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The New York Times

Sep 17 2019
Francis Bacon Read Just as He Painted: Deep, Dark and Bleak
A new exhibition at the Centre Pompidou in Paris looks at how literary figures like Eliot, Conrad and Aeschylus shaped the painter’s work.
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artforum.com

Sep 17 2019
Yuki Kihara to Represent New Zealand at 2021 Venice Biennale
The Arts Council of New Zealand announced yesterday that Japanese-Samoan artist Yuki Kihara will represent the country at the Fifty-Ninth Venice Biennale. The news marks the first pavilion announcement
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artforum.com

Sep 17 2019
Walker Art Center Commissions Angela Two Stars to Create Work for Sculpture Garden
Saint Paul–based artist Angela Two Stars of the Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate tribe has been awarded a commission by the Walker Art Center in Minnesota. She will create a site-specific public artwork for the
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artforum.com

Sep 17 2019
Managed Mayhem
THIS SUMMER, New York was introduced to one of the most renowned avant-garde works of the Argentine ’60s: La Menesunda. The New Museum’s exhibition “Menesunda Reloaded” reconstructed all the outlandish
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artforum.com

Sep 17 2019
Bakehouse Art Complex Plans to Build Affordable Housing for Miami Artists
The Bakehouse Art Complex in Miami’s Wynwood district—a nonprofit that offers studio residencies and provides local creatives with access to classrooms; exhibition spaces; a photography lab; and ceramics,
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artforum.com

Sep 17 2019
Kim Cogan
San Francisco represents the far edge of colonial expansion, an apocalyptic end zone. The gold rush dwindled in the nineteenth century. The beats got jobs, the hippies bought houses, the artists had to
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The New York Times

Sep 17 2019
A Nazi Design Show Draws Criticism. Its Curator’s Comments Didn’t Help.
A Nazi Design Show Draws Criticism. Its Curator’s Comments Didn’t Help.
The exhibition’s detractors say that a man who derided museums as too feminine and politically correct may not be taking the right approach to overseeing the sensitive items on display.
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The New York Times

Sep 17 2019
At the Whitney Biennial, Flood Preparation as Social Dance
At the Whitney Biennial, Flood Preparation as Social Dance
The choreographer Madeline Hollander has devised simple looping steps, with names like “zigzag waltz,” in a piece that meets climate change with ritual.
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The New York Times

Sep 17 2019
Getty Trust to Invest $100 Million in Saving Threatened Antiquities
The money will go toward preserving ancient artifacts that are in danger because of crises like war and climate change.
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artforum.com

Sep 17 2019
Ladan Akbarnia Joins San Diego Museum of Art as Curator of South Asian and Islamic Art
The San Diego Museum of Art has appointed Ladan Akbarnia its new curator of South Asian and Islamic art. Akbarnia will be responsible for managing the museum’s exhibitions and public programing; engaging
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artforum.com

Sep 17 2019
Art Institute of Chicago Taps Barcelona Firm for Campus Revamp
The Art Institute of Chicago has hired Fabrizio Barozzi and Alberto Veiga of the Barcelona-based architecture firm Barozzi/Veiga to overhaul the museum. Director James Rondeau told the
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The New York Times

Sep 17 2019
Amid the Renaissance Architecture of Florence, an Unexpected Villa
Amid the Renaissance Architecture of Florence, an Unexpected Villa
For their debut project in the city, Dimore Studio managed to transform a neglected 1960s-era house into a deeply contemporary take on Italian Modernism.
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The Guardian

Sep 17 2019
Frieze London installs its first augmented reality work

Visitors to Regent’s Park will see hovering ice slabs visible only through mobile app

First there was Pokémon Go. Now lovers of contemporary art can join the fun by tracking down shimmering, thought-provoking sculptures in a London park.

Frieze London art fair has installed its first augmented reality artwork. “No shipping, no installation costs,” said its director, Victoria Siddall. “It is interesting for us to be able to test the boundaries of what sculpture can be.”

