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The Guardian

Jul 05 2020
Boris Johnson pledges £1.5bn lifeline to keep UK's arts sector afloat

Industry welcomes ‘surprisingly ambitious’ sum for museums, galleries, theatres and music venues

Britain’s beleaguered arts and heritage sectors have been promised £1.57bn of help in a long-awaited rescue package described by the government as the biggest one-off investment in UK culture.

After weeks of desperate warnings that the UK was facing an irreversible cultural catastrophe without targeted support, ministers announced a package that it said would protect the future of the country’s museums, galleries, theatres and music venues.

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The Guardian

Jul 05 2020
Where's the air bridge to San Serriffe? | Brief letters

Protective bubbles | Pandemic literature | Sculptural distancing | Johnson’s gestures | Visiting San Serriffe

In the consideration of larger school protective bubbles, Geoff Barton may be correct that the logistics of keeping children apart will be “mind boggling” (Back to school: what can pupils in England expect from September?, 2 July) but monitoring bubbles could be greatly simplified by the use of different coloured hi-vis waistcoats, which are commonly worn by younger pupils on school trips.
Alan D Connell
Harrogate, North Yorkshire

• It’s not just Contagion that can help us to cope with Covid-19 (I feel fine: fans of world-ending films ‘coping better with pandemic’, 1 July). Turning to literature, there’s not only Camus’s The Plague and Defoe’s A Journal of the Plague Year, but Mary Shelley’s The Last Man (1826), which predicts a 21st-century epidemic, in which everyone dies except the title character.
Michael Bath
Rochester, Kent

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The Guardian

Jul 05 2020
Matteo Adinolfi obituary

My husband, Matteo Adinolfi, who has died aged 91 from Covid-19, was an internationally esteemed immunologist focusing on prenatal diagnosis of gene disorders, and a talented amateur artist.

Matteo was born in Eritrea. His parents, Attilio Adinolfi and his wife, Maria (nee Sellitti) had moved there from Italy, to escape fascism. In 1943, on a visit back to Naples, the family was trapped by the advancing war and unable to return to Africa.

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The Guardian

Jul 05 2020
Gordon Parks: Part One review – works of riveting beauty, dignity and anger

Alison Jacques Gallery, London
Capturing in living colour the daily lives of black families in segregated America, the photographer’s work shocks all over again today

Iced milk, banana splits, pecan ice-cream and butterscotch: they’re all for sale on a sweltering sidewalk in Mobile, Alabama. It is the long summer of 1956. Two women in fabulous sunray skirts and matching earrings stand patiently on the right as a handsome young father in shades helps his daughter to the drinking fountain on the left. Three more children are waiting thirstily for water.

The eye moves round the scene, taking in the sashed dresses, the ads for malts and shakes and newfangled Tupperware. It is a moment before you notice the children’s bare feet, and another before you connect the queue with the other fountain – entirely unused – in the centre. A little girl stands beside it, forbidden to drink. “White Only” is lettered upon it (in white).

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The Guardian

Jul 05 2020
Your pictures: share your photos on the theme of ‘block’

Wherever you are in the world, this week we’d like to see your pictures on the theme ‘block’

The next theme for our weekly photography assignment, published in print in the Observer New Review is ‘block’.

Share your photos of what block means to you – and tell us about your image in the description box.

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The Guardian

Jul 04 2020
Wouldn’t it be great for British town centres if people could just move into closed shops?

Boris Johnson wants to rebuild Britain but he will have to do more than change a few planning laws

The logic seems obvious. This country has too little space for housing, too much for retail, so why not convert the latter into the former? As the effects of the pandemic scythe through high street brands – Café Rouge, TM Lewin, Carluccio’s, Bella Italia – felling what were in many cases already wilting businesses, it makes sense, on paper, to hand over the spaces they vacate to people desperate for somewhere to live.

Let us therefore take the step, unusual in these pages, of agreeing with the prime minister. Shortly after he announced his “new deal” last week, he proposed that shops “be converted into residential housing more easily”. There would be the added benefit that any homes achieved in this way would, in theory, reduce the pressure on the nation’s green belts. They might also help to revive towns whose economic and social energy was flagging.

