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The New York Times

Aug 21 2017
Show Us Your Wall: For Tony Kushner, It’s Angels Over the Breakfast Nook
“Not everybody loves them as much as I do,” Mr. Kushner says of the ceramic angels hanging in the house he shares with his husband, Mark Harris.
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The New York Times

Aug 21 2017
Who Is Really Making ‘Chihuly Art’?
Dale Chihuly, an artistic trailblazer who has long worked with teams, is facing a court battle that opens complicated debate about age, infirmity and ego.
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The New York Times

Aug 21 2017
Photographer Donates Thoreau-Inspired Artwork to the Morgan
Abelardo Morell’s “Thoreau: 40 Journals in Chronological Order” will go on view on Tuesday.
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The Art Newspaper

Aug 21 2017
Museum visitor steps on Yves Klein work at Bozar in Brussels
Yves Klein and the Blue Globe (1961) (Image: © Yves Klein, ADAGP, Paris / SABAM, Bruxelles, 2017<br />Photo © Harry Shunk and Janos Kender © J.Paul Getty Trust. The Getty Research Institute, Los Angeles)
The Centre for Fine Arts (Bozar) in Brussels had a colourful day on Wednesday (16 August) when a visitor trod upon on and damaged a work in the Yves Klein exhibition, Theatre of the Void (closed 20 August). While approaching another work across a gallery space, the visitor inadvertently walked on Pigment bleu sec (Dry Blue Pigment), a shallow wood basin spread with sand and the artists signature matte pigment, International Klein Blue (IKB), leaving white footprints on the work and blue material on the floor.

Even though we have several safety measures (warning signs, a partial barrier and a guard), the man was too fascinated [with the other work] to notice all of that, a museum spokeswoman tells The Art Newspaper. Bozar employees fully restored the work in-situ the same day, re-arranging the sand and adding more IKB. Dry Blue Pigment, first conceived in 1957, must be re-installed with new sand and pigment each time it is shown, the spokeswoman adds, so its not the same as damage to a unique piece.

In April, a journalist walked on a similar Klein work at the Muse d'Art moderne et d'Art contemporain (MAMAC) in Nice during a press opening for the show About Nice: 1947-77 (until 22 October). Following the incident at Bozar, a museum visitor tweeted a picture of the post-damage cleanup, and quipped: I came for the paintings. But I stayed for performance art.


When u step on a Yves Klein art work. pic.twitter.com/TQuXPI2k1w

Tom Baetens (@Bromtommig) August 16, 2017

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The Art Newspaper

Aug 21 2017
Grenfell Tower exterior could be turned into a canvas for children’s art
The charred remains of Grenfell Tower in Kensington, London (Photo: ChiralJon/Wikimedia)
Grenfell Tower may be adorned with works of art made by local schoolchildren under plans put forward by site officials. Eighty residents died in the tower block fire in west London on 14 June.

Michael Lockwood, the site and remediation manager, told The Sunday Times that scaffolding surrounded by netting will be erected around the 24-storey structure from the end of August. Site workers will remove debris and the towers cladding panels behind the covering. 

Lockwood recently met primary school pupils in the area who said that looking up at the tower is upsetting. I asked them if they would like to come up with paintings of what they would like to see on the building, he said.  The works would be projected on to the scaffolding screen.

Last month, family, friends and fellow artists filled St Marys Church in Londons North Kensington to commemorate and celebrate the young artist Khadija Saye and her mother Mary Mendy who died in the fire. 
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The Art Newspaper

Aug 21 2017
UK artists call for rethink on climate change iconography
 Early Warning Signs by Ellie Harrison who will feature in the Slow Violence exhibition at the Art & Design Gallery, University of Hertfordshire
The issue of climate change is insidious, warn eight UK-based artists who highlight the encroaching threat of environmental degradation in an exhibition opening later this year. Slow Violence, which is due to open at the Art & Design Gallery at the UKs University of Hertfordshire (29 November-20 January 2018), will include new and recent works by Katie Paterson, Adam Chodzko and Thomson & Craighead, among others.

The exhibition title is taken from the 2011 publication, Slow Violence and the Environmentalism of the Poor, by Rob Nixon, a professor at Princeton University. Slow Violence acknowledges that the violence of climate change can often be unrecognised, even invisible, incremental, localised, extended, durational, the exhibition organisers say in a statement, adding that the contributing artists challenge us to rethink the prevailing climate change iconographyof melting ice caps or desertification.

