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The Guardian

Jul 23 2018
What’s the difference between a castle and a palace – ie Highclere Castle and Blenheim Palace? | Notes and queries

The long-running series in which readers answer other readers’ questions on subjects ranging from trivial flights of fancy to profound scientific concepts

Is there a technical/design difference to distinguish between a palace, castle or manor house? Why is it Highclere Castle but Blenheim Palace? Is there a difference or is it just a title?

Laura Rolles

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The Guardian

Jul 23 2018
Love Among the Ruins review – beauty and brilliance on the high-rises of Sheffield

S1 Artspace, Sheffield
This exhibition – which movingly captures day-to-day life on a Sheffield estate from the 60s to the 80s – tells a compelling story about changing Britain

Arriving in Sheffield by train, among the first things you will see is Park Hill – a brutalist megastructure that once housed more than 1,000 inhabitants in one of the largest social housing schemes outside London. Along with its sister estate Hyde Park, Park Hill looms large over Sheffield’s landscape and history, its utopian ideals and eventual demise mirroring the rise and fall of industrial cities in the 20th century.

It is within these concrete walls that S1 Artspace has built a new home, transforming the old garage block into a gallery and artist studios. Fittingly, S1’s first exhibition – Love Among the Ruins: A Romance of the Near Future – is a photographic celebration of life on the estates. Bringing together the images of Roger Mayne and Bill Stephenson, the survey begins as Park Hill opened in 1961 and ends at Hyde Park in 1988, shortly before it was due to be partially demolished.

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artforum.com

Jul 22 2018
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The Guardian

Jul 22 2018
The ugly truth: Ranger's House reopens with display of dark side

Treasury of objects considered ‘splendidly ugly’ will go on display at Greenwich house

Among gold and diamonds, porcelain and crystal, a treasury of objects considered “splendidly ugly” even by their original proud owner, will go on display as Ranger’s House in Greenwich opens its doors to the public again.

The imposing Georgian house holds the fabulous collection amassed by the millionaire Victorian diamond dealer Sir Julius Wernher. It includes Renaissance paintings, French porcelain, Italian bronzes, furniture, tapestries, jewellery as well as images in ivory, precious metals and carved wood of skulls, skeletons and decomposing corpses.

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The New York Times

Jul 22 2018
This Week in the Arts: Panorama, Andrew Solomon, ‘Be More Chill’
The Weeknd headlines the New York festival, “Far From the Tree” comes to screens and the high school musical debuts on Off Broadway.
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The Guardian

Jul 22 2018
John Russell, an Australian impressionist in France – in pictures

Sydney-born impressionist John Russell spent 40 years in Europe, where he cultivated friendships with late 19th-century and early 20th centuries luminaries Claude Monet, Auguste Rodin, Henri Matisse, Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec and Vincent van Gogh. While honing his craft in fin-de-siècle Europe, Russell clung to an Australian artistic sensibility that was at once colourful and defined by a love for nature (he spent half his European sojourn on a remote French island).

The Art Gallery of New South Wales is hosting the first major survey of Russell’s work in 40 years, bringing together 120 paintings, drawings and watercolours from private and public collections around the world

John Russell: Australia’s French impressionist is on at the Art Gallery of New South Wales until 11 November 2018

Main image, above: Mrs Russell among the flowers in the garden of Goulphar, Belle-Île (1907), by John Russell

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The Guardian

Jul 22 2018
New York art dealer says he found six De Koonings in New Jersey locker
  • David Killen paid $15,000 for contents of locker in Ho-Ho-Kus
  • 1955 De Kooning sold with a Jackson Pollock for $500m in 2015

A New York art dealer who bought the contents of a New Jersey storage locker for $15,000 says he has found six paintings he believes are by Willem de Kooning.

Related: Private sale believed to be one of contemporary artwork's largest ever

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The Guardian

Jul 22 2018
Behind the scenes with the biggest soul stars of the 70s

Marvin Gaye, James Brown, Stevie Wonder – Bruce W Talamon photographed them all. His images, collected in a new book, capture an era before publicists controlled their stars

“Nobody will ever understand what fun we had,” says Bruce W Talamon about the decade he spent photographing the heyday of funk, R&B and soul music in America.

Between 1972 and 1982, this young and relatively inexperienced photographer from Los Angeles had almost unrestricted access to the biggest, brightest and weirdest stars in black music. He went on tour with Gil Scott-Heron, Labelle and Parliament-Funkadelic. He shot performances by James Brown and Diana Ross and captured intimate backstage moments with Al Green and the Jackson 5. For one assignment, he spent seven days with Marvin Gaye, hanging out at the beach, playing basketball and eating Thanksgiving leftovers at Gaye’s parents’ house. Today’s music photographers are lucky if they get 15 minutes.

