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The New York Times

Jul 25 2017
Berkshire Museum’s Planned Sale of Art Draws Opposition
Two prominent museum groups said the plan to sell works by Norman Rockwell, Alexander Calder and others would violate the organizations’ ethical codes.
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The New York Times

Jul 25 2017
Videos of Syrian Life Pulled from Internet in Protest Effort
The Syrian video collective Abounaddara took down some 400 videos because they said a Milan art fair had improperly incorporated them into an exhibition.
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The Guardian

Jul 25 2017
Banksy stencil soars past Hay Wain as UK's favourite work of art

Bristol street artist’s Girl with Balloon, originally stencil on side of bridge, beats Constable idyll in poll of nation’s best-loved art

An image of a little girl sadly watching her heart-shaped red balloon drift away, originally a stencil on a grimy wall by Banksy, has toppled Constable’s Hay Wain as the nation’s best-loved work of art.

The most famous version of Girl with Balloon, by the Bristol-born street artist, appeared on the side of a bridge on the South Bank in London in 2002. It is now ubiquitous, available as prints, greeting cards and mugs, as an instant street artist kit in a precut stencil marketed by a firm in the US, and as a recent addition to the impressive collection of tattoos almost covering the skin of pop star Justin Bieber.

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The Art Newspaper

Jul 25 2017
BienalSur—a biennial without borders—launches this autumn
One of the most anticipated works in the show is a new video installation by the French artist Christian Boltanski called Misterios, comprising sound and visuals recorded by the sea in Bahía Bustamante, in Chubut, Patagonia, during the whales’ annual bree
The first International Biennial of Contemporary Art of South America (BienalSur) launches this September across 30 cities in South America, Europe, Africa and Asia. Anbal Jozami, the director of the biennial, told The Art Newspaper that the inaugural edition aims to establish a lasting institution that fosters cultural exchange and integration between countries.

The biennials that we are now acquainted with were born at different historical times as a consequence of certain social groups attempting to boost their city or region, as was the case with the political leaders of northern Italy after reunification, when they established the Venice Biennale in the late-19th century, Jozami says.  In view of this context, together with [the artistic director of the biennial] Diana Wechsler and [the biennials advisor] Marlise Ilhesca, we felt the need to rethink the current formatsconversely, this biennial does not respond to any city in particular. Although its main hub is in Buenos Aires, the show extends beyond Argentinato Santiago, Rio de Janeiro, Havana, Paris, Berlin and Tokyo, among other cities.

The show, organised by the Universidad Nacional de Tres de Febrero of Argentina, features 379 projects by renowned and emerging international artists and curators, who submitted their proposals during two open calls for projects, unrestricted to theme. Participants include South American artists like Paulo Nazareth, Cildo Meireles, Ivn Navarro, Oscar Muoz, Voluspa Jarpa and Marcelo Brodsky along with international artists such as Katsuhiko Hibino, Angelika Markul and Abdellah Karroum.

One of the most anticipated works in the show, to be displayed at the Museo Nacional de Bellas Artes in Buenos Aires, is a new video installation by the French artist Christian Boltanski called Misterios, comprising sound and visuals recorded by the sea in Baha Bustamante, in Chubut, Patagonia, during the whales annual breeding season. Other highlights in the Argentine capital include a site-specific installation resembling an attic at the national universitys Hotel de Inmigrantes by the Italian artist Tatiana Trouv, and interventions of the faade of landmark buildings by artists Pedro Cabrita Reis, Bernardi Roig and Marie Orensanz.
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The Art Newspaper

Jul 25 2017
Object lessons: a sculptural horse honouring the Tōhoku disaster by Deborah Butterfield and a still life by E. Charlton Fortune
Hisaiba (2016) by Deborah Butterfield. Photo courtesy of the Greg Kucera Gallery.
Seattle
Greg Kucera Gallery

3-6 August: Seattle Art Fair


Hisaiba (2016) by Deborah Butterfield

$165,000
The American artist, who works with found objects and materials such as driftwood and assorted debris to produce sculptures of horses, cast this unique bronze from flotsam and jetsam that was thrust across the Pacific Ocean after the Thoku earthquake and tsunami struck the northern coast of Japan in 2011 (the debris was collected in Alaska, then shipped to Washington). The sculpture was completed in Butterfields studio, which the downtown Seattle gallerist Greg Kucera described as a corral full of horses, at the famed Walla Walla Foundry in Woodland, Washington (which has also hosted Matthew Barney and Isa Genzken, among others). Butterfield aims to represent the all-knowing horse[their] demeanor, posture, [and] sensitivity, as she described in the catalogue for a 2016 exhibition organised by Kucera. By repurposing the detritus from a natural disaster in the form of the noble and meditative animal, she hopes to honour the survivors and victims. She named it Hisaiba after a horse rescue farm in Japan. Kucera tells The Art Newspaper that Deborahs work has an international market and is easily recognisable by collectors, even when, as with this piece, she takes a bold turn. The gallery is offering two additional sculptures by Butterfield at the fair, called Lemon Drop (2014) ($125,000) and MAKAALA (2016) ($160,000).

