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The Art Newspaper

Apr 27 2017
Maybe it's because I'm an EastEnder
EastEnder: Charles Saumarez Smith
The British artist and author Edmund de Waal praises Royal Academy of Arts' chief executive Charles Saumarez Smiths new book on East London, which is out today (27 April). De Waal describes the RA boss, a resident of the East End since the 1980s, as being a very good companion on his flaneurial walks, amusing, erudite and engaged in his response to buildings, people and places. The insiders guide to exploring the East End, published by Thames & Hudson, features everything from Anish Kapoors ArcelorMittal Orbit in Olympic Park, which he writes looks better close up, like an escaped triffid to the Dirty Burger that set up shop in an Edwardian building in Stepneys Mile End Road. Saumarez Smith notes that the gourmet chain is next to the Trinity Almshouse where you can have flagons of Crate ale and superior, but not expensive, burgers. The book was borne from the blog that Saumarez Smith started in 2014. He tells The Art Newspaper that he has another book up his sleeve, this time on central London, if things go well with this one.
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The Art Newspaper

Apr 27 2017
Nitsch performance using slaughtered bull to go ahead in Tasmania
Hermann Nitsch in front of one of his works (Image: Gero Breloer)
A performance by the Austrian artist Hermann Nitsch, which will use the carcass of a slaughtered bull to stage a bloody, sacrificial ritual will take place, as planned, on 17 June in Tasmania.
 
Animal rights campaigners had tried to block the work, the artists first in Australia. By this morning, 27 April, a petition set up on change.org by Animal Liberation Tasmania, which called on the City of Hobart to stop the Nitsch performance because it trivialises the slaughter of animals for human usage, and condemns a sentient being to death in the pursuit of artistic endeavours, had been signed by over 20,000 supporters.
 
But in a statement emailed to the press, Leigh Carmichael, the creative director of Dark Mofo, an annual music festival held at the Museum of Old and New Art, said that the Nitsch ritual would proceed.
 
The work of the Austrian artist, one of the key members of the Viennese Actionist group, exposes reality and deals with the sanitation of war, horror, and slaughterFor those members of the public who believe that this is no more than shock art, or a publicity stunt, we urge you to look deeper, Carmichael said.
 
The statement continued: Art sometimes has the power to influence a community, and although it would be an indirect outcome of this performance, we would consider a reduction in the consumption of meat a positive result. If we cancel this event, not one bull will be savedYes, we could select a random animal to live peacefully in a paddock for the rest of its life. This would amount to no more than a futile attempt to reduce our guilt, and in the process further suppress the truth and reality that we are seeking to understand.
 
In January 2015 an exhibition of Nitsch's work at the Jumex Collection in Mexico City was cancelled following protest by animal rights activists.
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The Guardian

Apr 26 2017
Georgia on my mind: Mark Steinmetz's American south – in pictures

From Mississippi lightning to balloons in Georgia, Steinmetz captures stories of longing, despondency and mystery in his photos of the southern states

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artforum.com

Apr 26 2017
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The New York Times

Apr 26 2017
Visit to the Met Could Cost You, if You Don’t Live in New York
Despite its history as a public institution with free entry to all, the museum is considering a mandatory charge to help address budget deficits.
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The New York Times

Apr 26 2017
Decorators on Display at the Kips Bay Show House
Can we find meaning in the feathered nests of the superwealthy?
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The Art Newspaper

Apr 26 2017
Thaddaeus Ropac defies the Brexit blues with his new Mayfair gallery
Gilbert, Thaddaeus Ropac and George at yesterday's gallery opening
The London art worlds Brexit blues were temporarily dispelled last night (27 April) with the opening of Thaddaeus Ropacs new gallery in a Georgian mansion in the heart of Mayfair. The grand new premises signal a significant gesture of faith in the capitals future as a European art hub. The Austrian born, Salzburg- and Paris-based, gallerist declared that although he was heartbroken by the referendum result, for me, London is still the ultimate art centre. 

Amongst a very cheery crowd that included the Arts Council England chairman Nicholas Serota, Tate Moderns Frances Morris, and the artists Antony Gormley, Grayson Perry and Anish Kapooras well as a host of the highest-end European collectorsthere was much admiration the new space. The architect Annabelle Selldorf was responsible for the sensitive conversion of the former premises of Mallett antiques, which before that had been the home of the Albemarle Club and the bishops of Ely. 

Nobody minded that at times the conversation had to compete with the sounds of a work by the young English artist Oliver Beer. The performance involved professional singers positioned in the corners of the main entrance hall, making the building reverberate uncannily with what were apparently its own particular resonant notes. Its a bit like an exorcism in reverse Thaddaeus is putting his spirit in every part of the building commented one collector.   