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The Guardian

Jul 21 2018
The big picture: the summer break starts now

A euphoric display of teen rebellion, captured by Aurore Valade, sums up the last day of summer term

School’s out for summer! And what better image to capture that moment of explosive joy on the last day of term than this chaotic and colourful image by French photographer Aurore Valade, a graduate of the elite Beaux-Arts school in Bordeaux.

Valade, whose work is one of the official exhibitions at the international Rencontres d’Arles this summer, seeks to examine the idea of liberation, transgression and revolt.

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The Guardian

Jul 21 2018
Hyperreal paintings of fruit - in pictures

For Dennis Wojtkiewicz, who creates hyper-real paintings of cross-sectioned fruit, finding his niche was a slog, until he set about carving up lemons. “The sun was out and the light happened to pass through the flesh,” he says. “It was a revelation. The form came to life.”

To capture the moment, he turned to his idols for influence: “Bonnard for his use of colour as energy, Vermeer for his use of light and the sense of timelessness in his paintings and Jan van Eyck for his exquisite craft.” Beyond the pictures themselves, in which grapefruits resemble luminous stained-glass windows, Wojtkiewicz plots themes of spirituality, sexuality and reproduction. Then again, as he is quick to add: “To some, a watermelon is just a watermelon.”

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The Guardian

Jul 21 2018
Memory Palace review – thinking inside the box

White Cube Mason’s Yard/Bermondsey, London
Jay Jopling’s first White Cube gallery opened in 1993 and changed the British art market for ever. A group exhibition celebrates the great, the good and the distinctly ordinary…

Can it really be quarter of a century since Jay Jopling opened his first White Cube gallery in a little room in Mayfair? A dozen visitors encountering the works of Damien Hirst or Tracey Emin and the space felt badly overcrowded. In those days it was still possible to glimpse the Etonian dealer himself, talking up the YBAs, selling their wildness to collectors whose caution he so shrewdly disarmed. It is no exaggeration to say that within the first five years he had changed the British art market for ever.

White Cube Hoxton Square followed in 2000, with queues forming in the scrubby grass before the converted print works to see the eye-poking art of Sarah Lucas, Marcus Harvey, Jake and Dinos Chapman. Six years later, the area now saturated with satellite galleries, Jopling opened White Cube Mason’s Yard in St James’s, and eventually White Cube Bermondsey, the biggest commercial gallery in Europe when it launched in 2011. To some people, his conglomerate remains forever sharp and new and current; for others it is as lumberingly middle-aged as Jopling’s roster of super-rich clients. But in these cavernous concrete spaces, he is still capable of mounting museum-class shows.

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The Guardian

Jul 21 2018
How landmark buildings became weapons in a new Gulf war

Across the Gulf region, states are vying to build ever grander museums and towers from the world’s most famous architects. But this display of soft power masks deeper ethical concerns

On the Doha corniche, on the route into the city from its airport, a monumental pile of fibre-cement discs is nearing completion. It is the new National Museum of Qatar, where the country’s “cultural heritage, diverse history and modern developments” are to be displayed. It will, says its silver-tongued Parisian architect Jean Nouvel, “symbolise the mysteries of the desert’s concretions and crystallisations, suggesting the interlocking pattern of the blade-like petals of the desert rose”. It does indeed look like the clusters of sandy crystals that go by that name.

This is the same Jean Nouvel whose outpost of the Louvre opened last year in Abu Dhabi, which for now is one of Qatar’s enemies. He also designed the 238-metre Burj Doha, completed in 2012, which is from the same genre of anatomically suggestive towers as his Torre Glòries in Barcelona and Norman Foster’s Gherkin in London. The burj is the most memorable building in an instant downtown called West Bay, an extravagantly variegated constellation of vertical glass of a type now familiar from China to the Gulf to the US to London.

