys side say that individuals with a financial stake in the estate, including Gagosian dealer Ealan Wingate, who was at the hospital during West's final days, wanted to make sure with the foundation that the heirs would not be in conflict with the gallerys interests, Kerres says. As a result, the lawyer did a rushed job, just writing something by hand and forgetting major parts of an agreement. Neither Wingate, a Gagosian spokeswoman nor Turian, who was also Wests longtime studio assistant, immediately returned requests for comment.

The Regional Court for Civil Law Vienna today concluded that the foundations last-minute contracts were improper. The court decided that the documents were missing important language that is standard in such an agreement, including a formal statement of dedication by the foundation that indicated its acceptance of the terms.

If the foundation dissolves as a result of the ruling, the Franz West Archive, established in 1997, could become the sole authenticator of Wests works. (Board member Edelbert Kb could not be reached for comment.) The archive has previously sued the private foundation, as well as Gagosian Gallery, which represents the artist in the US, and Galerie Eva Presenhuber, for selling the artists furniture and photographs, claiming it owns the sole license for those works.  

It would have been really unfair for the children to not only lose their parents, but also all their inheritance rights, says Kerres. But the legal order is back and, though the children are too young to realise it, this is the decision that will probably most affect the rest of their lives.

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The Art Newspaper

Jun 27 2017
MoMA gets $50m from Steven and Alexandra Cohen for expansion
Alexandra and Steven Cohen (Photo: North Shore-Long Island Jewish Health System)
The Steven and Alexandra Cohen Foundation has given the Museum of Modern Art in New York an unrestricted $50m gift. The money will support the museum's on-going expansion and renovation by the architectural firm Diller, Scofidio and Renfro, which is due to be complete in 2019.

In recognition of the gift, the museum will name its largest continuous open gallery, which will occupy the entire sixth floor after the expansion, the Steven and Alexandra Cohen Center for Special Exhibitions.

This gift will have an extraordinary impact on our ability to present exhibitions at a scale that is virtually unprecedented," Glenn Lowry, the museum's director, said in a statement. "I am also thrilled to have Steve as a new member of our board of trustees. Cohen joined the board in June 2016.

The foundation, for which Alexandra serves as the president, was established in 2001. Alongside arts funding, it also puts money in children's health, education and Lyme disease research, among other areas.

Before he became a collector, Cohen founded the hedge fund SAC Capital in 1992, which later came under scrutiny from the US Securities and Exchange Commission. In November 2013, the firm pled guilty to five counts of insider trading violations over the actions of several employees and agreed to pay a $1.2bn fine. Cohen himself was largely untouched by the investigation, and in 2016 reached a settlement with the SEC over charges of failure to prevent insider trading that bars him from managing outside investors money for two years.

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The Guardian

Jun 27 2017
Factory outlet: the art inspired by Joy Division and New Order

From an Ian Curtis doppelganger to works by Barbara Kruger and Scott King, the exhibition True Faith explores the Manchester bands’ visual legacy. Co-curator Jon Savage selects some of his favourites

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The New York Times

Jun 27 2017
Hans Breder, Who Broke Artistic Boundaries, Dies at 81
The German-born Mr. Breder left New York for the University of Iowa to establish the first interdisciplinary art program of its kind.
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The Art Newspaper

Jun 27 2017
Jeremy Deller's human Somme memorial lives on
'We're here because we're here', Manchester Victoria station, 2017<br />Jeremy Deller, Rufus Norris and 1418 NOW. Image ©Joel Chester
A new publication out next month (Thames & Hudson) throws new light on Jeremy Deller's poignant public art project evoking the centenary last year of the bloody Battle of the Somme. The UK-wide event, entitled Were here because were here, was commissioned by 14-18 Now, the official cultural programme for the centenary commemoration. Deller devised the piece in collaboration with 27 organisations including the National Theatre in London, the National Theatre of Scotland and Manchester Royal Exchange. The men, drawn from more than 1,500 volunteers, remained silent when approached, handing out cards with the names and ages of the battle casualties. At points, the participants sang the song Were here because were here to the tune of Auld Lang Syne, a popular song in the trenches during the First World War. The new book shows how members of the public reacted to this stoic, sombre spectacle on the streets, and also includes an eye-opening interview between Deller and Channel 4 news anchor Jon Snow. Deller's notes and sketches also illuminate the creative process behind the wistful countrywide performance. 
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The Art Newspaper

Jun 27 2017
Threatened Walsall gallery saved by Arts Council grant
The New Art Gallery Walsall, designed by Caruso St John, opened in 2000 (Photo: George Benson/Stereographic)
The New Art Gallery Walsall, which has been under threat of deep public funding cuts, has been saved by a four-year 3.5m grant from Arts Council England, which was announced today (27 June). The gallery is also considering a partnership with the University of Wolverhampton to secure its long-term future.

