News

Displaying 7301 to 7350 of 15666 results

The New York Times

Aug 30 2017
Putting Art on Wheels and Taking It Back to the Streets
Crisscrossing Spain, a fleet of trucks gives viewers a new perspective on art as it zooms by on the highway.
Read More
The New York Times

Aug 30 2017
Washington Square Community Group Protests Ai Weiwei Installation
The Chinese artist’s exhibition would put a large fence-like structure directly under the Washington Square Arch.
Read More
The Guardian

Aug 30 2017
Pink Floyd exhibition set to become V&A's most visited music show

Gallery announces it will extend Pink Floyd: Their Mortal Remains, meaning it is likely to overtake 2013 David Bowie show

The Pink Floyd exhibition is on track to becoming the V&A’s most visited music show, outdoing even David Bowie.

The gallery announced on Wednesday that ticket demand was so great that it would extend the exhibition by two weeks and fully expected it to exceed the visitor figures for Bowie.

Continue reading...
Read More
The Guardian

Aug 30 2017
Mystery solved: unknown soldier was painted by his mother

Case was among many perplexing amateur local historians and curators bought together on the Art Detectives website

A portrait of a sad-eyed young soldier has been released from museum stores after members of the public succeeded in identifying the young officer and the heartbroken artist – his mother.

However, argument still rages over the identity of a woman in a handsome black dress and whether an imposing mill building is really in Manchester, or built under much hotter skies.

Continue reading...
Read More
The New York Times

Aug 30 2017
Eavesdropping on Warhol and Capote
A playwright mines drama from 80 hours of taped chatter between the artist and the writer.
Read More
The Art Newspaper

Aug 29 2017
Why George W. Bush won’t be painting Michelle Obama
George W. Bush (courtesy The White House)
Former US President turned prolific portrait painter, George W. Bush, has painted the faces of military veterans for his follow-up show to world leaders at the George W. Bush Presidential Centre in Dallas. Proceeds from the exhibition Portraits of Courage (until 1 October) and its accompanying book go towards supporting post-9/11 veterans and their families. The 66 portraits and a mural confirm how Bushs confidence with paint on canvas has grown since his first works were leaked online in 2013. Then a portrait of Vladimir Putin divided opinion. Bush thinks he would do a better job now if he repainted the Russian strongman, but Im not going to, he told Bill Kearney, the editor-in-chief of American Way, the inflight magazine of American Airlines. Another person Bush wont be painting is the former First Lady and his friend across the political divide, Michelle Obama. Bush revealed why. I dont want to incur the wrath of Michelle Obama, if the portrait wasnt a success, like the one he attempted of another First Lady, his wife, Laura Bush. Discretion better part of valour, as saying goes.
Read More
The Guardian

Aug 29 2017
Royal Academy of Arts to reveal explicit side of Dalí and Duchamp

London gallery to warn visitors of graphic material in exhibition that demonstrates artists’ shared values

Some of the exhibits in a forthcoming exhibition on Salvador Dalí and Marcel Duchamp – two of the 20th century’s most famous artists – may not be for the faint-hearted. Visitors to the Royal Academy of Arts in London will be warned of sexually explicit material in one of the galleries.

Exhibits that could cause offence include a manuscript in which Dalí described in words and sketches his hunger for sex and food – his “nutritious perversions” – aroused while urinating and watching Duchamp and some cutlets that were being cooked for a picnic.

Continue reading...
Read More
The Guardian

Aug 29 2017
Hotel world: wherever you travel, the rooms are the same - in pictures

From Cairo to Cape Town, Paris to Panama, Roger Eberhard criss-crossed the globe photographing Hilton hotel rooms for his series Standard, only to find their decor eerily similar

Continue reading...
Read More
The Art Newspaper

Aug 29 2017
Countdown begins for sculpture’s lift-off
Trevor Paglen’s design for his Orbital Reflector sculpture. Courtesy Nevada Museum of Art
The Nevada Museum Of Art and the artist Trevor Paglen are crowdfunding to launchliterallya sculptural satellite into space, purely as an artistic gesture, according to the museum, which aims to raise at least $70,000 to help get the work off the ground. Im going to create a reason for you to look up at the sky, and think about what it is that youre looking at, Paglen says in a Kickstarter video.

Orbital Reflector is a mylar balloon that will be deployed from a small brick-sized container sent up into low-earth orbit on a SpaceX rocket from Californias Vandenberg Air Force Base next summer. The launch is timed to coincide with a mid-career retrospective of Paglens work planned at the Smithsonian American Art Museum in Washington, DC.

To realise the project, Paglen is working with the firm Global Western and the retired satellite engineer Zia Oboodiyat, who hes known since they partnered on another work attached to a satellite, The Last Pictures (2012). While early models for Orbital Reflector, shown at the Art Basel fair and the Nevada Museum of Art, imagined a spherical balloon, the team realised that they needed to create an object that has the maximum amount of surface area, so it can be as bright as it can be when seen from the ground, Paglen says.

They came up with a long, diamond-shaped kite that resembles an abstract sculpture, and there is a clear nod to the ideas of artist like Kazimir Malevich and Yves Klein, who both proposed sending art into space. They were trying to imagine a very different present and a very different future in a way, Paglen says of the avant-gardists work. With Orbital Reflect, he is similarly engaging as an artist in a field normally reserved for military or commercial purposes. Its aerospace engineering for aerospace engineerings sake, Paglen notes.