There was more artistic noise emanating from the front gallery where, among the elaborate 18th-century mouldings, Gilbert & George were conjuring up spirits of a different kind with their 1970s photographic Drinking Pieces, which depict the couple in various states of inebriation. These were joined by a trio of Video Sculptures in which a youthful G&G smoke, drink and stroll to the sounds of Grieg and Elgar as well as birdsong and thunder. Presiding over their earlier drunken incarnations, todays decidedly more sober G&G revealed that the two rather battered green chairs positioned by the fireplace (along with an empty bottles of Gordons gin) were the very same ones used in the 1972 video Gordons Makes Us Drunk, which was playing above the mantelpiece. They were the only two chairs that we owned at the time, Gilbert informed me, whilst also stating that they were most emphatically not for sale. We still want them back at home, he said.
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The Art Newspaper

Apr 26 2017
‘Brexit won't change anything,’ says Thaddaeus Ropac at opening of London gallery
Thaddaeus Ropac (Photo: © Mark Blower. Courtesy of Galerie Thaddaeus Ropac London, Paris, Salzburg)
In a defiant move in the face of Brexit, the Paris- and Salzburg-based art dealer Thaddaeus Ropac opened his first London gallery in Ely House, an impressive, five floor mansion in the heart of Mayfair today, 27 April. 

Brexit is the main topic of conversation, but the art world left behind its geopolitical borders a long time ago, Ropac says. We are part of an international movement, and so Brexit will not change anything.

On a personal note, however, Ropac is less sanguine. Morally, for me it was hard to swallow because Im a staunch European, he says. One of the things that healed the tragedy of the Second World War and the Holocaust was this vision of Europe. Thats what I grew up with.

His expansion in London is a boost for the UK art market, which has been buffeted by political and economic uncertainties after the UKs vote to leave the European Union almost a year ago. London will always be one of the quintessential art centres; it has the most successful museum in the Tate, a critical mass of galleries and an atmosphere of artists creating great art, Ropac says.  

Originally built in 1772 by Robert Taylor as the London residence of the Bishop of Ely, Ely House has been painstakingly restored by the art establishment's architect of choice, Annabelle Selldorf, who has designed galleries for David Zwirner and Hauser & Wirth as well as studios for Jeff Koons and David Salle. 

Each of the distinct spaces on the ground and first floors, including a library and drawings room, have been transformed into four galleries. Offices and private viewing rooms occupy the upper floors.

The four debut shows, one in each gallery, are testament to Ropacs international outlook (he represents around 60 major artists including European heavyweights Anselm Kiefer, Georg Baselitz, Imi Knoebel and the estates of Marcel Duchamp and Joseph Beuys). The exhibitions also reflect the gallerys art historical range, from 20th-century titans to up-and-coming contemporary artists.

Twelve works from Gilbert & Georges Drinking series, dating from the early 1970s, have been installed among the 18th-century plasterwork adorning the walls in the Ely Gallery, formerly the Bishops sitting room. Gilbert & George are part of my DNA, Ropac says, noting that he has been working with the duo for 30 years. 


Past the sweeping marble staircase, in the Berkeley Gallery, the young British artist Oliver Beer is showing Devils, a live sound installation broadcast through antique and modern vessels. Meanwhile, in the large hall at the foot of the stairs, five singers have been invited by Beer to respond to the natural frequencies of the building. Titled Composition For London, the 15-minute piece will be performed every day for the next two months. What better way to open a building than to find its sound, Ropac says.

Upstairs, the bijoux Chapel gallery features a key sculpture by Joseph Beuys, Backrest of a fine-limbed person (hare-type) of the 20th Century AD (1972-82), plus drawings from the 1950s. Around a third of the drawings are for sale, priced between 25,000 and 300,000. Beuys is such a large part of my life, says Ropac, who interned in the German artists studio in 1982 and has been working closely with Beuyss estate since 2010. But hes also such a part of London; since Anthony dOffay closed around 20 years ago, no gallery has taken on Beuys.

The final exhibition is dedicated to American Minimalists such as Dan Flavin, Richard Serra and Carl Andre. Ropac bought the 11 pieces from the Marzona Collection, a coup given that everything else was gifted to museums, Ropac says. 

Ropacs London gallery joins a fleet of four extensive spaces in Paris and Salzburg, which is enough for now, the dealer says. Nonetheless he is eyeing up opportunities in Asia with the recent appointment of Nick Buckley Wood as his director in the region, plus an office in Hong Kong due to open soon. Our structure is very much tied to Europe, and I still see London as part of that, he says. But the art world is moving East and we are watching.
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The Art Newspaper

Apr 26 2017
Artists who made it a family affair

Although Katarzyna Kobro and Wladyslaw Strzeminski worked primarily in different mediasculpture and painting, respectivelythe married couples relationship was of crucial importance to their artistic theories and work, says Jarosaw Suchan, the curator behind Katarzyna Kobro and Wladyslaw Strzeminski: Avant-garde Prototypes at Madris Reina Sofa (25 April-18 September).

The two met in Moscow in 1918 and were heavily influenced by European avant-garde movements like De Stijl and Constructivism. The show will include almost all of Kobros surviving works (many were destroyed during the Second World War) and a recreation of Strzeminskis The Neoplastic Room, which he built in 1948 for the Muzeum Sztuki in Lodz, Poland, which is a co-organiser of the current show. The interior is one of few examples of a museological space designed by an avant-garde artist, Suchan says.