Los Angeles
Bonhams
1 August: California and Western Paintings and Sculpture

Still life with narcissus and anemone by E. Charlton Fortune

Est. $80,000-$120,000
One highlight of the houses upcoming sale of works from the Golden State greats is a still life by the late American Impressionist, who is perhaps best-known for her landscape paintings of coastal California, where she lived on and off between stints in Europe and the East Coast. Fortune signed her work with a gender-neutral initial for her first name, Euphemia, which she hoped would help critics recognise and reward her work without gender bias. The work being offered, showing a vase of assorted flowers, a commonly feminine preserve, has the vigorous and bold qualities that led some critics to assume Fortune was male. Earlier this year, Bonhams sold an early painting by Fortune called Wharf, Monterey (around 1915)executed when the budding artist was 19 years old and studying art in San Francisco, before she went on to the Art Students League in New Yorkfor $728,000 with premium (est. $200,000-$300,000). In the later part of her life, the devout Catholic focused on producing ecclesiastical art for the church, and few examples of her secular oeuvre remains in private hands. An exhibition of the artists liturgical and secular paintings, sculptures and decorative arts, called E. Charlton Fortune: the Colourful Spirit, will open at the Pasadena Museum of California (20 August7 January 2018) and travel to the Crocker Art Museum, Sacramento, and the Monterey Museum of Art, later in the year.

Update: the work sold for $106,000 with premium. 
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The New York Times

Jul 25 2017
Canada Debates Whether Gift of Leibovitz Photos Is Also a Tax Dodge
Four years after the donation of 2,070 photos created by Annie Leibovitz to a Nova Scotia museum, a government panel is balking at its $20 million valuation.
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The Art Newspaper

Jul 25 2017
Richard Deacon fills the Royal Academy’s ‘sculpture ledge’
The artist and Royal Academician Richard Deacon has redisplayed the sculpture ledge on the top floor of the Royal Academy of Arts (RA) in London in time for the launch of the RAs next blockbuster show in its Sackler Galleries, Matisse in the Studio, which opens to the public next week (5 August-12 November).
 
The first artist-led redisplay of 21 works by fellow Academicians include Anthony Caros Mouchoir from his Cascade series (1990), which drapes over the plinth on the stone ledge, the RAs statuette of Frederic, Lord Leightons muscular nude, The Sluggard (1885), as well as pieces by Rebecca Warren and Michael  Sandle, among others. They span 200 years and 14 of the sculptures are Diploma Works, which every new Academician presents to the Collection when they are elected. 
 
Four works in wood by Joe Tilson, Fire Ladder, Air Ladder, Water Ladder and Earth Ladder (around 1971), lean against the gallerys glass wall in the lift shaft. At a private view for the installation, Richard Deacon RA Selects, earlier this month, Deacon revealed: The first piece of contemporary art I had physical contact with was a Joe Tilson in 1966 when I lugged Vox Pop up the spiral stairs of Plymouth Art Centre, where I moonlighted as an installer. These do something perfect in the space, they lean like ladders and play off the [Robert] Clatworthy cat in the window, referring to a small bronze feline perched on a RA library window ledge, which visitors will see best from the galleries glass lift.
 
I always thought this was a great space. The shelf is the outside of a building on the inside of another building, says Deacon, describing how the architects Norman Foster and Spencer de Grey expanded the institution by infilling space between and on top of the RAs historic buildings more than 20 years ago. 
 
Jillian Sackler, the widow of the benefactor who made the RAs expansion possible in the late 1980s, said how happy her late husband, Arthur Sackler, would have been to see the space filled with sculpture, as he had hoped. The loan of the RAs Taddei Tondo by Michelangelo to the National Gallery, which was formerly shown in the space, was one reason why fellow artist, Academician and RA President, Christopher Le Brun invited Deacon to redisplay the gallery with more sculpture from its collection. The installation was overseen by Maurice Davies, the RA's head of collections.
 
The redisplay provides an early preview of other treasures that will be revealed during the RAs anniversary celebrations marking its 250th birthday that begin in earnest in 2018, said Le Brun.  
 
Deacon, who won the Turner Prize in 1987, has juggled the sculpture redisplay at the RA with judging the Art Funds UK Museum of the Year Award and two major solo shows. At the San Diego Museum of Art, What You See Is What You Get, is the British artists  first major US museum survey (until 4 September) while at the Middelheim Museum in Belgium, he is showing more than 30 works in Some Time (until 24 September).
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The Art Newspaper

Jul 25 2017
Who is the collector behind the Getty’s windfall master drawings acquisition?
Fra Bartolommeo, Studies of the Heads of Two Dominican Friars, around 1511, red chalk
When the Getty secured its great Parmigianino painting Virgin and Child, St John the Baptist and Mary Magdalenevalued at 24.5mfrom the UKs Sudeley Castle last month, many in the field thought this would be the Los Angeles museums last major acquisition for some time. Im sure they are all tapped out for awhile, a source told us. Not quite.

