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The New York Times

Jun 16 2019
New York’s Tribute to the ‘Tombs Angel’: Lost, Found, Now Restored
A long-forgotten monument to a woman who helped inmates in New York’s infamous 19th-century jail is to be installed in a courthouse lobby.
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The New York Times

Jun 16 2019
Lorna Simpson Embraces the Blues
Photography, video, installation, and now painting in her new solo show, “Darkening,” in Chelsea. Is there anything this artist can’t do?
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The Guardian

Jun 16 2019
Rainbow wormhole in the Tar Pits: London's trippy pavilion moves to LA

Second Home, a co-working space company, has transplanted the ‘Instagrammer’s paradise’ for a summer of cultural events

When José Selgas and Lucía Cano unveiled their striking translucent wavy tunnel pavilion at London’s Serpentine Gallery in 2015, it was variously described as a psychedelic pupa, a trippy womb, a rainbow wormhole and – perhaps key to its runaway success – an Instagrammer’s paradise.

Now it has gone trippy in a whole new sense, because it is being moved across the ocean to Los Angeles, where it is being reconstructed piece by piece for a summer of cultural happenings and intense community conversations.

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The Guardian

Jun 16 2019
Sala Beckett: Barcelona’s inspired homage to the playwright

The story behind the extraordinary theatre is the subject of a new exhibition

Shortly before Samuel Beckett died in 1989, he received a request to name a new drama company and its theatre after him. Playwrights and thespians are habitually immortalised in this way – London can currently count the Pinter, Coward, Olivier, Gielgud and Garrick theatres, among others. But Beckett was not being asked to give his name to a gilded West End playhouse, an overture he would doubtless have detested and declined. Sala Beckett in Barcelona, founded by the actor Luis Miguel Climent and playwright José Sanchis Sinisterra, is as far from the plush velvet orthodoxies of commercial theatre as it is possible to imagine.

Sala Beckett occupies a remodelled workers’ cooperative building in Poblenou, a former industrial quarter wedged between the sea and the heart of Barcelona. In Spanish, sala means simply a room or hall. “It’s a space for creation and encounter,” says current director, Toni Casares. “It’s not a listings theatre that opens its shutters 10 minutes before the performance and closes them again as soon as the audience has left. It’s a space where things occur, where things are cooking throughout the day.” Standing apart from the conventions of the industry and the culture of leisure, Sala Beckett puts on plays, but it also “shapes, experiments, searches and manipulates time”.

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The Guardian

Jun 16 2019
Keith Haring review – jubilance and beauty from the message man

Keith Haring’s art speaks loud and radiantly clear at Tate Liverpool in the first major UK show of his work

Keith Haring, at Tate Liverpool, is a true surprise: a show of unexpected jubilance and beauty. The American artist was only 31 when he died in 1990, and it is almost beyond belief that some of the most vital images in this enormous exhibition were painted when he was living with Aids. But for a British audience who know him through the instantly recognisable graphics, undimmed down the years through the use of timeless black and white on everything from T-shirts and posters to Reebok sneakers, at least part of the pleasure is the sheer power of them, writ large and in radiant colour.

Radiance – and the radiating black lines scintillating around Haring’s simplified images of lovers, tellies, barking dogs and his trademark baby, crawling ever-onwards – is the overwhelming effect of this art. It is achieved entirely through line and colour. Just two elements – and even one, if you consider the original chalk drawings he made on vacant subway hoardings in New York in the early 1980s. Somehow, two of these have been preserved like chunks of the Berlin Wall and are shown here alongside fabulous photographs of the speccy young Haring darting about with his chalk to the fascination of passing passengers.

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The Guardian

Jun 15 2019
Oscar Murillo: ‘I want to hold up a mirror to this country’

The Turner prize nominee on socially engaged art, his Colombian heritage and why his family is part of his new Art Night show

‘Art and life – there is no separation between the two,” Oscar Murillo says. It is a line that stays in the mind although it is thrown out casually, part of a longer conversation. What is clear is that Murillo’s life is jammed with work to the point where art and life have become almost indistinguishable. He has a solo exhibition, Violent Amnesia (his first in the UK since 2013), at Kettle’s Yard in Cambridge; there is a show at David Zwirner’s London gallery; he is reviving a show in Berlin; and, later this month, a further show will open at The Shed in New York.

