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The Art Newspaper

May 25 2017
Conceptual artist Bernar Venet gets a bigger stage in the UK with three shows this summer
Bernar Venet's sculptures are on show in the grounds of Cliveden, the estate created for the Duke and Duchess of Sutherland in the 1850s (© Courtesy of the Artist and BlainSouthern; Photo: Jonty Wilde)
The French conceptual artist Bernar Venet is making a splash in the UK this summer, with his first gallery show in London in more than 40 years; an exhibition of large-scale sculptures at Cliveden country house in Buckinghamshire; and a new work on show in Frieze Sculpture in Regents Park, London.

The artist rose to prominence in the 1960s when he began making work based on mathematical and scientific formulae. Bernar Venet: Looking Forward 1961-84, which opens at Londons Blain Southern next month (8 June-22 July), focuses on his early innovations, from industrial paint works such as Dchet (1961) to key installations such as Tas de Charbon (Pile of Coal, 1963).
 
Venet moved to New York in 1966, subsequently creating works such as Stock Market TV Piece (1970) and How To Pick a Fund (1969), which reflect his continued fascination with mathematical theory, equations, finance and data. Sculptural works from Venets ongoing Indeterminate Line series dating from the 1970s and 1980s will also go on show. 

Meanwhile, an exhibition of ten large-scale sculptures by Venet opened earlier this month (until 15 October) in the grounds of Cliveden, the estate created for the Duke and Duchess of Sutherland in the 1850s. The swooping russet works, crafted from Corten Steel, are variations on the Arcs and Indeterminate Lines. A new piece, Seven Leaning Straight Lines, has been installed beneath Cliveden's clock tower. All of the works are for sale; Blain Southern has organised the display in collaboration with the National Trust, which owns the property. 

Venet says in a statement: My sculptures have been exhibited throughout the world, and every latitude has its peculiarities and qualities, but I am very enthusiastic about the way they integrate into the English countryside. They have found their place here. 

The artists 17 Acute Unequal Angles (2016) also forms part of the outdoor Frieze Sculpture presentation, the Frieze London public art exhibition, which opens three months before the fair this year (5 July-8 October). 

Venet runs his own foundation based in the south of France, west of Nice. His four-hectare estate, known as Le Muy, is dotted with works by Donald Judd, Dan Flavin and Frank Stella. The sculpture park will be open to the public 16 July (appointments for guided visits can be made throughout the summer).  
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The Art Newspaper

May 25 2017
Rare historic coins return to Salzburg Museum 70 years after they were looted
Two of the 94 historic coins being returned to the Salzburg Museum (Image: © American Numismatic Society)
Ninety-four coins stolen in 1945 will be returned to the Salzburg Museum at a ceremony in New York tomorrow (May 26), more than 70 years after they were hidden for safekeeping in an Austrian salt mine.

The American Numismatic Society bought the coins in 1995 thanks to a donation from Chester L. Krause, a benefactor who suspected they were looted from Austria after the Second World War and wanted to save them from being dispersed on the market and lost. 

After purchasing the coins, the ANS began making inquiries in Austria to trace the legitimate owner. Inventory numbers written in ink on the surface of the coinsa practise common in the 19th centurymatched with an old card file in the Salzburg Museum.

These coins were rather rare, which helped with the identification, says Ute Wartenberg Kagan, the executive director of the American Numismatic Society. We are delighted they will be returned to the museum where they belong. 

Towards the end of the Second World War, around 4,000 historic coins were removed from what was then called the Salzburger Museum Carolino-Augusteum, packed in a chest and stashed in a salt mine in nearby Hallein. In May 1945, in the chaotic aftermath of the war, rumours of plunder in Hallein circulated. In June 1945, US military authorities took custody of the coins. 

But when the Monuments Men returned the coin hoard to the museum in 1946, around 2,600 pieces were missing. Some were recovered from private individuals including US military personnel in the years after the war, but in 1955, almost 2,500 had still not resurfaced.

The 94 coins to be returned to Salzburg tomorrow were in the possession of a man in the US who probably acquired them in Austria. He was unwilling to relinquish them without compensation, prompting Krause to offer to finance the ANS purchase.

Salzburgs mint was one of the most important in medieval Europe and originated from a special dispensation to Archbishop Hartwig granted by the German Emperor Otto III in 996. One of the coins to be returned is a silver pfennig minted in the Archbishops reign. Another is a 14th-century gold florin of Archbishop Pilgrim II of Salzburg, the citys first gold coin. 

For Wartenberg Kagan, the case illustrates that even today museums in the US should be acting as safe havens for looted objects. We think museums should go to auctions and acquire items to repatriate them," she says. 
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The New York Times

May 25 2017
Update: For Frank Lloyd Wright’s 150th, Tours, Exhibitions and Tattoos
To celebrate the architect, museums, foundations and hotels will showcase buildings and drawings. Also, a bike route and sketch workshops.
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The Art Newspaper

May 25 2017
Former V&A director Martin Roth defends co-curating Azerbaijan pavilion
Martin Roth (Image: © Thierry Bal)
Amid ongoing criticism surrounding his co-curatorship of the Azerbaijan pavilion at this years Venice Biennale, Martin Roth, the former director of Londons Victoria & Albert Museum, has defended his involvement. Just like the foreign service, the art world also needs to talk to regimes it opposes, he tells The Art Newspaper. "If you no longer speak to each other, everything will be lost, he says. Roth has been attacked in his home country of Germany for working with the Central Asian country, which he has himself described as "authoritarian". The Berlin newspaper Tagesspiegel accused Roth of acting "unreasonably", and the Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung has also criticised him for working with the country.

In a recent report, Human Rights Watch stated that the "space for independent activism, critical journalism, and opposition political activity has been virtually extinguished" in Azerbaijan by arrest and conviction as well as law. 

"There is a lot that needs to be improved in Azerbaijan," he says, stressing that different religions coexist peacefully in the muslim country. But he says that calling it a "blueprint for tolerance" in a press releasea term that attracted a lot of criticism in Germanymight have been a mistake. Roth also underlines that he has been working with artists from Azerbaijan for many years.

