News

Displaying 7301 to 7350 of 14221 results

The Guardian

Jun 22 2017
A hot summer night in London – photo essay

On a midsummer night, after the hottest June day since 1976, photographer Sarah Lee travelled across London with writer Laura Barton to capture the capital’s mood

Midsummer, heavy heat, and London is beside itself: couples kiss by tube station steps, accordion players linger on street corners, the city is alive with the coatless, bare-legged and bewildered. Across the air comes the sound of last orders, police sirens, blurry conversation, while the backstreets stand quiet, lost in the scent of jasmine and dust.

Continue reading...
Read More
The New York Times

Jun 22 2017
Art Review: From Cuba, a Stolen Myth
There is nothing simple about the work of Belkis Ayón, a printmaker who drew her inspiration from the Abaquá, a secret male society with an origin story based on female betrayal.
Read More
artforum.com

Jun 22 2017
Read More
The Art Newspaper

Jun 22 2017
Northern exposure: artists explore theme of alienation for Nordic biennial
Norwegian duo Trollkrem's performance using face paint (Image: courtesy of Trollkrem)
What is Nordicness? What does alienation mean in todays political landscape? These are some of the issues tackled in the ninth Nordic Biennial of Contemporary Art, Momentum, in the small Norwegian town of Moss, which opened last weekend (until 11 October).
 
The biennial has been organised by five curators from throughout the Nordic countries. For this edition, it was Ulkria Flink from Sweden, Ilari Laamanen from Finland, Jacob Lillemose from Denmark, Jn Ransu from Iceland and Gunhild Moe from Norway.
 
This editions theme of alienation has been interpreted in many ways, from political or social alienation to the seemingly alien flora and fauna around us, and the refugee crisis. The work on view spans painting, sculpture, installation and sound.
 
The two main venues of the biennial are the industrial warehouse space Momentum Kunsthall and the converted house, Galleri F15, with other works installed at venues throughout the town. John Duncans 40-minute-long sound work Scare (1972) is installed at the towns 1930s cinema and Jone Kvies bronze sculpture of a kneeling astronaut (Carrier, 2006), which faces outward through a warehouse window.
 
On entering the Kunsthall, the first work is a huge installation from the Norwegian duo Trollkrem that invites viewers to put on a swimming costume, get into a Jacuzzi and watch a virtual reality film. The piece is also linked to a performance on the beach in which sylph-like sea characters paint visitors faces and feed them seafood.
 
Many of the works at the Kunsthall take scientific themes and forms. The Finnish artist Jenna Sutela has two works, a primordial swamp that bubbles and speaks of cell reproduction. She has also installed a living wall of moss and spirulina in the stairwell for Sporulating Paragraph (2017), which will grow and change for the duration of the biennial.
 
On the second floor of the space is Being Encounter (2017) by the Austrian artist Sonja Bumel, who works with microbes and the microbial body, exploring the permeability of our bodieswhere we begin and where we end. The work consists of cultures growing within a jelly-like blob, which viewers can lie in and handle.
 
We are swimming in biology but we cant feel it, Bumel says.
 

At Galleri F15 works range from H.R. Gigers space-age chairs to Cabaret Crusades: The Path to Cairo (2012), Wael Shawkys video of puppets enacting events during the Crusades, and Patricia Piccininis disturbing sculpture of a faceless fleshy creature, Atlas (2012).
 
In trying to tap in to the common consciousness, the biennial shows us tentative ideas of the future from the old with the gothic horror of Giger to the new idea that, through microbes, we are in fact all connected.
Read More
The Guardian

Jun 22 2017
Listed: the lavish waterworks temple that defied Thatcher

Part Greek temple, part jet engine, and now officially ‘one of the most exciting buildings of the 80s’, John Outram’s pumping station put the fun back into architecture. It is just one of his many works that deserve listing

Standing on the banks of the Isle of Dogs like a toy temple washed up from some colourful cartoon, John Outram’s strikingly postmodern storm water pumping station has been grade II* listed, as part of a new wave of listings that recognise an era of wit and fun in architecture.

Built between 1986 and 1988, the pumping station is a playful collage of references: classical Greek temples, riverine mythology and even jet engines, all fused in a uniquely colourful vision. “It’s one of the most exciting buildings of the 1980s,” says Roger Bowdler, Historic England’s director of listing. “Outram exulted in the panache and exuberance of classicism – and gave this utterly functional structure an exterior that is unforgettable.”

Continue reading...
Read More
The New York Times

Jun 22 2017
Art Installation Shares Sights and Sounds of the Border
At Pace Gallery, Richard Misrach and Guillermo Galindo’s work explores immigration across the United States-Mexico border.
Read More
The Art Newspaper

Jun 22 2017
Freemasons reveal their secrets and Art Deco home
Freemasons' Hall, United Grand Lodge of England, 2013.
Notoriously considered a mysterious and secretive society for men, Londons Freemasons have taken in their first artist in residence. Hidden in plain sight amongst central Londons innumerable imposing buildings, close to Covent Garden, is the Freemasons Hallthe headquarters of the United Grand Lodge of England and a fine example of Art Deco architecturewhere the South African painter Jacques Viljoen has spent the last four months capturing masonic life in the lodge. Organised as part of the celebration of the tercentenary of Freemasonry, Viljoen has had unprecedented access to the historic organisations headquarters. His paintings include a portrait of a father and son, a lodge room and a masonic still life. Looking at these paintings we get a glimpse of the world behind closed doors, says the curator Roberto Ekholm.
 
Viljoens works will go on show in the exhibition Rough to Smooth (24 June to 1 July) alongside nine other guest artists, one of whom is a Freemason himself. Martin Taylor, a member of Spelhoe Lodge, chose to paint the faade of the 1933 Freemasons Hall, which captures the installation of the Victoria Cross memorial for fallen Freemasons in the First World War, before it was unveiled in April. You can also catch Viljoen live in action painting at the halls open day on Saturday 24 June.
Read More
The Art Newspaper

Jun 22 2017
Rare drawing from Brian Sewell’s collection to feature in Wyndham Lewis survey
Wyndham Lewis's An Oriental Design (around 1900-05)
The largest ever survey of the British Modernist artist Wyndham Lewis, which opens this week at the Imperial War Museum North in Manchester, will include a rare early drawing once owned by the late art critic Brian Sewell.  