Murillo is also on this year’s Turner prize shortlist, saluted by the jury for the way he “pushes the boundaries of materials” – especially in his paintings. In addition, he has been commissioned to do a piece for Art Night in Walthamstow, part of the mayor of London’s first London Borough of Culture celebrations in Waltham Forest.

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The Guardian

Jun 15 2019
Berliners wary as €600m super-museum is latest project to overrun

Humboldt Forum delay follows series of other projects that arrived late and over budget

The opening of a €600m super-museum in Berlin has been postponed to next year, raising sceptical eyebrows among locals wary of the German capital’s growing tendency to deliver large public building projects late and over budget.

The Humboldt Forum will host blockbuster exhibitions about world culture, anthropology and ethnology, and is also expected to delicately touch on Germany’s under-explored colonial history.

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The Guardian

Jun 15 2019
The art of photography: sporting images – in pictures

Ryan Pierse is a Sydney-based sports photographer for Getty Images. He talks through some of the most memorable frames from his 20-year career

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The Guardian

Jun 15 2019
The art of Cold War Steve

From his first Twitter post in 2016, the caustically satirical photomontages of @Coldwar_Steve have become a cult phenomenon. Here are some highlights

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The Guardian

Jun 15 2019
Cold War Steve: satire is my antidote to a scary world
Twitter collagist tells how what started as a coping mechanism has led to the cover of Time and a Glastonbury hook-up

As the world around him gets madder by the day, the process of creating satirical collages has kept Christopher Spencer sane.

The artist known as Cold War Steve, whose image of Brexit Britain sinking beneath the Thames graced the cover of Time magazine this month, could have “gone on Twitter and ranted”. Instead he used the social media platform to share his versions of a Hieronymus Bosch-type hellscape.

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The Guardian

Jun 15 2019
Shutter speeds: the cars of El Mirage – in pictures

El Mirage is a racetrack on a dry lake bed a few hours outside Los Angeles in the California desert. Raced on since 1937, the 1.3-mile track attracts drivers from all over the US, some of whom reach speeds of up to 200mph.

London-based photographer Wilson Hennessy joined them for a weekend for his latest project. “Everyone was really happy to have their cars shot,” he says. “They welcomed you into the community. It was a pretty awesome experience.”

Almost all of the cars that race at El Mirage are modified originals, with some of them as old as the Ford Model T. “Each car is truly individual,” says Hennessy. “This is what drew me to shoot them.”

Hennessy went to the racetrack just before dawn each day. The dust lifted by the cars and the glowing sunrise created the otherworldly atmosphere of the photographs. “It was like God’s own natural smoke machine,” he says.

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The Guardian

Jun 15 2019
On my radar: Yinka Ilori’s cultural highlights
The artist and designer on rapper Dave, learning to love live poetry, and the best west African food in London

Designer Yinka Ilori was born in east London in 1987 to British-Nigerian parents and studied furniture and product design at London Metropolitan University. His work draws inspiration from the Nigerian parables and African fabrics of his childhood. For the second Dulwich Pavilion, Ilori has collaborated with the architecture practice Pricegore to create The Colour Palace, a bright, patterned structure in the grounds of Dulwich Picture Gallery, London SE21, until 22 September.

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The New York Times

Jun 15 2019
Female Surrealists Re-emerge in 2 Startling Shows
Leonora Carrington and Remedios Varo, known for their mystical styles, flourished in Mexico.
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The Guardian

Jun 15 2019
'They didn't look old enough': who filled a French art gallery with fakes?

Last year, a museum dedicated to the work of Étienne Terrus revealed most of its paintings were probably not by him. How did they get there?

