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The Guardian

Jan 18 2019
Anni Albers’s Intersecting: geometric language

The German textile artist blurred the lines between traditional craft and modern art. Here, she creates a sense of rhythm and movement on a handloom

The great modernist weaver Anni Albers made one of the earliest forms of cultural expression relevant to the 20th century. While the future seemed to lie in the gleaming, hard surfaces of skyscrapers and rockets, her tactile creations, wrought on a handloom, went in the opposite direction.

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The New York Times

Jan 18 2019
Can Art Make Something Happen?
With “This Land,” David Opdyke melds art and activism, hoping to inspire urgent changes in vision, one postcard, and viewer, at a time.
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The Guardian

Jan 17 2019
10 great European art anniversaries in 2019

From 100 years of Bauhaus to 500 years since Leonardo’s death, a host of landmark art events and exhibitions open around Europe this year

It is 350 years since the death of Rembrandt van Rijn. There is a year-long programme of events in nine Dutch cities, focusing on Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age (listings at holland.com). In Amsterdam, the Rijksmuseum (15 Feb-10 June) will display all of its 22 paintings, 60 drawings and 300 engravings – the biggest Rembrandt collection ever seen in a single exhibition. Later in the year it has a Rembrandt and Velazquez show (11 Oct-19 Jan), while the Rembrandt House Museum has three exhibitions and the City Archives tell his personal story (until 7 April). In the Hague, the Mauritshuis (until 15 Sept) is showing 18 paintings attributed to Rembrandt; there’s a display of the painter’s early work at Leiden’s Museum De Lakenhal (3 Nov-9 Feb 2020, lakenhal.nl); and the Fries Museum (to 7 March) has an intimate show devoted to his wife, Saskia . Exhibitions are also taking place in Germany and the UK.
See codart.nl for details

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The Guardian

Jan 17 2019
More trees are the answer to cool down our cities | Marco Amati and Lauren Rickards

Leaving trees in the ground and planting new ones could help future proof new development sites against extreme heat

Urban life can be an insulated existence, consisting of circling between one temperature-controlled space after another. But cities are not invulnerable to climatic changes. Indeed, when it comes to heat, they can fare worse. They are also far from homogenous. Counter to the images of “domed cities” that Buckminster Fuller proposed for Manhattan in the 1960s and that Dubai is touted to be pursuing, cities do not have equally distributed temperatures. Even if they do, the risk those temperatures represent are far from equally perceived or experienced.

Related: Australia heatwave: overnight minimum of 35.9C in Noona sets new record

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The Guardian

Jan 17 2019
Banksy rat? Tokyo takes a closer look at graffiti resembling artist's work

City’s governor asks if image of ‘cute rat’ is a gift from the elusive street artist


Authorities in Tokyo have launched an investigation into a work of graffiti that bears a striking resemblance to a trademark drawing by the celebrated – and so far unidentified – British street artist, Banksy.

Tokyo’s metropolitan government was alerted to a drawing of a rat holding an umbrella – one of Banksy’s best-known works – on a door near a Hinode monorail station in the city centre.

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The New York Times

Jan 17 2019
A Book Lover’s Haven Turns 100
The Grolier Club, the nation’s oldest society of bibliophiles, just celebrated the centennial of its grand Manhattan home. Yes, there’s a secret staircase hidden in a bookshelf. No, do not use gloves in its library.
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The New York Times

Jan 17 2019
Martin Luther King Day: 4 Ways to Honor His Legacy
An art exhibition, a play and more events that will help you commemorate the civil rights leader.
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The New York Times

Jan 17 2019
21 Art Exhibitions to View in N.Y.C. This Weekend
Our guide to new art shows and some that will be closing soon.
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The New York Times

Jan 17 2019
Now Unreeling, an Istanbul Artist’s Tumultuous Decade
Catching up with Banu Cennetoglu in her first U.S. show, at SculptureCenter. She calls it ‘a collective history.’
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The Guardian

Jan 17 2019
True hothousing at Pimlico school | Letter
It may have been architecturally acclaimed, but those who taught at Pimlico secondary school found its design anything but practical, says Ian Wilson

Oliver Wainwright (Eye of the freeholder, G2, 16 January) implies that it was wrong to demolish Pimlico comprehensive school, mentioning those who campaigned to save it on grounds of its architectural merit. Those of us who taught there were not impressed by the awards won by the building. Its extensive windows resulted in very high summer temperatures. In the long hot summer of 1976, I was then the NUT rep and I had to press the health and safety executive to visit and try to persuade senior management to ameliorate the problem of temperatures of over 35 degrees. The design of the building also meant that at lesson changes nearly 2,000 students converged on one concourse, often with predictable consequences on behaviour.