Once unfurled, the Orbital Reflector will remain in the sky for four to five weeksdepending upon the weather on the sun, Paglen says, adding that the dynamics of the orbit are chaotic, its fundamentally not predictableuntil atmospheric drag pulls the satellite down to earth. Before that happens though, Paglen plans to host viewing parties at museums across the country, where the public can gather to look at the sky and the constellations, and the sculpture will pass overhead.

Meanwhile, the artists upcoming exhibition at the New York gallery Metro Pictures, A Study of Invisible Images (8 September-21 October) features works that are drawn from the growing collection of visualisations made by machines for other machines, Paglen says.

Through his time as an artist-in-residence at Stanford University, and working with software developers and computer scientists, Paglen has turned the digital algorithms used by artificial intelligence systems into a series of prints and video projections. Or to put it more simply, Paglen says, these works look at questions like What does a mountain look like to a self-driving car? And the answers might surprise most human viewers. Some of them are truly weird, he says.


Read More
The Art Newspaper

Aug 29 2017
Read More
The Art Newspaper

Aug 29 2017
New drawing and sculpture fair shakes up Paris fine art world
The Palais Brongniart in Paris, which will host the new fair will take place (Image: Zerfvcxs / Creative Commons)
A new fine art, drawing and sculpture fair is due to open in Paris in November, filling the gap left by the Paris Tableau fair which folded two years ago. More than 30 international galleriesincluding Didier Aaron of Paris and Galerie de Jonckheere of Genevawill participate in the Fine Arts Paris fair held at the Palais Brongniart (8-12 November).
 
Officials at the Salon du Dessin, Pariss longstanding drawings fair which launched in 1991, are behind the new initiative. Diversity and quality are the hallmarks of this new fair, whether in media, periods, subjects on view, but also budgets because museum quality works exhibited by major galleries can be shown alongside discoveries by young dealers presented at lower prices, according to a statement.
 
Paris Tableau, which was also held at the Palais Brongniart, was founded in 2011 by a consortium of mainly Paris-based dealers. These included Galerie Eric Coatalem and Galerie Canesso who said at the time that no art fair catered specifically for the Old Masters market. Galerie Canesso is among the participants in Fine Arts Paris.
 
Paris Tableau closed its doors in November 2015, and merged with La Biennale Paris, formerly the Biennale des Antiquaires, which is held every September at the Grand Palais. Last year, 16 dealers from Paris Tableau took part in La Biennale Paris.
 
The Syndicat National des Antiquaires (SNA, the French association of antiques dealers) founded the Biennale in 1962. Asked about the latest developments, SNA president Mathias Ary Jan, tells The Art Newspaper that La Biennale Paris is an international level fair held in a prestigious institution, the Grand Palais, with many specialties: furniture, decorative arts, contemporary and Modern Art etc. You cant compare such different events. He also points to the appointment of the Qatari prince, Sheikh Hamad Bin Abdullah Al Thani, to the fairs honorary committee.
 
Jill Newhouse Gallery in New York, which specialises in 19th- and 20th-century US and European works on paper, is taking part in Fine Arts Paris. I believe this fair is a reboot of Paris Tableau but that it will have a broader outlook, Newhouse says. I have always sold well in Paris and to European collections so when this opportunity arose, I jumped!
Read More
The Art Newspaper

Aug 29 2017
Object lessons: a poetic take on decay, a goddess drawn by a cult favorite and a rare study by Peter Blake
Heavy (2017) by Toni R. Toivonen
Copenhagen
Galerie Forsblom at Chart Art Fair
1-3 September

Heavy (2017) by Toni R. Toivonen
16,000

Not for the squeamish, the young Finnish artist Toni R. Toivonen (b. 1987) creates ethereal works from grotesque means. He leaves the carcass of an animal a raccoon, mouse, dog, horses or cow, which died of natural causes on a brass plate and as it decomposes, the animal etches a ghostly, vaguely discernible gesture of its form on the oxidised metal. The results are a form of vanitas, a meditation on the transience of life. For this work, Heavy, in brass, resin, plexiglass and original substances of a dead animal, Toivonen used a horse.The Helsinki-based Galerie Forsblom will devote their entire stand to the artist's macabre works at Copenhagens Chart Art Fair, the Nordic-focused contemporary art fair in its fifth edition.


London
Roseberys

5-6 September: Fine art featuring jewellery and silver, paintings and Modern sculpture

Gaia (1946) by Austin Osman Spare
Est 4,000-5,000



Although unknown to most, the Outsider artist Austin Osman-Spare has a cult following. Born in Smithfield in 1886, the precociously talented Osman Spare became something of a rakish celebrity in Edwardian London. Osman-Spare was an occultist, interested in theosophy and spiritualism, and was an early experimenter with automatic drawing. But, refusing to change his style to conform to modernist tastes, he fell out of fashion and into obscurity, dying a penniless recluse in 1956. A collection of four works on paper by Osman Spare has been consigned to the south London auction house Roseberys, including this typically enigmatic signed pencil and watercolour of the Greek earth goddess Gaia, dating to 1946. Osman Spare was particularly interested in these early goddesses, and depicted Gaia on several occasions in different guises. Ely, UK
Rowley's