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artforum.com

Jul 21 2018
DIARY: Down in Front
Zack Hatfield at the inaugural FRONT Triennial
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The Guardian

Jul 21 2018
The 20 photographs of the week

Emmanuel Macron and Pussy Riot at the World Cup final, Trump and Putin in Helsinki and the wonders of the natural world

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The New York Times

Jul 20 2018
Library Cards Rival Golden Tickets With Culture Pass Option
By Friday afternoon, over 9,500 passes to the Met, the Museum of Modern Art and the Whitney had been reserved.
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The New York Times

Jul 20 2018
Art Review: Klimt, Schiele and Picasso: Erotic Visions From Three Modern Masters
The Met Breuer’s exhibition showcases frank portrayals of female nudity from Klimt, Schiele and Picasso, all from the gift of a recluse who collected their artworks.
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The New York Times

Jul 20 2018
She Gave Millions to Artists Without Credit. Until Now.
The artist Susan Unterberg, acting anonymously, has distributed more than $5.5 million over 22 years to 220 underrecognized female artists over age 40.
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The New York Times

Jul 20 2018
The Getaway: Museum Tours for People Who Don’t Like Museum Tours
A spate of innovative tours aim to make museum visits more fun, and less dutiful.
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The New York Times

Jul 20 2018
Britain Wants to Keep Trump. The Baby Version, That Is.
The British Museum and the Museum of London are in discussions to own the balloon, but the people behind it want it to tour worldwide.
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artforum.com

Jul 20 2018
PASSAGES: David Goldblatt (1930–2018)
Leora Maltz-Leca on David Goldblatt (1930–2018)
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artforum.com

Jul 20 2018
SLANT: On the Infinite Plane
Geeta Dayal on Tony Conrad at the Albright-Knox Art Gallery
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artforum.com

Jul 20 2018
FILM: Oh Henri!
Nick Pinkerton on “Henri Cartier-Bresson in Motion” at Anthology Film Archives
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The New York Times

Jul 20 2018
This Artist Wants You to Look Up and Savor a Balloon Rainbow
The artist Jihan Zencirli’s airy installation celebrates a renovated Pier 17 at the South Street Seaport.
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The Guardian

Jul 20 2018
Jeff Goldblum goes topless and Mark Wallinger goes into orbit – the week in art

A statue of the actor appears in London, the Edinburgh art festival prepares to launch and Wallinger takes on humans in space for a new exhibition in Hastings – all in our weekly dispatch

Mark Wallinger
The isolation of the human form in space is the focus of Wallinger’s metaphysical wit in this focused exhibition.
Jerwood Gallery, Hastings, from 21 July until 7 October.

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The Guardian

Jul 20 2018
Streets in the sky … the Sheffield high-rises that were home sweet home

Rollerskating paper girls, daredevil sunbathers, high altitude milkmen … a new photography show beautifully captures the first and last days of a Sheffield estate and its residents

Bill Stephenson had been trying to photograph the residents of one of Sheffield’s most notorious housing estates for some time when he realised he was going about things all wrong. No one trusted him, this outsider with a southern accent and a fancy camera, parachuting in from the city’s leafy Nether Edge area. They didn’t appreciate him hanging around Hyde Park flats, snatching photographs of them as they went about their lives amid the brutalist concrete they called home, perched on the hill above Sheffield railway station.

He started to leave his posh Billingham bag at home. His Hasselblad, worth thousands, went in a carrier bag with a towel at the bottom to protect it. Sometimes he never even took it out. “Often I’d go up there and not take any pictures,” he says. “I’d just sit on a bench and smoke and chat to people, go for coffee at the drop-in centre. There’s always someone on an estate who knows everyone, so I found that person and got them to introduce me to everyone else.”

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The Guardian

Jul 20 2018
Ed Ruscha’s The Old Tech-Chem Building: a dehumanised landscape

The American artist known for his word paintings and social commentary reflects on ecological disaster with apocalyptic red skies

This 2003 airbrushed canvas comes from Course of Empire, two series of paintings by Ed Ruscha, the master of landscapes reduced to cool, sharp graphics, word painting and sly social commentary.

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The New York Times

Jul 20 2018
Can 48 Artists in 14 Rooms Capture Michael Jackson?
An exhibition at London’s National Portrait Gallery explores how contemporary artists have responded to Jackson’s complicated image.
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The Guardian

Jul 19 2018
Colombia's zillennials – in pictures

Generation Z refers to those born after millennials. Zillennials is an ongoing project by Charlie Cordero that seeks to explore the lives of this generation through the concerns, needs and desires of a group of teenagers

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The New York Times

Jul 19 2018
23 Art Exhibitions to View in N.Y.C. This Weekend
Our guide to new art shows and some that will be closing soon.
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The New York Times

Jul 19 2018
Clark’s New Contemporary Curator Expands Its Focus
“We don’t want to disconnect ourselves from current creativity,” its director said in hiring Robert Wiesenberger, 33.
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artforum.com

Jul 19 2018
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The New York Times