This years exhibition in the Azerbaijan pavilion is entitled Under One Sun. The Art of Living Together and is supported by the Heydar Aliyev Foundation, which is chaired by Mehriban Aliyeva, the countrys First Lady. There was no interference whatsoever into his plans for the pavilion, Roth says. The pavilion, which Roth co-curated with Emin Mammadov, features the Georgian artist Elvin Nabizade as well as a group of video artists. Four years ago, Udo Kittelmann, the director of Berlins Nationalgalerie, organised the Russian pavilion, a point that has not been raised in the discussion regarding Roth. A curator at a leading German museum has called this hypocritical.
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The Guardian

May 24 2017
Fightback: Vanley Burke's black Birmingham – in pictures

The Jamaica-born ‘godfather of black British photography’ spent the 70s and 80s documenting street protests in the city. His work can be seen at Cardiff’s Diffusion festival until 31 May

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The Guardian

May 24 2017
Judy Chicago on the Beatles: 'They represent things we have lost – hope and freedom'

For Sgt Pepper’s 50th anniversary, the great psychedelic visionary of feminist art has created a giant mop-top mural inspired by Fixing a Hole – a song that sums up what she has spent her entire career doing

When American artist Judy Chicago accepted an invitation earlier this year from the Tate to paint a large-scale public mural as part of Liverpool’s Sgt Pepper at 50 celebration of the Beatles’ most popular album, she was amused to hear of an exchange between two of the curators involved in the project. One of them said, “What is Judy going to do? Paint a giant vagina?” The other replied, “I hope so.”

Related: The Beatles: Sgt Pepper 50th Anniversary Edition review – peace, love and rock star ennui

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The Art Newspaper

May 24 2017
Jeff Koons’s Ballerina caught up in a pas de deux
Jeff Koonss 45-foot-tall inflatable sculpture Seated Ballerina, installed at Rockefeller Center earlier this month (until 2 June), is not only drawing crowds in Manhattan. The kitschy work of appropriation art has also attracted a surprising amount of attention in Ukraine.
 
In a 22 May Facebook post, Lado Pochkhua, a New York-based Georgian artist, pointed out the sculptures striking resemblance to a porcelain figure designed by the Ukrainian artist Oksana Zhnikrup. Zhnikrup, who died in 1993, worked for the Kiev Experimental Art Ceramics Factory.
 
While some have called for Ukraine to confiscate the sculpture and install it in Kiev, Alexander Roitburd, a well-known and outspoken artist noted on Facebook that Im even glad that hes popularising Ukrainian art, adding however: I hope that he named the source.

A spokeswoman for Koons's studio said: "We are aware of Oksana Zhnikrups work and have a license to use it for Mr Koonss work."


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The Art Newspaper

May 24 2017
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The Art Newspaper

May 24 2017
London's pioneering Wilkinson Gallery to close as owners go separate ways
Wilkinson Gallery in London will close in July (Image: rehview/Flickr)
Wilkinson Gallery, the pioneering East End dealership that was the first in London to present solo shows by major female artists including Joan Jonas, Dara Birnbaum and Laurie Simmons, is closing at the end of July after nearly two decades.

The gallery's co-owners, Amanda and Anthony Wilkinson, say that they are dissolving their partnership for personal reasons. Both are in the process of setting up separate galleries in new locations, working with a number of the artists they currently represent. It will then be business as usual, they say in a joint statement.

Before the current craze for artists estates, Wilkinson Gallery was the first to work with the estates of Jimmy De Sana, in 2009, and Derek Jarman, in 2013. Other artists whom the Wilkinsons picked up early in their careers include George Shaw, who was nominated for the Turner Prize in 2011, and Sung Hwan Kim, who was the first to perform in The Tanks when they opened at Tate Modern in 2012.

The Wilkinsons opened their first gallery on Cambridge Heath Road in Bethnal Green in 1998, but in 2007 they sold up and bought a larger space on nearby Vyner Street. Owning their building has meant that they have been less affected than their neighbours by rising rents and operational costs, spurred by the area's gentrification and Olympic regeneration.

Several other galleries have left Vyner Street in recent years. Nettie Horn and Fred London Ltd relocated to Fitzrovia in 2012, with the latter closing altogether. Kate McGarry is now resident in Shoreditch, David Risely moved to Copenhagen and Ibid Projects relocated to Marylebone and now collaborates with other London venues.
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The Art Newspaper

May 24 2017
New Orleans biennial Prospect.4 announces artist lineup and focus
Maria Berrio's Japanese paper and watercolour collage<br />Wildflowers (2017) (Photo: courtesy the artist and Praxis Gallery, New York)
Theres no place like New Orleans, says Trevor Schoonmaker, the artistic director of Prospect.4, the fourth edition of the biennial-turned-triennial contemporary art event in the Louisiana city, to launch this November (16 November-25 February 2018). The theme of this edition, the Lotus in Spite of the Swamp, is a nod to the citys waterfront environment and its cultural history as the birthplace of jazz; the jazz saxophonist Archie Shepp called this art a triumph of the human spirit, a lily that grows in spite of the swamp, Schoonmaker explains (also adding the flowers significance as a symbol of enlightenment in both Buddhism and Hinduism). The idea is beautiful metaphor for overcoming difficulties, he says.

Prospect.4 is not a contemporary art event that happens to be held in New Orleans, but an event that addresses this unique citys identity. It will be spread across the city in 17 venues, including institutions like the Louisiana State Museum and even public transportation (such as an immersive work on a streetcar by the Baltimore-born, Brooklyn-based artist Derrick Adams).

Although the event has a global outlook, with around 25 countries represented on the roster of 73 artists and duos, the participants were chosen with a focus in mind, says Schoonmaker: they hail from places that relate New Orleans city, whether they are from the city and its surroundings (such as the New Orleans-born, New York) or from places that relate to the citys history (such as Zineb Sedira, who now lives in London but comes from France, the colonial power that founded the city).

Several themes addressed in works in the biennial reflect the history, geography and culture of the city, which celebrates the tercentennial of its founding as Nouvelle Orlans by the French in 1718. The environment and ecology, for instance, are major concerns in the city, which is located in the Mississippi River Delta and was devastated by flooding during Hurricane Katrina in 2005.