5 September: Antiques, fine art and decorative furnishings

Study (1996) by Peter Blake
Est 30,000-50,000


This delicate study by Peter Blake of a painting in Londons National Gallery was consigned by a local man out of the blue to the Cambridgeshire, UK, auction house Rowleys in Ely. The oil on canvas panel work is inscribed on a label to the verso, in what is believed to be Blakes hand, Study for 'A Black Woman' after a French 19th century painting. This painting was made while I was Associate Artist at the National Gallery, London 1996. Blake was associate artist at the National Gallery from 1994 to 1996 and made a few fully worked paintings during his time there, such as Madonna of Venice Beach (After Corregios The Madonna of the Basket) (1995). The consignor acquired this work in an unconventional manner, as part payment in a property deal brokered by Savills in 2008 with Niall Haigh, previously an art dealer based in London's Cork Street. The original work, inventory number NG3250, was part of the Sir Hugh Lane bequest to the National Gallery in 1917 and is unattributed, although in the past has variously been ascribed to Eugne Delacroix, Eugne Fromentin and Marie-Guillemine Benoist.






Read More
The Art Newspaper

Aug 29 2017
Italy relaxes stringent export laws for post-war art
Arc en Ciel (1965), by the Italian artist Piero Dorazio, will be on view at Mazzoleni's London gallery in Light in motion: Balla Dorazio Zappettini,  from 29 September though 9 December
After almost two years of debate, Italy has approved a new law relaxing the countrys notably stringent art export regulations.

The market and competition legislation, passed by Italian parliament earlier this month and effective as of 29 August, extends the window during which private owners of works by deceased artists may self-certify them for export from Italy without a licence, from 50 to 70 years after they were made. The law further streamlines Italys bureaucratic licensing process by introducing a minimum value threshold of 13,500, although this excludes archaeological artefacts, manuscripts and incunabula. The ministry of culture may also intervene in cases of suspected fraud or national cultural interest. Five-year passports to ease the movement of works of art across Italian borders are also planned.

Although the 20-year extension falls short of the 100-year limit proposed in 2015 by a lobby of art dealers and auction houses, it was welcomed as a boost to the trade in post-war Italian art. Luigi Mazzoleni, the director of Mazzoleni London, says it will invigorate the market as previously works made in the 1950s and early 1960s were not easily exportable, keeping the local market artificially low. He also thinks it will enable international museums to expand post-war Italian collections. 

Works from the 1950s and early 60s, by artists such as Lucio Fontana, Alberto Burri and Paolo Scheggi, are particularly desirable internationally in todays market the auction record for post-war Italian art stands at $29.1m (including fees), for Concetto spaziale, La Fine di Dio (1964) at Christies New York in 2015.

Benedict Tomlinson, director of Robilant + Voena, which has galleries in London and Milan, thinks the move does not go far enough. The 20-year extension seems arbitrary, why not extend it to Old Masters? To say a 1950s work is less important than one made in the 1940s is ridiculous. That boundary will keep moving each year, and soon Fontanas will be over 100 years old. What happens then?

But there is opposition as well. In an open letter to the Italian president Sergio Mattarella, the heritage group Italia Nostra and the scholar Salvatore Settis warned against a serious and baseless loss caused by a law introduced with the sole aim of favouring art dealers.

In a victory for art historians, the legislation also makes it possible for users of Italys state archives and libraries to freely photograph documents and books for personal and scholarly use (subject to copyright and without flash, tripods or physical contact with the page). Such legitimately acquired images of cultural objects can be published and distributed in any medium for non-commercial purposes. Until now, researchers had to request permission and pay licensing fees to take their own photographs. The shift, which is in line with the policies of the UK and French national archives, was supported by a petition of almost 4,500 Italian academics, including the late Umberto Eco.

Read More
The Art Newspaper

Aug 29 2017
Berkshire Museum board turns down $1m to pause art sale
A protest at the Berkshire Museum in August against the planned auction of 40 works from the collection (Image: Gillian Jones/The Berkshire Eagle/AP)
A $1m offer from an anonymous group of donors to pause the Berkshire Museums planned sale of art from its collection has been turned down by the board of trustees, the Berkshire Eagle reports. The cash came with the stipulation that the museum in Pittsfield, Massachusetts hold off for at least a year on auctioning 40 works of art, including two original paintings by Norman Rockwell. The sales would raise money for a $40m endowment and an ambitious $20m reinvention that would turn the 114-year-old curio cabinet-style natural history and art museum into a cutting-edge interdisciplinary institution. Although we must decline, we are grateful for the offer, Elizabeth McGraw, the president of the museums board of trustees, said in a statement.

The museums administration says the art sale and overhaul are necessary to help shore up a precarious financial situation, including an annual deficit of around $1.2m for the past ten years. The anonymous donors hoped that a years delay would allow them to assemble an outside panel to look at the institutions financial situation and come up with a solution that would allow the art to remain at the museum.

In a letter to the community posted on the museums website, McGraw says that the board has spent two years exploring other options, including a merger with the nearby Hancock Shaker Village, and has reached out to hundreds of residents for their input. Some individuals are frustrated because they think that a pause in the sale would lead to a different financial path somehow changing this harsh reality, McGraw writes. However, the consequence of a delay with the auction could be that the museum may close even sooner.