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The New York Times

Sep 17 2019
St. John the Divine Cathedral Is in Recovery Mode
St. John the Divine Cathedral Is in Recovery Mode
While all eyes are on Paris’s fire-ravaged Notre-Dame, New York’s St. John the Divine cathedral is dealing with the aftermath of a fire of its own.
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artforum.com

Sep 17 2019
Mona Hatoum and William Kentridge Among 2019 Praemium Imperiale Laureates
On Tuesday, September 17, the Japan Art Association announced the winners of the 2019 Praemium Imperiale awards, which honor practitioners in the fields of painting, sculpture, architecture, music, and
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The Guardian

Sep 17 2019
Death on a toilet: the shocking Paris show that almost sank Francis Bacon

It was meant to put the artist on a par with Picasso. But it was thrown into chaos by the suicide of his lover and muse. As Bacon returns to haunt the French capital, we recall a tragic, game-changing show

Last Tango in Paris, Bernardo Bertolucci’s controversial piece of 70s art cinema, begins with an oil painting of a man on a red bed wearing just a T-shirt, flashing fleshy legs as his face explodes in inky smears. He’s in a room with a green carpet and yellow walls. For a few moments, Bertolucci shows just this portrait – of Lucian Freud by Francis Bacon – then a sensual jazz score slowly starts, and the film’s opening credits roll alongside this unmoving canvas. It is succeeded by a brutally dissected female figure sitting on a wooden chair – another Bacon portrait, this time of Henrietta Moraes. Eventually, the two paintings are seen side by side. Then we cut to Marlon Brando in a camel overcoat on a Paris bridge, yelling: “Fucking God!”

Behind Bertolucci’s eerie use of these oil paintings is the shocking story of an art exhibition that gripped Paris, established Bacon as the great European artist he had always dreamt of being – and left a man dead in a hotel toilet. Bertolucci was so astounded by Bacon’s solo show at the Grand Palais – which opened in October 1971, just as he was preparing to make his film in the French capital – that he took Brando to see it. He urged the actor, he later recalled, to “compare himself with Bacon’s human figures because I felt that, like them, Marlon’s face and body were characterised by a strange and infernal plasticity”.

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artforum.com

Sep 17 2019
Joseph Keckler
In constant motion between the art and opera worlds by way of popular culture, Joseph Keckler is best known for his vocal shape-shifting and his “faux arias,” which recount daily experiences with
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The Guardian

Sep 17 2019
Ashes 2019: stellar images from an unforgettable summer

A look back at the fortunes of England and Australia across the five Tests, as seen through the lens of Guardian and Observer photographer Tom Jenkins. Click or tap on the images to read the captions

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The Guardian

Sep 17 2019
Buy a classic sport photograph: jumping in the fog at White Hart Lane

The first of a new Guardian Print Shop series featuring classic sports images from the likes of Gerry Cranham, Mark Leech and Tom Jenkins – yours to own for just £55 including free delivery

Frozen in mid-air and silhouetted against the distant floodlighting at White Hart Lane, this image captures Tottenham goalkeeper John Hollowbread jumping to keep warm during a third round FA Cup match against Chelsea in January 1964. Spurs were a powerhouse in the sixties: they won the double in 1961 – with Hollowbread, primarily the club’s reserve goalkeeper, making one appearance that season – as well as the FA Cup again in 1962 and 1967 and the Uefa Cup Winners’ Cup in 1963. White Hart Lane was demolished in recent years to make way for a new multi-million pound stadium, but this ethereal image captures the old ground in its pomp. The packed “shelf side”, comprising twin layers of terracing, housed close to 20,000 Spurs fans and produced an intimidating wall of noise. This historical photograph is one of the most recognisable frames by the renowned sports photographer Gerry Cranham.

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The Guardian

Sep 16 2019
The view from China – in pictures

Fifty galleries from across China and beyond are heading to Shanghai to showcase the best contemporary photography in this year’s Photofairs Shanghai. Here are our favourites

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The Guardian

Sep 16 2019
The maddest house party ever – Ragnar Kjartansson on making The Visitors

Set in the home of eccentric Americans, The Visitors is 64 hard-partying minutes of songs, cigars and sorrow. As it’s named the best artwork of the century, the artist relives its creation

Rokeby is a crumbling 43-room mansion in upstate New York, where the descendants of the grand American families the Astors and the Livingstons – as well as their bohemian friends – participate in everything from puppetry to organic farming. On one gorgeous summer evening, they gathered on the terrace while nine Icelandic musicians, including members of Múm and Sigur Ros, each took over one of the house’s rooms, from the ballroom to the bathroom. Together, they played a song that went “Once again, I fall into my feminine ways” – over and over.