Mark Dion will create an installation that looks like a real field station for studying the Mississippi River. Race and identity will be explored by artists such as Kara Walker, who is making a work in Algiers Point that deals with to the history of the area, where slaves were once quarantined upon arrival in New Orleans. While visiting the neighbourhood, she was struck by a tour steamboat that played Dixieland music, Schoonmaker says, and the work will respond to this. She has teamed up with the jazz pianist Jason Moran for this new commission, one of several commissions to address the citys importance to the history of music. Collages that the late jazz great Louis Armstronga New Orleans nativewho made the works on the covers for his reel-to-reel tapes, have been loaned by the Louis Armstrong House Museum in Queens for an exhibition at the New Orleans Jazz Museum.

There will also be a tribute to Barkley Hendricks, who was making works for Prospect.4 at the time of his sudden death in April, which remain unfinished. Instead, the event will mount an exhibition of around ten of his large-scale portraits back to the 1970s, many of which were tracked down from private collections.

Other artists in Prospect.4which aims for diversity, Schoonmaker saysinclude the Nigeria-born, Los Angeles-based Njideka Akunyili Crosby; the Tokyo-born, New York-based Yoko Ono, and the Bogota Colombia-born, Brooklyn-based Maria Berrio.
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The Art Newspaper

May 24 2017
Worth the pilgrimage: on Francesco de Mura at Vassar College

Now at its final venue, the stunning exhibition In the Light of Naples: the Art of Francesco De Mura is the first ever show devoted to the Neapolitan Baroque painter, who lived from 1696-1782. Occupying three small galleries at the Frances Lehman Loeb Art Center at Vassar College in Poughkeepsie, New York, it features three drawings and 37 pictures by the artist, as well as one spirited bozzetto by Francesco Solimena (De Muras master from 1708 until 1729), two works by Corrado Giaquinto and one by Giacinto Diano, a pupil of De Mura.

Solimena, at the time one of Europes greatest, most successful painters, must have taught De Mura well. His pupil's gifts are vividly summarised in 1745 by the Neapolitan art historian Bernardo De Dominici, who described a copy of a devotional painting that the ten-year-old apprentice made in Solimenas studio as beautifully combining the tints with softness and sweetness. Such features are equally present in a far later, meltingly beautiful Madonna and Child with the Infant Saint John from the 1760s (lent by the Hearst San Simeon State Historical Monument).

At his best, De Mura presents a world one can only dream of: glorious spectacles of color and light, peopled by noble, athletic-like saints and soaring members of the Godhead. Such a scenario is thrillingly present, for instance, in the more than six-foot high Vision of Saint Benedict (around 1738-40, lent by the Museo di Capodimonte in Naples). De Mura prepared this work for one of the ceiling frescoes he completed in 1740 in the church of Santi Severino e Sossio in Naples. When done, the mural cycle caused a sensation: day after day, De Dominici reports, the church filled up with admiring crowds. With its cool palette and heartfelt narrative, the frescoes heralded a new moment in the spiritual and artistic history of the city.

Soon after De Mura left Solimenas studio in 1729, major projects came his way, such as a series of paintings of the life of Christ and the Virgin Mary for the church of the Nativity in the Holy Sepulcher at Jerusalem. This was followed by commissions for over 30 paintings for the great Benedictine Abbey at Monte Cassino, already decorated splendidly in fresco by Luca Giordano, who had a lasting impact on De Muras style. From Giordano, who had been Solimenas teacher, Francesco absorbed major lessons in the art of composition.

After finishing his work for Monte Cassino in 1738, De Mura was in demand by the young Charles VII, the first of the Spanish Bourbons to rule the Kingdom of Naples. To celebrate his marriage that year, Carlo di Borbone (as he liked to be called) commissioned De Mura to paint a ceiling (now no longer extant) for the prima anticamera in Naples Palazzo Reale. A preparatory oil sketch (now Palacio Real, Madrid; not in exhibition), depicting the Bourbon and Saxon coat of arms with a host of allegorical figures, was dispatched to Madrid in October 1738 for approval by Carlos mother, Elisabetta Farnese, the Queen of Spain.

In 1759, when Carlo di Borbone transferred to Spain and became King Carlos III, he invited De Mura to serve as court painter. For unknown reasons, the artist did not comply. In the meantime, he had been gainfully employed by the House of Savoy. By 1748, for instance, he had completed six ceiling frescoes for the Palazzo Reale in Turin. It was probably for the same location that De Mura painted one of his noblest creations, the Charity (Art Institute of Chicago) of 1743-44, which unfortunately was not part of the Vassar College venue.

Why, considering De Mura's long and rewarding career, does he remain so under-appreciated? Early on, he established a vibrant artistic persona, but at mid-career, he likely lost some commissions to Solimena, the admittedly greater artist, who lived until 1747. Later, at an advanced age, De Mura also would have experienced the rise of Neo-Classicism and the concomittent dismissal of the barocchetto style. (Such, after all, was the partial fate of as great an artist as Giambattista Tiepolo.)

Two other conditions, in more recent times, have hampered De Muras critical renown. The first was the huge loss of his work at the Benedictine Abbey at Monte Cassino, which was destroyed in the Second World War; it held about a third of his total output. One small picture in the exhibition, Saint Carloman Presented with the Benedictine Habit by Pope Saint Zacharias (around 1730, private collection), is preparatory to one of De Muras lost altarpieces for the abbey. The drama depicted is palpable: energised figures, in a wide variety of poses, circle about the young saint. The grace and piety evidenced here by Carloman remind one of certain altarpieces by the Rome-based master, Pierre Subleyras.

The other hindrance is inaccessibility. The church of the Nunziatella in Pizzofalcone in Naples, which contains brilliant frescoes from 1732 and 1750-51, is now a military school and is closed to the public. Also, the nearby Pio Monte della Misericordia opened its doors only relatively recently, in 1972; but only 39 of the 192 paintings that De Mura bequeathed to the confraternity remain in situ. The remainder were sold off according to his wishes to further the city's charities. Moreover, Naples, which Carlo di Borbone did so much to develop as a major European metropolis, has in modern times been deemed a lesser stop on art pilgrimages.