Last week, the Getty announced the acquisition of 16 major master drawings and one paintingWatteaus exquisite, recently re-discovered La Surprise (around 1718). Among the drawings are Michelangelos pen Study of a Mourning Woman (around 1500-05); Andrea del Sartos brilliant red and black chalk study for the head of St Joseph (around 1526-27), a preparatory study for the Holy Family in Florences Palazzo Pitti; Aelbert Cuyps Panoramic View of Dordrecht and the River Maas (around 1645-52); and an exceptionally beguiling and rare chalk drawing by Lorenzo di Credi of The Head of a Young Boy Crowned with Laurel (around 1500-05) subsequently used by the artist for the head of a shepherd in his altarpiece of The Adoration of the Shepherds in the Uffizi. The drawings windfall is especially notable as the department's buying activity over the past decade has been piecemeal and quiet. The Getty is not releasing the price of the collection but experts estimate it to be around $100m.

According to sources in the field, the windfall comes from the collection of the 62-year-old collector Luca Padulli, the co-founder of the British investment management company Camomille Associates, who bought the works at auction over the last 17 years, through the British Old Master dealer, Jean-Luc Baroni. The Michelangelo drawing, a discovery from the library at Castle Howard in Yorkshire, sold at Sothebys London 2001 for $6m, the Sarto at Christies London in 2005 for 6.5m, and the Credi at Piasa in Paris in 2001 for 2.6m.

While Padulli owns a number of Old Master paintings of the highest quality, including Ludovico Carraccis Salmacis and Hermaphroditus, which he bought at Christies London in July 2006 for 7.4m (outbidding the Metropolitan Museum of Art), he has recently winnowed down his collection at auction, selling Govaert Flincks An Old Man at a Casement at Christies New York this April for $10.3m and Giovanni Benedetto Castigliones Pagan Sacrifice in the Temple of Jerusalem at Sotheby's London earlier this month for $632,750. Many observers in the trade believed that the drawings from his collection would soon follow suit.

According to a press release, the drawings come from a British private collection but the Getty would not comment further on the owner. Most of the works are already at the museum, although some are awaiting export licences. And the museum says it is looking at possibly acquiring additional works from the same collection, with plans for a special exhibition in the near future.

The painting by Watteau is an especially satisfying acquisition for the Getty as the museums canvas of The Italian Comediansbought as a work by Watteau in 2012 and still exhibited as suchhas not been universally accepted as an original autograph painting by several major scholars. When sold in Paris in 2011, it was notably granted a swift export licence.

There are no such concerns regarding La Surprise, which was praised as one of Watteaus most sublime paintings by his contemporaries and later 18th-century connoisseurs such as Jean-Pierre Mariette and its former owners Jean de Julienne and Ange-Laurent de La Live de Jully. Its appearance at Christies in 2008 from a private British collection caused a sensation, not least due to the pictures excellent condition as paintings by the artist are especially prone to overcleaning, and it sold for 12.4m.

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The Guardian

Jul 25 2017
Gay bars and tarot cards: Liverpool show celebrates LGBT art

Walker art gallery is putting on UK’s largest exhibition exploring LGBT themes and history through contemporary art

Poignant video footage of 170 empty gay bars in 13 UK cities will greet visitors to the UK’s largest exhibition exploring LGBT themes and history through contemporary art.

The footage, filmed over nine months by artists Hannah Quinlan and Rosie Hastings, is part of an exhibition opening this week at Liverpool’s Walker art gallery. The exhibition is one of a number of cultural activities marking the 50th anniversary of the Sexual Offences Act, which in 1967 partially decriminalised homosexuality in England and Wales.

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The Art Newspaper

Jul 25 2017
Crosby, Stills & Nash singer puts Crumb comics on the block
Robert Crumb, Zap Comix #1, cover original art dating from 1967 (courtesy, Heritage Auctions)

The rock n roll legend Graham Nash, singer and songwriter with the 1970s supergroup group Crosby, Stills & Nash, is offering several pieces by Robert Crumb, the countercultural cartoonist, at auction next month. Nash has consigned various Crumb classics to Heritage Auctions Comic Auctions in Dallas (10-12 August) including Zap Comix #1, cover original art dating from 1967 (est $100,000). The cartoonist himself features in The Peoples Comics (1972; est $50,000), depicting his various escapades including working on a farm for bourgeois intellectuals and artists. After school in Delaware, Crumb found work in Cleveland, Ohio, illustrating for the American Greetings card company, but his comics flourished after he moved to San Francisco in 1967. There, characters such as the mystic Mr Natural were born, and Crumb became a key figure in the counterculture and a fixture in Zap Comix, fashioning racy images that raised the eyebrows of conservatives and feminists alike.
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artforum.com

Jul 25 2017
500 WORDS: John Giorno
John Giorno talks about his New York retrospective
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The Art Newspaper

Jul 25 2017
Edinburgh Art Festival: artists look to Maori traditions, 19th-century botany and jellyfish
The Edinburgh Art Festival remains a slender operation compared to many art events, with just seven new commissions this year, relying heavily on partner shows. But this summer Edinburgh boasts a new pavilion, thanks to Jupiter Artland, the sculpture park whose co-founder Robert Wilson is also festival chairman. The 2017 festival (28 July-28 August) takes as its theme, The Making of the Future: Now, from the title of a pamphlet by the 19th-century town planner and conservationist Sir Patrick Geddes.  
 