The enormous influence of Bernd and Hilla Becher, the German husband-and-wife duo who taught at Dsseldorfs Kunstakademie, is examined in Photographs Become Pictures: the Becher Class at the Stdel Museum in Frankfurt (27 April-13 August). This exhibition of more than 150 works argues that the link between the Bechers and the Becher Class (also referred to as the Dsseldorf School) is more than simply a tendency towards big formats and wooden frames, says the exhibitions co-curator Martin Engler. Their former pupils, like Andreas Gursky, Candida Hfer and Thomas Ruff, digested the Becherss method of photographing several similar but not identical imagesan idea that has become important in broader contemporary art, Engler says.

A different kind of relationship is  to be explored in Renoir: Father and Son/Painting Cinema at the Barnes Foundation in Philadelphia (28 April-3 September 2018), which houses the biggest collection of the French Impressionist Pierre-Auguste Renoirs works. While his son Jean is revered as one of the great film directors, few know that he started out as a ceramicist. It will be the first time that Jeans ceramics will be shown, says the exhibitions curator Sylvie Patry. These, along with films, costumes, photos and paintings of Jean by his father, will shed new light on their relationship. The artists shared a sense of humanity, a sort of pantheist approach to nature, and the idea that the artist is a craft makernot necessarily an intellectual and omniscient creator, Patry says.
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The New York Times

Apr 26 2017
Are There Glass Snakes in Dale Chihuly’s Fragile Eden?
At the New York Botanical Garden, this Seattle glassmaker is spreading his glass sculptures of plantlike forms (and more) among the real flora.
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artforum.com

Apr 26 2017
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The New York Times

Apr 26 2017
California’s Marrakesh: A Country Club That’s Chic Again
“How seriously can you take yourself when you live in a pink house?” said one resident of a desert complex where time stands still and hair doesn’t frizz.
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The New York Times

Apr 26 2017
Owner Withdraws Nazi-Looted Painting From Auction in Austria
An auction house pulled the painting, “Portrait of a Man” (1647) by the Dutch master Bartholomeus van der Helst, after an outcry.
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The Guardian

Apr 26 2017
John Downing's best photograph: Mujahideen posing in an Afghanistan safe house

‘They smuggled me over the border in an old ambulance. I was wearing a burqa, hunching down, pretending to be a woman’

In the early 1980s, I was travelling in Afghanistan with the mujahideen, the rebels who were fighting the Russians with the only weapons they had: AK47 rifles and a few rocket launchers. They were tremendously dramatic looking and made for fantastic photographs.

Nobody was getting into the country at the time, but a reporter and I went to Peshawar on the Pakistan border where some mujahideen agreed to take us in. We travelled in an old ambulance with me sitting in the back wearing a burqa, hunching down pretending to be a woman.

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The Guardian

Apr 26 2017
Picasso's obsession with bullfighting laid bare at London gallery

‘Those horses are the women in my life’: Minotaurs and Matadors exhibition sheds fresh light on artist’s recurring themes

There are many matadors, picadors, minotaurs, bulls and horses in a new show exploring Picasso and the importance of bullfighting – but also a glimpse of his terrible treatment of women.

An exhibition opening to the public on Friday traces Picasso’s lifelong engagement with bullfighting and includes the artist’s earliest surviving painting, a small portrait of a picador on a horse made when he had just turned eight.

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The Art Newspaper

Apr 26 2017
New book lifts lid on Mohammed Afkhami’s Iranian contemporary art collection
Shiva Ahmadi's Hades (2010) (Courtesy Shiva Ahmadi and Leila Heller Gallery, New York)
A new book out next month will lift the lid on a major contemporary Iranian art collection amassed by a Middle Eastern financier, reflecting also the trajectory of the countrys art from the 1950s to today. 

The book, titled Honar (art in Farsi) and published by Phaidon, features 250 works from the collection of Mohammed Afkhami. It includes a joint essay by Venetia Porter, the assistant keeper of Islamic and contemporary Middle Eastern art at the British Museum in London, and Sussan Babaie, lecturer in the arts of Iran and Islam at Londons Courtauld Institute of Art. 

Their thesis delves into Afkhamis family history, highlighting that his paternal great-grandmother, Effat al-Muluk Khwajeh Nouri, was the first female artist in Iran to set up a private painting school for girls. And his maternal grandfather, Mohammad Ali Massoudi, compiled one of the most significant private collections of calligraphy in Iran (some examples were exhibited in 1978 at the Reza Abbasi Museum in Tehran, founded in 1977 under the auspices of Queen Farah Pahlavi).

The Swiss-born Afkhami divides his time between Dubai, Switzerland and London. He spent his childhood in Tehran, but his mother left Iran after the revolution in 1979. He began buying art in 2004. His collection of around 400 mainly Iranian contemporary works includes artists such as Mohammad Ehsai, Shirin Neshat, Shiva Ahmadi and Timo Nasseri. I have no plans to open a museum, he says. Its more beneficial to loan works to institutions.