The pen drawing, titled An Oriental Design (around 1900-05), is the earliest work in the show and was made while Lewis was a student at the Slade School of Art in London. [The drawing], with its small scale and dense cross-hatching, is Lewis attempt to copy Augustus Johns new Rembrandt style, says the exhibitions curator Richard Slocombe in a statement. Not a great deal of work survives from the artists early career, Slocombe tells The Art Newspaper. 

The drawing was sold for 6,250 (with fees) to a private collector at a Christies auction in September last year. Sewell, who worked at the auction house for nearly a decade as a young man before turning his hand to art criticism, built up his sizeable collection over several decades. It included works by Andrea Sacchi, Joseph Anton Koch and John Craxton. 

The Lewis exhibitiontitled Life, Art, War (23 June-1 January 2018)is the first retrospective in 40 years dedicated to the controversial artist and writer who founded Vorticism, the UKs only "true avant-garde movement", according to Slocombe. 

For more on the exhibition, see Manchester gets first comprehensive retrospective of Wyndham Lewis in 40 years.
Read More
The Guardian

Jun 22 2017
Destroying Great Mosque of al-Nuri 'is Isis declaring defeat'

Iraqi PM denounces levelling of Mosul building where Islamic State leader declared a caliphate three years ago

The Iraqi prime minister, Haider al-Abadi, has said the destruction of the Great Mosque of al-Nuri in Mosul is an admission by the militants that they are losing the fight for the country’s second-largest city.

One of Islam’s most venerated sites, the mosque has been destroyed by explosions as Iraqi forces battled Islamic State fighters who had holed up nearby.

Continue reading...
Read More
The Guardian

Jun 21 2017
Vincent Fournier's best photograph: Boris the cosmonaut shows off his spacesuit

‘After two hours of drinking vodka, General Boris suggested we just do the shoot at his house’

Star City is a self-contained city for cosmonauts about an hour from Moscow. Astronauts still come from all over the world to get trained there. It might look dated but, underneath, the important stuff is all working. As well as a training centre, it has a launch site, a technical department, a school, and a hospital – everything really. During the cold war, when there was a lot of money going into the space race, it was an important place. That’s not so much the case now.

We are all awed by space – and, although there is something old-fashioned, even funny, about this image, it is still noble. The subject’s name is General Boris V and I took his portrait back in 2007. Originally, the Yuri Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Centre had agreed to let me shoot on their premises, but when I got there they asked for money.

Continue reading...
Read More
The Guardian

Jun 21 2017
Famous photos restaged, from Picasso to Capa – in pictures

From Diane Arbus’s man in curlers to the little running boy by Willy Ronis, Catherine Balet makes delightful re-creations of the world’s most recognisable shots

Continue reading...
Read More
The Guardian

Jun 21 2017
How Nicholas Serota’s Tate changed Britain

Over three decades, he transformed a nation’s attitude to art. But is his revolution now in danger of being reversed? By Charlotte Higgins

In 1970, if you had said that London would one day become the centre of the international art world, the successor to Paris before the first world war and New York after the second, most people would have thought you mad. The gleaming commercial galleries, the art fairs, the record-breaking sales at Christie’s and Sotheby’s, the arrival of the super-rich from every corner of the globe – all of this was decades away. Large parts of the city were still pitted and scarred from the bombs of the blitz. The port and docks on the Thames in east London were so completely derelict that people assumed they would be like that for ever. Most people didn’t even notice the power station that crouched opposite St Paul’s Cathedral – for there was no Southwark tube station, no elegantly engineered footbridge across the river, no glassy apartments, no Shakespeare’s Globe, no scenic path along the water’s edge to Tower Bridge. No one imagined that this behemoth, then still a decade away from being decommissioned, would one day become the world’s most popular museum of modern and contemporary art.

Tate, now an empire of four museums, and a global brand, was then a single entity: the Tate Gallery, which occupied the building now known as Tate Britain, in Pimlico. It played second fiddle to the grander National Gallery, from which it had recently become independent, and had a rambling and uneven collection divided into “British art” and “modern foreign paintings”, as if contemporary art were a vice conducted mainly overseas. It had some great pictures, and hosted some memorable exhibitions: among them was 1964’s Painting and Sculpture of a Decade, a survey of the previous 10 years of contemporary art that, for an 18-year-old Hampstead schoolboy named Nicholas Serota, had fanned the flames of an interest in art; five decades later, he recalled its “bright colours and American art and a sense that things were changing”. But for most British artists, particularly those of the rising generation, the Tate Gallery was marginal. “The best you could hope for there was a one-man show the year before you kicked over,” recalls sculptor Richard Deacon, who was a student in 1970.

Continue reading...
Read More
The New York Times

Jun 21 2017
At the Dr. Seuss Museum: Oh, the Places They Don’t Go!
The new museum dedicated to Theodor Geisel, better known as Dr. Seuss, in Springfield, Mass., left out some controversial political cartoons.
Read More
The Art Newspaper

Jun 21 2017
Three to see: New York
 Renée Stout's Pretty Wings, Part 2 (The White Wall) (2010)
Figure painting is alive and well in the work of Lynette Yiadom-Boakye, on view in her New Museum solo show, Under-Song for a Cipher (until 3 September). Seventeen new, large-format oil paintings are installed on blood-red coloured walls that match the intensity and strength of the works. The paintings portray imagined people, like a man holding a falcon and a woman arranging her hair. The paintings are compelling, not only in the assuredness and autonomy of their subjects, but also because Yiadom-Boakye is skilful and expressive in capturing posture and gesture. You can feel the graceful strain of the dancer elongating her body in an arabesque in Light of the Lit Wick (2017) and the relaxed hang of a mans wrist in Brothers to a Garden (2017), in which he appears to be in conversation.

While the Washington, DC-based artist Rene Stout typically makes mixed-media works involving her alter-ego (a fortune-teller and healer named Fatima Mayfield), her current solo exhibition, titled Between Two Worlds (until 30 June), includes only paintings. Stoutwho was trained as a painterwas invited to show her work at Sean Scully's Chelsea studio (447 West 17th Street), for which she took what she calls the Sean Scully Challenge for the past five months, pushing herself to work in an abstract style (but not all the works in the show are new). Some of the paintings in the show, like You Said I Had A Mean Streak (2016), are entirely abstract, while others are mainly figurative, like Brown Jar (2013), a trompe-loeil depiction of a bottle that might hold medicine. But they all give off a mystical, somewhat dark feeling, which is present in Stouts work in any medium.

