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The New York Times

Jul 31 2021
Timothy Rub Will Step Down at Philadelphia Museum of Art
Timothy Rub Will Step Down at Philadelphia Museum of Art
As director, he oversaw Frank Gehry’s reimagining of the historic 1928 building and dealt with an institution reeling from reports of abusive behavior on the part of museum managers.
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The New York Times

Jul 31 2021
Good Fences Make Good Neighbors? Not at Opus 40.
Good Fences Make Good Neighbors? Not at Opus 40.
The scenic vistas of this landscape art and the legacy of its creator, Harvey Fite, are being challenged by a persistent feud and a big fence.
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The Guardian

Jul 31 2021
National treasures: posters celebrating US parks​ – in pictures

The art director JP Boneyard ’s favourite park is Montana’s Glacier national park. “It’s breathtaking, I’m smiling just thinking about it ,” he says. For his screen-print project Fifty-Nine Parks, now collected in a book, he asked modern artists to reinterpret America’s classic national park posters, commissioned by the government in the 1900s.

“I hope they inspire people to visit the parks and connect with nature, but, heck, it’d be awesome if the book inspired folks to pick up a squeegee and start printing too,” he says.

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The Guardian

Jul 31 2021
The RNLI deserves better than Nigel Farage’s contempt | Tim Adams

The rescue service has a long and glorious history of saving the lives of people, wherever they come from

A couple of weeks ago, I was at Lizard Point in Cornwall. The old lifeboat station below Britain’s most southerly cliffs has long since been replaced but the rusting structure remains, a stubborn legacy of heroism past. It was from here, in February 1907, that the biggest sea rescue in the history of the Royal National Lifeboat Institution (RNLI) was launched when the liner SS Suevic was thrown on to the jagged reef offshore in high winds and dense fog. For 16 hours, the lifeboat crews rowed out and rescued all 456 passengers (including 71 infants). The ethnicity or country of origin of those rescued was not recorded, as it has not been recorded for the 146,000 other lives saved during the RNLI’s history.

There has been much talk in recent years of the relevance of some of our monuments to the past. The lifeboat stations that circle our coastline, crewed by volunteers and funded by charity, are living reminders of the humanitarian impulse that remains the best of us. Nigel Farage’s attempts to undermine that spirit last week, by characterising boats saving drowning refugees as a “taxi service for migrants”, went against everything that the Lizard lifeboat and all the other crews risk their lives for. The fact that donations to the RNLI are up 3,000% in the days since is a welcome indication that the spirit that sends those crews out is as appreciated now as it ever was.

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The Guardian

Jul 31 2021
Buried in concrete: mafia architecture – in pictures

Alessio Mamo has photographed the illegal, brutalist buildings and gaudy, now decaying, villas in the south of Italy that mafia bosses constructed

Words by Roberto Saviano and Lorenzo Tondo

Read more on how the mafia made a killing from the destruction of Italy’s south

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The Guardian

Jul 30 2021
Wake review: a must-read graphic history of women-led slave revolts

Rebecca Hall and illustrator Hugo Martínez uncover hidden stories, vital truths and deep, unhealed, intergenerational pain

One especially bitter truth about the capture and enslavement of Africans brought to the New World is this: the identities of those who profited from it and those structures that upheld it were designed to be unremarkable.

Related: Secret history: the warrior women who fought their enslavers

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The New York Times

Jul 30 2021
Guggenheim Museum Curators Move to Join a Union
Guggenheim Museum Curators Move to Join a Union
The curators, as well as conservators and other staff, are looking to join a local of the United Auto Workers.
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The Guardian

Jul 30 2021
Twenty photographs of the week

Simone Biles at the Tokyo Olympic Games, migrants in the Mediterranean and forest fires in Athens, California and Siberia: the most striking images from around the world this week

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artforum.com

Jul 30 2021
The Green Goddess Reloaded
A follow-up to a 2019 exhibition in the French city of Lille that reflected, from a contemporary perspective, on the mythical lost city of “El Dorado” and the narrative of conquest it enshrines, “The
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The New York Times

Jul 30 2021
A Wedding or an Art Installation? A Little of Both.
Some artists have found a new home outside of art galleries as couples strive to create interactive art experiences for their wedding guests.
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The New York Times

Jul 30 2021
How the Guggenheim Got Its Groove Back
A video installation by Wu Tsang with Beverly Glenn-Copeland is part of a series of shows with a shared political charge, a taste of what can be.
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The Guardian

Jul 30 2021
Britain’s Victorian railway bridges may be saved in new green travel plan

Grant Shapps presents walking and cycling scheme, after Highways England slammed for pouring concrete into railway arch

Victorian railway bridges that were due to be filled in with concrete in an act previously decried as “cultural vandalism” will be repurposed as part of a scheme to encourage walking and cycling, the UK transport secretary has announced.