The 21m Caruso St John-designed gallery in the West Midlands opened in 2000 among the first of a wave of National Lottery-funded projects bringing contemporary art to the English regions. The hope was that it would boost the regeneration of Walsall. Its greatest treasure is the Garman Ryan collection, a gift from Kathleen Garman, the widow of the sculptor Jacob Epstein, which includes works by Van Gogh and Picasso. 

The fate of the gallery looked very uncertain last November, when Walsall Council proposed cutting its annual subsidy from around 900,000 to zero by 2020. The reduction would force it to become self-sustaining or potentially close. Leading art-world figures, including the Tate director Maria Balshaw (then the director of the Whitworth and Manchester City Galleries) and the artist Cornelia Parker, wrote a letter to the Guardian newspaper protesting against the threatened closure, which they described as a devastating blow to the life of the community. 

The decision was postponed earlier this year amid discussions with Arts Council England, the gallerys other major funder. The Arts Council's latest grant will now ensure funding of 881,000 a year until 2022.

As part of the rescue plan, the gallery is looking to reduce its dependence on Walsall Council by becoming a partner with the University of Wolverhampton. The move would follow a model adopted by the Middlesbrough Institute of Modern Art (Mima), in the north-east of England. Backed by Middlesbrough Council when it opened in 2007, Mima was transferred to the towns Teesside University in 2013 after its local authority funding was reduced.
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The Guardian

Jun 27 2017
Winning entries in the iPhone photography awards 2017 – in pictures

The winning entries in the annual iPhone photography awards have been announced, chosen from thousands of entries submitted from around the world. The overall winner: children in Iraq playing against a a backdrop of oil wells set aflame by Isis

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The Art Newspaper

Jun 27 2017
'Warehouse' of Italian art comes to Hudson Valley
The industrial space, a former dairy distribution centre, can accommodate large-scale works (Photo: © Marco Anelli; courtesy of Magazzino Italian Art)
Magazzinowarehouse in Italianseemed like a fitting name to the collectors Nancy Olnick and Giorgio Spanu for their new, free art space dedicated to post-war and contemporary Italian art. Privately funded by the couple and open by appointment from 28 June, the elegant space in Cold Spring in the Hudson Valley will have rotating displays drawn from the more than 400 works in the Olnick Spanu collection. 

The Spanish architect Miguel Quismondo has extended the building, a former dairy distribution centre, to create more than 18,000 sq. ft of exhibition space, a central courtyard and a library. For this kind of art, its exactly the environment I want, Olnick says. The collectors are now able to install large-scale sculptural installations by Pier Paolo Calzolari, Marisa Merz and Giuseppe Penone, among others, that were too unwieldy for their home in nearby Garrison. 

Olnick, a native of New York, and Sardinia-born Spanu are determined to raise the profile of Italys Arte Povera movement, which is not well represented in US museums. Arte Povera (poor art), a term coined in 1967 by the Italian curator Germano Celant, encompasses a loose set of avant-garde artists including Mario Merz, Alighiero Boetti and Michelangelo Pistoletto. They rebelled against the art world establishment and used humble, utilitarian objects and natural materials such as rocks, earth, branches and tobacco. They focused on the intersection between life, culture and nature, Olnick says. It was not commercial. These artists were antithetical to the market. 

Magazzinos inaugural presentation, Margherita Stein: Rebel with a Cause, pays tribute to the dealer who founded the Galleria Christian Stein in Turin in 1966 and championed the Arte Povera group over the next three decades. Her gallery was in her home and she lived and breathed this work, Olnick says, noting that Stein adopted her husbands name to gain credibility.

Stein was selective about selling, and retained a large cache of works in the hopes of opening a museum or foundation. After her death in 2003, Olnick and Spanu acquired the core of her personal collection. Around 70 works, including pieces by Giovanni Anselmo, Jannis Kounellis, Giulio Paolini and Gilberto Zorio, are now on view at Magazzino. One gallery is dedicated to later works by artists such as Marco Bagnoli, Domenico Bianchi and Remo Salvadorithe generation that followed Arte Povera.