Yet it is worth making such journeys; one painting in the Vassar exhibition, Christ and the Samaritan Woman (dated 1752, lent by the Seattle Art Museum), is alone worth the visit to Poughkeepsie from anywhere in the world. With its scintillating palette, grand, almost enigmatic gestures, narrative brilliance and consummate painterly bravura, it surely ranks among the greatest paintings produced in 18th-century Italy.

The credit for this worthy projectincluding its inception, fund-raising, loan selection and the years of research that have culminated in a handsome and substantial catalogueis due principally to the Cornell Fine Arts Museums director emeritus, Arthur Blumenthal. He was generously advised by Nicola Spinosa, the former director of the Museo di Capodimonte and today's leading specialist on Neapolitan Settecento (18th century) painting.

Eliot Rowlands is a New York-based freelance art historian who specializes in early Italian paintings. Among his publications are The Collections of the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art: Italian Paintings, 1300-1800 (1996) and Masaccio Saint Andrew and the Pisa Altarpiece (2003).


In the Light of Naples: the Art of Francesco De Mura, Frances Lehman Loeb Art Center at Vassar College in Poughkeepsie, New York, until 2 July
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The Art Newspaper

May 24 2017
Three to see: New York
Shirin Neshat, Roja (2016, video still) (© Shirin Neshat, Courtesy the artist and Gladstone Gallery, New York and Brussels)
There is something for everyone at the National Academy Museums exhibition Creative Mischief (until 13 June), the sixth annual show with this cheeky title. It includes works in a variety of media by more than 130 international artists, faculty, alumni and students of the academy. The works are all daring, playful and poetic, says the schools dean and the curator of the show, Maurizio Pellegrin, in a release. They range from Anthony Panzeras scroll series in sanguine chalk, in which swags of drapery playfully hide or reveal nude women, to Helen Esbergs non-figurative jute and embroidery thread weavings. An otherwise hodge-podge show is instead corralled into thematic groups, such as The Urban Dream, The Spirit and Illusion and Form. The museum is also showing a concurrent exhibition of works by children, Little Mischief (until 31 May).

An elegant dance between realism and abstraction features in Luxembourg and Dayans exhibition Figures Toward Abstraction: Sculptures 1910-40 (until 1 July). Works by artists such as Jean Tingueley and Alberto Giacometti are included in this show driven by a collaboration between the gallerist Daniella Luxembourg and the architect Daniel Liebeskind, who says: Sculpture itself is actually pure architectureform, without bothersome necessities like plumbing. All of the works are shown in the round and often appear figurative from some angles but dissolve into abstraction from others (see, for instance, how the face and hairdo in Henri Matisses 1930 sculpture Le Tiar become lumps and planes from some directions). The most commanding sculpture in the exhibition, Rudolf Bellings large and highly abstract 1919 depiction of three intertwined figures, Dreiklang (Triad), is given its own space. The work was shown in the Nazis Degenerate Art Exhibition of 1937, demonstrating abstractions provocative power.

What is the identity of a person straddling two cultures? What does it mean to be an Iranian in the US? The Iranian, New York-based artist Shirin Neshat takes on these uncertain feelings in her solo show of new works, Dreamers, at Gladstone Gallery (until 17 June). The film Roja (2016), shown in its own dark space, will leave you as disoriented as its eponymous Iranian protagonist, who struggles to find her place as she tries to connect with American culture. The films settings express this confusion: it was shot in places in the US that resemble the Middle East in architecture or geography. Those familiar with Neshats photography will be surprised by the series The Dreamers, which swap her typical images of calligraphy drawn on bodies and faces for large-scale, blurry photographs of white Americans with bare shoulders and faces.
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The Art Newspaper

May 24 2017
The Bass is back: Miami Beach museum set to reopen in October after $12m renovation (and multiple delays)
The Bass in Miami Beach (Photo: Robin Hill)
Miami Beachs contemporary art museum, The Bass, is due to reopen to the public on 8 October after a $12m restructuring (and a snappy rebranding that has removed Museum of Art from its name). Construction work on the project, which launched in 2015 and experienced multiple delays, roughly doubles the museums usable space. We worked within the existing footprint of the Bass museum, but we somehow were able to increase the usable square footage dramatically, says David Gauld, the projects main architect.

Gauld also worked on the design team for the museums previous expansion, which opened in 2001 and added 16,000 sq ft to the museums existing 1930s Art Deco building, originally built as a library and art centre, and where the museum was founded in 1964. (The Tokyo-based architect of the 2001 expansion, Arata Isozaki, served as the design consultant for this new building campaign.) Gauld says he tried to remain faithful to both Isozakis addition and the historic building, which he calls the crown jewel of Miamis Art Deco history.

The renovation almost doubles the museums square footage of exhibition spaces, located both on the ground and upper level of the building, adding 4,100 sq ft to the museums existing 8,700 sq ft. One of the ground-floor galleries shows works from the museums founding collection, donated by Johanna and John Basswhich includes Old Master paintings, textiles and sculpturesjuxtaposed with rotating artists projects.

The inaugural show in this gallery, Beautiful (until 2 April 2018) is by the Ghent-based Cameroonian artist Pascale Mathine Tayou, who works in multiple media and addresses themes such as colonialism. Extant works back to 2006 will join the new Bass commission Welcome Wall (2017), a site-specific LED work that shows the word welcome in 70 languages. Tayou has selected works from the museums collection to dialogue with his pieces.

Site-specific works have also been commissioned for the new 5,200 sq ft Creativity Centre, which includes education spaces, visitor spaces, administrative offices and a multimedia lab. The project of long-term installations, Round 1: Chroma, has works by five artists: Moniker, Emmett Moore, Amanda Season Keeley, Katie Stout and Rafael Domenech. These include Moores Bauhaus-inspired seating and desk arrangement and a sculptural light work by Domenech. The wing also has a 1,000 sq ft terrace for public programmes.

Two other solo exhibitions will also kick off the reopened museums programme. The Argentina-born, New York-based artist Mika Rottenberg will show video works that incorporate mixed-media installations, such as the humorous NoNoseKnows (2015), which made a splash at the 2015 Venice Biennale, and the multi-media work Ponytails (2014), mechanised, synthetic versions of the perky hairstyle wiggling on a wall (until 30 April 2018).