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The Guardian

Jul 04 2020
The big picture: summer camp goodbyes

Mark Steinmetz’s pre-Instagram pictures show American teenagers and children at camp experiencing their first taste of independence

For about 10 years from 1986 Mark Steinmetz photographed children at American summer camps. He taught photography to the kids, but he also captured those moments when children discovered the strangeness and possibility of independence for the first time. Summers in bunk beds and cabins and woods stretched ahead of them, communal and lonely by turns. Part of the photographer’s motivation was to recapture the intensity of the periods he had spent away from his own family as a boy.

His pictures are from different camps and different years but they share an emotional trajectory. The children arrive singly, clutching sleeping bags, they slowly overcome fears in ritualised games and campfire bonding, and they leave changed. In this picture the time away is coming to a close. The bus is waiting to return teenagers to the routine of home and school and TV. But as Steinmetz’s says: “Even if they’re miserable and bitching to one another throughout, by the end they’re like: ‘Oh my God, this is ending, you’re my best friend, and this has been the most intense thing I’ve ever done in my life!’”

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The Guardian

Jul 04 2020
From Talking Heads to a painter with seven fingers: the Observer culture quiz

Test your arts knowledge with these questions from our critics

The recent TV version of Alan Bennett’s Talking Heads featured a slew of 2020 actors reprising roles first taken in 1988 and 1998. Two monologues were newly written, and two, A Cream Cracker Under the Settee and Waiting for the Telegram, were not refilmed, being deemed unbetterable. Who was the original talking head in both cases?

Thora Hird

Alan Bennett

Maggie Smith

The daughter of an Irish musician is currently enthralling some of our Sunday evenings with lashings of laudanum and Maori magic. With which of these songs did her father once top the US Billboard chart?

I Still Haven’t Found What I’m Looking For

Whisky in the jar

Bright Side of the Road

Which London location inspired Mendelssohn’s popular Spring Song?

Hampstead Heath

Kew Gardens

Camberwell Green

What do Charlize Theron, Zoe Saldana and Christian Bale have in common?

They have all played cyborgs

They all trained in ballet

They all breed koi

Which artist painted himself with seven fingers?

Picasso

Dalí

Chagall

Before he moved into the world of film, the late director Joel Schumacher worked as what?

A department store window-dresser

A firefighter

A limbo dancer

Which of the following is NOT true of Russell Crowe?

He is a fan of Leeds United

He is a trained wrestler

He used to perform in a band under the name Russ Le Roq

Which Victorian novelist was also a theatrical business manager?

Wilkie Collins

Bram Stoker

Anthony Trollope

Which artist painted herself playing a lute?

Artemisia Gentileschi

Lavinia Fontana

Sofonisba Anguissola

Which of these TV titles, as printed here, has a grammatical, syntactical or spelling error?

Who Wants to Be a Millionaire

Dad's Army

Howards End

Peter Dalton, Wayne Furniss and Jamie Pinchbeck were early, pre‑fame members of which Sheffield band?

Arctic Monkeys

The Human League

Pulp

Who said “in this house with its four walls of glass I feel like a prowling animal, always on the alert”?

Ray Eames

Edith Farnsworth

Lina Bo Bardi

Many Haydn symphonies have nicknames, including one of the following. Which?

The duck

The bear

The budgerigar

In which play is the word “critic” used as an expletive?

Waiting for Godot

Look Back in Anger

The Front Page

Who called what “that great heap of stones”?

Sarah Churchill of Blenheim Palace

King Khufu of the Great Pyramid

Winston Churchill of the Palace of Westminster

Who urged us to Give Ireland Back to the Irish and was banned for their trouble?

Van Morrison

Dexys Midnight Runners

Wings

Neil Jordan’s 1992 thriller The Crying Game borrowed its title from a song released by whom?

Chuck Berry

Dave Berry

Tony Berry

Who is Sasha Fierce?

The actor Alexander Armstrong’s DJ alias

Beyoncé’s braver alter ego

A British dance music producer

15 and above.

You really are the cultural upper crust. Bask in the glory!

9 and above.

Solid work – you clearly know your cultural onions.

0 and above.

Oh... well, the less said about this, the better, eh?

4 and above.

Don't worry, with a little work you'll be one of the cultural elite in no time. See you next week...