He looked forward to a future after World War I where art and industry, education and health, morals and business must.... advance in unison. The festival encompasses 45 exhibitions in 35 venues this year from British Realist Painting at the Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art to work by Mona Hatoum and Stephen Sutcliffe.
 
The film installation at Gladstone Court by Shannon Te Ao, a New Zealand artist of Maori descent, is a highlight of  the festival commissions. With the sun aglow, I have my pensive moods  is mysterious, absorbing, and ironic. The work is a worthy follow-up to the success of the New Zealand pavilion at the Venice Biennale this year (by the part Maori artist Lisa Reihana). Sited in a one-time 19th-century asylum for fallen women, with a staircase of displaced New Zealand and Scottish plants lending a rich aroma of foliage, the piece weaves a Maori lament of a girl infected with leprosy, with scenes of tribal lands intersected by electricity pylons,  and a wandering herd of cows.  
 
Jupiter Artland continues to grow in stature as it approaches its tenth anniversary next year, and this year adds Pablo Bronsteins The Rose Walk to its permanent outdoor collection. The piece joins two ten-metre-high pavilions, in Gothic and Chinoiserie style, facing each other across a rose garden walk, and will host performances this summer. The Italian, Glasgow-based artist Marco Giordano has designed an avenue of body part sculptures, with motion-activated water sprays to bless approaching visitors. 
 
Meanwhile, the announced closure of Inverleith House, in the Royal Botanic Garden of Edinburgh (RBGE), as a contemporary gallery provoked a furious reaction last year. The festival marks its first outing under a new remit for contemporary artists responding to the setting and collections at the RBGE. Artist Laura Aldridge has dotted carpets of nature prints with oversized evil eye amulets. Impressive sculptures by Bobby Niven, whose work separately appears in the commissions programme, are inspired by collections of seedpods and fruit. Rediscovered 19th-century botanical landscapes by RK Greville charmingly show constructed scenes of countries he never visited. Photorealistic paintings by Oliver Osborne and screens and wall prints by Charlie Billingham drawn from 18th- and 19th-century satires also feature.  
 
A major new contemporary space is due to open in Edinburgh next year when the Collective Gallery takes over the refashioned City Observatory on Calton Hill, after a 4.5m revamp. In a temporary space this summer it shows a film by Scotlands Ross Little, on the curious life of cruise ships, augmented by a tank of jellyfish. The exhibition is sponsored by UK Jellyfish, suppliers of jellyfish and associated food supplies. An audio piece by Patrick Staff exploring the alternative history of Calton Hill, an Edinburgh landmark and once celebrated for its night-time gay scene, is also widely anticipated.
 
Partner exhibitions in the festival include solo shows by  Scottish artists Douglas Gordon and Graham Fagen at the Scottish National Portrait Gallery, which is also celebrating pioneering 19th-century photographers Hill and Adamson. Another international Scottish name, Toby Paterson, is developing a new sculptural work in Edinburghs Old Town. He lamented the state of a previous festival commission, artist Martin Creeds 250,000 marble overhaul of the Scotsman Steps, the famous staircase descending from the citys North Bridge. A visit confirmed it is badly in need of a clean, if not a polish. 
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The Guardian

Jul 25 2017
Bacteria from 300-year-old Ovid poetry volume inspires 'bio-artist'

Sarah Craske found the copy of Metamorphoses in a secondhand bookshop and used bacteria within its pages to create art with her own blood

There was more than poetry trapped between the leather covers of a 300-year-old volume of Ovid’s Metamorphoses: blood, sweat and snot feature in an art installation that displays the bacteria within its pages.

The sweat and the droplets from an ancient sneeze that spattered one page were contributed by centuries of previous owners and readers of the book – but the blood was the artist’s own, donated by Sarah Craske as part of the medium for cultivating the organisms.

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The Guardian

Jul 25 2017
Whips so cold: the lowriders that are now museum pieces – in pictures

The High Art of Riding Low, an exhibition at Peterson Automotive Museum in Los Angeles, examines the lowrider as an artistic catalyst and cultural icon. The range of work on display – paintings, photography and vehicles themselves – meld automotive ingenuity and imaginative expression

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The Guardian

Jul 25 2017
Getting to grips with sumo – in pictures

Ganjoji Yakushido temple in the central Japanese city of Nagoya is used by sumo wrestlers belonging to the Tomozuna stable as a temporary base for the Nagoya grand sumo tournament

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The Guardian

Jul 24 2017
Crouching tiger, hidden hairdo: World Illustration awards – in pictures

From a Hokusai-inspired wave resembling Donald Trump’s comb-over to a philosophical picture book for children, the World Illustration awards exhibition recognises the bold and colourful work by illustrators around the world

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The Art Newspaper

Jul 24 2017
Ren Hang’s provocative photographs feature in Shanghai Photofairs’ new Spotlight section
Ren Hang, Untitled (2014). (© Ren Hang. Courtesy of KWM Art Center Beijing)
Works by the late photographer Ren Hang are due to go on show at the Photofairs photography fair in Shanghai this autumn (7-10 September, Shanghai Exhibition Centre) in a show billed as the first major exhibition of the artists work since his death in February. All 19 works, previously seen at the KWM Art Center in Beijing in the exhibition Beauty without Beards, will feature in the new fair section called Spotlight which explores the critical and commercial standing of key contemporary photographers.
 