Meanwhile, the entire second floor will be taken over by the main re-opening exhibition, the Switzerland-born, New York-based artist Ugo Rondinones good evening beautiful blue (until 19 February 2018), which will include works like his foam and resin clowns, vocabulary of solitude (2014) and the colourful mirror work clockwork for oracles II (2008). Rondinones Miami Mountain (2016) was acquired by the Bass in 2016 as part of the museums ten-year acquisition initiative, launched in September 2016. He has been working with the Bass on the show for about two years, and hosted the museums preview event this week at his studio in a converted Harlem church, a space with soaring ceilings dotted with his works in progress.

Speaking at the studio on 23 May, the Basss executive director and chief curator Silvia Karman Cubi discussed Rondinones exhibition, the change in attitude towards museums (less of a quiet churchlike space, more of a dynamic experience) and the Basss graphic and sleek naming rebranding. More than a building, she says, it was a transformation.
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The Art Newspaper

May 24 2017
Importance of being eclectic at Masterpiece
 Yannima Tommy Watson’s Iyarka painting (2015)
Masterpiece fair, according to its chairman Philip Hewat-Jaboor, is discovery. In the past, he explains, a collector could stroll up Madison Avenue or Bond Street and happen upon an objetbe it a 19th-century painting or a bronze Roman helmet, saythat tickled his fancy. You cant do that today, he says. Theres no serendipity. For the fairs eighth edition, at the Royal Hospital Chelsea (29 June-5 July), certain dealers are taking responsibility for creating those opportunities themselves. Galerie Mathivet will curate a booth of Art Deco design and Aboriginal art, featuring Yannima Tommy Watsons 2015 painting Iyarka and Edgar Brandts monkey-adorned andirons (around 1925).

Others are pairing up mixed wares on the same stand. Safani Gallery, specialist in ancient art, is joining forces with Geoffrey Diner and his 20th-century and contemporary design. Berwald will make its Oriental art at home among classical Chinese furniture from MD Flacks. And one stand will contain the sweep of Italian civilisation, with Donati Arte Classicas artefacts set against Repetto Gallerys post-war paintings and sculptures.

Done well, such pairings can excite not only Masterpieces faithful cosmopolites but also neophyte collectors, according to Hewat-Jaboor. Were trying to help push the pendulum toward cross-category collecting, he says. You have to show people.
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The Art Newspaper

May 24 2017
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The Art Newspaper

May 24 2017
Hokusai’s late style comes into view at the British Museum
The British Museums exhibition Hokusai: Beyond the Great Wave, which opens this week, offers a fresh perspective on the Japanese artist by focusing on the last 30 years of his life. Hokusai (1760-1849)who lived until he was 89, working prodigiously right to the endclaimed to have started painting at the age of six. Altogether he produced 3,000 colour prints and nearly 1,000 surviving paintings.

Hokusai had an eventful life. In 1807, he was called before shogun Tokugawa Ienari to demonstrate his work. On a sheet of paper, he painted a few lines in blue and then produced a live chicken from a basket. He dipped its legs in red ink, had it walk across the paper and titled the work Autumn Leaves on the Tatsuta River. (Sadly, the work no longer survives.)

Hokusai believed that the older he got, the better his art became, says Timothy Clark, the exhibitions curator. In old age, he remained productive, assisted by his daughter Eijo (known as Oi), who was also an accomplished artist. Hokusai once wrote that by the time he reached 90 he would have made good progress, but at 100 he would achieve a divine state in my art.

The British Museum exhibition presents 110 works, including a fine impression of The Great Wave (1831), which the museum bought in 2008 for 130,000. For conservation reasons, half the works on show are on display for only five weeks, so 50 will be replaced halfway through the exhibitions run. (The show will be closed on 3-6 July for the changeover.)

One-third of the examples on show are from the museums collection, with the remainder on loan from Japan, Europe and the US. The show is driven by a research project on Hokusais late style organised with Angus Lockyer of the University of Londons School of Oriental and African Studies. The exhibition will later tour to the Abeno Harukas Art Museum in Osaka, Japan (6 October-19 November).

Hokusai is now regarded as Japans greatest artist, a status recognised by the Japanese government when it recently announced that images of all Thirty-six Views of Mt Fuji (including The Great Wave and Red Fuji) will grace the pages of its passports from 2019. As Clark explains, Hokusai has become an ambassador for Japan. The show is supported by the Mitsubishi corporation.

We take a look at some key works from the show:



Red Fuji (1831)


Red Fuji is part of Hokusai's portfolio Thirty-six Views of Mt Fuji, which he produced after turning 70. In Red Fuji, the artist depicts a specific time and place: the eastern side of the volcano with the sunrise over the Pacific. Hokusai originally titled the print Clear Day with a Southern Breeze, but it was later re-named because of its powerful colours. The southern breeze referred to in the original title alludes to the winds of later summer, during which snow survives only in the crevices at the summit.

Waves (1845)

This panel painting served as part of the ceiling of a cart paraded around the town of Obuse in central Japan during festivals. The centre of the work was painted by Hokusai, who also produced the design for the painted frame that was executed by Takei Kozan. Created more than a decade after The Great Wave, Hokusais festival panels show his continued interested in stylising water. The spiralling waves throw up white specks that dot the surface of the sea. and foam is depicted in shades of whitish blue, apparently falling into a deep blue whirlpool. Two ceiling panels, which have never been shown in Europe, will be on display at the British Museum. 



Poppies (1831-32)



This work is one of Hokusais ten Large Flowers, made at around the same
time as Thirty-six Views of Mt. Fuji. Here, the subject is not just the poppy, but also the wind that bends the flower. Stylistically, Poppies is reminiscent of the same movement that appears in The Great Wave, with the flower bending in a similar configuration as the wave. Hokusais brushstrokes are deliberately rough and forceful, capturing the movement of the wind.