Odette Traby was dying. It was the summer of 2016 and the sun baked the terracotta roofs of her hometown, Elne, in the south of France, as she lay in bed. Weeks earlier, the 78-year-old had been diagnosed with stage IV cancer. This grande dame of Elne town life had refused all treatment and chosen to tough it out alone. “She was someone who wanted to grapple with, to face up to, death,” says Dani Delay, her niece.

Traby had one consolation. She had spent the previous months trying to secure the future of her life’s work, the town’s art museum. It was dedicated to the work of the local artist Étienne Terrus (1857-1922), a friend of Henri Matisse who had been largely forgotten by the time Traby established the museum in the mid-90s. When nearly 60 Terruses came on to the market in 2015, Traby rallied two local historical associations to raise tens of thousands of euros, securing at least 30 of the works. As her life ebbed, at least Traby could tell herself that her beloved museum was closer to gaining the “Musée de France” status that would give it priority state funding and resources.

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The Guardian

Jun 15 2019
The 20 photographs of the week

The second anniversary of the Grenfell disaster, demonstrations in Hong Kong, the Women’s World Cup 2019 and the Appleby horse fair – the week captured by the world’s best photojournalists

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The New York Times

Jun 14 2019
How a 19th-Century Workman’s Cottage Became a Family Home
In Gallatin, N.Y., the husband-wife co-founders behind the design firm Workstead converted a 1850s clapboard house into a rural idyll.
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The New York Times

Jun 14 2019
Berlin’s Troubled Humboldt Forum Pushes Back Opening
The high-profile museum project in the German capital has aroused controversy over its treatment of colonial-era objects. Now technical problems have delayed its premiere.
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The Guardian

Jun 14 2019
Renegade, prolific, formidable: was Mary Kunyi the NT's Jackson Pollock?

A new retrospective of paintings by the Indigenous artist shows a maverick at work

Miriam-Rose Ungunmerr-Baumann launched the first retrospective exhibition of her mother’s multi-decade painting career with an open question to the audience.

She recalled the 1973 controversy surrounding the National Gallery of Australia’s purchase of the US painter Jackson Pollock’s abstract expressionist work Blue Poles. “Well, if they bought that then, why weren’t they interested in my mother’s painting?” she asked.

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Art News

Jun 14 2019
Monika Sosnowska at the Modern Institute, Glasgow, Scotland

See images from one notable show every weekday. Read More

The post Monika Sosnowska at the Modern Institute, Glasgow, Scotland appeared first on ARTnews.

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artforum.com

Jun 14 2019
Baloise Art Prize Awarded to Giulia Cenci and Xinyi Cheng
Giulia Cenci from Italy and Xinyi Cheng from China have been selected as the winners of this year’s Baloise Art Prize, an annual award presented to artists whose works are featured in the Statements
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artforum.com

Jun 14 2019
Lehmann Maupin Settles Lawsuit with Former Employee Accused of Stealing Trade Secrets
More than six months after Lehmann Maupin |https://www.artforum.com/news/lehmann-maupin-accuses-former-employee-of-stealing-trade-secrets-78399|sued| its former director Bona Yoo over the alleged theft
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artforum.com

Jun 14 2019
Brooklyn Academy of Music Employees Vote to Unionize
The administrative and cinema workers at the Brooklyn Academy of Music (BAM) have voted to unionize, with 119 out of 145 (or around 82 percent) voting in favor of joining Local 2110 UAW (United Auto
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Art News

Jun 14 2019
Art Basel’s Baloise Art Prize Goes to Xinyi Cheng, Giulia Cenci

Lu Yang has been named the winner of the BMW Art Journey Award. Read More

The post Art Basel’s Baloise Art Prize Goes to Xinyi Cheng, Giulia Cenci appeared first on ARTnews.

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The Guardian

Jun 14 2019
John McLean obituary
Painter who continued to champion abstract art in postmodern times

In postmodern times, the lack of pretension in the artist John McLean, who has died aged 80, was highly unfashionable. So, too, was abstract painting, the mode that he followed for 50 years. Yet neither his plain speaking nor his loyalty to abstraction was unthinking.