Margherita Steins dream was to open a museum of her artists and to expose them in the United States, Olnick says. I feel were following on her mission. 

Education is also key to the programme at Magazzino, where the collectors have stocked the library with more than 5,000 volumes on post-war Italian art. The space is well located to become a resource to Vassar and Bard colleges, and joins a network of Hudson Valley art venues including Dia:Beacon and the Storm King Art Center. 

The collectors say they were inspired by the artist Massimo Bartolini, who brought his students at the University of Pennsylvania to their home for a class on Luciano Fabro because his work was not accessible in public institutions. We realised we have to do this really seriously, Spanu says. We started collecting more and more books because its important that they are shared for research.

Three works to see at Magazzino


Michelangelo Pistoletto, Stracci Italiani (2007) 

An Italian flag made of old rags grouped by the colours green, white and red, this commission by the collectors designates Magazzino as a kind of Italian embassy.

Giulio Paolini, Amore e Psiche (1981) 

This canvas of a female head seen from behind, with seven pieces of vivid fabric streaming from her shoulders, refers to the Greek myth of Psyche, who was condemned not to look upon the divine beauty of her husband, Cupid. 

Mario Merz, Che Fare? (1968-73) 

The neon sign across this aluminium pot filled with wax poses the existential question What is to be done?, a phrase possibly borrowed from Lenin, which recurred throughout Merzs work after 1967. 
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The Guardian

Jun 27 2017
Superstars of St Ives – in pictures

Twisted trees, beer bottle still lifes, brazen blocks of colour … work by everyone from Francis Bacon to Patrick Heron and Lucian Freud is going under the hammer at Sotheby’s – capturing a time when a Cornish fishing village regularly rivalled London as an art superpower

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The Guardian

Jun 26 2017
Sharmeen Obaid-Chinoy: 'I know there will be an attempt to silence me'

Her films about ‘honour’ killings and acid attacks won Oscars – and caused fury in Pakistan. How will her latest work, an uncompromising look at lives wrecked by the partition of India, be received?

When Sharmeen Obaid-Chinoy was studying for her A-levels while growing up in Pakistan, she heard that Michael Jackson was playing a concert in India. The 17-year-old was desperate to go, but when she told her grandfather, he forbade her – not just from the concert, but from the country. “He said, ‘You are going to India over my dead body.’ He was a very logical man, so I wondered why.”

The answer lies in 1947, when Obaid-Chinoy’s grandfather became one of more than 15 million people who fled across the hastily drawn borders between the new country of Pakistan and newly independent India. Seventy years on, the migration it sparked is still one of the biggest in history, while the repercussions – from the birth of Bangladesh in 1971 to the ongoing hostility between the two now nuclear countries – still shape the subcontinent today.

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artforum.com

Jun 26 2017
FILM: Shock and Awe
Travis Jeppesen at the 18th Jeonju International Film Festival
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The Guardian

Jun 26 2017
Nurturing nature: how green features can make a positive impact on business

Defence Housing Australia’s latest development includes many natural features but will it inspire more businesses to take up biophilic design?

Wednesday is harvesting day on the rooftop garden at St Canice’s Church in Sydney’s Kings Cross. Tending the garden’s array of vegetables, flowers and herbs are groups of mental health patients from a nearby hospital.

The simple act of being out in the open air and in contact with nature acts like therapy, says project coordinator Rob Caslick. To prove the point, he invited a research team from the hospital to monitor the patients’ progress.

“It’s only once a week in a garden but people report feeling much more positive … The clinicians were really surprised just how much people opened up to them while they were gardening,” says Caslick, who runs a soup kitchen in the same building.

The benefits of contact with nature – technically known as biophilia – are becoming increasingly well documented. One well-known study showed how hospital patients with a view of trees from their ward window recovered more quickly than those without such a view.

Yet since Edward Wilson popularised the term biophilia (literally, “love of life or living systems”) back in the early 1980s, uptake of the idea in Australia has been piecemeal.