Hokusai: Beyond the Great Wave, British Museum, London, 25 May-13 August



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artforum.com

May 24 2017
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The New York Times

May 24 2017
Artists Space Gallery Finds a New Home, in TriBeCa
The 45-year-old organization, which left SoHo last June, has signed a lease at 80 White Street.
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The Guardian

May 24 2017
Marvin E Newman's best photograph – coated sunbathers in 1950s Coney Island

‘I wanted to show well-off people the underclass – where they lived, how they lived, what they did’

In 1952, I came back to New York after studying in Chicago, keen to break new ground. I decided to use colour to document what people were doing, even though colour was not what museums wanted. The other problem was that colour film was so slow. You needed fast lenses and enough sunlight. Still, I felt that I could not only succeed, but do better than what had gone before.

The first shots I took were at the Italian festival in downtown New York. The second were at Coney Island in winter. That’s when this was taken. In the summer, Coney Island was like Brighton in England. We didn’t have air-conditioning back then – you’d have thousands of people on the beach, because it was the only way to get out of the heat of the city. There were still remnants of the early 1900s: beer gardens, silent movies, carousels.

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EosArte.eu

May 24 2017
Milano. Hype
di Marco Mendeni a cura di Matteo Bittanti Project economART www.amyd.it La mostra presenta una serie di progetti realizzati dal 2013 ad oggi che indagano ed esplorano nuove realtà e situazioni generate dall’apparato tecnologico, in particolare guarda al complesso rapporto, mutevolmente in atto, tra uomo e tecnologia. La vita reale e quella sullo schermo si stanno fondendo, il nostro rapporto [...]
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The Guardian

May 24 2017
International contest will transform Paris 'ghost' Métro stations

Scheme will develop 34 sites, including Champ de Mars near Eiffel Tower, as cultural or economic spaces

They are known as the ghost stations: 16 stops on the Paris Métro system barred and padlocked nearly 70 years ago.

In the past seven decades, many ideas for their reinvention have been floated, including turning one into a swimming pool and others into bars and nightclubs. None have come to anything, but their allure remains.

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The New York Times

May 24 2017
From Clipper Ships to Artists’ Lofts, at the Menil Collection
The work of pioneering loft-dwelling artists of New York City will be on display in Houston through early August.
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artforum.com

May 24 2017
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The Guardian

May 24 2017
Gallery in JMW Turner's beloved Margate to host 2019 Turner prize

Turner Contemporary, built on site of boarding house artist visited when painting there, announced as exhibition venue

The Turner Contemporary art gallery in Margate, the seaside town where JMW Turner would come to paint the east Kent skies, will host the Turner prize in 2019.

The prize, one of the most prestigious accolades in contemporary art and which comes with £40,000 in winnings, is presented at a venue outside London every other year.

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The Art Newspaper

May 24 2017
Musée Dapper, Paris museum specialising in African art, to shut up shop
A statuette by the Senufo people from the Ivory Coast currently on show at the Musée Dapper (© Archives Musée Dapper; Photo:Hughes Dubois)
The Muse Dapper in Paris will close its doors next month, with officials citing high costs and low attendance as reasons for shutting the privately funded, non-profit museum of traditional and contemporary African art.

The institution moved to its current location in the 16th arrondissement in 2000. More than 50 exhibitions have been held in the space. The current show Masterpieces from Africa (until 17 June) includes ancient works from Cameroon and Mali. The museum, which has a 6 entrance fee, was founded by the late engineer Michael Leveau through his organisation, the Dapper Foundation.

The museum president Christiane Falgayrettes-Leveau told the newspaper Le Figaro that there are too many responsibilities, its difficult to manage. The building will now be sold. In a statement, the museum says: Attendance has not diversified and has stagnated.

Falgayrettes-Leveau adds in a statement that the move gives the Dapper Foundation more flexibility to realise other ambitious projects and invest in other spaces. She declined to comment further. 

The foundation recently organised two exhibitions in Senegal, including an open-air display on the island of Gore of photographic works from Nyaba Lon Ouedraogos series The Phantoms of Congo River (until 28 May). A selection of Gabonese works from the collection will also go on show at the Muse du Quai Branly-Jacques Chirac in Paris in October. 
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The Art Newspaper

May 24 2017
Behnam Bakhtiar Award set up to promote Iranian art
The artist Sassan Behnam Bakhtiar who founded the new prize
A new prize aimed at artists of Iranian descent has been launched in Monaco. The biennial Behnam Bakhtiar Award hopes to promote Iranian art internationally and to counteract the image of a culture and country that is too often misunderstood and criticised, says Sassan Behnam Bakhtiar, the Monaco-based Iranian artist who founded the prize.
 
The first edition of the award, titled Future Iran, invites artists to portray their vision, hopes and dreams for the country. I believe that every change starts with a visionexploring ideas, inviting possibilities, thus planting seeds for a better future, Behnam Bakhtiar says.
 
The award is one of the only international prizes to focus specifically on Iran and has few selection criteria. The open call is aimed at artists over 18 years old, working in any media, anywhere in the world. The winner will receive 10,000, a solo exhibition at Galerie Behnam Bakhtiar in the Monte-Carlo district of Monaco, and a book publication, as well as having two works selected to enter the Fondation Behnam Bakhtiar collection. Being an Iranian artist myself, I understand very well what needs to be put in place in order for our artists to thrive and succeed in more effective ways today, Behnam Bakhtiar says.
 
The deadline for submissions is 24 August, after which eight artists will be shortlisted in October, and the winners announced the following month. The judging panel includes the writers Joobin Bekhrad and Anna Wallace Thompson, the curators Nina Moaddel, Alistair Hicks and Janet Rady, the art historian Bibi Naz Zavieh and The Art Newspaper correspondent Tim Cornwell. I am delighted to be working with a prize panel and collector so clearly committed to the promotion of Iranian art and culture, Cornwell says.
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The Art Newspaper

May 24 2017
Turner Prize to take a trip to Margate’s Turner Contemporary in 2019
The Turner Contemporary gallery in Margate, Kent, was built on the site that inspired works by J.M.W. Turner (Photo: Hufton + Crow)
The Turner Prize is on the move again, decamping to the Turner Contemporary gallery in Margate in 2019. The high-profile contemporary art award is presented in alternate years at Tate Britain in London and at a regional UK venue. The Turner Prize was shown in Liverpool in 2007, Gateshead in 2011, Derry in Northern Ireland in 2013, and Glasgow in 2015.