Head to the Matthew Marks gallery to catch Ellsworth Kelly: Last Paintings (until 24 June), which shows the artists last nine works, completed before he died in December 2015, aged 92. The concise exhibition neatly reveals Kellys unwavering commitment to his exploration of the power of colour and form across his entire career. Some works have many colours, like Spectrum IX (2014), made of twelve joined vertical panels; others are made of joined monochrome panels, like four works made in black and white. In a subtler contrast, the only work with a single panel, Diagonal Curve (2015), which is all white, stands out against the gallerys white walls, which reveal themselves to be a different colouralmost like Malevich's Suprematist Composition: White on White (1918).
Read More
The Art Newspaper

Jun 21 2017
Kandinsky record falls twice in patchy Sotheby’s sale
Helena Newman fields bids during the sale of Kandinsky's Bild mit weissen Linien for £33m  (Photo: Courtesy Sotheby's)
Its a 1913 Kandinsky, said a shaky Hugo Nathan by way of explanation on why he bid a record 29.2m (33m with fees) on Wassily Kandinskys Bild mit weissen Linien at Sothebys Impressionist and Modern Art sale on 22 June in London.

Nathan, of the London-based art advisory Beaumont Nathan, said he bought the oil on canvas on behalf of a private collector. The work, an early foray into abstraction by the artist, carried an estimate of in excess of $35m, and was subject to both a guarantee and an irrevocable bid. Nathans winning bid, against Patti Wong, chairman of Sothebys Asia, was met with applause by an audience glad to see a major work sell in the room for once and relieved the sale might finally move onto the next lot.

The standing record for Kandinsky was, in fact, minutes old, set just six lots earlier by MurnauLandschaft mit grnem Haus, a landscape from 1909 before the artist fully turned to abstraction. Pitched at 15m to 25m, it sold on the phone at 18.5m (20.9m with fees), beating the previous high of $23.3m/18.7m for the artist, set at Christies New York in November 2016.

Just as well its the longest evening of the year, later quipped auctioneer Helena Newman, the global co-head of Sothebys Impressionist and Modern Art Department and chairman of Sothebys Europe, during the lengthy bidding for Alberto Giacomettis Grande figure (1947), eventually sold over the phone with Sothebys Simon Stock for 15.8m (17.9m with fees).

This evenings sale was one of two halves, jointly totalling 129m (148.9m including fees), just shy of the lower pre-sale estimate of 129.9m-170.5m. If taken together, tonight narrowly exceeded Sothebys New York Impressionist and Modern evening sale in May, which totalled $173.8m/137.9m with fees.

The first part of the sale was Actual Size, an appealing selection of 35 small works curated by Sothebys Thomas Bompard. This met with a mixed reaction, with 66% sold by lot for a total of 17.4m (21m with fees), falling short of the estimated 19.3m-27.9m. It was generally the lower value pieces (in the lower- to mid-six figures) that failed to find buyers; some felt a little like padding. Ironically for an Impressionist and Modern art evening, though well deserved, the top lot of Actual Size was an Old Master paintinga meticulously painted still-life of flowers by Dutch painter Ambrosius Bosschaert the Elder (1573-1621). This sold on the phone to Wong, bidding on behalf of an Asian private collector, for a mid-estimate 2.5m (2.97m with fees).

The ensuing main body of the auction was in fact smaller, at 23 lots, but amounted to 112m (127.9m with fees), with 74% sold by lot. Although only scraping the 110.6m-142.6m estimate, this represented a 24% increase on the equivalent London sale last June, which totalled 103.3m with fees. Led by the aforementioned Kandinskys Bild mit weissen Linien, this was the first time Sothebys has sold three works for over 20m (once fees are added) in one Impressionist and Modern sale in London. The runner up work was Joan Mirs lyrical Femme et oiseaux (1940), the eighth of his series of 23 Constellations works. Carrying an estimate of in excess of $30m, it sold on the phone for 21.7m (24.6m with fees).

Speaking after the sale, Newman said she thought such lively and lengthy bidding painted a compelling picture following Art Basel. To have three landmarks in the development of 20th Century art by Kandinsky, Mir and Giacometti come to the market in a single sale tonight was momentous, said Newman, adding Collectors were out in force, participating from a record number of locations around the globe, with the level of Asian buyers as numerous as those from the US.

Despite ongoing political uncertainty, this evenings sale tentatively improves upon Sothebys 2016 equivalent, held the night after the contentious Brexit vote. Eyes shift now to Christies sale next week, which benefits from healthier consignment volumes than last year.



Read More
The Art Newspaper

Jun 21 2017
Collector sues Christie’s for cancelling David Hammons sale
Body prints by David Hammons on show at the Aspen Art Museum, Colorado. Photo: Billy Farrell/BFA/REX/Shutterstock
A lawsuit filed in April suggests that Christies recently tried an unorthodox method to secure a lot for its big spring auctions: taking the art from someone who does not want to sell it.

The suit, filed in a New York district court on 18 April, alleges that Christies tried to withholdand resell at last months post-war and contemporary evening salea David Hammons painting after title had passed to its purchasera Luxembourger named Philippe Dupont, the plaintiff in this case.

Coach (around 1974) is an impressive example of Hammonss body prints, and was expected to sell for between $300,000 and $500,000 at a 3 March auction that featured the work on the catalogue cover. Dupont won the lot, number 67, with a phone bid of $390,000. After emails from Christies congratulating him on his purchase, he wired the auction house his $475,500 total with premium on 8 March, which then cleared his bank on 10 March. One week later, he received a phone call from four Christies employees saying they wanted to cancel the sale, and re-auction the work on 17 May.

The work was not re-auctioned, thanks to the lawsuit, but neither is it in Luxembourg with Dupont. The case is now headed to arbitration, and Christies has agreed not to re-auction pending the result of that process. Both the auction house and Duponts lawyer declined to comment for this article.

Duponts complaint draws attention to a clause in the terms of sale published at the back of every Christies catalogue, which states that, in the case of error or dispute, the auctioneer can whether during or after the auction continue the bidding, determine the successful bidder, cancel the sale of the lot, or re-offer and resell any lot. However, it is not clear whether the statement applies to works where ownership has already been transferred to the buyer.

According to court papers, Christies offered to remunerate Dupont for this mistake and disappointing and frustrating result, saying that it was supposed to have brought in another bidder to the 3 March sale, but that someone had forgotten to call this bidderhence the desire for re-auction.

Dupont rejected the offer. I demand that you deliver the Property to me in Luxembourg pursuant to the agreed contract for shipment, he wrote to Christies on 24 March.