The government is halting the demolition of historic train lines in the hope that they can be remodelled as routes which encourage greener means of travel.

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The Guardian

Jul 30 2021
Van Gogh, mazes and a chilling elephant: Friday’s best photos

The Guardian’s picture editors select highlights from around the world

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The Guardian

Jul 30 2021
Stuffed Tokyo super-rats and Isaac Julien’s abolition hero – the week in art

A vibrant survey of the Olympic capital in art and a 10-screen video devoted to anti-slavery campaigner Frederick Douglass – all in your weekly dispatch

Tokyo: Art and Photography
Exciting and eye-opening survey of one of the world’s great art cities, from 17th-century paintings of courtesans and samurai to a stuffed specimen of today’s urban super-rats.
Ashmolean Museum, Oxford, 29 July to 3 January.

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The Guardian

Jul 30 2021
Hemingway ‘wannabes’ celebrate author with lookalike contest

Fans in Nobel prizewinner’s favourite haunt of Key West hold their 40th competition on his birthday

Ernest Hemingway is survived as much by his macho mythology as he is by his writing. Hemingway was in two plane crashes in two days. Hemingway shot himself in both legs while wrangling a shark. Hemingway had at least nine major concussions – and four wives. He had brain damage. He won the Pulitzer and the Nobel prize. He hunted and fished and wrote plays and books and articles and stories, for ever in pursuit of the truest sentence. He was rageful, charming, violent, brilliant and drunk.

Hemingway is also something of a Key West mascot, especially for a week every July, when a festival called Hemingway Days, which coincides with his birthday (this year, he would be 122) honours his legacy by gathering his lookalikes together.

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The Guardian

Jul 29 2021
‘A long-form pilgrimage’: Coventry hosts 24-hour interfaith celebration

The RSC and City of Culture’s free events include promenade performances and an installation by Tower of London poppy artist

In a celebration of one of the most religiously diverse cities in the UK, Coventry is to host 24 hours of art, theatre, music, food and debate aimed at exploring belief and promoting the connections between faiths.

The Royal Shakespeare Company and Coventry City of Culture have teamed up to produce Faith, a series of free live events in September, including four promenade performances and an art installation by the creator of the 2014 Tower of London poppy memorial.

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The Guardian

Jul 29 2021
A portrait of black lives in Suffolk – in pictures

Black Suffolk is a series of portraits by photographer John Ferguson of people from Suffolk’s African-Caribbean community. The pictures will be on display in an outdoor exhibition in central Ipswich from 30 July and throughout August. Ferguson said: ‘I have produced a new collection of portraits which explore the concept of home for a diversity of people in the African-Caribbean community in Suffolk. This theme creatively expresses people’s experience and interpretation of what exactly is home. Home can be a feeling, a physical space or a geographical place. Home can be a memory, metaphor or experience. The idea is to connect with the notion that our lives are inextricably attached to where we live, our homes, and Suffolk.’

Black Suffolk is part of the six-month-long Aspire Black Suffolk cultural programme, promoted by Head East

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The New York Times

Jul 29 2021
5 Things to Do This Weekend
5 Things to Do This Weekend
Our critics and writers have selected noteworthy cultural events to experience virtually and in person in New York City.
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The New York Times

Jul 29 2021
George Rhoads, Designer of Fantastical ‘Ball Machines,’ Dies at 95
In his ingeniously conceived sculptures, balls seem to travel randomly and trigger various sounds. “Each pathway that the ball takes,” he said, “is a different drama.”
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The Guardian

Jul 29 2021
Australia’s 2021 National Photographic Portrait prize winner and finalists – in pictures

Sydney photographer Joel B Pratley’s photo of a lone farmer immersed in a dust storm in drought-stricken Australia has won the 2021 National Photographic Portrait prize. Titled Drought Story, the image shows David Kalisch captured amid a sudden dust storm on his 1,000-acre farm in Forbes, New South Wales. Pratley said his subject’s stance reflects the resilience of a man pushed to the limits by an unforgiving climate: ‘David’s composure during the storm was surreal, because he is just so used to it. For me, it was like being on Mars.’