Related: Cities that steal smart ideas from plants and animals

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The New York Times

Jun 26 2017
Art Gallery Closures Grow for Small and Midsize Dealers
Large galleries with multiple locations grab wider audiences, dominate art fairs and focus on trophy works. Closures threaten emerging artists.
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The New York Times

Jun 26 2017
Crossing the Line Festival Includes a Dancer’s Mini-Residency
The French Institute Alliance Française has unveiled its lineup for the 11th edition of the festival, which returns Sept. 6 through Oct. 15.
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The Art Newspaper

Jun 26 2017
The ‘only annual biennial’: La Biennale Paris reveals details of 2017 edition
The 2016 edition of the fair, then the Biennale des Antiquaires, which had a sleek new design
September marks a new era for La Biennale Paris, the fair formerly known as the Biennale des Antiquaires, founded in 1962 and run by Frances Syndicat National des Antiquaires (SNA, the National Federation of Antiques Dealers). In addition toand in spite ofthe new name La Biennale Paris, announced last November, this is the first edition of the fair to be held as an annual event, with new leadership.

Everybody remembers the only annual biennial, jokes Christopher Forbes, the American publishing magnate and collector who was named the president of the Biennale Commission, which oversees the event, last November, and says he was nominated before the change was made. Forbes replaced Henri Loyrette, the former President of the Louvre Museum, who served as the fairs president for only one year.

The new leadership also includes the Paris-based dealer of 19th-century European paintings, Mathias Ary Jan, who became the SNAs new director in November after the group voted to end the tenure of Dominique Chevalier. Chevalier oversaw the shift in the fair from a biennial to annual event, and also the fairs takeover of the art fair Paris Tableau in 2015. (And though Forbes is of the new guard, he says Chevalier was one of the people who encouraged him to take up his new position.)

While the new name is a splashy (and somewhat befuddling) transformation, Ary Jan emphasised a more substantial change at a press event held in New York today (27 June) to announce details for this fair: a ramped-up, more rigorous vetting process for this years edition. The fair was already vetted, but Forbes points to the scandal of fake 18th-century furniture that badly rattled the French antiques world last yearand involved two of the fairs major, regular exhibitors, Kraemer and Aaron galleries (who did not present in the fair's 2016 edition).

There are 92 exhibitors so far confirmed to participate in the Biennale Paris 2017 from 12 countries, mainly in Europe, but also a gallery from Delhi, Nirav Modi, which specialises in jewellery, and from Singapore, Singva Blue Horizon specialising in 19th-century decorative arts. (113 galleries participated last year.) Interesting objects to be presented include a tambourine painted by Manet after a trip to Spain (1879, Galerie Bers, Paris) and a 19th or early-20th century Kifwebe mask once owned by Lucien Lefbvre-Foinet, who sold painting supplies to artists including Brancusi, Matisse, Modigliani and Picasso, shown by the Paris-based Galerie Ferrandin. The objects on show will span 6,000 years.

The fair will also show around 130 works from the Barbier-Mueller Collectionan array that includes Jeff Koons, the 18th-century French painter Elisabeth Vige Le Brun, a Samurai helmet and African art. The exhibition honours Jean-Paul Barbier-Mueller, the Swiss collector and founder of the Muse Barbier-Mueller in Geneva who died last December aged 86.
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The Art Newspaper

Jun 26 2017
New museum to open on Canada's prairies puts artists first
A rendering of the new Remai Modern museum in Saskatoon
An ambitious new Modern and contemporary art museum is growing on the Canadian prairies. Remai Modern, which has been under construction since 2013, is due to open on 21 October in Saskatoon after a years delay. The museum, which is named after its leading patron, the local entrepreneur and philanthropist Ellen Remai, announced details of its opening exhibition today (27 June).
 
The 11,500 sq. m riverside building, designed by the Canadian architect Bruce Kuwabara, extends over four cantilevered floors reflecting the wide open spaces of the Saskatchewan region. Its size is extraordinary for a small city, says Gregory Burke, Remai Moderns New Zealand-born director and chief executive, who previously led Torontos Power Plant Contemporary Art Gallery. The museum will charge admission and aims to attract around 220,000 visitors a year (the local population is 300,000). Originally budgeted at $71m, the final cost of construction is yet to be confirmed.

The museum has inherited the bulk of its 8,000-strong collection, including European Modernist and Canadian Group of Seven works, from Saskatoons now-defunct Mendel Art Gallery. The gallery was established in 1964 by the local authorities and Frederick Mendel, a meatpacking magnate and collector who had fled Nazi Germany. After a planned extension struggled to attract funding, the city council voted in 2009 to replace it with a new purpose-built gallery as part of a wider downtown regeneration scheme.