The result was The Visitors by artist Ragnar Kjartansson. Named after Abba’s final album and presented as a nine-screen video installation in galleries from London’s Barbican to the Broad in LA, The Visitors mesmerised viewers, most of whom stayed for its entire 64 minutes, moved to tears of euphoria and sorrow. As the New York Times put it, the effect is “alternately tragic and joyful, meditative and clamorous, and that swells in feeling from melancholic fugue to redemptive gospel choir”. A memorial to the end of Kjartansson’s marriage, a paean to the twilight of youth, a celebration of friendship, music and America itself, The Visitors is sumptuous and profound.

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The Guardian

Sep 16 2019
The best art of the 21st century

Steve McQueen in bed, Ai Weiwei in trouble, Pussy Riot in church and Ragnar Kjartansson in the bath – they’re all included in our countdown of the best art since 2000

Almost an hour long, Tacita Dean’s film is a summation of her work to date. Poet Anne Carson and actor Stephen Dillane move through the world on an imaginary day, as the sun is eclipsed. Set in multiple locations and weathers (Bodmin Moor, Yellowstone Park, Wyoming and Illinois), and with innovative technical manipulations (the entire film was edited in-camera), atmospheres and startling imagery, the whole thing is a delight. AS
Read the review.

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The New York Times

Sep 16 2019
Will Banksy’s Chimpanzees Laugh to a Record $2 Million?
Will Banksy’s Chimpanzees Laugh to a Record $2 Million?
What effect did the artist’s 2018 salesroom prank have on his prices? A major sale at Sotheby’s looks set to reveal the impact.
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The New York Times

Sep 16 2019
The New Architecture: Sky Parks, Tidal Pools and ‘Solar Carving’
Projects debuting this fall suggest that hard barriers between the designed environment and the natural one are softening — maybe for good.
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The New York Times

Sep 16 2019
Cable Cars Over Jerusalem? Some See ‘Disneyfication’ of Holy City
Cable Cars Over Jerusalem? Some See ‘Disneyfication’ of Holy City
The architecture of occupation: A planned cable-car network to Jewish holy sites bypasses Palestinians and furthers Israel’s claims over East Jerusalem.
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artforum.com

Sep 16 2019
Artwork by Daniel Buren Badly Damaged in Knife Attack at Centre Pompidou
A man who visited the Centre Pompidou in Paris on Thursday, September 12, was arrested after he attacked a painting by French modernist Daniel Buren with a knife,
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The Guardian

Sep 16 2019
Antony Gormley review – metal master puts a bomb in the RA

Royal Academy, London
From its primordial gloop to the iron baby in the courtyard, Gormley’s show chronicles human progress. But is he really the right person to tell the story of us all?

Antony Gormley’s retrospective at the Royal Academy ends in a moment of blissful release. After tottering through low, pitch-black metal tunnels and chambers, you emerge into a gallery filled with cool sea air and a briny tang. The floor of the final beaux-arts room is submerged beneath earth and seawater. This is Host, a work he’s created a number of times over the past three decades, nodding to primordial creation, the ocean that life originally crawled from and the squidgy stuff with which artists fashioned the first figures. Here, in the bastion of civilisation that is the Royal Academy, it also becomes a tacit doomy statement about climate change. It’s the beginning and the end. That’s one of the things about Gormley’s art: it goes for big statements, while being so open-ended that it can change with context, adapting to its viewers’ concerns.

This is a seriously handsome show with plenty of crowd-wowing art that aims to put “the visitor centre stage”, yet also underlines his project’s sticking points. In a recent interview, he bemoaned art’s waning ability to speak truth to power. Here, he reaches for the epic to tackle the Enlightenment dream of human progress that birthed the Royal Academy. It begins with an iron baby that he describes as a “bomb”, ripe with destructive potential but vulnerable, on the grand courtyard’s paving, framed by neoclassical walls and parked cars. No chronological retrospective, the exhibition evolves in beats, small to big, simple to spectacularly complex. Drawings track his lifelong interest in bodies and space, with a recurring solitary figure, either against the open landscape or framed by doorways, the womb, the tomb.