Afkhami is in talks for a touring show of works drawn from his collection, currently at the Aga Khan Museum in Toronto, Canada (until 4 June), to the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston. The exhibition, titled Rebel, Jester, Mystic, Poet: Contemporary Persians, includes works by 23 artists. 

The show includes Farhad Moshiris Flying Carpet (2007)a digital fighter jet made from 32 stacked Persian carpets. There is also a 2m-high sculpture by Parviz Tanavoli, Blue Heech (2005), and the late photographer and Palme dOr-winning film-maker Abbas Kiarostamis Untitled, from the Snow White Series triptych (2010). Pieces by Shirin Neshat and Monir Farmanfarmaian are also included. 
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The New York Times

Apr 26 2017
‘Why Pictures Now’: Louise Lawler’s Examination of the Art World Comes to MoMA
As part of the so-called “Pictures Generation” of the 1970s, Ms. Lawler revealed art objects to just be part of a market.
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The Guardian

Apr 26 2017
Langlands & Bell: the artists storming Silicon Valley's fortresses

With their eerily pristine models of Apple and Facebook’s offices, Turner-nominated artist duo Langlands & Bell expose the ‘fantasy of total control’ that is Silicon Valley architecture

Eerie white forms appear to float off the walls of a gallery on Pall Mall, hovering in front of lurid blocks of colour like the preserved cadavers of some alien race displayed in a future museum of natural history. There are amoebic creatures with bulbous appendages, others with angular faceted shells; some seem to stare out with cyclopean eyes or gaping circular mouths.

Westminster’s gilded avenue of gentlemen’s clubs, where kings and earls once strode, is an appropriate place for what turns out to be a display of our modern-day vessels of power. These bleached bodies are the headquarters buildings of the world’s biggest technology companies, as seen through the detached, deadpan eyes of artist duo Langlands & Bell.

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The Art Newspaper

Apr 26 2017
Jonas Burgert’s monster landscape confronts decay, decline and death
Jonas Burgert, Zeitlaich (detail, 2017) (Image: courtesy of the artist and Blain Southern, Photo: Lepowski Studios)
Inside Jonas Burgerts studio, in the Berlin suburb of Weissensee, an enormous painting is approaching completion. At a panoramic 22 metres wide, the work called Zeitlaich is a fantastical frieze of nightmarish visions, grotesque figures and apparently random objects, tumbling together in a surreal dreamscape, rendered in Burgerts characteristic palette of rich, dark tones clashing with violent graffiti-like outbursts of neon and fluorescence.
 
I thought I wanted to have a really beautiful mountain of trash, Burgert says, explaining that the work has been six months in the making and now, a week before delivery, is only one layer away from completion. Its not about only what you see in the narrative, its about feeling thinking. Thats what art does, I think, in the best case: its the feel of thinking.
 
This vast painting forms the heart of Burgerts solo show Zeitlaich at the Berlin outpost of Blain Southern (29 April-29 July), which opens during Gallery Weekend (28-30 April). Accompanied by a series of life-sized portraits of fantastical figures, presented against stark black backgrounds, it takes up an entire wall of the gallery, reverberating with vivid metaphor, narrative and figuration within a surreal psychedelic maelstrom. It articulates something of the artists ongoing exploration into the more pessimistic side of human frailties, hopes and puny defences in the face of inevitable decay, decline and death.
 
We are all suffering with the same questions over thousands of years, and will continue to do so over the next thousands of years, he says. We have the need to find something bigger than we are, but well never find it. Everything we do is an ongoing procedure of hope and failure, and a kind of permanent struggle in a way. In the end, its senseless disaster sometimes, but theres maybe a case that it is the phenomenon itself that counts. All the evolution we do is based on thisbut we have no solution.
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The Art Newspaper

Apr 26 2017
World Monuments Fund launches Instagram campaign to save Modern buildings
The Hall of Nations before it was demolished
The World Monuments Fund (WMF) launched its first Instagram campaign today, 26 April, to draw attention to the plight of the worlds Modern buildings, an increasing number of which are at risk because of the lack of regulations or political will needed to protect them.

The fund kicks off the programme with a list of 30 sites nominated by architects, experts and students posted on its website and is appealing to the public to add to this list by submitting nominations via Instagram. Until 25 May, the fund will add five more buildings to its website each week drawn from the pool of public entries. The list will be sent to an advisory council formed of architects, including Annabelle Selldorf, designers and critics, who will advise the WMF on the next phase of the Modern Century programme.

The WMFs new initiative could not be more timely: within days of the campaigns launch, the Indian press reported that developers had razed one of the buildings on the listthe Hall of Nations in New Delhi, India. The countrys first pillar-less building was demolished on 23 April, along with the nearby Hall of Industry and Nehru Pavilion, under the orders of the India Trade Promotion Organisation, a governmental agency, as part of a major redevelopment of the site. The Hall of Nations, designed by the award-winning architect Raj Rewal was part of an exhibition complex built in 1972 to mark the 25th anniversary of Indias independence. The buildings are less than 60 years old and so do not meet the countrys minimum age requirement to receive designation.