Read More
The New York Times

Aug 29 2017
A Man on an Eco-Mission in Mixed Media
The Brooklyn artist Justin Brice Guariglia has turned Greenland’s meltdown into a new show at the Norton Museum of Art.
Read More
The New York Times

Aug 29 2017
A Cozy London Townhouse, Both Spare and Filled to the Brim
Claudia and Matthew Donaldson married their two distinct styles into an airy oasis for their modern family.
Read More
artforum.com

Aug 29 2017
500 WORDS: Alexandra Schwartz
Alexandra Schwartz discusses “As in Nature: Helen Frankenthaler Paintings”
Read More
artforum.com

Aug 29 2017
Read More
The Guardian

Aug 29 2017
€100m needed to save the gargoyles and gothic arches of Notre Dame

Fundraising campaign launched to restore Paris landmark amid fears that parts of its exterior could fall

The archbishop of Paris is on a €100m fundraising drive to save the crumbling gargoyles and gothic arches of Notre Dame cathedral.

Each year up to 14 million people visit the 12th-century Paris landmark on an island in the Seine river. Building began about 850 years ago, but pollution and the passing of time have chipped off large chunks of stone.

Continue reading...
Read More
The New York Times

Aug 29 2017
Home and Work: From a Beloved Children’s Boutique to a French Décor Store
After Bonpoint and Merci, Marie-France Cohen begins her third act with a new store called Démodé, which she’s running from her Paris home. Step inside.
Read More
The New York Times

Aug 29 2017
Reimagining a Nazi Bunker
On the shores of Denmark, the massive Tirpitz bunker, which was built by the Nazis, is now part of a new museum. Designed by Bjarke Ingels Group, the Tirpitz Museum features exhibitions about World War II, western Denmark and a collection of Danish amber.
Read More
The Guardian

Aug 29 2017
Ironbridge Coracle Regatta - in pictures

The 30th annual Ironbridge Coracle Regatta is held at the Ironbridge rowing club with dozens of people taking to the small boats made from an interwoven wooden frame for races and events on the river Severn in Shropshire

Continue reading...
Read More
The Guardian

Aug 28 2017
A New York minute: everyday dramas on the city streets – in pictures

Actor and photographer Dan Ziskie is best known for playing the vice-president in House of Cards, but the pictures he takes offer intriguing glimpses into the theatre of real life – a reminder that every passerby has a story

Continue reading...
Read More
The Art Newspaper

Aug 28 2017
On the side of the angels


Vittorio Scarpati lay dying in Manhattans Cabrini Medical Center for five months before finally succumbing to Aids in 1989, one of the thousands of New Yorkers to fall victim to the epidemic that ravaged the cityand the wider worldin the 1980s and 1990s.

In those months, Scarpati, a 34-year-old cartoonist and artist from Italy, filled notebooks with hundreds of felt-tip pen drawings that illustrated his plightthe collapse of both lungs, the pneumonia, the gurgling suction machinery inserted into his chest. In one self-portrait, daggers pierce his torso as he collapses to his knees saying, in Italian, Thats enough. In another, he opens his shirt and golden light pours out. Skeletons appear often, as do broken hearts.

Scarpati was gripped by a frenzy of pent-up art communication that exploded out of him, wrote his wife, the writer and actress Cookie Mueller, who would die of the same disease a few months later. Seen chronologically, this is a journey of extreme pain made bearable by his sublime imagination. Its the story of a trip along the paths of Vittorios fantasies, and for a man who hasnt felt the warmth of sunlight or the sweet breezes of fresh air for four months theres a lot to create in the inward eye.

Scarpatis deathbed drawings appeared that year at New Yorks 56 Bleecker gallery and as part of Witnesses: Against Our Vanishing, an exhibition of artists responses to the Aids epidemic, curated by the photographer Nan Goldin at Artists Space. The next year, Kyoto Shoin International published the drawings as a book, with a preface by Mueller, under the title Puttis Puddinga term Scarpati used to describe the piles of angels he liked to draw.

More than two decades have passed without the works appearing in public again. But this month, the non-profit gallery Studio Voltaire in London is opening an exhibition featuring 40 of Scarpatis drawings from the hospital, as well as archival documentation and Muellers preface to the book (9 September-5 November). The drawings contain everything about that situation from the perceived transcendent bliss of an angelic afterlife to the sheer horror of having your body pierced by all that technology, says Paul Pieroni, the shows curator. Im always interested in the potential radicality of the recently antiquated and building a narrative around this stuff.

The exhibition will be an introduction to Mueller and Scarpati for many Londoners. Even Pieroni had not heard of Mueller until relatively recently, while reading a biography about the artist David Wojnarowicz in which she appeared as a minor character. For some reason I was just attracted to her, he says, echoing a sentiment often expressed by those who encountered the heavily eyelinered blonde during her heyday in New York. She was the starlet of the Lower East Side, Goldin once reminisced, the queen of the whole downtown social scene.

The cult film director John Waters, who cast Mueller in his movies Pink Flamingos, Desperate Living and Female Trouble, among others, has called her a writer, a mother, an outlaw, an actress, a fashion designer, a go-go dancer, a witch doctor, an art-hag, and above all a goddess.

When the novelist Chris Kraus saw Mueller read at the St Marks Church Poetry Project in New York toward the end of her life, she was so moved and impressed that she signed Mueller up as the first author for publisher Semiotextes Native Agents series. I couldnt believe she was still seeking a publisher, but apparently soagents and editors had told her shed have to do x, y or z with the manuscript for them to consider it. And she was already sick, and she couldnt, Kraus says. I think I started the Native Agents series around a desire to publish her work. I didnt know Cookie at all, but I approached her and said well publish whatever manuscript you want to give us. The resulting book was Walking Through Clear Water in a Pool Painted Black, a collection of semi-autobiographical short stories published just a few months after Muellers death at the age of 40.