Originally shown at the KWM Art Center in February 2017, all the images within the exhibition were the last to have been authenticated by the artist and following the artists death, they will never be printed again. They are on show in an international forum in China for the first time since Hangs passing, says a statement from Photofairs.
 
Ren had long struggled with depression, and challenged Chinas taboo surrounding mental illness with his openness; he maintained a public blog documenting My Depression from June 2007 until last September. In 2013 he published a book by the same title, and presented his struggle in numerous poems. His brief but meteoric career spanned 85 group shows, including Paris Photo in Paris, Brussels and Los Angeles, as well as Fuck Off 2 at Hollands Groninger Museum in 2013. He published 16 books of photography and a volume of poetry.
 
Photofairs is managed by the World Photography Organisation,  a subsidiary of the London-based fairs organiser, Montgomery Group, The fourth edition in Shanghai includes several new sections and features. For the first time, a special exhibition will offer a curated insight into the private acquisitions of powerful art collectors David Chau (Cc Foundation), Adrian Cheng (K11 Art Foundation), Thomas Shao (Modern Media Group), and Jenny Wang (Fosun Foundation), says a statement. The related exhibition will include works by Yang Fudong and Wolfgang Tillmans. A parallel Photofairs sister fair runs in San Francisco (26-28 January 2018).
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The Art Newspaper

Jul 24 2017
The arts festival erupting in the middle of the Atlantic Ocean
Benandsebastian, Nordic Miniature (2017). (Photo: Filipa Couto)
How does an international arts festival end up on a small island in the middle of the Atlantic Ocean? For the first edition of the Walk & Talk festival in 2011, its current artistic director Jesse James and fellow co-founder Diana Sousa wanted to bring just one artist to Ponta Delgada, the capital of the Portuguese Azores islands. 
 
Now, in its seventh edition, the festival (until 29 July) has grown with more than 70 participating artists, from around the world and working across different disciplines. The festival includes exhibitions, performances, public interventions, residencies, workshops and more, all concentrated over two weeks in July. 
 
The founders, James and Sousa, grew up in the Azores but both left to study in mainland Europe. On returning in their early 20s, they wanted to bring back some of the culture they had been exposed to and also showcase what the islands had to offer. 
 
The festival has become a way of presenting the Azores in a different way, beyond lagoons and whales and dolphins, James says. Although he admits that the exoticism of the locationI hate the word[makes it easier] to invite people.
  
 
The first edition went from the idea of just inviting the Portuguese street artist Vhilsnow one of urban arts biggest namesto having over a dozen artists create 20 murals in two weeks, James says. The suggestion to invite more artists came from the local Azorean government.
 
James says he and his small team thought we should just occupy public space and street art was the most direct way of doing that. Following the relative success of the early editions, art becamefor the first time that I can recalla conversation on the streets [of Ponta Delgada], James says. 
 
This year there is only one street artist, Spy from Madrid, who is part of the Public Art Circuit, co-commissioned by the Lisbon- and Copenhagen-based KWY group. The festival started to move away from urban art in 2013 as they felt every city had a public arts festival and street art was just being used as a form of beautification, James says. 
 
A turning point in the way the festival was run came during the 2013 edition when they had their first residency, the choreographer Victor Hugo Pontes, working with a local dance group called 37.25 (named after the main island of Sao Miguels coordinates). [We realised] this is the model that we need. [Pontes] is sharing knowledge with the dance group, James says. Over the subsequent years, different artists-in-residence have worked with the group and now 37.25 are organising their own dance festival, James says. 


Walk & Talk currently runs multiple residencies, with artists staying on the island during the festival with a view to exhibiting at the next edition. At the recently reopened Carlos Machado natural history museum, the Portuguese artist Joao Paulo Serafims new show, Naturalis Histori: When Was a Crocodile First Seen in the Azores? (until 12 September), includes installations and photographs taken during the museums refurbishment while Serafim was based there during his residency two years ago. 
 
Among the current artists-in-residence is the photographer Pauliana Valente Pimentel, who will be working with the inhabitants of one of the islands fishing villages, one of its most deprived areas, as well as with its high society, she says. The show of her works next year will take place in the Azores only commercial gallery, Galeria Fonseca Macedo.
 