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artforum.com

Sep 16 2019
Aimé Iglesias Lukin Named Director and Chief Curator of Visual Arts at the Americas Society
Aimé Iglesias Lukin has been appointed the new director and chief curator of visual arts at the Americas Society, the New York–based organization dedicated to fostering an understanding of the political,
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The New York Times

Sep 16 2019
Wondering Who Did That Painting? There’s an App (or Two) for That
Wondering Who Did That Painting? There’s an App (or Two) for That
With companies racing to develop Shazam for art, we see what instant-identification apps really add to your experience in museums and galleries.
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artforum.com

Sep 16 2019
General Assembly
THE BERGEN ASSEMBLY marked my first trip to Scandinavia, and as a Henry James fan I hope I may be forgiven if I play here a bit of the wide-eyed American abroad, marveling at the tall Nordics with their
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artforum.com

Sep 16 2019
“Better Homes & Gardens”
In 1980, philosopher Liang Shuming asked, “Will the world get better?” This group presentation—featuring contributions from Alston Watson, Mama Yoshi, Bettina Yung, Lu Zhang, and the queer footwear
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The New York Times

Sep 16 2019
Amy Sherald’s Shining Second Act
After her famous portrait of Michelle Obama, the artist is bringing her new works to New York. “Every painting is a kind of communion,” our critic says.
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artforum.com

Sep 16 2019
Maurizio Cattelan’s Solid Gold Toilet Stolen from Blenheim Palace
An artwork by Italian provocateur Maurizio Cattelan—a solid 18-karat gold toilet worth about $5 million—was stolen from Blenheim Palace in Oxfordshire, England, over the weekend. Titled America, the
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The Guardian

Sep 16 2019
Francisco Toledo obituary

Mexican artist whose work paid homage to the myths he imbibed growing up in an indigenous Zapotec family

The Mexican artist and activist Francisco Toledo, who has died aged 79, was best known for paintings, prints and ceramics that paid homage to the myths and stories he imbibed growing up in an indigenous Zapotec family, depicting a vast menagerie of real and fantastical animals, often on unconventional yet traditional grounds such as ostrich eggs and tree bark.

Playful depictions of monkeys were plentiful, but there was a darker side to his work, such as the red-stained ceramics he made in response to Mexico’s drug wars, Duelo (Mourning, 2015), and the overtly sexual, phallus-centered self-portraits he returned to throughout his career.

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artforum.com

Sep 16 2019
Mike Henderson and Angela Hennessy Win 2019 San Francisco Artadia Awards
Artists Mike Henderson​ and ​Angela Hennessy have won the 2019 San Francisco Artadia Awards. Open to visual artists who have lived in the Bay Area counties of Alameda, Contra Costa, Marin, San Francisco,
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The Guardian

Sep 16 2019
'The works represent a new era': behind the Met's bold new sculptures

Kenyan American Wangechi Mutu has become the first artist to fill Metropolitan Museum of Art’s alcoves with four eye-catching female sculptures

If you’re standing outside the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, there’s one small detail that’s often overlooked in the building’s grand architecture: the four alcoves that crown its entranceway.

These alcoves have been left empty since the museum was built over a century ago, but that’s about to change.

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The Guardian

Sep 16 2019
Tim Walker: Wonderful Things review – a vibrant and upbeat V&A show

One of British fashion photography’s biggest names explores museum artefacts

The show-stopping gown in a new exhibition at London’s Victoria and Albert Museum is a red silk number from Alexander McQueen’s infamous Horn of Plenty collection. Its billowing skirts are only partially visible, however, beneath a gauzy white conservational wrap, while its distinctive headdress is entirely hidden. This outer layer catches the light in what must be the first time a McQueen creation has been upstaged by its own dust jacket.

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The Guardian

Sep 16 2019
The best architecture of the 21st century

A flying roof, a bamboo airport, a marooned galleon and a park in the sky … continuing our series, we pick the 25 greatest builds of the new age

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The Guardian

Sep 16 2019
Mother of all loft conversions: how Tate Modern became building of the century

What was once a gloomy brickshed is now one of the most awe-inspiring art galleries in the world. As Tate Modern tops our chart, its architect reveals his trick: avoid glamour and keep it raw

‘It is totally unimaginable now,” says Jacques Herzog, “but this was a huge chunk of the city that was completely excluded from public life, overgrown and set back behind high walls. It felt like Sleeping Beauty’s castle.”

The Swiss architect is referring to Bankside power station, the great brick hulk that he and Pierre de Meuron transformed into Tate Modern in the year 2000, turning it into a cathedral of art that is now officially the most popular attraction in the UK, receiving 5.9 million visitors last year. People don’t just come for the art, but to experience the most powerful architectural transformation of the century, and one of the most majestic indoor public spaces in the world.