Scarpati was then, and remains, far less known than his celebrated wife. Vittorio was a quieter background figure, a perfect foil for Cookie, recalls Bill Stelling, who ran 56 Bleecker, the gallery that first showed Scarpatis drawings in 1989. He was smart, funny and trenchant.

The couple met during the summer of 1983, in Positano, Italy, a coast town south of Naples so paradisal it looked like Walt Disney made it, Mueller wrote. She was immediately impressed with Scarpatis cartoons and his ease with pen and ink, brush and colour, she wrote. The images just flew out of him effortlessly. Both Scarpati and Mueller were heroin users and knew they were HIV positive when they married three years later. But neither understoodindeed, no one didwhat that really meant.

Goldin has said that she was with Mueller on Fire Island in New York when they first learned of Aids in 1981, referred to as a gay cancer at the time. Cookie just started reading this item out loud from the New York Times about this new illness we all kind of laughed it off. We certainly didnt think of its magnitude. It didnt affect us, like: this is going to be our future.

Eight years later, Goldin photographed Mueller, by that time walking with a cane, beside her husbands casket. Soon after, she shot Mueller in hers. Pieroni imagines that Mueller and Scarpati might have gone on to become major artists if only they had had more time. Thats a recurrent tragic motif among artists in that era of the Aids crisisnever quite getting to be focused because they were all fucking dying.

Nevertheless, the couple remain part of a distinguished art historical movement and, with Puttis Pudding, contributed a crucial document to it. The book was a visionary project about strength and beauty and pain, Pieroni says. But more than a historical artefact, the drawings are also an intimate look into the mind of an artist we might not have otherwise known. With cartoonish images of dolphins, nurses, birds and a sumo wrestler, Scarpati revealed his humour as much as he did his anguish. On Valentines Day he drew a skunk holding a heart out to another skunk, writing beneath: Happy Valentine to my beloved. I cant believe me drawing hearts!!

Pieroni suggests: Theyre very pure and very playful and kind of full of sweetness. Stelling says that the drawings reflected the daily horrors he experienced, but with irony and humour. When you look at the drawings, there are some that will make you smile. The New York-based writer Linda Yablonsky, who was friends with both artists until their deaths, adds: I thought they were amazing at the time and still do, extremely pointed as well as poignant. What stands out is an acknowledgement of his condition and treatment, as well as his will to live, both in reality and through his artthe best path he could take.

Pieroni is sensitive to the criticism that this historical demographicthe artists who both flourished and perished during the Aids epidemic in New York Cityhas received so much attention that it runs the risk of becoming romanticised. There was a danger that there was a weird fetishisation of this era and illness, he says. But he received the support of Muellers son, Max Wolfe Mueller, who loaned many of the drawings for the Studio Voltaire show, and in the end decided to go ahead with the exhibition. It is an important reminder of how lucky we are to live in a time where an Aids diagnosis is no longer a death sentence, he says.
Sometimes I wake up and I dont know why people make art, why there are all these artists and institutions and magazines, Pieroni says. It feels sort of self-regulating, like its just regulating the pointlessness. But if someones on life support and theyre still making drawings, well, that feels to me like a justification for the whole thing.

Like her husband, Mueller worked until the very end of her life. In one of her final pieces for a now defunct magazine East Village Eye, in which she penned a satirical health column called Ask Dr Mueller, she wrote an elegy for her generation: Fortunately I am not the first person to tell you that you will never die. You simply lose your body. You will be the same except you wont have to worry about rent or mortgages or fashionable clothes. You will be released from sexual obsessions. You will not have drug addictions. You will not need alcohol. You will not have to worry about cellulite or cigarettes or cancer or Aids or venereal disease. You will be free.
Read More
The Art Newspaper

Aug 28 2017
Year Ahead 2017
Bruce Nauman’s Human/Need/Desire (1983) is one of the 200 MoMA works that will appear in Being Modern (Image © Bruce Nauman/Artists Rights Society, digital image © MoMA)
Your essential guide to the must-see shows, biennials and museum openings around the world
Read More
The Art Newspaper

Aug 28 2017
Objections to Ai Weiwei installation: much ado about nothing?
A rendering of Ai Weiwei's upcoming installation at the Washington Square Arch, part of the exhibition Good Fences Make Good Neighbors (Image: courtesy of Ai Weiwei Studio and Frahm & Frahm)
A site-specific installation by Ai Weiwei for the passageway of the 1892 Washington Square Arch in New York, part of the artists upcoming city-wide exhibition Good Fences Make Good Neighbors (24 October-11 February 2018), seems to have ruffled some neighbours feathers. On 25 August, the president of the Washington Square Association community group, Trevor Sumner, addressed an open letter to the Public Art Fund, which is organising the show, to raise its objections to the planned installation. The letter alleges among other complaints that the work would interrupt annual holiday celebrations and that [t]he project was not built with the collaboration of the neighborhood. But according to a statement by the Public Art Funds president Susan Freedman, the non-profit has been in close dialogue with [Sumner] to ensure that the tradition of the Christmas tree lighting ceremony moves ahead without interruption, and has also met with community boards and neighbourhood groups throughout the planning process, including the Washington Square Park Association. (Freedman also says that Sumner expressed excitement about the project.) The Public Art Fund also plans to speak with residents at a Community Board meeting next week. Perhaps the groups can rally around the Christmas tree come December and share some neighbourly love.
Read More
The Art Newspaper