The terms of sale make no reference to the time in which the house must deliver purchases to buyers, but do say it may charge buyers who have not collected their purchases within a week.

Auction houses have lately been testing the waters with Hammons. In May 2016, Christies pulled a Hammons stone head from his heralded show at Mnuchin Gallery in New York, into its Bound to Fail curated sale; it brought $1.02m, around its low estimate. Hammonss record, set in 2013, was for a basketball hoop chandelier, Untitled (2000), which sold at Phillips for $8m.
Read More
The Art Newspaper

Jun 21 2017
Spain’s new Centro Botín shuns the ‘Bilbao effect’
The Centro Botín in Santander prioritises
Almost 20 years since Frank Gehrys $100m titanium-clad Guggenheim Bilbao opened, another city on Spains north coast is getting a major contemporary art centre designed by an internationally acclaimed starchitect. The Centro Botn, Renzo Pianos first big commission in the country, opens in Santander on 23 June. But comparisons with the museum that became a model for culture-driven regeneration schemes worldwide are too simplistic, say Piano and the president of the Fundacin Botns visual arts committee, Vicente Todol.

The foundation launched in the 1960s by Santanders banking dynasty appointed Todol, the Spanish curator and former director of Londons Tate Modern, around the time it unveiled Pianos initial plans for the centre six years ago. The idea was not to create an icon, Todol says. The building is not trying to show off or give the impression that Santander is more than it is. (The citys population of 170,000 is around half that of Bilbao.)

Piano described the design in strikingly similar terms after the public consultation process in a 2011 interview with the architecture critic Richard Ingersoll. The building overlooking the bay of Santander was to prioritise luminosity and lightness and be as invisible as possible from the city centre. I suppose our strategy was the opposite of the Guggenheim, Piano said. How many Bilbao effects can you have after all?

Covered in thousands of light-diffusing ceramic tiles, the 10,300 sq. m structure is split into two lobes housing 2,500 sq. m of galleries and a 300-seat auditorium respectively. (This compares to around 11,000 sq. m of exhibition space across 19 galleries at the Guggenheim Bilbao.) To preserve views of the waterfront, Piano has raised the building on four-metre pillars level with the tree trunks in the surrounding Pereda Gardens. By re-routing a main road through an underground tunnel, the project has doubled the green space to almost ten acres.

The park hosts Cristina Iglesiass permanent water installation in five pieces, Desde lo subterrneo, while an open-air amphitheatre will screen films and activities within the centre. Free admission to these external spaces will encourage visitors to move seamlessly between outdoors and indoors, says the centres executive director Ftima Snchez. The 8 ticket price for exhibitions will be waived for residents of Cantabria.

The aim, Snchez says, is to create an art centre with a social mission that reflects the foundations 50-year record of philanthropy in the region and beyond. The auditorium and other rooms in the buildings eastern half will present concerts, festivals and activities in music, dance and cookery. Educational programmes based on the foundations research partnership with Yale University will explore the links between creativity and emotional intelligence.

Nevertheless, it is important to place the Botn Centre on the contemporary art scene on a global level, Snchez says. Todol and Udo Kittelmann, a fellow committee member and head of Berlins Nationalgalerie, are co-organising the opening exhibition dedicated to Carsten Hller (Y, until 10 September). The 250-strong collection holds works by established names including Mona Hatoum, Miroslaw Balka and Tacita Dean, who have mentored young artists for the foundations workshops initiative.

A third programming strand focuses on drawings, following catalogues raisonns of the Spanish masters published by the foundation since 2006. A show of 80 Goya drawings drawn from the collection of Madrids Museo del Prado (Agility and Audacity, until 24 September) anticipates the completion of the project in 2019.

But unlike flashier art museums backed by private foundations, the centres primary mission is to serve the local community. The foundation declined to say how many visitors it hopes to attract. Forecasts aside, Todol says: You dont need to be a big city to have a very good and appropriate cultural infrastructure.

In Spain, which is still trying to recover from the recession, the anti-Bilbao style of the Centro Botn speaks to a wider context of discomfort with grand [cultural] building projects in a post-crisis world, says Bruce Altshuler, the director of museum studies at New York University. Culture is not saving cities any more.
Read More
artforum.com

Jun 21 2017
FILM: Magnificent Seven
Amy Taubin on Jim McKay’s En el Séptimo Día
Read More
The Guardian

Jun 21 2017
'We don't want to be dug out': the Indigenous art helping to protect the land from mining

Each year, a community legal centre in the NT auctions off donated art to keep its doors open – and the proceeds now provide a third of its funds

“It’s some sort of a hole they’ve got to dig in and get the oil and the gas, you know – but there’s spirits of Yolngu people in the ground,” says artist Nawurupu Wunungmurra.

Wunungmurra, a senior Yirritja man from north east Arnhem Land, is describing long held Yolngu beliefs of the endless spiritual cycle of their people through the land’s water sources, and how the prospect of mining – especially fracking – impacts them.

Continue reading...
Read More
The Art Newspaper

Jun 21 2017
Memorial appeals launched to remember Khadija Saye
Khadija Saye at the launch of the Diaspora Pavilion at the Venice Biennale with Nicholas Serota looking on (Image: Khadija Saye/Twitter)
Two memorial appeals have been launched to remember the young artist Khadija Saye (1992-2017) who died with her mother, Mary Mendy, in the Grenfell Tower fire in west London on 14 June. As well as the Khadija Saye Memorial Fund, donors are contributing to a fund to support paid internships in galleries or other cultural organisations in her name.

Saye benefited from a paid internship through Creative Access, a non-profit that provides Black, Asian and other young people from minorities opportunities to work in cultural organisations. The charity is co-ordinating the fundraising appeal specifically to create The Khadija Saye internship. The appeal target is currently 10,000, which would enable two six-month paid internships.
 
Saye worked at Peer, a small gallery in Hoxton, east London, as the first Creative Access-supported paid intern from July 2015 until April 2016, and then as a part-time gallery assistant. She was due to work at the gallery this week, says Ingrid Swenson, Peers director. Swenson and her husband, Andrew Wilson, who is a Senior Tate curator of Modern and Contemporary British art, where close friends of the artist.

Meanwhile, a more general appeal has also been launched as the artists self-portrait from a group of works that are now on show in the Diaspora Pavilion went on display at Tate Britain. The silkscreen, Sothiou (2017), is displayed by the Tate in memory of Saye and all who died in the fire. In the past the gallery has traditionally marked the death of artists in its collection.  