Burke hopes that the inaugural show, Field Guide, which he is co-organising with the chief curator Sandra Guimares, formerly of the Serralves Museum in Portugal, will act as a primer to introduce the programmes direction. Selected works from the collection will be interspersed with contemporary commissions by Canadian and international artists, including a live project evolving on-site by Thomas Hirschhorn and a collaboration between the Ontario-based indigenous artists Tanya Lukin-Linklater and Duane Linklater.

In line with the museums artist-centred ethos, Ryan Gander will turn curator to present one of the centrepieces of the collection: the worlds largest group of Picasso linocuts, donated by the Frank and Ellen Remai Foundation in 2012. They have inspired a new addition to Ganders own installation, Fieldwork (2015), another gift from the Remai foundation. The rotating conveyor belt of cryptic objects, ranging from a damaged teddy bear to a kitchen sink, will now include a skewered stack of drawings reproducing all 406 Picasso prints, while the originals hang safely alongside.

After Field Guide, the museum will be the only Canadian venue for the first US retrospective dedicated to the Cherokee artist Jimmie Durham, organised by the Hammer Museum in Los Angeles and now at the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis. Opening in spring 2018, the show marks Remai Moderns commitment to become a centre for contemporary indigenous art.
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The Art Newspaper

Jun 26 2017
David Bowie’s Tintoretto altarpiece to return to Venice for 2019 Biennale
David Bowie's Tintoretto being unveiled (Image: @ Ans Brys)
For 30 years, David Bowie cherished his altarpiece by Jacopo Tintoretto, even naming his record label after the Venetian painter. But little did Bowie know that beneath the layers of oil was an underdrawing that suggests the work was created earlier than previously thought. 
 
The discovery by the Royal Institute for Cultural Heritage in Brussels, whose technical analysis also revealed the work was painted entirely by the Venetian artist and not by his studio, has prompted plans to return the painting to Venice for the 2019 Biennale. The altarpiece is due to go on show with a group of works by Flemish Old Masters who admired and were influenced by Tintoretto, including Rubens, Van Dyck and Maerten de Vos. 
 
The painting was bought by an unnamed European collector for 155,000 (191,000 with fees) at Sothebys white-glove sale of Bowies collection last November. It was immediately announced that the work, now dated 156070, would be loaned long-term to the Rubens House in Antwerp, a museum that Bowie loved. The painting is being unveiled there this week (27 June).  
 
The late musician bought the canvas from the London dealer Colnaghi in 1987 and it is the Colnaghi Foundation that is now co-ordinating the research project. Further analysis later this year will examine the sky and architectural details in the composition. A full scholarly publication on the altarpiece will be published in October.
 
Tintoretto painted the work, depicting an angel warning Saint Catherine of Alexandria of her impending martyrdom, for the church of San Geminiano on St Marks Square in Venice, where it remained until the church was demolished in 1807. The painting was briefly placed in the Galleria dellAccademia, Florence, before disappearing into private ownership. The work most likely left Venice in around 1818 when it was acquired by a Colonel T.H. Davies. 
 
The 2019 Venice exhibition will focus on the demolished Church of San Geminiano and the works of art it once housed. Rubens most likely saw Tintorettos altarpiece there, while Anthony van Dyck, his celebrated pupil, sketched it in situ.
 
Ben Weyts, Belgiums minister for tourism, describes the exhibition as a unique opportunity to show the Flemish masters to the world in the place wheremore than any otherthey drew inspiration from their Italian colleagues and from the classical legacy.
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The New York Times

Jun 26 2017
A Winning Design for a New York Monument to Gay and Transgender People
Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo announced that the artist Anthony Goicolea had been selected to design the monument in Hudson River Park in Manhattan.
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The New York Times

Jun 26 2017
As if He Isn’t Busy Enough: Met Museum Head to Write Book
Daniel H. Weiss has sold a book about America’s experience in the Vietnam era to PublicAffairs, he confirmed Monday. He became the museum’s top official this month.
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The New York Times

Jun 26 2017
Exhumation of Salvador Dalí’s Body Ordered in Paternity Case
A court in Madrid ruled that the examination of Dalí’s corpse was the only way to resolve a woman’s claim that she is the Surrealist painter’s daughter.
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The Art Newspaper

Jun 26 2017
Is Dalí the daddy?
Enduring favourite Salvador Dalí claimed two top-five places in 2013
A Spanish court today (26 June) has ordered that Salvador Dals body be exhumed to determine whether he is the biological father of Pilar Abel Martnez. According to the Spanish newspaper El Pas, Abel has been fighting to be acknowledged as Dals daughter since 2007.  