Aug 28 2017
Where does the Berkshire Museum go from here?
The Berkshire Museum's audience visits for a fine aquarium, a remarkably dashing mummy named Prahat, fur snow suits belonging to North Pole explorers, an impressive meteorite, and shows such as its current survey of the history of the guitar
The charming, quiet Berkshire Museum is suddenly tempest tossed. Following its announcement of a new mission, a jamboree of pious finger-wagging ensued. National arts organisations clamour in protest, but their buildings are in good shape. They dont have to worry from month to month whether staff salaries get paid. Yes, the Berkshire Museum endured long periods of bad management, but Pittsfields economy tanked when its core industries left. With them exited much of the museums donor base. Its financial model was never a good one: it relied on a few old Pittsfield families and the wealth generated by its General Electric factories. The citys poor; the museum competes for local money with dozens of other arts and culture not-for-profits, and also hospitals, schools and churches. Berkshire County is both Americas premier cultural resort and Appalachia.

Clearly, the trustees are free to change the Berkshire Museums mission. If it wants to be a science museum or a childrens museum, fine. Few in the Berkshires think of it as an art museum anyway. Its audience visits for a fine aquarium, a remarkably dashing mummy named Prahat, fur snow suits belonging to North Pole explorers, an impressive meteorite, and shows such as its current survey of the history of the guitar.

Its fair to say that most of the Pittsfield community sees the changes as good ones. Some think theyre horrible but most think about what their families will use and enjoy. They see the art as so many gold bricks locked in a vault.

Still, the museum is a not-for-profit built through a century of philanthropy to serve the public, so the public is entitled to answers to key questions. Even in the staid museum world, Watergates Deep Throat offers wise advice: follow the money.

How much are the trustees personally pledging to finance the museums new strategy? I think everyone would agree that selling capital is a last resort. It comes long after dedicated trustees have given what is reasonable for people who, at the end of the day, run the place and should be its biggest boosters and funders. Why should anyone write a check if trustees liquidate capital as a substitute for their own giving?

What will Sothebys earn through the sale of the museums art? Lets say the museum sells $30m of art at auction. The standard buyers fee is 20%, or $6m, paid to the auction house on top of the hammer price. The standard sellers fee is 10%, or $3m. This is big money. The museum is its client, to be sure, but not its friendits goal is getting the consignment. It has much incentive to lavish the new mission with praise. Board members need to realise this.

Who are the museums consultants? How much is the museum paying them? Are their fees for the feasibility phase separate from future fees pegged to the cost of implementing the plan? The trustees are caring and conscientious people. All want Pittsfield to thrive. Consultants often beget more consultancy, though. They need to make a living, after all. Its important to know their credentials and track records, too.

The board has promised money from the sale of art will first fund an endowment big enough to support its transformed mission. Will this happen? Of course it wont. Everyone will get giddy and most of the money will get spent. If were lucky, the board will address all the museums infrastructure needs, though these needs, inasmuch as they often involve mechanics we cant see, are the least sexy parts of a new mission. More likely, the razzle dazzle will get pride of place, estimates of paying audience will be inflated, and future operating costs will be underestimated.

This isnt guile; its irrational exuberance. An education and exhibition programme as tech reliant as the plan envisages has to look new and improved, and we cant know what the latest bells and whistles will cost. A meteorite just needs an occasional dusting. A mummy doesnt even need a new tube of lipstick.

Venerable institutions tend to develop their own DNA. As if guided by the gods, theyll repeat old patterns of operation, for better or for worse. This is a powerful impulse, and at the core of the Berkshire Museums historic DNA is impoverishment. But its only an impulse. Lets hope a full airing of these questions will help put the museum on solid footing and keep it there.

Read More
The Art Newspaper

Aug 28 2017
Must-see shows this autumn
Jean-Michel Basquiat on the set of Downtown 81 (© New York Beat Film LLC. By permission of The Estate of Jean-Michel Basquiat. Photo: Edo Bertoglio)
Basquiat: Boom for Real
Barbican, London
21 September-28 January 2018 

The last Jean-Michel Basquiat exhibition in London was, remarkably, a 1996 show at the Serpentine Gallery of around 20 works. Now, the one-time graffiti artist who became a star in the 1980s (and died of a drug overdose in 1988) is the subject of a much grander survey. Around 100 of his major works, accompanied by an extensive film and live programme, come to the Barbican Centre in September. Among the items in the show are small works referring to Duchamp, Jackson Pollock and Roy Lichtenstein, among others, which reveal how he ate up every image, every word, every bit of data that appeared in front of him, as the late American writer Glenn OBrien once said. The show also puts an emphasis on his interest in jazz and television through new research to be published in the exhibitions catalogue. 

Jasper Johns: Something Resembling Truth

Royal Academy of Arts, London

23 September-10 December

More than 150 paintings, sculptures, drawings and printsincluding some of his most famous worksare due to be included in this major Jasper Johns exhibition. Edith Devaney, the Royal Academys contemporary art curator, says the show will start with his familiar flags, targets, maps and numberswhat Johns called things the mind already knowsbut aims to reveal the degree to which he revisited themes over a 60-year period. Devaney began considering a show when she saw some of his more recent work in New York. I went to talk to him in 2013 and realised he was still working hard in the studio every day, she says. The exhibition will look at his use of symbols and language, his musings on paintings as physical objects, and on time, transience, memory and mortality. Although Johns has rarely discussed his relationship to other artists, the show will examine works referencing (through words and titles) artists and poets from Alfred Lord Tennyson and Samuel Beckett to Vincent van Gogh. 
 