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The Guardian

Jul 04 2020
The heat's back on: our insiders' guide to 2020's best summer culture

From art to architecture, from festivals to films, our expert guests spotlight the hottest cultural events and share their own summer touchstones

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The Guardian

Jul 04 2020
Imagine a 'New America': reclaiming the American flag – in pictures

With the explosion of global protests and activism demanding an end to racial inequality, Jameelah Nuriddin and Erin Hammond consider the complicated relationship between African Americans and the American flag in a series of photos.

The eight images capture a giant 200-year-old flag, a young black woman with a giant afro, and various postures combining the pledge of allegiance and black power poses. They are accompanied by a manifesto, written by Nuriddin, that mirrors the preamble to the US constitution. Nuriddin is also the model in the series.

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artforum.com

Jul 04 2020
Võ An Khánh
In the midst of the jungle, focused children attend to instruction in an itinerant classroom. In a wetland field, women in ascetic uniforms jeté with balletic grace. The paradisal world in Võ An Khánh’s
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The Guardian

Jul 04 2020
The eerie beauty of Britain's deserted playgrounds – in pictures

Ciaran McCrickard began photographing abandoned playgrounds in England at the start of lockdown.

“Parks that would have been well-loved and well maintained by local authorities suddenly looked forlorn, unkempt, forgotten,” says the photographer. “At times they looked post-apocalyptic – empty swings just swaying in the breeze.”

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The Guardian

Jul 04 2020
Waiting in the wings: theatres in lockdown

Throughout June, photographer Joanna Vestey photographed the caretakers of 20 closed London theatres, in situ, for a project titled Custodians for Covid. Its aim, through sales of limited edition prints, is to raise funds for the pandemic-threatened arts institutions

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The Guardian

Jul 04 2020
Original Observer photography

Covid-19, Black Lives Matter and poetry – the best photography commissioned by the Observer in June 2020.

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The Guardian

Jul 04 2020
Gavin Rossdale: 'Embarrassing moment? The gross spectre of my crumbling marriage'

The musician on being bigger in the US than the UK, his footballer’s legs and owning a guitar used on The Eagles’ Hotel California

Born in London, Gavin Rossdale, 54, co-founded the band Bush in 1992. They went on to sell 20m records and, in 2013, Rossdale was awarded the Ivor Novello award for international achievement in songwriting. The band split in 2002, but reformed in 2010; their latest album, The Kingdom, is out on 17 July. Rossdale has three sons with the singer Gwen Stefani, and is the father of the model Daisy Lowe. He is single and lives in Los Angeles.

When were you happiest?
Last year, when I had all four kids – Daisy, Kingston, Zuma and Apollo – staying with me on my birthday. It was magical.

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The Guardian

Jul 03 2020
20 photographs of the week

Black Lives Matter protests, protests in Hong Kong and the impact of Covid-19: the most striking photographs from around the world this week

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The Guardian

Jul 03 2020
Tayla Harris image takes out top sport prize again, this time in a boxing ring

Michael Willson is honoured a second time at the 2020 Women in Sport Photo Action awards – for another very different image of Harris

A year ago, the famous image of Tayla Harris taken by photographer Michael Willson, who captured the AFLW player’s distinctive style mid-kick, was selected as the best women’s sport image of the year. The pair have now been honoured for a second time, with Willson again taking out the top prize at the 2020 Women in Sport Photo Action awards for another image of Harris, this time in a boxing ring.

Titled From The Kick to a Punch, the image references last year’s winner, who became an influential actor for change after she was targeted by online trolls. Harris was ultimately immortalised in bronze with a statue erected in Melbourne’s Federation Square.

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artforum.com

Jul 03 2020
Mirak Jamal
Mohsen Jamal (b. 1941) began painting pastorals after he emigrated with his family from Tehran to Germany, fleeing Iran’s turbulent revolution. His son, Mirak Jamal (b. 1979), has been carving out a
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The New York Times

Jul 03 2020
Margaret Morton, Photographer at Home With the Homeless, Dies at 71
For nearly two decades, she chronicled communities on the edge of society in elegant photographs that drew comparisons to the work of Jacob Riis.
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The Guardian

Jul 03 2020
The Guardian view on socially distanced culture: who pays? | Editorial

Half-empty museums, galleries and cinemas sound luxurious, but there will be consequences

Space is a commodity. Cinema, as a cheap-to-enjoy, democratising artform, depends on crowds of people enjoying the same experience. Restaurants work by fitting the maximum number of covers compatible with a pleasant customer experience into their premises. Blockbuster exhibitions generate valuable income for galleries when they attract proper, elbows-out crowds. University lectures offer a convenient way of teaching a large number of students in a single space at once.