I often wondered whether those who decided on the awards or believed the building should survive ever bothered talking to the users?
Ian Wilson
Thames Ditton, Surrey

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The New York Times

Jan 17 2019
What to See in New York Art Galleries This Week
Harold Haliday Costain photographs the sugar and salt industries; Karl Haendel creates artistic punch lines; and Lynette Yiadom-Boakye ignites the unexpected.
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The New York Times

Jan 17 2019
Critic’s Pick: Ansel Adams in a New Light
The National Parks are in partial shutdown. But America’s wilderness shines in a show at the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston that reveals how human intervention has changed purple mountains’ majesty.
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The Guardian

Jan 17 2019
La Caixa collection review – Whitechapel's tapas leaves me hungry

This compact selection of art owned by the Spanish bank gains no greater meaning beyond the corporate through investing in an author’s explications

What does the end of a marriage look like? In 1993 the German painter Gerhard Richter made a startling image of his second wife, the provocative and fascinating artist Isa Genzken. This was the year they separated. In a small room at London’s Whitechapel Gallery, Genzken stands with her bare back to us – and to Richter – with her thin body and short hair. She hangs her head downward, as if commanded by the artist, or perhaps in despair. Her expression is anyone’s guess. This painting, as is Richter’s custom, was copied from a photograph. His smooth brushwork emphasises qualities of the photo – a Polaroid? – that reveal depths of anxiety and estrangement. She’s harshly lit and blurred. Is Richter saying goodbye through tears of suppressed anguish, or is he himself driving her to turn her back?

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The New York Times

Jan 17 2019
Show Us Your Wall: Take Your Child to Work Day Is Every Day for This Collector
Sarah Harrelson and her husband have careers that deal in art and design, and their children aren’t left behind.
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The Guardian

Jan 17 2019
Turbulence, trauma, hope: Koen Wessing's indelible images of history – in pictures

Koen Wessing recorded the history of the postwar period: decolonisation, violence and barbarism in Latin America, the disintegration of the Soviet bloc, war in Yugoslavia, apartheid in South Africa and the resurgence of China.

A new exhibition, Koen Wessing: The Indelible Image, presents a set of 80 prints, as well as screenings and a filmed interview with Dutch film-maker and cinematographer Kees Hin.

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The Guardian

Jan 16 2019
Carla Kogelman's best photograph: children playing on a swing

‘They’re in their own world and don’t see me. It’s a nostalgic image, with a touch of magic from those disembodied feet and hands’

I took the picture in the summer of 2013, in a rural part of northern Austria. I grew up in Holland. I went back there in 2012 to try to recapture my own childhood, but the farm where I was born no longer existed and the people I knew as a child no longer lived there. And then I found my childhood – or what I wished it had been – here, in the Austrian countryside.

I was asked to do a documentary project about the Waldviertel region, which is how I came to meet these two local little girls, Hannah and Alena. Their mother, Sonja, asked if I would take some pictures of them.

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The New York Times

Jan 16 2019
American Alliance of Museums Leads National Diversity Initiative
A multiyear project, backed by $4 million from three foundations, aims to make the country’s museums more inclusive.
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The Guardian

Jan 16 2019
Norway's favourite painting to go on display in London

Winter Night in the Mountains part of first Harald Sohlberg show outside Norway

Edvard Munch’s The Scream is a classic symbol of dread that has been hailed as the ultimate icon of contemporary politics – but a very different Norwegian painting is the country’s favourite.