Being Modern: MoMA in Paris
Fondation Louis Vuitton, Paris
11 October-5 March 2018

Following two major historical exhibitionsKeys to a Passion in 2015 and the Shchukin Collection last yearthe Fondation Louis Vuitton is flexing its borrowing muscles again in a collaboration with New Yorks Museum of Modern Art (MoMA). With 200 works drawn from all seven of the museums curatorial departments, Being Modern will be a kind of manifesto of the future MoMA, says Suzanne Pag, the Vuittons artistic director. To coincide with the completion of its $400m extension in 2019, the New York museum is planning a radical rehang that will expand the Modernist canon that was defined by its founding director, Alfred Barr. Nowadays, interdisciplinarity is the established model and [it] involves new parameters of opennessgeographical, cultural, social and technological, Pag says. The show in Paris, organised by MoMAs chief curator of photography, Quentin Bajac, is a taste of things to come. Alongside works by the European and US greats, from Czanne to Cindy Sherman, will be pieces by artists from Eastern Europe, Turkey and Egypt, as well as industrial design, Disney animation, digital art and even the original emoji (acquired by MoMA last October). 

Carte blanche to Camille Henrot: Days are Dogs

Palais de Tokyo, Paris

18 October-7 January 2018

Camille Henrots dizzying 13-minute video Grosse Fatigue, which won her the Silver Lion at the 2013 Venice Biennale, whipped through computer screenshots of the vast collections at the Smithsonian Institute in Washington, DC, to tell the history of the universe. This autumn, the New York-based French artist is bringing her exhaustive research process to the Palais de Tokyo in Paris, where she will stage the third carte blanche exhibition, filling the 13,000 sq. m space (after Philippe Parreno in 2013 and Tino Sehgal last year). Encompassing sculpture, drawings, films, installations and ikebana flower arrangements, as well as works by six guest artists, the show is an opportunity to demonstrate the outreach of her vision, says the curator Daria de Beauvais. Henrot will divide the space into seven parts, each representing a day of the week with its own mood and associations, from melancholic Monday through to spiritual, domestic Sunday. 

Michelangelo: Divine Draftsman and Designer

Metropolitan Museum of Art

13 November-12 February 2018

Around 150 drawings by Michelangelo will carry this exhibition of the artist's work in New York. The show, which also includes three marble sculptures, his earliest painting and works by other artists to provide context, draws on 54 public and private collections in the US and abroad. It focuses attention on Michelangelos draftsmanship and his abilities as an architect and designer, and includes his model for a chapel vault. Other highlights include a colossal cartoon made for a fresco at the Vatican. The exhibition is organised by Carmen Bambach, the museum's curator of Italian and Spanish drawings. She has also written an essay on the work to be published by the museum in a scholarly catalogue. 

Modigliani

Tate Modern, London

23 November-2 April 2018

A flurry of excitement and controversy foreshadows the Tates blockbuster survey of the Italian Modernist Amedeo Modigliani, with a high-profile bust of 21 alleged forgeries of his works at a show in Genoa in July and another major exhibition of early drawings coming up at the Jewish Museum in New York (15 September4 February 2018). The Tate show will feature almost 100 works from 30 private collections and 40 institutions, including ten of the artists infamous nudesthe largest group ever seen in the UKthat were deemed indecent when he first showed them. The exhibition will also use virtual reality technology to recreate scenes from 20th-century Paris, where Modigliani spent the latter half of his tragically short life. Modigliani is a hugely well-loved and well-known artist, and he has never before been the subject of a major retrospective in this country, says Emma Lewis, the shows assistant curator. It feels timely to introduce him to a new generation. 

For the full Year Ahead, see the September issue
Read More
The New York Times

Aug 28 2017
South Street Seaport Museum Gets City Funds to Restore Lightship
The museum will receive $4.5 million to stabilize and restore the lightship Ambrose, which guided vessels into lower New York Bay from 1908 to 1932.
Read More
The Art Newspaper

Aug 28 2017
Texas museums brace for full impact of Hurricane Harvey
Floodwaters from Tropical Storm Harvey flow in the Buffalo Bayou in downtown Houston, Texas, Monday, 28 August 2017 (AP Photo/LM Otero)
Tropical Storm Harvey continues to batter south-eastern Texas with torrential rain, potentially displacing thousands of residents in Houston and the surrounding area. Most museums across the region remain closed and many took precautions before the storm to protect their collections and staff. This page will be updated with replies from institutions as they come in.

The Museum of Fine Art Houston (MFAH) closed its main campus, Bayou Bend, Rienzi and Glassell School locations on Friday. It has posted on its website that "our collections are safe, but the Museum remains closed to the public for now. Our thoughts are with our fellow Houstonians."

On Monday, a museum spokesperson said the museum's collections "have not been impacted at all, and there have been only limited issues with our facilities." She added: "Advance planningfor sandbags, emergency water pumps, and the floodgates that are installed at various critical points around the campushas largely mitigated potential issues."