It seems even more fitting to host the prize here in Margate on the site where J.M.W. Turner was so inspired," says Victoria Pomery, the director of Turner Contemporary, in a statement. We look forward to working with our existing and new stakeholders and colleagues at Tate on this exciting initiative. Turner Contemporary has drawn more than 2.3 million visitors since it opened in 2011.

The 2017 Turner Prize shortlist, announced earlier this month, reflects the Tates recent decision to lift the age limit of the shortlisted artists. Since 1991, artists over 50 have been excluded from the prize, but this years shortlist includes the painter Hurvin Anderson, 52, and another painter and multimedia artist, Lubaina Himid, who is 62.

This year, the Turner Prize exhibition will take place at the Ferens Art Gallery in Hull, the UK's current City of Culture (26 September-7 January.) The winner, who receives 25,000, will be announced on 5 December in a live BBC broadcast.   
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The Art Newspaper

May 24 2017
Deutsche Bank plans new culture forum in central Berlin
Prinzessinnenpalais (Image: courtesy of Deutsche Bank)
Deutsche Bank is planning to establish a new arts forum in central Berlin, primarily to exhibit its corporate collection, one of the largest in the world, encompassing 50,000 works acquired since the late 1970s.
 
The arts centre, expected to open in mid-2018, is located in the Prinzessinnenpalais at 5 Unter den Lindenthe boulevard leading up to the Brandenburg Gate. We are working on an exciting programme, says Klaus Winker, a spokesman for Deutsche Bank, adding that it is too early to give details.
 
With an available area of 3,000 sq. m, the building will house both permanent and temporary exhibitions as well as hosting concerts, readings, talks, workshops, sporting events and a caf. About a third of the space will be devoted to displaying art. Exhibitions of the banks own collectionfocused on works on paper and photographywill be supplemented with shows of other private collections.
 
The centre will incorporate the Deutsche Bank KunstHalle, currently located at 13/15 Unter den Linden. The KunstHalle is the successor to the Deutsche Guggenheim, a cooperative venture with the Guggenheim Museum which closed in 2013. The new forum will treble the space available for exhibiting art.
 
Deutsche Bank is a major sponsor of art, focusing on emerging artists by supporting museums and fairs, awarding its own art prize and publishing an art magazine.
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The New York Times

May 24 2017
Footsteps: Mondrian’s World: From Primary Colors to the Boogie Woogie
Exploring the touchstones of Piet Mondrian’s life, as Dutch cultural institutions celebrate the 100th anniversary of the art movement he helped found.
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The New York Times

May 24 2017
Michael Bloomberg Gives $75 Million to Shed Arts Center
His donation helps solidify New York’s first new cultural institution in recent memory, a $500 million project to be completed in spring 2019.
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The Art Newspaper

May 24 2017
Object lessons: a Cuban vanguardian work, a Noguchi sculpture with a Hollywood history and a Ragamala miniature painting
Magatama (1946) by Isamu Noguchi. Photo courtesy of Wright.
New York
Christies

24-25 May: Latin American Art


Guajiro con Gallo (also known as Muchacho con Gallo) (1943) by Mariano Rodrguez

(est $500,000-$700,000)
The Cuban vanguardian painted roosters in every phase of his career, sometimes rendering the animal in the fighting rink (cockfighting remains an emblematic sport of the country). This painting shows another motif that often surfaces in the artists work: the guajiro, a Cuban term used to describe a man from the countryside or a farmer. Together, the figures offer a colouristic tour de force that sheds the progressive social concerns of earlier vanguardia artists for a purely pictorial, rather than sentimental, distillation of the nation, Abby McEwen, of the University of Maryland, writes in the catalogue. The work was first shown in 1944 at the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) in New York in an acclaimed exhibition of Modern Cuban painters organised by the museums founding director Alfred Barr, a proponent of Cuban art (the show travelled to The National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C. and other American institutions). The painting last surfaced on the market at Sothebys in New York in 2009, where it sold for $483,000 with premium (est $125,000-$175,000).Gabriella Angeleti

Update: the lot sold for $488,000 with premium. 

New York
Wright

25 May: Masterworks


Magatama (1946) by Isamu Noguchi

(est $300,000-$500,000)
An onyx sculpture by the Japanese-American artist with a colourful Hollywood history is one of the highlights of the sale. In 1946, the artist gave the work to the film director John Huston and actress Evelyn Keyes (best known for her role as Suellen OHara in Gone With the Wind) as a gift on their honeymoon. The couple divorced three years later, and Huston suggested they toss a coin toss to determine which of them would keep their art collection. Keyes won, and kept the sculpture along with works by Pablo Picasso, Paul Klee, Rufino Tamayo and other artists, as well as an extensive collection of pre-Columbian art. In 1957, Keyes gave the sculpture to the film producer Mike Todd as an engagement gift, although Todd left Keyes six weeks later for Elizabeth Taylor, and returned the sculpture (and died a year later in a plane crash). When Keyes passed away in 2008, the sculpture was bequeathed to the film producer Allan Glaser and his partner, the actor Tab Hunter, who are now offering the sculpture at auction for the first time.Gabriella Angeleti

Update: the lot did not sell. 

London
Christies, King Street

25 May: Arts of India


Gauri Ragini of Shri Raga (around 1680-90) from a Bikaner royal collection, Bikaner, North West India

(est 60,000-80,000)
This finely painted Rajasthani miniature is a highlight of the 29-piece Moscatelli collection of Ragamala paintings. Ragamala paintingsin which a series of ragas, a set of musical modes originating in medieval India, are given a visual representationflourished from the late 15th century onwards. The works often explore the relationship between lover and beloved, and by extension between the human and the divine. The essence and emotion of the Gauri Raginian evening raga assigned to autumn, or to melancholic or contemplative moodsis captured in this work, where a female character, who is lingering for her beloved by a river, is shown on the foreground of an extensive landscape filled with animals and birds, which visually heightens her solitude. The high finish of the work and use of light pastel colours reveal the influence of Bikaner court painting, as well as that of both Mughal and Deccani court painting. This combination has produced a particularly elegant and delicate rendering of Gauri Ragini, which must once have been part of a series comprising at least 36 equally exquisite paintings.Henrietta Cockrell