Historically astute, McLean saw his art as part of the project of modernism, and that project as morally important. “The influence of what we call ‘modernism’ hasn’t disappeared,” he said, in the early 21st century when it seemed that it might. “It’s in there, ingrained. It’s still going on … Art has always had a lot of mansions. I don’t think abstract painting is anything like dead. I don’t think it ever will be.”

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artforum.com

Jun 14 2019
Hauser & Wirth to Open Art Center on Island Off the Coast of Spain, Salon 94 Acquires New Building, and More
Hauser & Wirth is planning to open an arts center in a disused Naval hospital on Isla del Rey, one of three islands located in the port of Mahon in Menorca, in 2020. The facility will be restored by
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The New York Times

Jun 14 2019
Dia Diversifies, While Staying True to Its Roots
A farsighted director is leading a profound transformation and anointing the next Dia Generation: Charlotte Posenenske and Lee Ufan.
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Art News

Jun 14 2019
Squeeze It Like an Orange: Passionate Painter Huguette Caland Shines at Tate St. Ives

A timely exhibition focuses on work made from the 1960s to the '80s in Paris and Beirut. Read More

The post Squeeze It Like an Orange: Passionate Painter Huguette Caland Shines at Tate St. Ives appeared first on ARTnews.

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The New York Times

Jun 14 2019
You Know Frida Kahlo’s Face. Now You Can (Probably) Hear Her Voice.
The National Sound Library of Mexico has released a track that it believes is the only known surviving audio recording of the artist.
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The Guardian

Jun 14 2019
Moonwalk and 9/11 photographs part of 'global visual memory'

Results of 12-nation survey show that some ‘iconic’ images are better known than others

From the spacesuit-clad form of Buzz Aldrin on the moon to the middle-distance gaze of Che Guevara, some photographs really are seared into the public’s mind all over the world, research suggests.

While some images have long been hailed as “iconic”, experts say there has been little research to show that certain photographs are widely recognised and what people read into them. An international study by a researcher in the Netherlands set out to examine just that.

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Art News

Jun 14 2019
From the Archives: A Personal Remembrance of Picasso, in 1942

"It is not an easy task to write about Picasso," Mary Callery writes. Read More

The post From the Archives: A Personal Remembrance of Picasso, in 1942 appeared first on ARTnews.

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Art News

Jun 14 2019
Here’s the Artist List for the 2019 Istanbul Biennial

The exhibition will take place across three locations, including the city's historic shipyards. Read More

The post Here’s the Artist List for the 2019 Istanbul Biennial appeared first on ARTnews.

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The New York Times

Jun 14 2019
Sterling Ruby’s Art-Driven (and Autobiographical) Clothing Line
The mostly gender neutral collection ranged from acid-washed denims to spatter-dyed work wear.
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artforum.com

Jun 14 2019
Cinga Samson
Beauty is a key aspiration for Cinga Samson, whose exhibition “NaluLwandle, NaliKhaya” (Here’s the Sea, Here’s Home) includes his lauded Afro-gothic portraits of lone, blank-eyed male subjects.
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artforum.com

Jun 14 2019
Wu Hao
This retrospective of work by Wu Hao—one of the founders of the postwar Taiwanese modernist art collective Ton Fan Art Group—provides a glimpse into the variety of styles that the esteemed painter has
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The Guardian

Jun 14 2019
Eye-boggling Bridget Riley and black British pioneers – the week in art

Keith Haring’s first major UK exhibition opens in Liverpool, Leonardo da Vinci visits the British Library and op-art invades Edinburgh – all in your weekly dispatch

Bridget Riley
This retrospective of one of modern Britain’s most brilliant and original artists is guaranteed to fool your eyes and stretch your mind.
Scottish National Gallery, Edinburgh, 19 June–22 September. Hayward Gallery, London, 22 October–26 January.