London-based Michael Pinskys Pollution Pods (2017) mimic the smog found in some of the worlds most polluted cities. A series of interconnected geodesic domes contain polluted air, emulating the relative presence of ozone, particulate matter, nitrogen dioxide, sulphur dioxide and carbon monoxide which pollute London, New Delhi, Sao Paolo and Beijing, the artists website says. Ellie Harrisons Early Warning Signs (2011), which resemble garish retail notices, are also included (the words climate change spin round on revolving signs). 

Emma Critchley is showing Frontiers, a photography and film series. The viewer roams through a seemingly apocalyptic landscape encountering what may appear to be detritus from the aftermath of a disaster or perhaps boats carrying those fleeing crisis, she tells The Art Newspaper. Alternatively, we may be witnessing the discovery of new land, artificial islands or a future scenario where land has formed from debris.

The work was made in 2015 when China aggressively pursued a programme of land reclamation on the Spratly Islands in the South China Sea. It also references the Pacific Oceans floating garbage patch [of plastic waste], Critchley says. Other artists featured include Ackroyd & Harvey and Tom James.

The show taps into the University of Hertfordshires partnerships with environmental initiatives such as the Climart project based at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology in Trondheim.
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The Guardian

Aug 21 2017
Halo by Rinko Kawauchi – images of the everyday sublime
A book celebrating the earth, the heavens and all points between confirms Kawauchi’s standing as a singular presence in modern photography

Rinko Kawauchi came to prominence in 2001 with the simultaneous publication of three photography books: Utatane (Japanese for catnap), Hanabi (fireworks) and Hanako (after the young girl who is the subject). From the start, her images were intimate, poetic and often luminously beautiful, the world around her – whether her family, the sky, trees or insects – rendered sublime by her soft colours and eye for everyday majesty.

Sixteen years and several acclaimed series later, Kawauchi has broadened and deepened her gaze. In Ametsuchi, published in 2013, she portrayed the harsh, volcanic landscape of Japan’s Mount Aso, a sacred site where Shinto rituals have been carried out for centuries. The book marked a stylistic departure, a move away from the intimate to a more distant standpoint, though somehow retaining her particular poetic sensitivity. She photographed the mountain during the traditional yakihata, or controlled burning of the land, which leads in time to a refertilising of the soil. Kawauchi pointed her camera at the heavens, framing the constellations, and at the vast landscape on which tiny figures toiled. Throughout, images of Buddhist ceremonies and rituals suggested an earthly cycle connected to the mysteries of time and transience through deep spiritual devotion.

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The Guardian

Aug 21 2017
Sotheby's auction photographs collected by Mario Testino – in pictures

Shake It Up photographs from the Mario Testino collection to be auctioned by Sotheby’s for the benefit of Museo Mate, Lima, Peru

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The Guardian

Aug 20 2017
The magical world of Parisian mysticism – in pictures

Forget The Da Vinci Code. Why look for secret symbols in Leonardo’s paintings if they can be found in modern art? The Guggenheim show Mystical Symbolism reveals the curious world of French Symbolism that art critic Joséphin Péladan revealed in his salon exhibitions of the 1890s

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The New York Times

Aug 20 2017
How to Sell a Frank Lloyd Wright House
A house by Frank Lloyd Wright is instantly recognizable, but what does it take to market, sell or even live in something designed by him.
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The New York Times

Aug 20 2017
Critic's Notebook: We Need to Move, Not Destroy, Confederate Monuments
The art historian in a critic wants to preserve Confederate images in museums, not trash them. At a crime scene, you don’t destroy evidence.
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The Art Newspaper

Aug 20 2017
The darkness of the eclipse—and the American West
Paul McCarthy's stagecoach in the exhibition Observatories
Jackson Hole, Wyoming will experience a total solar eclipse today (21 August), and to celebrate, the local Center for the Arts has staged Observatories, an exhibition of site-specific works by ten contemporary artists, including Glenn Kaino and Sarah Braman. The works explore both the eclipse and the American Westwhich is in some ways, treated like a Disneyland or a Western film, but hidden underneath that veneer is the violence and dark history, says Andy Kincaid, who organised the show with Camille Obering and the artist Matthew Day Jackson. When visitors enter Anna Tsouhlarakiss structure Edges of Ephemeral, made of old fencing wood, they learn about the Native Americans views of the eclipse, while Paul McCarthy takes on the Western film genre, presenting a stagecoach from a movie he is making with Damon McCarthy. (The film, a tale of a stagecoach journey turned violent, will be screened on the evenings of 22 and 23 of August.) Eduardo Navarro, who is showing a phone booth installation with eclipse glasses, has teamed up with Matthew Day Jackson on a phone recording that captures the apocalyptic feeling of an eclipse. Call 1-866-WYECLIPSE to hear Jacksons grandfather reading the poem There Will Come Soft Rains (1920), by Sarah Teasdale, on natures indifference towards the disappearance of humankind. Observatories will be on view through 14 September (with the exception of McCarthys work, until 27 August).
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The Art Newspaper

Aug 20 2017
When Spanish-language cinema flourished in Los Angeles
A shot from the Argentine film noir Los tallos amargos (1956). It is included in the UCLA Film and Television Archive's PST project. (Courtesy of UCLA Film & Television Archive)
It is impossible to tell from the outside, but the Downtown Independent movie theatre on Main Street in Los Angeles was once called the Aztecaa nod to the Spanish-language films it used to play in the 1940s.