Alongside the longer residencies, the Public Art Circuit also acts as a basis for short-term stays. This years nine projects unfold during the festival, with some not due to be completed until the final daysa relic from its street art days of working and presenting simultaneously, James says. Many of these pieces end up becoming permanent works. 
 
One of this years projects, by the Canadian artist Mark Clintberg, plays on the unique position of the nine islands that make up the Azores. They are almost an intermediate, queer space, he says. Part of Europe but classified as being on the ultra-periphery, 900 miles from the national capital of Lisbon. Clintberg is creating a fictional, liminal space that is advertised but will never open, called Intermediario (intermediate), replete with advertising and signage.
 
Another public work is Nordic Miniature (2017) by the Berlin-based artist duo Benandsebastian. This vitrine of diminutive imported trees situated in the grounds of the Terra Nostra botanical park is a nod to the islands historical location on trade routes and fertile climate. 


On the other side of the island, the Stockholm-based, Japanese artist Akane Moriyama has made a 70m-long fabric installation, titled Azorean Spectrum Range (2017), running between the basalt buildings of Arquiplago, a 13m contemporary art centre that opened in 2015. The building, nominated for the Mies van der Rohe architecture award, is a world-class venue for the arts and is a vast investment on an island with a population of less than 140,000. We hardly even have anything like this in Berlin, says Sebastian de la Cour, one half of Benandsebastian.  
 
Walk & Talks main venue is less monumental. Having lost their previous temporary space at the last minute, this years central hub is a former supermarket in the city centre, where the main group exhibition, Message in a Bottle (until 29 July) is being held. Many of the performances, as well as artist-led workshops with local teenagers also take place here. 
 
On the same street is a pop-up canteen where the artists, organisers and visiting press eat together. As with the festival as a whole, James is keen to take out the boundaries between disciplines. It is important that even if they dont collaborate [artistically], that they mix, he says. This diversity is quite important, James says, as audiences and different artistic disciplines rarely overlap at most festivals, biennials and art scenes in major cities such as Lisbon or London. 
 
The main festival funders are the Azorean government and Mailchimp, supplemented by several smaller organisations. Thirty percent of the budget is in kind: car [rental], insurance, flights etc., James says. 
 
The ambitious mix of disciplines and a local audience slowly getting used to some of the more challenging content means that sometimes things do not go to plan. But as artists at Walk & Talk you are entitled to fail, James says. The idea of failing is important, not only [for the] artists, but us [as an organisation] and the audience. 
 
As for the future, James hopes that it becomes a reference point both nationally and internationally, and despite a limited marketing budget to spread the word, the artists who visit are becoming like ambassadors. Even though the islands are on the periphery of Europe, they are also centrally located between Europe and North America, attracting visitors and artists from both. 
 
James says finally that he only wants to continue leading the festival, along with his current co-director Sofia Carolina Botelho, until the tenth edition [in 2020], then I think it has to pass onto someone else. He will be 32.
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The Art Newspaper

Jul 24 2017
The sun sets on twenty years of art clan gatherings at the Hydra Workshops
Maria Balshaw and Pauline Karpidas
There are many outstanding events in the art world but few as eagerly anticipated or keenly attended as the annual gathering on the Greek island of Hydra hosted by patron extraordinaire Pauline Karpidas, accompanied more recently by her son Panos, and organised with quiet efficiency by the gallerist Sadie Coles and her team. For twenty years, these meetings of overlapping art clans have opened the yearly summer exhibition in the Hydra Workshops on the islands harbour waterfront with three sybaritic days of sun, sea and socialising.
 
Last weekends (21-24 July) opening of six vivid new paintings by the young New Jersey-born, Brooklyn-based artist Jamian Juliano-Villani  attracted an especially illustrious crowd. Among the shoreside ranks soaking up the rays and the gossip were the Tate director Maria Balshaw who ran morning yoga classes for early risers; Serpentine Gallery supremo Hans-Ulrich Obrist; National Portrait Gallery director Nicholas Cullinan; Beatrix Ruf of the Stedelijk Museum and the Royal Academys Tim Marlow. Also in attendance was patron and philanthropist Maja Hoffmann and Sothebys Oliver Barker, as well as Juliano-Villanis gallerist Tanya Leighton, gallerist Thaddaeus Ropac (who has a house on the island) and Gagosian Director Robin Vousden.   
 
However, the pleasure of the weekend was also tinged with acute sadness with the announcement by Panos that this was to be the last one. Over the ensuing days, memories flowed thick and fast of the Hydra Workshops twenty year run, which has spanned from a 15-strong mixed exhibition by what were the then-Y BAs in 1997 through to shows by Christopher Wool, Richard Prince and Carroll Dunham, to name but a few who have shown their work in this modest but perfectly proportioned space.


In 2005 newly weds John Currin and Rachel Feinstein  put on a joint Honeymooners collaboration and in 2005, artist Urs Fischer made much of his show in situ using chairs and tables from nearby Tassos caf. Nate Lowman also responded to the unique Hydra experience when he lined the space with painted portraits based on Johnnie Shand-Kydds photographs chronicling both the changing and the consistent cast of Hydra guests.   
 