Sothiou, from the series Dwelling, has been lent by the artist Nicola Green, in whose studio Saye worked part-time as an assistant. Green is married to the Labour MP, David Lammy, who has been outspoken in criticising the government and local authorities handling of the disaster and its aftermath.  

Saye also worked part-time at London's Transport Museum in its education team.     

To support an internship in Khadija Sayes name, see https://www.justgiving.com/crowdfunding/khadijasayeinternshipfund

To support the Khadija Saye Memorial Fund, see https://www.justgiving.com/crowdfunding/khadija-saye-memorial-fund
Read More
The Art Newspaper

Jun 21 2017
Queer Asian cinema king takes Shanghai art scene by storm
Installation view of Monuments at ShanghArt’s West Bund gallery (Image: courtesy of ShanghArt)
The Thai filmmaker and artist Apichatpong Weerasethakul has brought a bit of cinematic glamour to Shanghais art world this summer. Weerasethakul, a cult figure of queer Asian cinema, enjoys an enthusiastic following in mainland China, where both experimental styles and gay subject matter are heavily censored.  His exhibition Monuments (until July 27) at ShanghArts West Bund gallery has generated the sort of enthusiastic scrum usually reserved for film festivals. On the opening day, he was in much demand by his fans, for autographs and signatures, describes a gallery spokeswoman, while at the press conference 30 media were expected but over 60 appeared.

Weerasethakuls China following includes friendships with the Chinese video artist Yang Fudong and the Taiwanese auteurs Cai Mingliang and Hou Hsiao-hsien, says the spokeswoman. We have two different types of audiences visiting his exhibition: one knows him very well, follows his every film and understands the concepts, characteristics and his methodology. The other type has little knowledge about Apichatpong; they come to find out about the artist, and either like him or find it difficult to connect with his works.

Monuments was two years in the making and grew out of contacts established from the Shanghai-based gallerys Singapore location. Although ShanghArt has previously brought the ethnic Chinese Singaporean artist Robert Zhao Renhui to exhibit in China, Weerasethakul marks its first showing of a non-Chinese Southeast Asian artist. ShanghArt, established in 1996 and one of the first contemporary art galleries in China, primarily exhibits established mainland artists whom it has worked with since its early days, such as Ding Yi, Geng Jianyi and Zhang Enli. In March it reopened its old Moganshan Lu premises as a project space dedicated to developing the next generation of Chinese talent, starting with a group show followed by Qfwfq, a solo exhibition by Lin Yuqi (until 23 July).

Works in Weerasethakuls Shanghai show include Async First Light (2017), a music video made in collaboration with the Japanese composer Ryuichi Sakamoto, and 2009s Haiku, which was included in A Night with Apichatpong Weerasethakul at the Tate Modern last year. ShanghArts spokeswoman says that there was no censorship or self-censorship of Weerasethakuls politics. Almost all his works reflect his political criticisms, like the 2016 video installation work Fireworks: Fans, where the combining of powerful fire with the mundane object of a fan implies the conflict between the local authority and people. However, as is becoming common practice in China, his gay identity was left implicit. We didnt especially mention his queer perspective in our materials [but] were very open to talk about this, she says. Even for the artist, he holds a very open attitude towards his sexual orientation as a gay man working in Thailand. And during the press conference, the media freely raised questions about his queer perspective and he answered very naturally. However, she added, I think most people in China know Apichatpongs films more than his art works, and Chinese fans focus on his auteur status more.
Read More
The Art Newspaper

Jun 21 2017
Syrian refugees to be trained to rebuild Palmyra and other heritage sites
Palmyra
The World Monuments Fund (WMF) is launching a 500,000 scheme to train Syrian refugees living in and around the Zaatari camp on the Jordanian border in traditional stone masonry. The aim is to develop skills so that cultural heritage sites that have been caught in crossfire or destroyed by Isil can be rebuilt once peace is restored to Syria. 

Organisers of the training course, which is due to launch in the border town of Mafraq in Jordan in August, are also hoping to recruit Jordanian students in a bid to alleviate some of the pressures put on the local community by the volume of people fleeing war-torn Syria. The project is being developed with Petra National Trust, a Jordanian not-for-profit organisation whose mission is to promote the protection and conservation of the Unesco World Heritage site of Petra.

There has been enormous destruction in Palmyra, Nimrud and Aleppo, says John Darlington, the executive director of the World Monuments Fund Britain, which is working with the New York-based WMF on the scheme. When the dust settles, one of the things that will stop restoration is that we will see money going into places like Palmyra but the skills on the ground wont be there. Because so many people have left, theres a huge skills deficit. 

There are an estimated 80,000 refugees living in the Zaatari camp, with a further 80,000 thought to be living in the neighbouring towns and villages. 

The blueprint for the Syrian project came from a similar scheme begun by the WMF in Zanzibar two years ago. While the Anglican Christ Church Cathedral was being repaired, an intensive programme of skills development was also launched. There is now a pool of local trained stone masons to help with future repairs.

We are looking for stone masons who are already living in the local community or in the refugee community. Its a long-held tradition in that part of the world, Darlington says. We dont want to parachute in a load of experts and then leave. The idea is to train people who will become trainers themselves, so it will cascade out.

With the conflict in Syria raging on, it is too early to say how long the project will last, or indeed when the WMF will be able to start work there. We are aiming to recruit 34 trainees who will be able to train others, Darlington says. If the project is shown to make a real difference, we will be rolling it out elsewhere.

Since civil war broke out in Syria in 2011, much of the countrys cultural heritage has come under attack, especially in the cities of Palmyra and Aleppo, where historical buildings such as the Citadel of Aleppo and Great Mosque of Aleppo have been either destroyed or damaged.

The scheme is supported by the UKs Cultural Protection Fund, which was established in 2016 to safeguard monuments and heritage sites at risk due to conflict. Other projects to benefit from the 30m fund include a scheme, led by the University of Liverpool, focused on Yazidi historic shrines in Dohuk, Mosul and Sinjar in Iraq; the creation of a database of cultural heritage on Soqotra, a Yemeni archipelago between Yemen and the Horn of Africa; and initiatives in the Occupied Palestinian Territories including the establishment of a new cultural and youth centre. 
Read More
The Art Newspaper

Jun 21 2017
Ei Arakawa sculpture vandalised at Sculpture Projects Münster
Visitors observing where the missing LED panel in Ei Arakawa's sculpture should be (Photo: Matthias Ahlke)
Part of Ei Arakawas sculpture on show at Sculpture Projects Mnster (until 1 October), the German sculpture festival held every ten years, has been stolen. The New York-based Japanese artists workHarsh Citation, Harsh Pastoral, Harsh Mnsteris on display in a field in front of Haus Kamp, which houses part of the citys Chamber of Crafts.