It was not the only such venue. Across the city, a network of more than 60 playhousesincluding the Million Dollar Theatre, today a national landmarkregularly screened movies for Latin American audiences, many of whom emigrated from Mexico or fled from the Mexican Revolution (1910-20). In 1939, more than 200 films were shown in Los Angeles for Spanish speakers. From the 1930s through the 1950s, there was a vibrant Spanish-language film culture in the city thats largely forgotten, says Jan-Christopher Horak, the director of the UCLA Film and Television Archive, which is exploring this history in its Pacific Standard Time (PST) contribution, Recuerdos de un cine en espaol: Latin American Cinema in Los Angeles, 1930-60, which is organised by Horak, Colin Gunckel, Mara Elena de las Carreras and Alejandra Espasande-Bouza.

The programme includes screenings of around 40 movies that once drew major crowdsand not only in Los Angeles. At their peak, Spanish-language production companies were distributing films to 500 theatres across the US. Some were even shot in Los Angeles, including La Cruz y La Espada (1934), which was produced by the Fox Film Corporation.

If you want to study Latin American cinema, you cant leave the US out of the equation, says Gunckel, who wrote the 2015 book Mexico on Main Street, which looks at the film culture of Los Angeless Mexican immigrant community in the years before the Second World War.

There is overwhelming evidence that Los Angeles was a node of Mexican cinema, Gunckel says. And there is also evidence that Mexican producers used Los Angeles as a way to gauge the tastes of their audiences. One Los Angeles record store belonged to Mauricio Caldern, whose brothers, Jos and Rafael, ran a major studio called Caldern Productions. Mauricio would provide his brothers with sales figures from the shop to help them decide how to market and produce their films.

The terms of Mexican identity were hotly contested in this period, Gunckel says. In the US, the question was whether Mexicans living here could remain Mexican. In the years following the Mexican Revolution, the countrys government undertook a project to create a national image for a nation that had been fragmented. It wanted to convince Mexicans that the country belonged to them, he says, adding: From its inception, Mexican cinema has been transnational.


The UCLA programme also looks beyond Mexico, to movies from Cuba and Argentina, reflecting the diversity of the period. In part because producers wanted their films to appeal to wide audiences, actors from all over Latin America were employed.

The films were spoken in an odd uniform SpanishHispao, Horak says. In the movie La Vida Bohemia (1938), which takes place in a Puerto Rican community in New York but was shot in Los Angeles, actors from at least four countries were involved.

Why has it taken until now to look at this story? Theres been a shift in cinema studies in the past ten or 15 years where people have stopped emphasising analyses of filmic texts and are looking at the context in which those films were shown, Gunckel says. That includes the production history and the press cultureand when you look at these, things open up.

Another reason is more sinister. In the years after the end of the Second World War, the city of Los Angeles took up a project of urban renewala code word for removal of non-white populations to make the city safe for new Caucasian migrants from the East, as Horak writes in an essay. When Latin American migrants were pushed out of downtown, their film culture left, too.

Film Preservation

To preserve this history, the UCLA project is funded in part by a $280,000 grant from the Getty, which helps pay for a catalogue with new scholarship. It also allowed organisers to conduct oral histories with archivists and those who were on the scene. We talked to people who remember going to these theatres downtown because we wanted a real notion about the atmosphere, Horak says.

Film preservation is another major initiative. The process can be expensive: up to $50,000 for a feature-length film. Further grants to the UCLA project, including one from The Film Foundation, have been used to restore movies such as Enamorada (1946), set in the Mexican Revolution. In a rare opportunity, conservators have been able to restore the original camera negatives of the film.

Horak is especially excited to present Romance Tropical (1934), the first feature-length Puerto Rican film, which was long believed to have been lost. A copy was found in the holdings of the Packard Humanities Institute, which is at the UCLA Film and Television Archive.