Even more plentiful were all the otherutterly unprintablerecollections of the exploits, encounters and escapades that, for the past two decades have given the art world a very particular form of Hydra therapy. It was therefore appropriate that last Sundays sunset over Hydra was an especially spectacular one, providing a suitably grand finale for the end of an unforgettable era. 
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The New York Times

Jul 24 2017
Young Digital Artists, Anxious About ... Technology
An exhibition at Sotheby’s in New York betrays a broad generational anxiety about the technological future and the role of humans in it.
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The New York Times

Jul 24 2017
Books From the Frick to Offer Authors’ Views on Major Works
The series, Frick Diptychs, is to feature the novelist Hilary Mantel, the filmmaker James Ivory and the artist and author Edmund de Waal.
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artforum.com

Jul 24 2017
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The Art Newspaper

Jul 24 2017
Berkshire Museum courts censure from museums groups with plan to sell 40 works
Blacksmith's Boy—Heel and Toe (1940) also known as Shaftsbury Blacksmith Shop, was given to the Berkshire Museum by Norman Rockwell
The Berkshire Museum in Pittsfield, Massachusetts, plans to auction 40 works of art from its collection, including two original paintings by Norman Rockwell, to fund a $40m endowment and $20m refurbishment of the 114-year-old museum. The move has caused some controversy in museum circles, since works of art are usually sold only to fund further acquisitions. The AAM and the Association of Art Museum Directors (AAMD) have released a joint statement saying that they "are deeply opposed" to the museums plan to sell works. 

To think that selling the art will save the future is simply to push the challenge down the road while diminishing the strength of the institution. Disassembling the unique treasure that is our regional museum to save it, is not saving it, wrote Laurie Norton Moffatt, the director and chief executive of the nearby Norman Rockwell Museum, in an oped in the Berkshire Eagle. Selling these treasured assets actually poses a debilitating economic ripple effect beyond the museum, not to mention would be a profound spiritual loss to the community.

Among the 40 works to be sold are two paintings by the American artist Norman Rockwell, including Shaftsbury Blacksmith Shop (1940) and Shuffleton Barbershop (1950)works that were given to the museum by the artist. The painting of a pair of smithies competing in a horseshoe forging contest was made to illustrate Edward W. OBrien's short story Blacksmiths BoyHeel and Toe, which ran in the Saturday Evening Post, on 2 November 1940. The work Shuffleton Barbershop, painted for the cover of the 29 April 1950 issue of The Saturday Evening Post, was the inspiration for a 2013 television movie staring Danny Glover.

The museum released the full list of works being sold, including works by Frederic Edwin Church, Alexander Calder, Francis Picabia and other artists, in a press release detailing their 'new vision' for the institution. The cache of works will be offered sometime in the next six months at Sothebys, New York, and is estimated to bring in at least $50m. The museums annual deficit has averaged around $1.2m for the past ten years, according to Van Shields, the executive director of the Berkshire Museum.

Museums that have similarly sold off works to shore up their finances have found themselves ostracised by their peers in the past. In 2008, the National Academy in New York sold two Hudson River School paintings at Sothebys to cover operating expenses. This resulted in the AAMD issuing its first ever censure of an institution, instructing its 180 members to stop lending to and collaborating with the academy, and releasing a hardline policy on the selling of works.

It is a slippery slope when you deaccession for operations. The fear is that a board of trustees will see the museum as a bank, Kaywin Feldman, the AAMDs then-director told The Art Newspaper at the time. The sanctions were lifted in 2010, after the academy showed that it had regained its financial footing and would not again deaccession works.

In their joint statement about the deaccession, the AAM and AAMD argue that: "selling from the collection for purposes such as capital projects or operating funds not only diminishes the core of works available to the public, it erodes the future fundraising ability of museums nationwide. Such a sale sends a message to existing and prospective donors that museums can raise funds by selling parts of their collection, thereby discouraging not only financial supporters, who may feel that their support isnt needed, but also donors of artworks and artifacts, who may fear that their cherished objects could be sold at any time to the highest bidder to make up for a museums budget shortfalls. That cuts to the heart not only of the Berkshire Museum, but every museum in the United States."

The Berkshire Museum has already braced itself for any potential backlash. We explored every possible ramification of this decision Loans to the museum have not made a material difference to our programming, Shields told the Berkshire Eagle, adding that acting as stewards of the museum is the true public trust.
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artforum.com

Jul 24 2017
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artforum.com

Jul 24 2017
500 WORDS: Kishio Suga
Kishio Suga discusses his show at Dia:Chelsea
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The Art Newspaper

Jul 24 2017
Tate Liverpool’s long-serving art handler (Ken) gets his own show
Paul Nash, Equivalents for the Megaliths (1935). (Image: ©Tate)