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The Guardian

Jan 16 2019
Artist Bridget Riley unveils huge Messengers wall painting

Riley says she wants National Gallery artwork to spark feelings of joy

Bridget Riley hopes her huge new work, painted directly on to to a spare white wall at the National Gallery, will help people appreciate the joy of being alive.

The 87-year-old artist, one of Britain’s most important living painters, on Wednesday unveiled a permanent wall painting which will be the first work of art many visitors see after they enter the gallery off Trafalgar Square.

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The Guardian

Jan 16 2019
Crowds, vandals, chaos: what happens when Banksy sprays your wall?

One person struggled to sell their home, another had to remove wall. We meet the people whose lives changed after Banksy left his mark

After a Banksy mural appeared on his Port Talbot garage last month, Ian Lewis found himself facing a “very, very stressful” battle to protect the artwork from thieves and vandals. Here, four people share their own, very different experiences of being “Banskied”.

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The Guardian

Jan 16 2019
How a grieving artist 'gathered strength' from painting groundbreaking women

In her set of paintings, titled Groundbreaking Girls, artist Allison Adams found inspiration from influential women throughout history after the death of her husband

Marie Curie was the first woman to win the Nobel prize for physics. Frida Kahlo was a pioneering Mexican artist. And the ballet dancer Janet Collins was one of the first African Americans to take the stage in the 1950s. Together, these women broke barriers and to celebrate their legacies, an artist in California has painted roughly 200 portraits of them and other groundbreaking heroines – from suffragists to civil rights activists and gospel singers – as part of an upcoming exhibit at the Women’s Museum of California, entitled Groundbreaking Girls.

Related: Beyond borders: the artists using their work to take on division

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The Guardian

Jan 15 2019
Smile, dad! Alternative family portraits

From artfully photobombed beach holiday snaps to the soulful portraits of a birdwatching brother with schizophrenia – this year’s Photo50 at London art fair exhibition goes inside the family photo

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The Guardian

Jan 15 2019
Haiti's isolated and forgotten village – in pictures

Near the bottom of the island of Hispaniola in south-east Haiti is a forgotten village, cut off from its own country, and slowly emptying as its residents leave. As well as health services or electricity, Boucan Ferdinand also lost its only road to the nearest town, Bois Negresse, in devastating floods in 2004. Some of its residents have left for the capital, Port-au-Prince, while others cling onto a precarious life. Many have crossed illegally into the more prosperous neighbouring Dominican Republic

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The Guardian

Jan 15 2019
How The Scream became the ultimate image for our political age

Edvard Munch’s painting is a masterpiece for these troubled times. Ahead of an exhibition at the British Museum, Jonathan Jones charts its rise, from the 1893 original to today’s inflatables and emojis

The face is a greenish sock of sickly flesh stretched tight over the skull. Its features have been burned away by pain. All that remain in the elongated mask are two wide round eyes with dots for pupils, a pair of black nostrils and a mouth open in an oval scream. We’ve all been there.

The Scream was created by the Norwegian artist Edvard Munch in 1893 but it has become a masterpiece – the masterpiece – for our time. There are comparably “iconic” works of art – the Mona Lisa, Van Gogh’s Sunflowers – but they exist in a world of art and beauty. The Scream is ugly and brutal and belongs in the here and now. It is a symbol we reach for as we might for a strong word, to express what we’re feeling this minute.

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The New York Times

Jan 15 2019
Senegal’s Museum of Black Civilizations Welcomes Some Treasures Home
With its focus on black cultural contributions across the world, a museum opens amid a heated debate about reclaiming plundered art.
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The New York Times

Jan 15 2019
The Shed, a Rare New Arts Center on the Hudson, Is Set to Open
For its first season, beginning in April, the Shed has commissioned more than a dozen exhibitions, performances and lectures across disciplines.
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The New York Times

Jan 15 2019
Big Fairs Dominate the Art World. Small Galleries Are Seeking Another Way.
The Condo group exhibition, whose fourth London edition opened on Saturday, lets smaller dealerships attract new faces by sharing their spaces and client lists.
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The Guardian

Jan 15 2019
Can we trust the government to judge what's beautiful?