Sometimes this makes for a less than pleasant experience. Not everyone wants to be so close to their neighbours in a cafe that they can hear every nuance of their conversation; seeing art can be marred when it becomes a choreographic game, requiring neck-stretching, ducking and side-stepping. Many readers pine for absolute unpeopled silence in a library, and the close-quarters crunch of popcorn or shine of a phone screen in the cinema is a universal irritant.

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The New York Times

Jul 03 2020
Protesting U.S. Immigration Policies, Artists Aim for the Sky
Protesting U.S. Immigration Policies, Artists Aim for the Sky
This Independence Day, 70 artists are having messages of solidarity and defiance typed in the sky to highlight the plight of immigrants held in detention centers.
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The Guardian

Jul 03 2020
Designers to wrap empty UK theatres with message of hope

Pink barrier tape reading ‘Missing Live Theatre’ will be attached to venues as part of an initiative for the ailing industry

The easing of coronavirus restrictions means that England’s theatres are permitted to reopen from 4 July, albeit without live performance. But many major UK venues are not in a position to open their doors yet. A new design project has been launched to wrap some of these empty buildings with a bright message of hope amid the industry’s deepening crisis.

The #scenechange project will see theatres in the UK and Ireland wrapped with pink barrier tape reading “Missing Live Theatre”. It has been organised by a community of designers who work in theatre and want to bring “joy and colour” to venues that currently stand empty, devoid of their usual hustle and bustle. “Theatres which are usually teeming with life feel stark and bleak,” they said, “some even shut away behind hazard tape to prevent them inadvertently being places of gathering.”

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The Guardian

Jul 03 2020
Titian's fiery dreams are brought back to life as National Gallery prepares to reopen – the week in art

Elsewhere, there are provocative bodies, Don McCullin’s landscapes and a liberating take on LGBTQ+ Britain – all in your weekly dispatch

Titian: Love, Desire, Death
The Greek myths are brought to smokily erotic, achingly emotional life in the series of stupendous canvases this great Venetian painter created for Philip II of Spain in the 16th century. Closed by Covid-19 after just three days, this wondrous reunion of Titian’s fiery dreams is back for the rest of the year as the National Gallery reopens.
National Gallery, London from 8 July until 17 January

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artforum.com

Jul 03 2020
Skye Arundhati Thomas on Ramy
IN THE PENULTIMATE EPISODE of Ramy’s first season, the eponymous Egyptian-American protagonist finds himself at a party in Cairo. Everyone is doing coke and listening to house music. Ramy would rather
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The Guardian

Jul 03 2020
Walter Wegmüller’s The Tower: the all-seeing eye of providence

The Swiss painter is known for creating a set of tarot cards, with the Tower seen as a sign of disaster

The late Walter Wegmüller’s version of The Tower, from his 1982 Neuzeit (New Age) Tarot, gives a trippy spin on the card denoting destruction and sudden change. The all-seeing eye of providence – and dollar bill iconography – shoots lightning down on a tower-cum-hungry monster. Its exposed brains are a grey metropolis of whirring cogs, high-rises with outsized TV antennae and polluting factory chimneys. The base is a heap of eggs, the age-old symbol of rebirth. The red tongue recalls the Rolling Stones’ “tongue and lips” logo.

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The Guardian

Jul 03 2020
City crumbles as the sands shift on Senegal's coast – in pictures

Nicky Woo has won the Marilyn Stafford award 2020 with her project As the Water Comes, documenting rising sea levels in Saint-Louis

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The Guardian

Jul 03 2020
Which biscuit takes its name from this person? The great British art quiz

The Stirling Smith Art Gallery & Museum hosts today’s quiz, setting questions to explore art collections of museums closed due to coronavirus

This quiz is brought to you in collaboration with Art UK, the online home for the UK’s public art collections, showing art from more than 3,000 venues and by 45,000 artists. Each day, a different collection on Art UK will set the questions.

Today, our questions are set by the Stirling Smith Art Gallery & Museum. The museum was founded in 1874 with the bequest and collection of the artist Thomas Stuart Smith. Today, its collection contains more than 40,000 objects, artworks and photographs spanning thousands of years, from local archaeological finds to 19th-century European art.