A spokesperson from the Contemporary Arts Museum Houston (CAMH), says: "Our thoughts are with those who have been impacted by Harvey and our fellow Houstonians during the on-going storm. We are thankful to our crew who prepared CAMH for the storm and who continue to monitor the museum." The museum will release further updates via its social media channels.

The Menil Collection has maintained a 24-hour security presence on its campus since Friday. Museum employees have been "making regular checks on our basements in the main building" as well as periodic checks on other buildings, including the Menil Drawing Institute construction site, according to a spokesperson.

"At this time, and thankfully, our buildings have not been impacted by the storm. Our director, conservation, and registration departments, which includes art handling services, are receiving regular updates about building status."

The Rockport Center for the Arts in Corpus Christi appears to have "sustained serious external damage," according to a Facebook post from its executive director, Luis Purn, who has seen pictures of the building.

"One image demonstrates that the front porch is completely gone and a roof structure in the front of the building is exposed and thus compromised," Purn wrote. "It is entirely possible that additional damage to the roof exists, yet only an onsite inspection will reveal that."

The Houston Center for Photography (HCP) "has experienced no visible damage to our facility that we have been able to locate during a brief visit before the heavy rains began again," says its director, Ashlyn Davis. "No artwork has been damaged and our library is still in good shape. We are very lucky."

Davis added: "There are several artists in the HCP community though who have taken direct hits and are in real need of support. They've all evacuated to dry homes with their small children and are safe, but HCP's community of artists will likely need major support in the weeks ahead."

The Texas-based publication Glass Tire has video from the owner of the Cardoza Fine Art Gallery in Houston that shows extensive flooding in his home and gallery. According the the publication: "Cardoza says that although his building has been damaged, most of the art in the gallery was out of harms way. As of this morning, water in the area has been receding." The journal also has a list of emergency resources for artists.

The city of Austin has missed the brunt of Hurricane Harvey, but institutions like the Blanton Museum of Art at the University of Texas and the San Antonio Museum of Art were prepared nonetheless.

"Whenever something like this in on the horizon, we monitor the weather very closely and watch for alerts from the University of Texas emergency notification system, which is very responsive," says a Blanton Museum spokesperson. "When its raining, our gallery staff frequently check all levels of the museum for any signs of leaks."

Although the museum is closed Mondays, it will be open and free the rest of the week for anyone who has been displaced by the storm.

Necessary precautions were also taken at the San Antonio Museum of Art, says William Rudolph, the museum's chief curator.

"We are in an area prey to flash flooding and unexpected torrential rainfall and lived through a catastrophic hailstorm in 2016 so we have a very good knowledge of any trouble spots," Rudolph says. "We did monitor the storm in advance and to that end, we moved particularly vulnerable objects out of harms way and made protective modifications, such as draping cases with plastic, etc., by the end of the work day on the Friday that the storm made landfall."

He added: "We luckily were spared any of the worst of Harvey, due to its impact being mainly to the south and east of our city."
Read More
The Art Newspaper

Aug 28 2017
MCA Chicago makes the most of Murakami merch mania
The artist's merchandise is flying off the shelves (Photo: Maria Ponce Berre, © MCA Chicago)
The demand for Murakami merchandise at the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago shows no signs of letting up. With just a few weeks left before the travelling retrospective Takashi Murakami: The Octopus Eats Its Own Leg closes on 24 September, the museums shop continues to roll out new items, including limited edition prints that sell out as soon as they are made available. Its still very much jamming in the store, says Mark Millmore, the MCAs director of retail. He adds that museum staff has had to remain very nimble to respond to the sustained interest in the artist. Ive never had to ask so much from the retail department, as well as everyone else in the building, including the social media team.

The exhibition, organised by the MCAs chief curator Michael Darling, shows the wide range of Murakamis work, from his Superflat pop paintings and sculptures that draw on the cartoonish world of anime, to his more recent paintings that invoke Buddhist legends or the 2011 Japanese earthquake and tsunami. Similarly, the museum store has worked closely with the artist to offer a large assortment of art objects for Murakamis fans, be they students or serious collectors, from $3 sticker sets to silkscreens starting at $6,000. The latter are specially shipped over from Japan and have never before been available in the US. And the catalogue for the show has already gone into a second printing.

The appetite for all this material has meant the need for more resources, including staff to help process the added inventory and professional art handlers to manage the editioned work. Even the museums unused spaces have been commandeered to the cause. Luckily, the theatre is dark, because we needed somewhere to put all of these prints, Millmore says.

Perhaps most surprising is the number of repeat customers, not just those who return to the store to see the new releases every week or two, but visitors who keep coming back to see the show, Millmore says.

So just how much of a windfall will this Murakami mania reap for the museum? Millmore says that hell know the exact receipt numbers within an hour of the shows closing, but that he estimates it is definitely more than $1m so far. It is even set to surpass the sales success of the MCAs last major blockbuster, David Bowie Is, which broke a record for the museum with 189,000 items sold including 7,000 exhibition catalogues, 14,000 t-shirts and 2,100 limited edition prints. Murakami will beat Bowie by more than 40%, Millmore says.


Read More
artforum.com

Aug 28 2017
SLANT: London Calling
Sammy Medina on the fall of Mies van der Rohe’s Mansion House Square
Read More
The Guardian

Aug 28 2017
Notting Hill carnival costumes – in pictures

The second day of the Notting Hill carnival is the main day, and the costumes are not all just feathers and diamante

Continue reading...
Read More