Although the plan to demolish the buildings to make room for a mega exhibition and conference centre was met with harsh criticism from both national and international heritage organisations, on 20 April a high court rejected Rewals petition to grant protection to the Hall of Nation, the Hall of Industry and the Nehru Pavilion. A joint statement, from Rewal and representatives from various Indian architectural and heritage bodies, published in the Hindustan Times calls the demolition an act of outrage and states that further hearings had been scheduled for 27 April and 1 May.

The WMFs president Joshua David, says the destruction just days before its court hearing makes brutally clear the need to rally to protect Modern heritage sites. We hope that our Modern Century programme will raise awareness about Modern treasures like the Hall of Nations and save them from senseless demolition.

To submit a nomination via Instagram, use the hashtag #moderncentury and tag @worldmonumentsfund
 
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EosArte.eu

Apr 26 2017
Ariccia, Ippolito Caffi, artista patriota. Ne discutono Sgarbi e Pulini
  Venedi 28 proseguono a Palazzo Chigi di Ariccia le iniziative culturali ideate da Francesco Petrucci. con la presentazione del libro “Ippolito Caffi” di Ferdinando Peretti, ed De Luca
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EosArte.eu

Apr 26 2017
Ippolito Caffi pittore e patriota (1809 -1866).Venerdì 28 ad Ariccia ne discutono Vittorio Sgarbi e Massimo Pulini.
Continuano le inziative culturali ideate da Francesco Petrucci al Museo del Barocco Romano ad Ariccia. Sgarbi e Pulini presentano il libro “Ippolito Caffi” di Ferdinando Peretti, editori De Luca (Roma 2016)
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EosArte.eu

Apr 26 2017
Scultura a Roma, un importante volume presentato alla Galleria Corsini
Per LIBRI BARBERINI / CORSINI a cura di Silvia Pedone giovedì 27 aprile ore 17.00: SCULTURA A ROMA 1534-1621, Da Paolo III Farnese a Paolo V Borghese di Adriano Cera (edizioni Etgraphie) Gallerie Nazionali di Arte Antica – Galleria Corsini, via della Lungara 10, Roma Intervengono: Claudio Strinati Gregoire Extermann Emilio Negro Giovedì 27 aprile alle ore 17.00, si terrà nella sede [...]
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The Art Newspaper

Apr 26 2017
What French presidential candidates Macron and Le Pen have in store for the arts
Marine Le Pen and Emmanuel Macron are competing for the French presidency
Culture has featured in the policy proposals and values of both Emmanuel Macron and Marine Le Pen, who will contest the French presidential election on 7 May.
 
Spending on culture has been a bone of contention during the five-year mandate of current president Franois Hollande. He failed to keep his promises as a candidate to maintain the cultural budget, which shrank by around 430m during his five years in office, compared with his predecessor Nicolas Sarkozys last budget, according to our sister newspaper Le Journal des Arts. There have also been three ministers of culture during Hollandes presidency.
 
Macron, running for the centrist party En Marche! (on the move) that he founded last year, has declared his intention to maintain the cultural budget in exchange for greater efficiency. He wants all schoolchildren to have access to cultural and artistic education, and has proposed a 500 annual culture pass for young people.
 
A staunch pro-European, Macron wants to launch an Erasmus (the EUs student exchange programme) for cultural professionals, including artists and curators. He is also looking to create an endowment for the renovation and upkeep of heritage properties, as well as a 200m fund to support cultural and creative industries in France.
 
Le Pen, meanwhile, who has temporarily stepped down as the leader of the far-right, nationalist and populist party Front National, has made no overall budget commitment. However, as part of her focus on French patrimony, she wants to increase funds for heritage and conservation by 25% (under Hollande, there has been a total fall of 371m in funding across his term). She also wants to stop the sale of national buildings and palaces to foreigners and the private sector.
 
Le Pens funding plans for culture include the creation of a digital platform for popular philanthropy and sponsorship. A major plank of her cultural programme is the development of centres for artistic production that will host residency programmes for artists of all ages and disciplinesoffering lodging and studio spaceto focus on supporting local contemporary art scenes.
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EosArte.eu

Apr 26 2017
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The Art Newspaper

Apr 26 2017
Venture capitalist Jean Pigozzi plans foundation to house huge contemporary African art collection
Chéri Samba’s L’espoir fait vivre n°2 (1997) (Courtesy of CAAC, The Pigozzi Collection; © Chéri Samba; photo: © Maurice Aeschimann) 
One of the worlds most active collectors of contemporary African art, the Paris-born venture capitalist Jean Pigozzi, says that he plans to create a foundation and space for his burgeoning collection. Pigozzi is showing works by 15 artists drawn from his holdings in the exhibition Art, Africa: the New Atelier (26 April-28 August) at the Fondation Louis Vuitton in Paris. 