Although the programme looks back, it also reflects current events. Shortly after the then US president Barack Obama announced a softer position on Cuba in 2014, the director of the countrys film archive came to Los Angeles to discuss the project and the restoration of the film Casta de Roble (1954). Such conversations may prove more difficult in the future: in June, President Donald Trump announced plans to make travel between the US and Cuba more difficult.

But for now, the curators are focusing on their work, which shines a light on a rich chapter in US and Latin American cultural history. For Horak, its part of a larger mission to expand the narrative of cinema. As soon as you start scratching the surface of film history, he says, you realise there are more white spots than there are ones that are coloured in.

For more information on screenings and events, visit pacificstandardtime.org

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The Guardian

Aug 20 2017
The mystery of ‘AJW’, the West Midlands’ Mario Lanza beer-mat artist

His identity is a secret and fans believe the original cartoonist may be dead – so who’s behind the sketches?

If you like the idea of Banksy – the whole is-he-or-isn’t-he-the-bloke-from-Massive-Attack backstory, the ghastly theme parks and grand political statements – then the good news is that there is a perfect artist for you: his name is Banksy.

If, however, you are of the opinion that Banksy simply isn’t elusive enough, or you are put off by all the insurrection stuff, then the good news is that there is an artist for you too. In anonymity and elusiveness terms, he makes Banksy look like someone banging a big bass drum underneath a flashing neon “YES IT’S ME, BANKSY!” sign, and his work is mercifully devoid of radical imagery. Best of all, he does all of his art in pubs.

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The Guardian

Aug 20 2017
Dover soul: a new walking trail on the Kent coast

There’s more to the world’s busiest passenger port than ferries and military history – it is looking forward with a new architectural walking trail along the Kent coast. We get a preview

On a hazy summer morning, Dover harbour appears to be in a state of perpetual motion. Beneath the white cliffs, cross-Channel ferries glide in and out while, closer to shore, a fleet of dinghies skims across the water. A group of swimmers make their way along the shingle beach, watched over by a sculpture of two bathers ploughing through the waves – a reminder that this has been the starting point for countless attempts to swim the Channel. Beneath my feet, inlaid into the paving stones of the esplanade, a granite strip marks the start/finish line for the North Downs Way long-distance walking trail.

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The New York Times

Aug 20 2017
In Serbian Refugee Center, a ‘Little Picasso’ Dreams of Art and Asylum
Farhad Nouri, 10, originally from Afghanistan, has won acclaim for his artwork, but he spends his days dreaming of asylum for him and his family.
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The New York Times

Aug 20 2017
When Self-Criticism Was an Order, These Portraits Were Revolutionary
“Cultural Revolution Selfies,” a new book by Wang Qiuhang, includes subversive images, taken during China’s Cultural Revolution, of the photographer himself.
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The Guardian

Aug 20 2017
Richard Woods, artist: ‘I made six identical bungalows and installed them around Folkestone’

The playful Slade graduate on why he is bringing vibrant colour – and a potent message about the housing crisis – to Folkestone Triennial

Born in Chester in 1966, Richard Woods graduated from the Slade School of Art in 1990. He has become known for his architectural installations characterised by cartoon-like decorative surfaces, bold patterns and vibrant colours, which he has said are inspired by his parents’ garish 1970s home and were once described by the Guardian as “beguilingly simple and wickedly clever”. In the past, Woods has turned a New York gallery into a mock-Tudor building, and created a wall-to-ceiling installation of geometric patterns at London’s Alan Cristea gallery. For his latest project, Holiday Home – part of this year’s Folkestone Triennial (2 Sept to 5 Nov) – Woods has created six colourful bungalows, situated in unexpected locations around the town.

How did you get the idea for the project?
I was in Folkestone 18 months ago and got given this strange leaflet saying, “Have you thought about turning your property into cash?” – basically, “give up your house so someone can buy it as a second home”. The idea grew out of that: to make six identical bungalows and install some in very desirable locations, some not, but keeping it very open-ended. There’s been equal [numbers of] people coming up to me and discussing the second home issue, and immigration.

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The Guardian

Aug 20 2017
Now, Today, Tomorrow and Always review – young Turks do Morrissey

Towner Gallery, Eastbourne
Filmed in Istanbul in more liberal times, a newly poignant Smiths karaoke session redeems an otherwise banal survey of pop culture in art

It takes less than 10 minutes to scoot around Now, Today, Tomorrow and Always, a diminutive new show at the Towner Gallery in Eastbourne that aims to explore the effect of pop culture on contemporary artists, and at first sight it’s all a bit underwhelming: even The Uses of Literacy (1997), an installation by Jeremy Deller comprising drawings and poems gathered from fans of the Manic Street Preachers, fails much to stir me (until now, I’ve never seen anything by the brilliant Deller that I didn’t like).