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The New York Times

Jul 29 2021
Murals at a San Francisco School Should Stay for Now, Judge Says
Murals at a San Francisco School Should Stay for Now, Judge Says
In response to a lawsuit, a judge says an environmental review must take place before any action is taken to remove or hide the Depression-era murals that some consider offensive.
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The New York Times

Jul 29 2021
Douglas Chrismas, Gallery Owner, Arrested on Embezzlement Charge
Douglas Chrismas, Gallery Owner, Arrested on Embezzlement Charge
The Los Angeles art dealer Douglas Chrismas has surrendered to the F.B.I. and a trial date has been set for September.
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The Guardian

Jul 29 2021
Unmissable moments of Australia’s Olympians – in pictures

Guardian Australia takes a closer look as our sporting heroes give it their all in Tokyo

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The New York Times

Jul 29 2021
At The Ranch in Montauk, Plenty of Room for Art and Horses
At The Ranch in Montauk, Plenty of Room for Art and Horses
Max Levai joins the migration of gallerists to Long Island’s East End, presenting the overlooked Surrealist Renate Druks.
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artforum.com

Jul 29 2021
Marian Goodman Announces Five Partners
New York’s Marian Goodman Gallery today revealed a new partnership structure and leadership plan. Philipp Kaiser, currently the gallery’s chief executive director of artists and programs, has been
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artforum.com

Jul 29 2021
Helen Frankenthaler Foundation Awards $5.1 Million in Climate Grants to Art Institutions
The Helen Frankenthaler Foundation on July 28 announced the recipients of its first round of climate-change grants totaling $5.1 million, parceled out among seventy-nine US institutions in amounts
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The New York Times

Jul 29 2021
Marian Goodman Appoints Five Partners
Marian Goodman Appoints Five Partners
Goodman, a defining presence in the art world for decades, has now promoted five employees as partners to shape the business’s future.
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artforum.com

Jul 29 2021
MoMA PS1 Unveils Artist List for 2021 Greater New York Exhibition
Having been forced last year by the Covid-19 crisis to delay the fifth edition of its regional quinquennial survey Greater New York, MoMA PS1 has announced that the exhibition will open October 7 and
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The New York Times

Jul 29 2021
5 Art Gallery Shows to See Right Now
Julie Mehretu’s prints; Lee Lozano’s drawings; paintings by the Florida Highwaymen; sculptures by Hugh Hayden; and a survey of protest art.
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The Guardian

Jul 29 2021
Holocaust memorial in Westminster is given go-ahead after inquiry

Controversial £100m education centre to be built next to parliament, but opponents may launch appeal

A controversial Holocaust memorial and education centre is to be built in the heart of Westminster at a cost of more than £100m after the government gave it the go-ahead following a public inquiry.

The Board of Deputies of British Jews welcomed the decision, saying there was “something uniquely powerful about locating a memorial to the Holocaust right next to the centre of the UK’s democracy”.

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The Guardian

Jul 29 2021
Motorbike stunts and Turkish fires: Thursday’s best photos

The Guardian’s picture editors select highlights from around the world

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The New York Times

Jul 29 2021
Londoners Were Promised a Hill With a View. They Got a Pile of Scaffolding.
Londoners Were Promised a Hill With a View. They Got a Pile of Scaffolding.
The $2.7 million Marble Arch Mound was meant to create a new attraction for visitors in the middle of London. But the reality of the project is falling short of expectations.
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The New York Times

Jul 29 2021
A Trick of the Eye Turns a Luxurious Embassy Inside Out
A Trick of the Eye Turns a Luxurious Embassy Inside Out
The French delegation in Rome is staging some of the city’s boldest public art projects. The latest, by the street artist JR, cuts like an X-ray into the mission’s sumptuous offices.
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The Guardian

Jul 28 2021
Richard Hutchins: the homeless artist who became an Oprah-endorsed sensation

He spent years in jail and more on the street but now the 62-year-old’s artwork is selling for thousands to stars like Oprah Winfrey

On 4 April 2021, Richard Hutchins, 62, watched as a blue truck pulled into the supermarket parking lot at Ralph’s in Los Angeles. Richard had been homeless for six years. He didn’t know it then, but that blue truck was about to change his life.

At the age of six, he worked in the fields after school in Georgia. He used the brown bags provided, together with twigs from the fire to create charcoal stickmen. His passion for art grew from there and he made his first major sale of $1,500 at the age of just 15.

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The Guardian

Jul 28 2021
‘You never stop learning, you just become wiser’ – a photo essay on black fatherhood

Renee Osubu’s intimate portraits of black fathers include close friends, professional boxers, even a man with 18 grandchildren she bumped into at the market

“This photo project is something I’m really drawn to because of my relationship with my dad,” says Nigerian-British photographer and director Renee Osubu. Her father passed away in 2017, while she was shooting her debut film Dear Philadelphia. “This is my most vulnerable project because it’s specifically about a relationship and a person I miss. It felt like an honour to be able to spend time with all these different dads.” Though documenting children and other sensitive social groups is nothing new to Osubu, Fathers & Figures is her most honest series to date.