These include Benin-born Romuald Hazoum, who is known for using found objects such as jerry cans, the late Malian photographer Seydou Keta, and the Congolese painter Chri Samba. The works, grouped in a section of the exhibition called The Insiders, date from 1989 to 2009.

In an interview with the French website Le Quotidien de lArt, Pigozzi outlines his vision for a foundation, saying: It would be sad if 30 years of work disappeared, and the 10,000-strong collection was dispersed, if I were to fall under a taxi one day in London. It is still incredible that neither the Museum of Modern Art, nor Beaubourg [the Centre Pompidou in Paris], nor the Metropolitan Museum of Art have a department of contemporary African art. In five years time, I want to create an [operational] space in Europe. 

In the catalogue introduction, he also stresses that he plans to open a venue but declined to give further details.

Pigozzi began collecting contemporary African art in 1989. He worked with the curator Andr Magnin who trawled sub-Saharan African countries looking for prospective artists. I held myself to three rules: the artists had to be from black Africa, live there and work there, Pigozzi says. 

In an interview in the exhibition catalogue, Suzanne Pag, the artistic director of the Fondation Louis Vuitton says that some observers have criticised Pigozzis choices, which reflect a neo-colonial approach that privileges handicrafts or self-taught artists at the expense of work that is more in line with the [scholarship] criteria of international art. 

Pigozzi responds: Deep down, what do artists care about categorisation?... African artists speak to us about themselves, their society, their reality. This demands an open mind colonisation negated the reality of certain populations, and today the future of Africa is in the hands of Africans.

The extensive survey at the Fondation includes a section drawn from the institutions own collection, featuring works by African artists such as David Goldblatt and Omar Victor Diop, as well by the US artist Rashid Johnson and the British painter Lynette Yiadom-Boakye, who is of Ghanaian descent. There is also a section of the show that contains a strong strain of social activism, including works by 16 South African artists dating from 1990 that critically revisit their countrys past, according to a press statement.
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The Art Newspaper

Apr 26 2017
Hirst, Lucas and Gormley in a cathedral of art (not the Tate)
Sue Freeborough, Chromosomal Dance

Works by Damien Hirst, Antony Gormley and Elisabeth Frink turn up in an unlikely location this summerChester Cathedral. The ARK show (7 July-15 October) promises to be a sculpture smorgasbord, comprising 90 works by over 50 artists. Gallery Pangolin, the Gloucestershire-based company which operates its own casting foundry, is behind the ambitious exhibition, which also includes pieces by Sarah Lucas and Barbara Hepworth (and less well known names such as Sue Freeborough). The Dean of Chester Cathedral, The Very Revd. Professor Gordon McPhate, says enthusiastically: It is an honour to host such an important collection of sculpture with individual pieces chosen to reveal and complement the narrative of our building. Almost three years in the planning, ARK will bring world-class works of art to Chester entirely free of charge.
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The Guardian

Apr 25 2017
Sands of time: Saharan Africa in the 1930s – in pictures

Czech photographer Ludwig Jindra was sent on a world tour by his government – and opened up understanding about Tuareg culture and beyond

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artforum.com

Apr 25 2017
FILM: After Darko
Howard Hampton on Richard Kelly’s Donnie Darko
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The Art Newspaper

Apr 25 2017
Sotheby’s first Modern and contemporary African art sale set to be a record-breaker
Leonce Raphael Agbodjelou, Untitled (Demoiselles de Port-Novo Series,, 2012) (Image: courtesy of Sotheby's)
With a low estimate of 2.8m for total sales, Sothebys first auction of Modern and contemporary African art on 16 May is due to smash the 1.6m hammer record, set by Bonhams a year ago. 
 
The London auction is jam-packed with well-known names from across the continent and across generations, from Meschac Gaba and Nicholas Hlobo to Ablade Glover and William Kentridge. One of the most striking aspects is the variety of objects, media and styles on offer, including Modernist painting, drawing, photography, ceramic sculpture and found objects. 
 
Equally noteworthy is the range of prices. The most expensive lot is a bottle-top hanging by the Ghanaian-born artist El Anatsui, which is expected to sell for between 650,000 and 850,000. The least expensive is a black-and-white photograph by the South African artist Roger Ballen of a dog sat beside a homeless man lying under a blanket (1,000-1,500; edition of 20).
 
We have works by some big names starting at 5,000, says Hannah OLeary, Sothebys head of Modern and contemporary African art. Its where a lot of the market is right now, but it wont stay that way for long. 
 
Indeed, art from the continent has never been more popular. The French luxury goods billionaire Bernard Arnault this week opened a three-part exhibition devoted to African art at his Fondation Louis Vuitton in Paris (until 28 August). And in September the much anticipated Zeitz Museum of Contemporary Art Africa (Mocaa) is due to open in Cape Town.
 