The UK government has resolved to put beauty first to create better homes. Shame no one can agree on what that means

The UK government thinks it has got to the heart of the housing crisis: the problem is, new homes just aren’t beautiful enough. “Build beautifully and get permission,” says the housing minister, Kit Malthouse. “Build beautifully and communities will actually welcome developers, rather than drive them out of town at the tip of a pitchfork.”

If only housebuilders would make their product more visually appealing, the thinking goes, then opposition to them would fade away, more homes would be built, prices would drop and we would all live happily ever after. The simple solution, Malthouse says, is “putting beauty at the heart of our housing and communities policy”.

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The Guardian

Jan 15 2019
Beyond borders: the artists using their work to take on division

In a new show, the role of protest art is explored in relation to issues of nationalism and exclusion, including a large brick wall erected by Mexican artist Jorge Méndez Blake

As Donald Trump pushes for a Mexican border wall and his shutdown drags on, artists are having their say in a group exhibit of border art at a New York art gallery. Borders features more than 20 artists who look at how, with the rise of nationalism, barriers exclude, divide and separate.

Related: How the government shutdown affects museums

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The New York Times

Jan 14 2019
Trilobites: In an Ancient Nun’s Teeth, Blue Paint — and Clues to Medieval Life
A rare blue pigment, discovered in the fossilized plaque of a German nun, hints at a broader role for women in the production of religious texts.
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The New York Times

Jan 14 2019
Jessica Tcherepnine, Exacting Botanical Artist, Is Dead at 80
Ms. Tcherepnine painted blossoms from her family garden in England and became a world-renowned botanical artist after moving to the United States.
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The New York Times

Jan 14 2019
Russian Artist, Sentenced Over Bank Fire, Dedicates Trial to the Marquis de Sade
Pyotr Pavlensky was given a three-year sentence for lighting a fire as part of a work of performance art. He will not serve any time in prison.
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The Guardian

Jan 14 2019
Own a limited edition Andy Murray print from photographer Tom Jenkins

The multiple grand-slam winner is retiring from tennis and we are giving readers a chance to own an exclusive print by our award-winning photographer, who has been documenting the player’s career since 2005

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The Guardian

Jan 13 2019
Welsh farmstead is rare medieval hall house, experts confirm

New dating technique used to prove Llwyn Celyn farmhouse is medieval marvel

A Welsh farmhouse that was once in such poor condition that rainwater ran through its rooms is in fact an exceptionally rare 600-year-old medieval hall house, it has been confirmed, after conservation experts used a groundbreaking new dating technique originally developed by climate change scientists.

Llwyn Celyn, which lies in the Black Mountains on the border of England and Wales, was completed in 1420, an analysis of its timbers found, making it one of only a tiny number of domestic buildings to survive from one of the most destructive periods in Welsh history, immediately following the failed revolt of the Welsh prince Owain Glyndŵr.

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The Guardian

Jan 13 2019
Nevill Holt Opera review – a quiet kind of drama

Subtle and intimate, this opera house within a stable block is perfectly attuned to performers, audience and the elements alike

Think of an opera house and you might think of something grand and lush – red velvet, gilded stucco, the great chandelier and theatrical staircases of the Paris Opéra – or, in a 20th-century iteration, the nation-defining, sail-shaped roofs of Sydney. You probably don’t think of a structure hidden within a partly 17th-century stable block, whose architects have considered with great care its multiple shades of brown.

Such is the 400-seat venue in the grounds of Nevill Holt Hall near Market Harborough in Leicestershire, a great, rambling additive work of seven centuries now owned by the Carphone Warehouse magnate David Ross. In a way typical of a certain sort of English rural composition, a church and hamlet (population: 28, according to the 2011 census) look like annexes of the house. The building is designed to serve the annual Nevill Holt Opera festival, which is backed by the David Ross Foundation, and to hold occasional performances and education events through the year. It replaces a temporary structure deemed by the local planners to be too damaging to the historic building.