Update: the work sold for 106,000 with premium.  
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The Guardian

May 23 2017
Earth's wealthiest people – in pictures

America’s biggest house, a golfing Versace addict in China, the must-have sweater for Russian it-girls … Lauren Greenfield’s photobook Generation Wealth documents 25 years of rampant global materialism

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artforum.com

May 23 2017
FILM: Eternal Return
Sarah Nicole Prickett on the premiere of Twin Peaks: The Return
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The New York Times

May 23 2017
Gardner Museum Doubles Reward for Recovery of Stolen Masterpieces
Thirteen masterpieces were taken by thieves posing as police officers in Boston nearly three decades ago in the largest art heist in American history.
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The Art Newspaper

May 23 2017
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The Art Newspaper

May 23 2017
Renoir’s restored home becomes a museum
Renoir’s family home in Essoyes where the artist spent the summer months (Photo courtesy of Magalie Duvaux)
A museum dedicated to Pierre-Auguste Renoir will open on 3 June in the French painters family home in Essoyes, 120 miles southeast of Paris, following a major restoration project.

Renoir bought the house in 1896, six years after marrying his mistress and model Aline Charigot, who was born in the village nestled among champagne vineyards on a tributary of the Seine. Chronic rheumatism forced his move a decade later to Cagnes-sur-Mer on the Riviera coast where he built a villa (now also a Renoir museum). But he continued to spend his summers in Essoyes until his death in 1919 and he is buried in the local cemetery along with Aline and their three children.

Renoirs great-granddaughter, the actress Sophie Renoir, sold the house to the village council for 600,000 in 2012. It has spent around 1m over the past four years to convert it into a museum, says the towns deputy mayor, Philippe Talbot. Work has included installing a lift for disabled access, reinforcing the floors of the first-floor bedrooms, turning the dining room into a climate-controlled secure exhibition space for borrowed works of art and restoring the fin-de-sicle interiors and garden. The team was guided by Renoirs own paintings of the house in its quest to return it to its state in his time, Talbot says.

As well as the house, the museum includes the studio that Renoir built at the bottom of the garden. The studio opened to the public 20 years ago under the aegis of the non-profit organisation the Association Renoir; it was bought separately by the village a decade ago and houses a slideshow, sculptures made towards the end Renoirs life and memorabilia. It currently receives around 10,000 visitors a yeara figure Talbot expects to increase with the opening of the house and garden.

Three French institutions are loaning works by Renoir for the museums opening: a sculpture is coming from the Renoir Museum in Cagnes-sur-Mer; the portrait Jeune femme au miroir (1919) is travelling from the Muse des Beaux-Arts in Rouen; and the Muse des Beaux-Arts in Bordeaux is lending a landscapeLe Pont dEssoyes.

The Muse dArt Moderne in nearby Troyes is marking the opening of the house with an exhibition of around 40 of Renoirs works and a dozen by friends and fellow Impressionists. Opening on 17 June, the show will also include six paintings from the private collection of Pablo Picasso, illustrating Renoirs influence on the Spanish artist. The idea is to put forward a new reading of Renoir, says Daphn Castano, the shows curator.
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The Art Newspaper

May 23 2017
A beacon of digitised art: Pharos consortium builds massive digital database
Representatives from 14 international institutions met at the Frick Collection in 2013 to discuss the establishment of Pharos (Photo: Michael Bodycomb)
The Frick Collection in New York has spearheaded a major initiative to digitise its collections and those of 13 other international institutions, including the Courtauld Institute in London, the Getty Institute in Los Angeles and the Bibliotheca Hertziana in Rome. Called the Pharos Art Research Consortium, the platform quietly launched last autumn and currently houses 25 million publicly available and searchable images, along with related historical documentation (some of which was previously unpublished). The original project partners anticipate that an additional seven million images will be digitised and available on the platform by 2020. The Frick Art Reference Librarya six-storey research institution in New York established in 1920 by Helen Clay Frick, the daughter of the museums foundercurrently holds over 1.2 million images of works of art that until now had to be visited in person and used in situ. Researchers today are accustomed to having online resources at their fingertips, and in order to ensure that our offerings remain relevant and accessible, they must be digitised and catalogued in a searchable central resource, Ian Wardropper, the director of the Frick Collection, said in a press release.
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The Art Newspaper

May 23 2017
A haunting look at the Élysée Palace
The film lyse (2016) by Laurent Grasso is an engrossing exploration of the Salon Dor (or Golden Room) in lyse Palace in Paris, the gilded office of the president of the French Republic. Grasso is the first artist to be given authorisation to film the space, which is shown in the film with an original score by Nicolas Godin (one-half of the electronica duo Air). The classical and haunting work premiered at the Edouard Malingue Gallery in Hong Kong last year and made its US debut at the Sean Kelly gallery in New York (until 17 June) earlier this month on the heels of the outcome of the French presidential election. The above video is a clip from the full, 16 minute work.
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The Art Newspaper

May 23 2017
Oliver Beer and Andrew Hale get some good vibrations at Galerie Thaddaeus Ropac
Andrew Hale and Oliver Beer exchanging notes in front of a rather fine Rauschenberg
It was a case of good vibrations on Monday night (22 May) at a special dinner hosted by Thaddaeus Ropac to celebrate Oliver Beers current pair of shows at Mr Rs grand new London gallery and also at Birminghams Ikon Gallery. The artist treated 20 guestsincluding the Ikon Gallery director Jonathan Watkins, the Ikon and Tate patron Alia Al Senussi, and the also-iconic Bianca Jaggerto a highly exclusive performance. In Resonant Project, classically trained singers planted in four corners of the main hall of the gallery cause the building to reverberate with the uncanny sound of its own special acoustic frequency. 

Later, Beer offered some even more bespoke tuition, in the fine art of space-singing, to the musician and art collector Andrew Hale. And soon the duo were making the upstairs dining room hum in unison. As well as being a patron of contemporary art, Hale is also a member of Sades band and co-writes many of her songs. Who knows, maybe the divas next albumwhich is apparently currently in the pipelinemight now contain a rather more noticeable amount of reverb?
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