Nonetheless, African artists still account for just 0.01% of the international art market, according to Sothebys. This is something OLeary aims to rectify. El Anatsui and William Kentridge are the only names that tend to come up in contemporary sales, she says. Theres a need to give a platform to more of these artists. Many are collected by institutions, but arent familiar on the auction circuit. 
 
First-timers at auction include the Congolese painter Eddy Ilunga Kamuanga and the Zimbabwean artist Virginia Chihota, while a number have appeared only a handful of times including Lonce Raphael Agbodjelou, Dawit Abebe and Boris Nzebo. 
 
People are always looking for something new in the contemporary art world. We want to expose these artists to new audiences, and the artists want the same thing, OLeary says.
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The Art Newspaper

Apr 25 2017
New faces at Art Cologne seize Berlin calendar clash opportunity
Gagosian's stand features works by Chris Burden, Cady Noland and Rudolf Stingel (Image: © Koelnmesse)
The opening of the 51st edition of Art Cologne was marked by discussions about the changes under way in the German art scene. For the first time, two of the most important events in the German art calendarArt Cologne (until 29 April) and Berlins Gallery Weekend (until 30 April)are clashing this year. This overlap triggered a collaboration between the organisers of Berlins ABC fair and the Cologne fair, who are in negotiations to launch a fair in September called Art Berlin to replace the experimental but dwindling ABC.
 
The April clash resulted in fewer Berlin galleries at the fair in Cologne this year, and that has given way to several newcomers.
 
A remarkable booth by Gagosian, a first-time participant at Art Cologne, presents works by four artists, Chris Burden, Cady Noland, Richard Prince and Rudolf Stingel. Works by Noland, one the most expensive living female artists, are exceptionally rare at art fairs, as she has no official gallery representation and is known for disavowing her works. The booths centrepiece is a small set of Burdens familiar cast-iron street lamps, similar to those installed at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. His late work Buddha's Fingers (2014-15) comes with a likely price tag of over seven figures, but whether the work will find a buyer at Art Cologne remains to be seen.
 
A necessary change was to bring all young gallery sections under the Neumarkt umbrella, says Daniel Hug, the fairs director. The art market is going through changes and its critical to support young galleries.
 
The fairs New Contemporaries section features small (20 sq. m), relatively affordable booths with solo presentations by young galleries. Polish newcomer Piktogram features a much talked about solo presentation of works by Krystian Truth Czaplicki. The display includes some of his autobiographical collages incorporating his snowboarding equipment, razor blades and vodka-filled glasses. And New Yorks Lyles & King brought paintings by Chris Hood.
 
Gallery collaborations also helped bring new faces to the fair. New Yorks Essex Street paired up with Dsseldorfs Max Mayer in a presentation of works by the Belgian avant-garde artist Jef Geys. And hip London gallery Project Native Informant and Munichs Deborah Schamoni have mixed a few artists from their roster, including Amalia Ulman and the DIS collective.
 
Fascinating rediscoveries can also be found at the fair this year, Hug says. Josef Scharl, an eccentric outsider artist active in the 1920s and 30s, is on show at the Hagemeier booth. Volker Boehringer, a contemporary of Georg Grosz, is at Valentin. And works by Gotthard Graubner, a post-war German artist starting to be known for his monochrome pillow paintings, feature on the booths of several galleries.

CORRECTION: This article was corrected on 27 April to reflect that works by Richard Prince are on show at Gagosian's stand. He was omitted from the earlier version. 
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The Art Newspaper

Apr 25 2017
Fondation Louis Vuitton offers a snapshot of contemporary African art

No single exhibition can fully capture the art scene of the worlds second-largest continent, which has 54 countries and a population of more than one billion. So organisers at the Fondation Louis Vuitton have focused their survey of recent African art, titled Art/Africa: the New Atelier, on two themes.

The first focus, called The Insiders, is a selection of works on loan from the Geneva-based collection of Jean Pigozzi, who entered into unknown territory when he began buying art directly from artists in Sub-Saharan Africa with the help of the art advisor Andr Magnin in 1989, says Suzanne Pag, the foundations artistic director and the shows head organiser. The show looks primarily at work made between then and 2009 and includes the Zimbabwean photographer Kudzanai Chiurai and the Congolese painter Chri Samba.

A complementary section on recent art from South Africa, titled Being There: South Africa, a Contemporary Scene, presents work by 17 artists born between 1930 and 1991. The current situation of the country is very present in the works, Pag says, as with Sue Williamsons two-screen video Its a Pleasure to Meet You (2016), which portrays two young South Africans differing attitudes towards suffering during Apartheid.