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artforum.com

Jun 14 2019
Cosima von Bonin
Cosima von Bonin, as most familiar with her art already know, works from her bed. From there, she undertakes a collaborative process with craftspeople, modeling artists, musicians, and, in this case,
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artforum.com

Jun 14 2019
Baltimore Museum of Art Adds More Than Seventy Works to Its Collection
The Baltimore Museum of Art announced today that it has acquired more than seventy historic and contemporary artworks by a range of national and international artists. Seventeen of the new acquisitions
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artforum.com

Jun 14 2019
Jessica Bridgfoot Named Director of Australia’s Bendigo Art Gallery
Bendigo Art Gallery, in Bendigo, Australia-one of the oldest cultural spaces in the region-announced that Jessica Bridgfoot has been appointed the gallery’s next director. Bridgfoot has worked as a
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The New York Times

Jun 14 2019
What to Do in New York This Weekend
There’s something for everyone, from classical music in the park to Alvin Ailey at Lincoln Center and four must-not-miss art shows spotlighting women.
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Art News

Jun 14 2019
Baltimore Museum of Art Acquires Works by Charles Gaines, Ana Mendieta, and Others

The funds to support the acquisitions came from the sale of works by white men. Read More

The post Baltimore Museum of Art Acquires Works by Charles Gaines, Ana Mendieta, and Others appeared first on ARTnews.

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Art News

Jun 14 2019
Morning Links: Gen Z Yellow Edition

Here's what we're reading this morning. Read More

The post Morning Links: Gen Z Yellow Edition appeared first on ARTnews.

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Art News

Jun 14 2019
Art Basel’s Unlimited Section: By the Numbers

The section for ultra-large art—and special presentations of videos and series—includes Huma Bhabha, Felix Gonzalez-Torres, Jacolby Satterwhite, and some 70 more artists. Read More

The post Art Basel’s Unlimited Section: By the Numbers appeared first on ARTnews.

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Art News

Jun 14 2019
At Basel’s Museum Tinguely, an Artist-Designed Bar Will Fill a Void

A new Roth Bar is running during the art fair, and through to the end of the year, thanks to the work of Björn Roth and other collaborators. Read More

The post At Basel’s Museum Tinguely, an Artist-Designed Bar Will Fill a Void appeared first on ARTnews.

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Art News

Jun 14 2019
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The Guardian

Jun 14 2019
Buy a classic Guardian photograph: balloons over London, 2019

This week in our Guardian Print Shop series, the photographer Graeme Robertson captures hot air balloons flying over London

The Guardian photographer Graeme Robertson rose early last Sunday to photograph nearly 50 hot air balloons that took flight across London, as part of the fifth Lord Mayor’s Hot Air Balloon regatta. Robertson, who was photographing them from the basket of a balloon himself, took off from Battersea Park just after 5am, as the sun came up. “Once we’d passed the City, I knew I’d be able to turn back and shoot the balloons behind me, with the buildings reflecting the sunrise as a backdrop,” he says. He captured City airport in the foreground, and the O2 and Canary Wharf farther back. Robertson had time to shoot five frames before his balloon changed position, and the shot was gone.

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The Guardian

Jun 14 2019
Paula Rego’s The Cake Woman: everyday power struggle

The Portuguese-born artist’s painting has echoes of the oracles in the Sistine Chapel

Who would dare snaffle a pastry from Paula Rego’s Cake Woman? This familiar character on Portugal’s beaches in the 1940s has been transformed into a menacing Sibyl. With her ambivalent smile and androgynous, mighty form, she is reminiscent of Michelangelo’s oracles in the Sistine Chapel.

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The Guardian

Jun 14 2019
Photo Basel 2019: tender moments – in pictures

Photo Basel, the Swiss art fair dedicated to photography, focuses on tender moments in this year’s Master Cabinet showcase. Exploring people’s capacity and need for affection, the vintage images capture and express the attentive and empathetic nature of human interaction

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The New York Times

Jun 13 2019
Mandatory Viewing: Nancy Spero’s Bold Feminist Art
Her works are radical, topical and inspiring, and time is running out on what our critic calls a stunning show at MoMA PS1.
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