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The Guardian

Jan 12 2019
Photographer Kathy Shorr on driving a limo in 80s Brooklyn

Shorr’s side job as a stretch limousine driver in the late 80s provided rich material for her series on working-class New Yorkers in high celebration mode

• See more of Kathy Shorr’s limousine photos here

Driving limousines in New York taught Kathy Shorr a lot about human nature. “Working-class guys were the best tippers,” she recalls. “They understood that the tip was going to make the driver’s day or evening. The worst were the people who had money: the more money it seemed that somebody had, the cheaper they were.” One particular man hired the limousine for the afternoon to propose to his girlfriend: Shorr bought flowers and drinks for the couple, and it took military precision, timing and coordination to get them from their upmarket brownstone building to Times Square for the exact moment a sign would appear on the billboard with her name on it, asking her to marry him. It all went off without a hitch: they got there at the right time, saw the message, she said yes. But at the end of the trip, nothing. The next day the man complained, saying the limousine was too cold.

Even more galling, because of all the strategising involved, she didn’t even get a picture of them. In 1989, as a recent graduate of New York’s School of Visual Arts, Shorr had decided to take a job as a limousine driver in her native Brooklyn to photograph the people she drove around. At first she had considered driving taxis, but the customers would have been in and out too quickly, constantly in a hurry, while driving a limo gave her several hours with her passengers. So, for nine months in 1989 and 1990, she worked weekends for a downtown limo company. “I would describe them as being on the low end of the limousine hierarchy,” she says. “Drivers had to provide liquor and mixers for their clients, and everything was a bit shabby and cheap.”

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The Guardian

Jan 12 2019
The big picture: behind the scenes of an Indian wedding

There’s a note of melancholy in Mahesh Shantaram’s photograph of a young bride in north-eastern India

Mahesh Shantaram, a 41-year-old from Bangalore, has no qualms saying that he is best known as a wedding photographer. But it wasn’t exactly what he had in mind when he left his homeland to study photography in Paris. “In the 00s, if you were a wedding photographer, you would not reveal it,” he laughs. “When I got back to India, people were a bit shocked, saying, ‘You spent all that money, you should do advertising or something.’ But weddings gave me excellent access to society across India. And I was one of the first photographers to use a, let’s say, western approach to photojournalism and apply it to weddings.”

Shantaram’s new book, Matrimania, is “an alternative wedding album”, one that features not only the bride and groom, but also guests and workers. Some of the “mania” in the title is obvious, such as an Alice in Wonderland-themed set on which the bride’s parents spent £50,000 on lighting. A typical wedding that Shantaram photographs might have 1,000 guests, but some have as many as 400,000. “You did hear that right!” he says.

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The Guardian

Jan 12 2019
Back-seat hijinks: Brooklyn limousine portraits – in pictures

For nine months in 1989, the American photographer Kathy Shorr drove a stretch limousine and found rich material for a series capturing working-class Brooklyn in high celebration mode.

See more of her work at kathyshorr.com

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The Guardian

Jan 12 2019
Urban Scrawl: street art around the world – in pictures

Photographer and street art lover Lou Chamberlin has travelled across the globe in search of the world’s most intriguing street art. Urban Scrawl documents some of the world’s most interesting street art words and typography

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The Guardian

Jan 12 2019
The golden hour: fantasy sunsets and sunrises – in pictures

South Korean artist and photographer KangHee Kim lives in New York, and because of visa restrictions has been confined to the US for the past 10 years. Unable to leave physically, she has created her own form of “surreal escapism”. In her series Golden Hour, she takes shots an hour after sunrise and before sunset, then uses Photoshop to layer them together to create fantastical images. “I’ve been feeling stuck from the visa complication, and I found myself waiting to see exceptional scenes to capture,” she says. “But instead of waiting for a magical moment that may never occur, I wanted to create it myself.” Inspired by a visit to California, the series also mixes urban landscapes with nature. “I want to see familiar settings in a new space, as if I am travelling,” she says. “It feels as if I could make the impossible possible – like my visa status.”

KangHee Kim’s book Golden Hour is published by Same Paper

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The Guardian

Jan 12 2019
Whistler and Nature review – nature as perfect decor

Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge
For the American artist James McNeill Whistler, nature was merely a pretext for painting, which makes Whistler and Nature an uneasy affair

It would be hard to think of a more perverse subject for a show than Whistler and Nature. The American painter (1834-1903) famously despised nature’s rampant chaos. He hated the way nature kept cropping up all over the place without any thought of harmony, structure or aesthetic restraint, all of which had to be imposed upon it by artists such as himself. “Nature is very rarely right,” runs one of Whistler’s typical barbs, “to such an extent even, that it might almost be said that Nature is usually wrong.”