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artforum.com

Sep 16 2019
New York City to Build $15 Million Immigrant Research and Performing Arts Center
New York City is planning to build a new $15 million performing arts center dedicated to the American immigrant experience in the Inwood neighborhood of Manhattan. The cultural venue is being spearheaded
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The Guardian

Sep 16 2019
The stolen golden toilet: the perfect punchline to an 18-carat joke

Maurizio Cattelan is right to enjoy the loss of his fully-functioning conceptual wonder. It makes his comment on art, money and Trumpian desire even more brilliant

It feels like a huge honour to have been, quite possibly, one of the last people to pee in Maurizio Cattelan’s golden toilet. If his artwork, the solid gold lav stolen from Blenheim Palace on Friday night, is not recovered soon, it may never be seen again. For it seems unlikely this crime was commissioned by an anally obsessed collector or planned by gangsters to use the loo as underworld collateral. “Don Corleone, to mark our deal, please accept this golden toilet.” Let’s face it, the thieves stole Cattelan’s conceptual wonder for the metal it is made of.

Related: Hitler in Churchill's birthplace more shocking than the golden toilet – Maurizio Cattelan review

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The New York Times

Sep 16 2019
9 Photographs by Robert Frank Reveal His Mastery and Evolution
The most influential living photographer upon his death at age 94, he produced a book, “The Americans,” that changed the rules of documentary photography.
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The Guardian

Sep 16 2019
John Squire: 'I don’t think I’m a very good guitar player – or painter'

He helped create the fist-pumping soundtrack of a generation – now the Stone Roses guitarist paints pictures he makes on Snapchat. Will Ian Brown be coming to his show?

I’m in an enormous, concrete, box-shaped space. Alone, but the noise of men working nearby – drilling, talking – reverberates around the room. Literally an echo chamber. On the walls rest huge, colourful paintings, ready to be hung. Figures that are lifelike but messed with, so that bits are in the wrong place, or the background appears within the boundaries of the figures, a jigsaw forced together the wrong way.

The artist, John Squire, comes in quietly (he does everything quietly, he used to be much louder) and explains how he did it. It starts with a photo – perhaps one he’s found on Tumblr, or taken himself (this one is his wife, at the basin in the bathroom at home near Macclesfield) – which he then manipulates.

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The Guardian

Sep 16 2019
The polaroids of Linda McCartney – in pictures

Before her marriage to Paul McCartney, Linda McCartney (née Eastman) was known for her rock portraits: in 1968 she became the first woman to shoot the cover of Rolling Stone.

A new book showcases hundreds of Polaroid snaps from the early 70s to the mid-90s, offering an intimate glimpse into the life of a much-loved family

Linda McCartney: The Polaroid Diaries (Taschen, £40) is published on 18 September

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The New York Times

Sep 15 2019
Overlooked No More: Mihri Rassim, Feminist Artist in the Ottoman Empire
Overlooked No More: Mihri Rassim, Feminist Artist in the Ottoman Empire
In conservative Turkey, she sought the same artistic freedoms that men were granted, championed art education for women and ultimately left for the United States to pursue her ambitions.
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The New York Times

Sep 15 2019
An Electric Temple of Culture Fires Up
An Electric Temple of Culture Fires Up
In a former coal station in Germany, a novel hybrid business is set to open: a renewable energy plant and art museum in one.
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The New York Times

Sep 15 2019
A New International Fair Peddles Pocket-Size Art
A New International Fair Peddles Pocket-Size Art
Barely Fair in Chicago will feature miniature contemporary works in shoe-box-size booths.
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The New York Times

Sep 15 2019
A Light Safari in Wine Country
A Light Safari in Wine Country
Public light spectacles by artists like Bruce Munro herald a movement that infuses culture in valleys of viticulture (and blazes new trails in cities, too).
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The Guardian

Sep 15 2019
Artist pans claims he orchestrated theft of solid gold toilet

The artist and serial prankster Maurizio Cattelan denies stealing 18-carat loo entitled America from Blenheim Palace

The artist who made a solid gold toilet reportedly worth £4.8m has denied orchestrating its theft in a Banksy-style prank.

The 18-carat working loo was ripped from a wood-panelled room at Blenheim Palace, the birthplace of Sir Winston Churchill, in the early hours of Saturday.

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The Guardian

Sep 15 2019
Auction for Banksy artwork depicting MPs as chimpanzees

Devolved Parliament expected to sell for £1.5m-£2m, potentially becoming most expensive Banksy sold

Banksy’s withering view of the UK parliament, showing a Commons chamber packed full of chimpanzees, is to appear at auction for what could be a record amount of money.

The artist painted Devolved Parliament in 2009, when the word Brexit would have baffled people.

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