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artforum.com

Jul 28 2021
Christie’s Details New Asia Pacific Headquarters in Hong Kong
Christie’s has announced that a curvy, glass-clad Zaha Hadid Architects–designed skyscraper scheduled to be completed in 2023 in Hong Kong will house its new Asia Pacific headquarters. The blue-chip
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artforum.com

Jul 28 2021
25 Artists Sever Ties with Zabludowicz Collection over Pro-Israel Connection
Twenty-five artists and art workers have announced that they are disaffiliating from London’s Zabludowicz Collection, citing the contemporary art museum’s connections to the Israeli military. On July
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The New York Times

Jul 28 2021
Robert Ellison, Ceramics Collector With a Giving Streak, Dies at 89
Robert Ellison, Ceramics Collector With a Giving Streak, Dies at 89
The more than 600 works he gave to the Met enriched the museum’s collection enormously.
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The New York Times

Jul 28 2021
Review: Marina Abramovic Summons Maria Callas in ‘7 Deaths’
Part mixtape and part séance, this opera project by the famed performance artist attempts to unite two divas across time.
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artforum.com

Jul 28 2021
Jamieson Webster on Louise Bourgeois and psychoanalysis
I WONDER HOW people will think of psychoanalysis after they see the show “Louise Bourgeois, Freud’s Daughter,” currently at the Jewish Museum in New York. Will it rise in their esteem, having fallen
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The New York Times

Jul 28 2021
Sunday in the Trenches With George
Sunday in the Trenches With George
James Lapine’s book shows how he and Stephen Sondheim invested two years of work to burnish their musical from an avant-garde near-disaster to a mainstream classic.
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artforum.com

Jul 28 2021
Kristy Luck
“Know thyself,” commands the age-old adage; yet no matter how hard one tries, the true depths of one’s history and identity remain inscrutable. This inscrutability lies at the crux of Kristy Luck’s
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The Guardian

Jul 28 2021
Winners of Wellcome Photography Prize 2021 announced

Lockdown knitting self-portrait and images of Indonesian transgender women win first place

Images of an artist knitting in order to get through a lockdown low and a rare glimpse into the lives of transgender women in Jakarta have won one of the most prestigious photography prizes in the UK.

Jameisha Prescod’s bedroom self-portrait in London and Yoppy Pieter’s survey of trans women in the Indonesian capital both won the Wellcome Photography Prize, which awards the winners £10,000 each.

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The New York Times

Jul 28 2021
Frankenthaler Foundation Energy Project Is Giving Museums $10 Million
Frankenthaler Foundation Energy Project Is Giving Museums $10 Million
Grants awarded to 79 U.S. visual arts institutions will finance energy-efficiency initiatives and measures for protection from wildfires and earthquakes.
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The Guardian

Jul 28 2021
A young Mexican mourns his teenage cousin: Luis Antonio Rojas’s best photograph

‘Children have to deal with the fallout of the drug trade. They are the ones who can’t walk to their school in safety, who have to train to use a gun’

In the mountains of Guerrero in south-west Mexico, there is a small town called Alcozacán. Violence is common in the area, which is strategically important for the drug trade. Violence has increased all over Mexico over the past few years, but some places including Guerrero have been particularly badly affected.

The people of Alcozacán and its surrounding towns became more and more angry about the criminal groups terrorising their communities and what they saw as a lack of protection from the government. They felt abandoned, so formed community defence forces to protect themselves from the gangs and drug traffickers. In Alcozacán, there are no police as we know them. It is ruled – or taken care of, depending on your point of view – by a force made up of local people.

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The Guardian

Jul 28 2021
Cuts to art subjects funding ‘walk us back 60 years’, says artist Helen Cammock

UK’s decision to slash subsidy is designed to stifle criticism from artists, Turner prize winner says

The Turner prize-winning artist Helen Cammock has condemned the government’s decision to halve higher education funding for some arts subjects, calling it a move that will “walk us back 60 years” and make the arts a pursuit for the rich.

Cammock said the funding cuts, which were signed off last week and will slash the high-cost funding subsidy for creative and arts subjects by 50% from September, were a cynical move designed to stifle criticism from artists.

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The Guardian

Jul 27 2021
‘They stood firm’: Poverty and police violence in 70s Northern Ireland – in pictures

In 1978, Magnum photographer Chris Steele-Perkins visited Northern Ireland to document the lives of Catholic communities from the inside: ‘I was not neutral and was not interested in capturing it so’

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artforum.com

Jul 27 2021
Sarah Entwistle at Galerie Barbara Thumm
Artist and architect Sarah Entwistle traces her familial history and reimagines failure as possibility in the exhibition, “The knots of tender love are firmly tied” at Galerie Barbara Thumm Berlin
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artforum.com

Jul 27 2021
“Highwaymen”
Beginning in the 1950s, a group of young Black men, faced with the prospect of toiling in Florida’s citrus groves, instead learned to paint the windswept palms, motley waters, and singular radiance of
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