Of course the natural world is present in his art, if deeply veiled in mist or moonlight. Every one of Whistler’s Nocturnes is an outdoor scene, after all, showing the Thames and other great rivers dissolving in atmospheric fog. A gathering of Nocturnes would have been magnificent to behold (there is only one here); likewise an exhibition of his black and white visions of Venice, adrift on its mystic lagoon. Whistler and Water: that would have been a spectacular show. But instead, the Fitzwilliam Museum in Cambridge has 90 works that wander so far from the theme of nature, on the whole, as to make a mockery of the show’s title.

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The Guardian

Jan 12 2019
The 20 photographs of the week

Protests in Gaza, migrants at the border fence in Tijuana, the election in the Democratic Republic of Congo and Elvis fans in Sydney – the week captured by the world’s best photojournalists

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The Guardian

Jan 12 2019
Buy your own Guardian classic photograph: Early morning frost, North Downs, Kent, 2010

This week in our regular series, an atmospheric image of early morning frost on the North Downs, Kent, 2010, by Martin Godwin

This atmospheric picture was taken near photographer Martin Godwin’s home on the North Downs, near Biggin Hill, in early January 2010. He has lived there for the past 25 years, and watched the trees along this avenue grow from saplings. It’s all about the light, he says. “As a photographer, light is one of the biggest things that interest you. Here, the sun is just breaking through the clouds, creating a band of light.” This radiance, along with the line of skeletal trees, slice the photograph neatly in two. “Cutting a picture in half like this lends a stillness and a stability to the composition,” says Godwin. Hannah Booth

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The New York Times

Jan 11 2019
Warhol Foundation Overturns 8-Year Smithsonian Funding Ban
The foundation decided to ban grants to the Smithsonian when a video by David Wojnarowicz was removed from an exhibition in 2010.
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The New York Times

Jan 11 2019
Prosecutors: Art Dealer Mary Boone Should Go to Prison
In a court filing, prosecutors asked a federal judge to sentence Ms. Boone to as much as three years in prison for filing false tax returns.
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The Guardian

Jan 11 2019
Wales in bid to save Banksy mural in Port Talbot

Artwork prompts influx of visitors as Welsh government hopes to secure its future

Ian Lewis was scrolling through Facebook when he saw an image of a new Banksy artwork on a plain garage wall. He thought it looked a bit like his garage – and was shocked when it transpired that it actually was.

The arrival of the work has since transformed the Welsh town into a cultural destination, prompting an influx of visitors from as far as Australia and creating a cottage industry in souvenirs devoted to the piece.

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The Guardian

Jan 11 2019
Performance art piece spends four days trying to 'reverse Brexit'

Simulation uses fake news and adverts to explore how public was manipulated in 2016 vote

An artist who has set up an installation in a central London gallery with the aim of “reversing Brexit” hopes the performance art piece will help people understand and navigate the murky world of online manipulation.

Swedish multimedia artist Jonas Lund has set up Operation Earnest Voice, a “fully functioning propaganda office”, at the Photographers Gallery with a singular but playful aim: to use the technology and devices that were utilised during the Brexit referendum debate to stop it from happening.

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The New York Times

Jan 11 2019
How Paparazzi Dogs and Rabbitgirl Conquered New York City Streets
Going around the traditional gatekeepers, Gillie and Marc Schattner of Australia have become the city’s most prolific creators of public art.
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The New York Times

Jan 11 2019
Unearthing Photography’s Time Capsule
Four trailblazing photographers — Robert Frank, Robert Heinecken, Dave Heath and John Wood — collaborated on a project that was hidden for 30 years.
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The New York Times

Jan 11 2019
‘Harry Potter’ at Night: Historical Society Extends Exhibition Hours
During the final week of a blockbuster exhibition, the museum will offer visitors a late-night Potter fix.
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