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artforum.com

Jul 02 2020
Camel Collective
This online exhibition, a nine-minute video essay titled Gated Commune, 2018, is an unsettling sendup of modernist problem-solving that befits our dystopian moment. Over grainy black-and-white footage
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The New York Times

Jul 02 2020
Guggenheim Opens Investigation Into Basquiat Show After Racism Complaints
Guggenheim Opens Investigation Into Basquiat Show After Racism Complaints
After nearly a quarter of all employees signed onto a letter accusing executives of racism and mismanagement, the museum has hired a lawyer to start an independent investigation.
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The New York Times

Jul 02 2020
‘Liberty Bell’ Tolls for Sites Where History Is Alive and Kicking
Nancy Baker Cahill uses augmented reality to explore the meaning of historical sites from the Rockaways in New York to Selma, Ala. Is public art embellishing our heritage, or defacing it?
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The New York Times

Jul 02 2020
8 Things to Do This Fourth of July Weekend
8 Things to Do This Fourth of July Weekend
Our culture writers offer suggestions for celebrating Independence Day, and what to watch or listen to without leaving your home.
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The New York Times

Jul 02 2020
Can a New Arts Center Revitalize Provincetown?
Can a New Arts Center Revitalize Provincetown?
In saving the Mary Heaton Vorse home, Ken Fulk hopes to help rescue an arts colony under siege from gentrification. But artists still need cheap studio space.
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The New York Times

Jul 02 2020
Berkshires Museums Announce Reopening Plans Under Phase 3
Mass MoCA, the Norman Rockwell Museum and the Clark Art Institute will reopen this month, with programming changes and social-distancing measures.
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The Guardian

Jul 02 2020
Where are the black voices in visual arts? | Letter

We must address the absence of black and minority ethnic artists from our public museums and galleries, writes Gilane Tawadros

I was pleased to see the intergenerational conversations between black British artists in G2 (Black British Culture special, 25 June) on racism in the arts. But I was surprised that no mention was made of the visual arts. No black or ethnic minority person has run a major art institution in this country. The first big retrospective exhibition of a black British artist at the Tate – Frank Bowling – only took place last year. Sonia Boyce will be the first black British female artist to represent Britain at the Venice Biennale in 2022, 113 years after it was established.

The Institute of International Visual Arts (Iniva) was set up in 1994 to address the absence of BME artists from public museums and galleries, despite the fact that in the 1990s, as today, the UK was witnessing a flowering of young artists, film-makers and intellectuals coming up in the wake of earlier generations of visual artists such as Aubrey Williams, Althea McNish and Kim Lim. Almost three decades later, a significant part of the British population cannot see themselves represented by the institutions they fund. In the wake of Black Lives Matter protests, we must ask: who owns our art institutions and how should they represent us?
Gilane Tawadros
Chair, Stuart Hall Foundation; founding director, Iniva

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The Guardian

Jul 02 2020
Renaissance couple: unhinged duo reunited after 125 years apart

Separated portraits of 16th-century high society husband and wife finally back together

A couple painted by the leading renaissance artist Bartholomäus Bruyn the Elder before their marriage in 1539 have finally been reunited after an art historian turned detective, spending two decades piecing together clues from across Europe to bring the two-panel portrait together again.

Jakob and Elisabeth Omphalius, scions of high-society in 16th-century Cologne, had stared at each other for over 350 years from their respective wooden panels before being inexplicably separated during a sale at a London auction house in 1896.

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The Guardian

Jul 02 2020
Tate Britain announces recipients of £10,000 Turner bursaries

Cash awards given to 10 artists who would have been in the running for cancelled 2020 prize

A “fantastic and exciting” list of ten artists who would all have been in the running for this year’s Turner prize have been named as the recipients of £10,000 bursaries.

Tate Britain on Thursday announced the names of artists who will receive no-strings-attached cash awards in place of this year’s abandoned competition.

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The New York Times

Jul 02 2020
Turner Prize Was Canceled, but Organizers Still Gave Out the Cash
Turner Prize Was Canceled, but Organizers Still Gave Out the Cash
The organizers of the British art award are giving out 10 grants to support artists.
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The Guardian

Jul 02 2020
Jarman prize shortlist 2020 celebrates vibrant escapism

Afro-surrealism, Hollywood racial imbalances and LGBTQ history are explored by nominees for the £10,000 film-making prize

Arabic science fiction, flying paint and a journey through the black techno scene: this year’s Jarman award nominees offer plenty of vibrant escapism.