Abel claims that her mother had an affair with the artist in 1955 in Port-Lligat, a small coastal village in northern Catalonia where Dal lived and worked. Abel was born the following year in February 1956. Dal was married to Gala at the time; the couple never had any children.   

If Abel is the daughter of Dal, Abel could make a claim towards the artists estate, which was left to the Spanish state following his death in 1989. No date has been set for the exhumation but Abels lawyer told the Spanish press that it could be as soon as next month.

The Dal Foundation is preparing an appeal to oppose this exhumation that will be lodged in the coming days, a spokeswoman for the Fundaci Gala-Salvador Dal said in a statement.  Our internal legal team, together with the Roca Junyent, S.L.P office are working on this appeal in coordination with the State Attorney.
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The Guardian

Jun 26 2017
Georgia O’Keeffe, health food devotee: the pioneer of modernism’s favourite recipes

The American artist lived until she was 98 – and a new book of her favourite recipes might give some clues as to how

Georgia O’Keeffe was an icon of the American art world: a pioneer of abstract modernism, with boldly innovative paintings of flowers and bleached animal skulls. Lesser known is that her diet, too, was ahead of its time.

A new cookbook of O’Keeffe’s personal recipes – Dinner with Georgia O’Keeffe: Recipes, Art and Landscape, by the Australian author Robyn Lea – reveals she was a forerunner to today’s organic, slow food movement, a health food devotee who made her own yoghurt.

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The Guardian

Jun 26 2017
Former Paris stock exchange to be reborn as major new art museum

François Pinault, the billionaire luxury brand owner, will convert the 19th century Bourse de commerce into art museum with architect Tadao Ando

It is the latest chapter in the art-world rivalry of two of France’s richest businessmen: a saga of momentous contemporary art collections and a quest by their owners to build Paris museums that would transform the city’s landscape.

When the French luxury goods tycoon François Pinault – once described as the most powerful man in the modern art world – stepped out under the magnificent glass dome of the former Paris stock exchange on Monday to unveil the plans for his new modern art museum, the architecture world held its breath.

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The Art Newspaper

Jun 26 2017
Pinault’s (circular) designs on Paris
Models of Francois Pinault's future museum in Paris (Image: © Luc Castel)
The French billionaire Franois Pinault wants to create a "completely circular museum, said his preferred architect, Tadao Ando who has been charged with creating such a space to display Pinaults collection in his home city of Paris. The 108m project is scheduled for completion in late 2018 for an opening planned in early 2019. 
 
In the heart of Paris, between the Louvre and the Centre Pompidou, the site, which was the first circular building built in France ever, was once used to store wheat, then served as home for the commodity stock market. All historical parts will be respected and restored, said the former minister for culture and Pinaults confidant, Jean-Jacques Aillagon, at a press conference today (26 June).
 
Tadao Ando plans to insert a central cylinder into the core of the building, up to the first floor. The cylinder will be made of metal and covered by concrete slabs similar to those used in several of his other projects, including the Punta della Dogana for the Pinault Foundation in Venice. It will provide 3,000 sq. m of exhibition space, accessed by a walkway curled around the internal facade of the building and topped by a glass dome. It will also feature a 300-seat auditorium below ground level, along with a vast foyer and a black-box theatre for video installations and experimental performances.
 
With the creation of this new museum, I am writing the next chapter of my cultural project, whose goal is to share my passion for contemporary art with as broad an audience as possible. This story began in Venice more than ten years ago, when I opened Palazzo Grassi, then the Punta della Dogana. These two spaces will maintain a close and constant contact with their Parisian sibling, Pinault said at the press conference presenting the building plans with his son, Franois-Henri Pinault. The site will be 100% devoted to contemporary art, not Modern or classical, said Martin Bthenod, the deputy director of Collection Pinault-Paris. As in Venice, the Paris museum will show works from the Pinault collection and present living artists." 
 
Without naming it directly, Franois Pinault and Aillagon emphasised the differences between the project and the citys Vuitton Foundation, which has recently been criticised in the French press for relying heavily on state support (firms can deduct 60% of their investment in an art foundation from their profits). With a 50-year lease from the city, the new site relies entirely on the family company, Financire Pinault. When I see how difficult conditions are for so many today, and in view of the many priorities the government has to deal with, I would have considered it scandalous to rely on public help, Pinault said. 

CORRECTION: This article was corrected on 27 June to reflect that Franois Pinault's museum would not be the world's "first circular museum". 
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