But just as I’m about to give up and leave, I force myself to sit down and watch something I passed on earlier: dünya dinlemiyor (2005), a video by 2006 Turner prize nominee Phil Collins. I’ll give it 10 minutes, I think. Forty minutes later I’m still there, mesmerised.

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The New York Times

Aug 19 2017
With Color and Fury, Anti-American Posters Appear in North Korea
The posters were unveiled this past week amid tensions over the country’s nuclear program.
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The Guardian

Aug 19 2017
Thomas Heatherwick: Pied Piper who has the very rich under his spell | Observer profile
Despite the collapse of his plan to build a garden bridge across the Thames, the ambitious designer still has projects aplenty across the globe, thanks to those who admire his talents

Last week, the London Evening Standard ran a single article in its editorial column, rather than its usual two, something it only does in matters of grave importance. It was about the end of plans to build a garden bridge over the Thames and blamed the mayor, Sadiq Khan, for killing off “a brilliant and imaginative plan” and for wasting public money.

The nerve was breathtaking. If anyone wasted public money, it was the former chancellor George Osborne and the former mayor Boris Johnson, who promised £60m to a project whose viability was always in doubt. Osborne, of course, is now editor of the Evening Standard.

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The New York Times

Aug 19 2017
An Architect and an Artist Walk Into a Barn
On a former horse farm in New Jersey, Frank Gehry built Cai Guo-Qiang’s dream home.
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artforum.com

Aug 19 2017
DIARY: Scottish Rites
Calum Sutherland around the Edinburgh Art Festival
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The Guardian

Aug 19 2017
Magic mushrooms: art foraged from nature – in pictures

The mysterious islands of the Salish Sea, between British Columbia and Washington State, are home to the ecological artist Jill Bliss, who since 2012 has devoted herself to exploring the isolated region, artistically and literally. The archipelago has its own unique ecosystem, and Bliss’s medleys of mushrooms and other arcane plants, which she calls her “living sculptures”, are gathered during a “daily treasure hunt”, hiking through woods and staying in isolated cabins. “This particular medley was made while lost deep in the woods of Cortes Island,” she says of one of her favourite works (see first image, below). “I first spotted the amanita [toadstool] glowing under the shadows of a downed tree.”

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The Guardian

Aug 19 2017
The 20 photographs of the week

The attacks in Spain, the rally in Charlottesville, Usain Bolt’s last race and wildfires in Greece – the news of the week captured by the world’s best photojournalists

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The New York Times

Aug 18 2017
Trump Aside, Artists and Preservationists Debate the Rush to Topple Statues
As cities and states remove Confederate monuments, leaders in the art world urge more dialogue and deliberation.
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The New York Times

Aug 18 2017
16 Members of White House Arts Committee Resign to Protest Trump
Artists, authors, performers and others stepped down from the President’s Committee on the Arts and the Humanities after Mr. Trump’s remarks about white nationalists.
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artforum.com

Aug 18 2017
FILM: As Luck Would Have It
Nick Pinkerton on Steven Soderbergh’s Logan Lucky
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The Guardian

Aug 18 2017
Not to be sniffed at: long-lost Banksy artwork is rediscovered

Snorting Copper was missing for a decade after being vandalised and boarded up – now it has been uncovered in east London

A Banksy painting that appeared on a public toilet block in east London, only to disappear after it was vandalised, spray-jetted by the local council and then painted over, has been rediscovered over a decade later.

Known as the Snorting Copper and considered an exemplary image by the elusive graffiti artist, it shows a uniformed policeman on his hands and knees snorting a line of cocaine.

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The New York Times

Aug 18 2017
Art Review: Editta Sherman’s Long Reign as ‘The Duchess of Carnegie Hall’
Royalty photographs royalty in an exhibition of portraits by Ms. Sherman at the New-York Historical Society.
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The New York Times

Aug 18 2017
Columbus, Ind., Renews Its Big Design Legacy
Let’s put on a show: The “Athens on the prairie” steps into the future with “Exhibit Columbus.”
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artforum.com

Aug 18 2017
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The New York Times

Aug 18 2017
Solid-Gold Toilet to Be Removed From Guggenheim in September
It’s unclear where the artist Maurizio Cattelan’s fully functional, 18-karat interactive sculpture, titled “America,” will move to next.
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The New York Times

Aug 18 2017
Art Review: Maira Kalman’s Irreverent Pictures for the Grammar Bible
The first New York showing of all 57 illustrations that Maira Kalman dared to make for “The Elements of Style,” the primer on writing well.
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