According to the Sculpture Projects Mnster website: [Arakawa] has personally grouped seven pixelated LED panels he assembled himself on the grassy space these illuminated pictures accompanied by sound are arranged like an audio-visual choir in the landscape. The panels depict animated versions of paintings by artists such as Joan Mitchell and Gustave Courbet.

A statement posted on the exhibition Facebook page says that one of the seven LED panels was stolen on 17 June. The artist is working on the replacement, and it might take until the beginning of July. Six other LED panels and all seven sound components are working normally, so please visit, the organisers say. 

New York-based Arakawa told Artnews that the replacement work will be on a black PVC sheet instead of on hand-dyed fabric. This is in part because it will take less time to replace, but also because I want this incident of the public work being stolen to be visible to future visitors, he said.   
Read More
The Art Newspaper

Jun 21 2017
Kassel to build permanent Documenta Institute
Marta Minujín, The Parthenon of Books (2017)
 on Friedrichsplatz, Kassel, is part of Documenta 14 (Photo: Roman März)
Kassels city council has settled on a location to build a new Documenta Institute to serve as a research centre and to host events, conferences and exhibitions studying its significance in the contemporary art world.

The city has budgeted the construction of the new centre at 24m and plans to build it on a plot of land that is currently a carpark in the north of the city, close to the university. The German government will stump up 12m, the state of Hesse will provide a further 6m and the city will raise the remaining 6m.

The new centre will be managed by the Documenta team, the city of Kassel and the Fridericianum museum. The idea is to keep alive the concept and experience of Documenta in the years between exhibitions, the city council says in a statement.

The Documenta exhibition has been held every five years since 1955. The 14th edition opened in Kassel on 10 June and runs until 17 September. For the first time, the exhibition is split between two locations, with a section in Athens that runs until 16 July.
Read More
The Guardian

Jun 21 2017
'I think leftism is a disorder': is this artist the rightwing Banksy?

Street artist Sabo shot to fame during the 2016 US election with his politically incorrect approach. Now he’s plastering LA with controversial works

The guerrilla art movement is usually associated with leftwing politics. Banksy targets capitalism, consumerism and inequality. Blek le Rat, the father of stencil graffiti, depicts oppression and resistance.

Shepard Fairey gilded Barack Obama’s rise with the iconic “Hope” poster and now highlights the scapegoating of Muslims and the corporatisation of US politics.

Continue reading...
Read More
The Art Newspaper

Jun 21 2017
Entire body of UK public sculpture to go online by 2020
United Trinity (2008) by Philip Jackson outside Old Trafford stadium (Image: © the artist. Photo: Art UK)
Britain will be the first country to create an online catalogue of its entire collection of publicly owned sculpture. Art UK, a charity which recently completed a similar venture for 210,000 oil paintings, is undertaking the operation in partnership with the Public Monuments and Sculpture Association.
 
Art UK believes there are around 150,000 sculptures in the UKs public collections, which it defines as museums, galleries, universities, hospitals and other public buildings. A further 16,500 outdoor public monuments and sculptures will also be included. Antiquities made before AD1000, of which there are probably some tens of thousands in museums, will be excluded.
 
The cost of digitising nearly 170,000 sculptures will work out at just over 13 an object. Other expenditure will take the total cost to 3.8m, of which 2.8m has been pledged by the Heritage Lottery Fund. Work has just begun, with the first tranche of material due to go online early next year; it will be freely accessible. The project should be completed in May 2020.
 
Nearly half of the UKs public sculptures are not on display and most have not been properly photographed. Many outdoor works have never been properly catalogued and are at risk of decay.
 
Andrew Ellis, the director of Art UK, says that Britains public sculpture collection is much more globally diverse in terms of artists than is the case with paintings: Along with British sculpture, there are Benin bronzes, Japanese works, Tibetan votive figures, Mexican pieces, Italian Renaissance statues and New York Abstract Expressionists.

Catalogued paintings (and eventually sculptures) can be viewed at artuk.org 
Read More
The Guardian

Jun 20 2017
The great Gaspé: life on Canada's edge – in pictures

Intrigued by a place described to her simply as ‘wilder’, French photographer Claudia Imbert took up residency in Petite-Vallée, on the tip of Quebec’s Gaspé Peninsula, to create theatrical portraits of everyday people

Continue reading...
Read More
The Guardian

Jun 20 2017
Tall timber: the world’s tallest wooden office building to open in Brisbane

Cross-laminated timber towers are becoming more popular thanks to benefits for the environment and occupants – but are they safe and strong enough?

The famous Queenslander tradition of building houses upon wooden stilts is escalating to a whole other level on Thursday – or 10 levels, to be exact.

The sod-turning ceremony at 5 King Street in Brisbane will be a groundbreaking event in more than just in the literal sense. When complete in 2018, 45 metres of the 52-metre office tower will qualify as the world’s highest to be held aloft not by steel and concrete, but timber and glue.

Continue reading...
Read More
The New York Times

Jun 20 2017
Art of a Grenfell Tower Fire Victim Is Shown by the Tate
The display of a work by Khadija Saye might be a “means to remember her and her neighbors” who were killed, said Andrew Wilson, a Tate senior curator.
Read More
artforum.com

Jun 20 2017
Read More
The Art Newspaper

Jun 20 2017
The many loves of John Giorno
The poet (and lover) talks big at the I Heart John Giorno exhibition. Photo: Shaugn & John—Freedom Agency.
Not just a fantastic poet, John Giorno must also be an impressive lover. How else to explain I Heart John Giorno, a 13-venue show dedicated to Andy Warhols former boyfriend and the current partner of Ugo Rondinone (who organised it)? Giorno kicked off the show on 21 June with a talk at Sky Art with MoMA curator Laura Hoptman, the pair nestled between two of his pieces: Its Not What Happens, Its How You Handle It and A Hurricane in a Drop of Cum. The conversation was lively and free-flowing, touching on why Giorno doesnt read at his readings (Its like a singer. Have you ever heard a singer read a phrase?), how he came up with his Dial-A-Poem project (I was on the phone waiting and I thought to myself, why do I have to listen to this bullshit? This could be a poem!), and hanging out with William Burroughs (He somehow got SMARTER with vodka and marijuana.) The message of the talk, like the message of the show, seemed to be that you will never ever be as cool as John Giorno.
Read More
The Art Newspaper