Among the six shortlisted artists for the £10,000 prize, which recognises the pioneering work of UK-based artist film-makers, are Jenn Nkiru, whose work is influenced by Afro-surrealism and electronic music, and Michelle Williams Gamaker, who tackles racial imbalances using the language of Hollywood.

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The Guardian

Jul 02 2020
Where is this idyllic sun-dappled island? The great British art quiz

Munnings Art Museum hosts today’s quiz, setting questions to explore art collections of museums closed due to coronavirus

This quiz is brought to you in collaboration with Art UK, the online home for the UK’s public art collections, showing art from more than 3,000 venues and by 45,000 artists. Each day, a different collection on Art UK will set the questions.

Today, our questions are set by the Munnings Art Museum, in the beautiful Dedham Vale on the Essex/Suffolk border. The museum is the former home of Sir Alfred Munnings (1878-1959), who is a major figure in the tradition of British horse painting and is celebrated for his depiction of English rural life and landscapes. The museum owns the largest collection of his paintings, drawings and sculpture.

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The Guardian

Jul 01 2020
'Daily life is deeply magical': images from OpenWalls Arles 2020 – in pictures

Supernatural grandmothers and a family of 13 living on a boat were among the subjects that caught the eye of the prestigious photography award’s judges

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The Guardian

Jul 01 2020
Pride, power, pedals and protest: black British photographers pick a best shot

Black Lives Matter has underlined the crucial role played by black photographers. We asked eight British leaders in their field to pick a favourite image from their archives – and explain why it’s so important to them

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The Guardian

Jul 01 2020
Unseen Picasso portrait of lover and muse to appear at auction

Sotheby’s will auction 1931 charcoal drawing that shines light on artist’s affair with Marie-Thérèse Walter

A tender and largely unseen portrait by Picasso of his lover and muse Marie-Thérèse Walter, which the artist personally kept until his death, is to appear at auction for the first time.

The 1931 charcoal drawing shines light on one of the great love affairs of the 20th century and was made by Picasso when his affair with Walter was still a closely guarded secret.

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The Guardian

Jul 01 2020
UK photography body removes image 'playing to racist stereotypes'

Critics say the BIPP’s picture on Instagram of black woman hashtagged #nativo highlights profession’s lack of diversity

An image of a black woman posted by one of British photography’s leading organisations has been removed after criticism that it was racially insensitive.

Critics said the photograph, captioned Naomi Black Samba, which was posted on the British Institute of Professional Photography’s (BIPP) Instagram page, played into “racist stereotypes” of black women.

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The Guardian

Jul 01 2020
'It's like our future has gone': visual artists facing existential threat post Covid-19

Shutdown and recession have caused artists’ commercial and teaching opportunities to dry up – with little help from government. But some see the crisis as a chance to reset

Australian artist Abdul Abdullah was in New York City showing new works at the famed Armory Show, held this year on Pier 94, when the Covid-19 pandemic struck.

The first case in New York was identified on 1 March. The Armory Show opened four days later. “People were already elbow-touching instead of hugging, but over the course of that week, it all got serious,” Abdullah told Guardian Australia.

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artforum.com

Jul 01 2020
Bruce Conner
Created in the summer of 1975, Bruce Conner’s DECK drawings are some of the artist’s very first works in the INKBLOT series—one of his most expansive bodies of works. An intensely meticulous activity,
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The New York Times

Jul 01 2020
New York City Cuts Arts Spending by 11 Percent to Close Budget Gap
Facing a $9 billion loss in tax revenues, city leaders cut agency spending across the board, including the Department of Cultural Affairs.
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artforum.com

Jul 01 2020
Yojiro Imasaka
MIYAKO YOSHINAGA is pleased to present a special reopening exhibition featuring the photo installation “Correspondence” by New York–based artist Yojiro Imasaka (b. 1983, Hiroshima). This project sheds
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The New York Times

Jul 01 2020
3 Art Gallery Shows to Explore From Home
Galleries and museums are getting creative about presenting work online during the coronavirus crisis. Here are three shows worth viewing virtually.
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