Art/Africa: the New Atelier, Fondation Louis Vuitton, Paris, 26 April-28 August
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The Art Newspaper

Apr 25 2017
I.M. Pei’s life and work celebrated to mark architect’s centenary
I.M. Pei in the East Building of the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC, on opening day, 1 June 1978 (Photo: courtesy of the National Gallery of Art)
The Chinese-American architect Ieoh Ming Pei turns 100 years old on 26 April, and institutions across the globe are celebrating his centenary. The Harvard Graduate School of Design (GSD), where Pei both studied and taught, is co-organising a series of conferences with the University of Hong Kong and M+ museum about the architects influence. We hope to generate a much-needed contemporary discourse on the global significance of Peis prodigious list of incredible projects, says Mohsen Mostafavi, the dean of Harvard GSD. During his six-decade career, Pei became increasingly interested in museum projects. Here are our picks of his most notable museum buildings.

Five memorable museums


Pyramid extension, Louvre

Paris (1983)

It is hard to believe that Peis Louvre Pyramid, which is now emblematic of the Parisian museum, was highly controversial when it was first proposed. Before it became a well-loved addition, critics called it an imposition of American Modernist taste on French Renaissance architecture.

Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum

Cleveland, Ohio (1995)

Pei originally turned down the commission to design the museum dedicated to rock and roll music, claiming to be a classical guy, according to Cleveland Magazine. Perhaps he should have trusted his instincts. In his 2001 biography of the architect, Carter Wiseman reported that Pei admitted he was never happy with the final building.

Suzhou Museum

China (2006)

Although Pei was born in Guangzhou and grew up in Shanghai and Hong Kong, Suzhou is the architects ancestral home. Pei has said the uniquely personal project combines his Chinese roots with his modern aesthetic.

East Building, National Gallery of Art

Washington, DC (1978)

The extension of the National Gallery of Art was one of Peis earliest museum designs. At first, many were sceptical of the triangular design, which Pei made to fit the trapezoid-shaped plot allotted to him. But Time magazine went on to describe the building as a masterpiece on the Mall in its 1978 review. Peis long-time associate Perry Chin completed a $69m renovation of the gallery last year.

Museum of Islamic Art (MIA)

Doha, Qatar (2008)

The MIA is one of Peis most recent projects, and his first in the Middle East. The museum was built on a man-made, bespoke island so that the growing city of Doha would not encroach on his design. In its review of the museum, The Art Newspaper concluded that the Emir of Qatar could be proud that I.M. Pei, in his great old age, built him a masterpiece in which to house his treasures.
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The Art Newspaper

Apr 25 2017
Shows set to let textile artist and printmaker Anni Albers shine
Josef and Anni Albers at Anni’s loom, Orange, Connecticut, 1955 (Photo: Alburtus/Yale News Bureau)
When we hear the name Albers, we tend to think of Josef and his Homage to the Square series of paintings. But Anni Albers (1899-1994), his wife and fellow Bauhaus refugee, is at the forefront of two forthcoming exhibitions, including a full-scale survey of her work planned for 2018 at Tate Modern.

The show, which will travel to the Kunstsammlung Nordrhein-Westfalen in Dsseldorf, is preceded by a smaller survey, Anni Albers: Touching Vision, which is due to open this autumn at the Guggenheim Bilbao (6 October-14 January 2018).

Nicholas Fox Weber, the director of the Josef and Anni Albers Foundation, which is supporting both exhibitions, says: "During her lifetime, she got quite a bit of attention, but in a slower world than Josef did," he says. In 1949, she became the first textile artist to have a solo show at New Yorks Museum of Modern Art, which was organised by Philip Johnson. The US architect helped them get out of Germany in 1933 when the Bauhaus, where they both taught, was forced to close by the Nazis. A 1985 show at the Smithsonians Renwick Gallery "put her again on the map, but not on the international scale of Josef," Weber says. Although her book On Weaving (1965) was influential for textile designers, she had fewer students than Josef did when they taught at Black Mountain College, so her influence was not as strong.

The Bilbao exhibition is a focused look at Anni's work between 1925, when she and Josef were at the Bauhaus, and the late 1970s, after she had taken up printmaking. The Tate survey is still in the planning stages. Another show, currently titled Josef and Anni Albers, is scheduled to open at the Muse d'Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris in 2019.
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The New York Times

Apr 25 2017
Marisol Estate Is Given to the Albright-Knox Art Gallery
The bequest from the estate of the artist, who died last year, is being described as the largest gift of art in the Buffalo museum’s history.
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artforum.com

Apr 25 2017
DIARY: Texas Tale
Kat Herriman at the 9th Dallas Art Fair
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artforum.com

Apr 25 2017
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artforum.com

Apr 25 2017
500 WORDS: Edgar Heap of Birds
Edgar Heap of Birds discusses Genocide and Democracy
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The Guardian

Apr 25 2017
Joan Baker obituary

My friend the painter and teacher Joan Baker, who has died aged 94, was the first woman to run a major art department in Wales, at Cardiff College of Art, where she was head of foundation and assistant director of studies. She made a big contribution to the artistic culture of Wales from 1945 onwards, even though she never sought attention for herself and exhibited rarely, despite painting for 70 years.

Joan was born in Cardiff, the daughter of Joseph Baker, a marine engineer, and his wife, Mary (nee Harrison). She attended Howell’s school for girls in Llandaff, to the north of the city.

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