Jun 20 2017
Object lessons: a maquette by Barbara Hepworth, a Cubistic balalaika by Ben Nicholson and a work by Venice Biennale artist Mark Bradford
1932 (guitar) by Ben Nicholson, O.M. Photo courtesy of Christie's Images Ltd 2017.
London
Sothebys

22 June: Impressionist and Modern Art Day Sale


Dual Form (conceived 1965, cast 1966) by Barbara Hepworth

(est. 150,000250,000)
Collectors Mary and George Bloch spent four decades pursuing treasures, from antique snuff bottles to contemporary works; this day sale features selections from their trove of Modern sculptures, including five works by one of Britain's foremost Modern sculptors. This bronze maquette (the second of nine) derives from Hepworths Dual Form, a sculpture conceived in 1965 that was first installed outside of the Guildhall in St. Ives, Cornwall. Hepworth, who settled in St. Ives in 1939 with her husband, the artist Ben Nicholson, helped make the seaside fishing village a locus of mid-century abstraction. Drawing inspiration from the landscape, her elegantly reductive forms have become quite sought-after over the past three years, with significant pieces bringing seven figures at auction. This comparatively affordable maquette was acquired by the Blochs from Marlborough Fine Art of London in 1968, a year after it was shown in the British Pavilion of the Expo 67 fair in Montreal.

Update: the lot sold for 585,000 with premium

London, King Street
Christies

26 June: Modern and British Art Evening Sale


1932 (guitar) by Ben Nicholson, O.M.

(est. 500,000-800,000)
A highlight of the houses evening sale dedicated to British and Irish works of art is a Cubistic depiction of a balalaika (type of Russian stringed instrument) by the late Ben Nicholson, who described his work as not necessarily representational or nonrepresentational, but both musical and architectural. Even before the artist befriended Pablo Picasso on a trip to Paris in 1933, this 1932 painting, in oil and pencil on gessoed board, shows Nicholson edging toward a more radical approach inspired by his sojourns among the Parisian avant-garde and was included in a major exhibition of his work organised at the Tate Gallery in 1993-4. John Russell wrote of the artists early 1930s works, These paintings are the purest Nicholson: the fastidious fine-drawn line, the paint so transparent that the support seems to breathe through it, the delineation of objects which looks casual and elliptic but is really very much to the point. They give the feeling of life being lived on many levels, and of a world in which the image and the word are equal.

Update: the work sold for the 509,000 with premium

Bonhams

London, New Bond Street


29 June: Post-war and Contemporary Art


Dream Deferral (2009) by Mark Bradford

(est. 1m1.5m)
The highest-estimated of the houses sale is a multimedia collage on canvas by the Los Angeles-born artist Mark Bradford, who is representing the US in the current Venice Biennale (until 26 November), a tour-de-force showing that has left Bradfords work in very short supply, says Ralph Taylor, the director of the houses Post-war and Contemporary art department in London. While mostly abstract, Bradfords art often alludes to urgent social issues and the black experience in America; this works title derives from the writer Langston Hughess famous 1951 poem suite Montage of a Dream Deferred, which celebrates and commiserates with the Manhattan neighbourhood of Harlem and its residents. This the best of Bradford, showcasing all the great elements of his worka delicate and yet raw composition, with a textured and bright surface that gives the sense of a landscape or the whorls of a thumbprint, adds Taylor. The work last appeared at Christies London in 2015, when it sold to the present owner for 903,000 with premium in 2015.

Update: the lot sold for 1,565,000 with premium
Read More
The Art Newspaper

Jun 20 2017
Miami artist to work on Pulse victims’ memorial
The Pulse LGBT nightclub in Orlando will be turned into a museum. Photo: © Walter
The Pulse nightclub in Orlando, Floridathe scene of a mass shooting last June, when 49 people were killed by Omar Mateenis to be turned into a museum and memorial for the victims, says the clubs owner, Barbara Poma. According to the Orlando Sentinel newspaper, the memorial campaign will be led by the OnePulse foundation. The Miami-based artist Jefre Manuel has been appointed as the foundations design consultant, while the board of trustees includes Lance Bass, formerly of the boy band NSync.
Read More
The Art Newspaper

Jun 20 2017
Creative workshop is just the job for Venice Biennale
Olafur Eliasson: Green light – an artistic workshop. In collaboration with Thyssen-Bornemisza Art Contemporary. 57th International Art Exhibition of La Biennale di Venezia Viva Arte Viva, 2017. Photo: Damir Zizic. © Olafur Eliasson
No great Expo or Worlds Fair was complete without a native village or two in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. The Midway at Chicagos Worlds Columbian Exposition in 1893 had a Dahomey village, with Africans in traditional dress, as did Pariss Exposition Universelle in 1900. Caucasians were displayed as well as more exotic people. Young women, or colleens, in the Irish villages especially.

This year at the heart of the main exhibition at the Venice Biennale, the art worlds greatest gathering, there is a workshop where refugees and migrants, some from Africa, others from the Middle East, are making lamps designed by the Danish-Icelandic artist Olafur Eliasson. Visitors can join around 40 volunteer migrants, who are being housed on the Venetian mainland, to help them in their task until July and again in the autumn. The artists geometric design with an LED light is best put together by two people, so encouraging conversation.

Called Green light, the project was launched by Studio Olafur Eliasson and partners in Vienna last year. Venice is the art workshops most high-profile venue so far.

For some the context is very wrong. I felt sickened by this human zoo, wrote Jackie Wullschlger, the art critic of the Financial Times. Cristina Ruiz, a former editor of The Art Newspaper and another Venice Biennale veteran, was also unimpressed: Let people interested in the project seek it out. Let the others gawp at something else. This is not art in service of migrants but migrants in service of a curatorial vision.

The context is challenging. Another of Christine Macels curatorial choices does not help.

I agree with Ruiz and others about the Brazilian artist Ernesto Netos Sacred Place in the Arsenale. His giant tepee made of jute, where members of the Amazonian Huni Kuin can be found, has something of the Midway about it. An exotic show-stopper, in the accompanying didactic display the artists voice speaks loudest. But Green light feels different. It would have been diminished if it was a sideshow at the Biennale: art and activism as an add-on. It feels like a project designed and evolving to meet migrants real needs and encourage conversations. You need only speak to the migrants themselves to hear their thoughts and life stories (and critics of the project have so far failed to include the participants voices in their critiques).