Jul 19 2018
At Arles Festival, 7 Promising Photographers to Watch
Artists from China, France, Poland, Switzerland and Turkey talk about the work they are exhibiting at the influential show in France.
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The Guardian

Jul 19 2018
Yves Klein review: Blenheim Palace's fusty furnishings feel the shock of the blue

Blenheim Palace, Oxfordshire
The latest in the stately pile’s big-name installations has its ravishing moments. But this is hardly a comprehensive exhibition – and you really can have too much blue

Ai Weiwei’s crabs, Lawrence Weiner’s texts, Michelangelo Pistoletto’s smashed mirrors and Jenny Holzer’s redacted military documents have all given the baroque pile of Blenheim Palace – home to the dukes of Marlborough and birthplace of Winston Churchill – a jolt over the past few years. Inviting living artists to insinuate their works into this world heritage site, major tourist attraction and stately home is one thing. Mounting what the Blenheim Art Foundation insists is the most comprehensive exhibition of Yves Klein in Britain to date is another.

The huge rectangle of ultramarine pigment on the floor of the large entrance hall, a recreation of a 1957 Pure Pigment installation, is ravishing – a bottomless visual pool for the eye, thrumming across the floor. Klein died from a heart attack in 1962, at the age of 35. Had he lived, he would have been 90 this year. Later, we come to a large canvas covered in the same adulterated ultramarine, a colour Klein managed to patent as International Klein Blue (IKB). It is his signature colour, representing the void. The void at the heart of this show is also unavoidable.

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The Guardian

Jul 19 2018
Anne Olivier Bell obituary
Bloomsbury group matriarch and editor of Virginia Woolf’s diaries who was also one of the wartime ‘Monuments Men’

From the 1960s onwards, Anne Olivier Bell, who has died aged 102, was one of the grand matriarchs of the Bloomsbury group and its progeny. A product of the art world of the 1930s, lover of the painter Graham Bell during the second world war, and an early member of staff of the Arts Council in the 1940s, she helped her husband, Quentin Bell, write his pioneering study of his aunt, Virginia Woolf, published in 1972, and herself edited Virginia’s diaries.

She was closely involved in the foundation of Charleston farmhouse, the home of Bloomsbury art and ideas near Lewes in East Sussex, as an independent trust in 1980, and was supportive of everyone who wanted to study Bloomsbury, exercising a fierce and critical eye over their texts.

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The New York Times

Jul 19 2018
Art Review: The Cement Mixer as Muse
A Socialist state’s postwar buildings burst with ambition and invention at the Museum of Modern Art.
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The Guardian

Jul 19 2018
Britain’s seaside shelters – in pictures

Will Scott has made a study of seaside shelters around the country. His photographs show the astonishing architectural variety in the quirky buildings designed to defeat the British weather. Seaside Shelters is published by Heni Publishing, with an accompanying exhibition at their London gallery until 19 August

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The Guardian

Jul 18 2018
Hong Kong: the city still shaped by feng shui

Feng shui masters are still regularly consulted to help make the city’s buildings harmonious and prosperous

“A lot of people design spaces in Hong Kong and then consult a feng shui master afterwards. But for us it was very important to consult one right from the beginning,” says Philippa Wong of M.int Academy, a learning centre in Hong Kong’s Aberdeen area that offers music tuition.

Philippa and her sister Andrea opened the centre in August last year. Like many business owners in the city, they wanted to start off on the right foot and ensure optimal luck and a harmonious environment for their business to flourish. So they hired local feng shui master John Choi to advise on the most auspicious layout and design of their centre.

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The Guardian

Jul 18 2018
Anarchy by the sea: radical Essex – in pictures

From punk colonies to dynamic groundbreaking architecture, Catherine Hyland’s photographs capture the real Essex behind the stereotypes

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The Guardian

Jul 18 2018
Pieter Hugo's best photograph: the hyena men of Nigeria

‘They would beat drums to draw a crowd. Then they’d take the muzzles off the hyenas and put their heads between their jaws’

I first learned about Nigeria’s “hyena men” in 2005, thanks to a picture that had gone viral. The caption said they were debt collectors in Lagos. I knew I had to find them. The country has a population of 186 million people, though, so the odds were pretty low. But then in 2017 a journalist friend told me they come from his home town, Kano, in the north. Two weeks later, I was on my way.

The hyena men are itinerants: they never spend more than two days anywhere. I found them in a shanty town near Abuja, the capital. Despite the language barrier we got to know each other pretty quickly. Outside of Lagos and Port Harcourt, I didn’t see a single white person in Nigeria. So I probably seemed as odd to them as a guy walking a hyena in the street seemed to me.

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