One participant, Tahajud Alghrabi, a teacher from Baghdad who joined the project in Vienna, is now helping other refugees in Venice. During the preview week one young man from Nigeria, Jerry Angel, said frankly that if he wasnt taking part in Green light he would probably be hanging out at a railway station drinking or possibly selling drugs.

The artist Mark Bradfords contribution to Venice, beyond his US pavilion, is also based on him listening to what people in dire straits have told him they really need. He has backed, including financially, a shop where prisoners can sell the products they make in partnership with a local co-operative, Rio Ter dei Pensieri. It will stay open after the Biennale closes in NovemberProcess Collettivo is a six-year project.

Eliasson and his partners in the Green light project are also in it for the long-term. This is not a feel-good photo-opportunity, and a far cry from going slumming and meeting have-nots in a Scandi design setting. Refugees and migrants have access to practical training, legal advice and language courses for free.

Before the project even had a name, Eliasson told us he was trying to find a way of using art for people who are not allowed to get the one thing they need most: a job. He revealed that one of the project partners in Venice, the Italian design firm Moroso, is creating jobs in Africa making a line of furniture. The projects staging in Venice highlights just how difficult it is for migrants to find gainful employment in Europe.

A key part of Green light elsewhere is missing at the Biennale, however. Eliasson had designed an area where participants could eat together, as happened at workshops in Vienna and Houston. But permission for this was declined by the exhibition organisers, so communal lunches instead take place beyond the Biennale boundary in the Serra dei Giardini.

It would be ironic if Italys labour unions had nixed the proposal to let migrants serve food or if this has been barred because of rules about the catering concession in the exhibition (the Biennale declined to comment). At least coffee and water were allowed in the workshop space after preview week.
Read More
The Art Newspaper

Jun 20 2017
Dara Birnbaum takes on Wonder Woman
While the blockbuster Wonder Woman film continues to lasso audiences in theatres, raking in more than $400 in box office sales, it's worth remembering that the Amazonian warrior princess has been an inspiration for artists as well as comic book fans. Dara Birnbaum took the superhero as her subject in the 1978-79 video piece Technology/Transformation: Wonder Woman, remixing scenes from the television series starring Linda Carter to deconstruct the feminist image in pop culture. The abbreviated narrativerunning, spinning, saving a manallows the underlying theme to surface: psychological transformation versus television product. Real becomes Wonder in order to do good (be moral) in an (a) or (im)moral society. The work is now in the collections of MoMA, the Whitney and the Brooklyn Museum, among others.
Read More
The Art Newspaper

Jun 20 2017
Will the real Modigliani please stand up?
The Little Peasant (around 1918) was catalogued by Ceroni
The US scholar Kenneth Wayne is planning a variation to the traditional catalogue raisonn on the Italian artist Amedeo Modigliani. Ambrogio Ceronis catalogue raisonn, first published in 1958, is considered the benchmark, but is often said to contain gaps as his listing of 337 pieces only includes works that he had seen.

The Modigliani Project, founded by Wayne in 2013, aims to throw new light on a market bedevilled by fakes and squabbles. We plan to publish a supplement to Ceroni by 2020 with around 50 works, Wayne says. This will be followed by detailed online postings on the Ceroni works. In a counter move, the Paris-based art historian Marc Restellini told Vanity Fair magazine that his organisation, the Institut Restellini, plans to launch an online-only, fee-paying catalogue raisonn of Modigliani paintings later this year.

Wayne is organising a show of Modiglianis works at the Barnes Foundation in Philadelphia scheduled for 2020, the 100th anniversary of the artists death. In addition, a major survey opens at Tate Modern (23 November-2 April 2018), as well as an exhibition of early drawings at the Jewish Museum in New York (15 September-4 February 2018). Meanwhile, an international team of scholars and curators aim to clarify Modiglianis techniques through scientific analysis. Jeanne Bathilde-Lacourt, the curator of Modern art at the Lille Mtropole Museum, is assisting the research related to Modiglianis works in French state museum collections.
Read More
The Art Newspaper

Jun 20 2017
Olafur Eliasson: ‘There is ultimately no space in which art cannot work’
Green light, the Vienna-based art project launched by Olafur Eliasson to welcome refugees. Photo: Sandro E.E. Zanzinger © Olafur Eliasson
In the past few years, Ive grown more and more interested in policy making and have had discussions with politicians in Germany, Denmark, Iceland, and Ethiopia; with UN officials, with mayors and city planners, and with people who believe in the European Union and seek to revitalise it as a shared project; with climate scientists, who are addressing the fundamental changes the world needs to make to curb climate change; with economists, contemplative specialists, and compassion trainers; with the business sector and people working to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals and the 2030 Agenda.

I have been pushing for art to act on its responsibility and for others to understand its potential. My motivation is simple: I think art and culture are incredibly robust and have so much to offer, also outside the cultural sectors.

There is ultimately no space in which art cannot work. Culture has consequences for how we see the world and how we make the world. It is crucial to our feelings of being connected and of global responsibility, and it can build bridges between local and global contexts. The arts embrace diversity, often generate a sense of trust and inclusion, and even cultivate feelings of empathy and compassion. And we need more of that.

In autumn 2016, it became clear that Brexit was no exception and that many of us had been smugly walled up in our comfort zones, convinced that our world was a world shared by many, by the majority even, and that our world understood the world. And we were wrong. I was wrong.

I realised then that I had not been speaking to the world but to a privileged group. I asked myself, what now? What can I do to tear down the wall between me and those I didnt know that I didnt know about? How can we speak the language of culture while avoiding the blinding elitism that we have seemingly and involuntarily adopted?

I, for my part, will keep thinking about future artworks through which to respond to these questions, projects like Green lightan artistic workshop, Ice Watch, Riverbed and Little Sun. Each of these takes art out of the comfort zone that is the art world to test its potential in broader conversations.

For comment on Elisson's Venice Biennale project, see Creative workshop is just the job for Venice Biennale

Open House, about Studio Olafur Eliassons ideas and practice, was published on 15 June by Koenig Books
Olafur Eliasson: Maison des ombres multiples (Multiple shadow house), opens at the Muse d'art contemporain de Montral on 21 June (until 9 October)


Read More
The New York Times

Jun 20 2017
Jeff Koons Sent Paris Flowers. Can It Find the Right Vase?
The artist donated his large sculpture “Bouquet of Tulips” to honor terrorism victims. The project is stuck in red tape, and its critics wish it would disappear.
Read More