Tate Liverpool is honouring its art handling manager, Ken Simonswho has been at the institution since it opened in 1988in a special way. As he prepares to retire, Ken will present an exhibition of 30 works drawn from the Tate collection Kens Show: Exploring the Unseen (2 April-17 June 29108), in the ground floor Wolfson Gallery, includes some of his favourite works, many of which he has previously installed in the galleries, a Tate statement says. Kens preferred pieces include Light Red Over Black (1957) by Mark Rothko, J.M.W. Turners Snow Storm, Steam-Boat off a Harbour's Mouth (1842) and Equivalents for the Megaliths by Paul Nash (1935). Ken says he has got to know the works personally. It is through this hands-on interaction and curating this show that I learnt and understood much more about artists exploration of space, he says (could this start a tradition, we wonder, whereby dedicated front-of-house staff turn their hand to curatorial matters?).  
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The Art Newspaper

Jul 24 2017
Paris exhibition and auction throw spotlight on refugee NGOs in France
Jimmie Durham, Encore un essais (2017). Courtesy of the artist and Michel Rein, Paris/Brussels
Artists such as Cindy Sherman, Glenn Ligon, Jimmie Durham, and Annette Messager have donated works to a special exhibition and auction in aid of non-governmental organisations (NGOs) that assist refugees arriving in France. The show, We Dream Under the Same Sky, is due to open at the Palais de Tokyo in Paris this autumn (16-21 September); the works will be sold 27 September at the Azzedine Alaa gallery in a sale organised by Christies.
 
Ligon will show Stranger Study#29 (2017), a work incorporating coal dust, while Shermans Untitled #553 (2010-12) also features. Other works include Mona Hatoums woollen rug, Afghan (red and orange, 2008), the sculptural work Chicos (2015) by Adel Abdessemed and Nairy Baghramians wire mesh piece, Waste Basket (Bins for rejected ideas, 2012).
 
The French designer Martin Szekely has contributed a piece, entitled Artefact Side Tables (Paire, 2013), made of quartzite and gold-plated stainless steel. He expressed his solidarity for our human brothers who are destitute and exhausted, adding that: How could I not but think of my parents who fled Hungary 70 years ago to the country [France] where I now live.

The Palais de Tokyo show will include screenings, performances and discussions highlighting the NGOs including La Cimade, which helps migrants access health and accommodation services, and Thot, a French language school for refugees.
 
The honorary committee backing the event includes high-profile names such as the actress Catherine Deneuve, the Swiss art patron Maja Hoffmann, the billionaire French collector Franois Pinault and Hans Ulrich Obirst, the artistic director of the Serpentine Galleries in London.
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The Guardian

Jul 23 2017
‘I'd be crushed if this was gone before anyone got to see it': Rone's Omega House – in pictures

In the most extensive piece of art he has created in one space, internationally renowned Melbourne street artist Rone has taken over the inside of a crumbling old house in Alphington – the last remaining home on a development site that’s set to become an entire new suburb in ever-changing Melbourne.

His signature ‘Jane Doe’ mural portraits stare out from the rooms, which are packed with furnished nostalgia for a forgotten Australiana, designed by interior stylist Carly Spooner.

The house, and the art that now lines its walls, will be demolished before the end of the month. ‘I would be crushed if this was gone before anyone got to see it,’ says Rone

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The Guardian

Jul 23 2017
Beauty meets decay: Melbourne street artist Rone breathes new life into condemned house

Rone discusses the Omega Project, which sees his signature murals grace the walls of an abandoned house marked for demolition

Melbourne is busy growing, razing old houses and factories and throwing up apartment towers for the almost 2,000 new residents the state gets each week.

Change is happening so fast there’s barely time to mourn what’s lost.

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The Guardian

Jul 23 2017
'We found it rolled up in a tube': Alice Cooper discovers Warhol classic after 40 years
  • Silkscreen from Death and Disaster series sat in storage among other artefacts
  • Rocker became friends with Warhol in New York in the 1960s

The rock star Alice Cooper has found an Andy Warhol masterpiece that could be worth millions “rolled up in a tube” in a storage locker, where it lay forgotten for more than 40 years.

Related: Andy Warhol’s Electric Chair, 1964: a dark mirror to pop art

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The Guardian

Jul 23 2017
Ravishing ripples: pools to dive into – in pictures

Whether it’s swimming laps, high-diving, or whiling away a long, hot summer on the sunbed, Karine Laval’s shots capture the thrills, the beauty and the melancholy of pool life

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The Guardian

Jul 23 2017
The construction of Apple Park in California – video

Apple’s new 175-acre California campus was envisioned by Steve Jobs as a centre for creativity and collaboration. Apple claims it will be the ‘greenest building on the planet’. It consists of 5 million square feet of asphalt and concrete with grassy fields and over 9,000 native and drought-resistant trees, and is powered by 100% renewable energy

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artforum.com

Jul 23 2017
PASSAGES: Barkley L. Hendricks (1945–2017)
Trevor Schoonmaker on Barkley L. Hendricks (1945–2017)
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The Art Newspaper

Jul 23 2017
Gurlitt bequest spurs provenance research in Switzerland
Germany's Gurlitt Provenance Research Project continues to study the hoard (Photo: Britta Pedersen/AFP/Getty Images)
Cornelius Gurlitts surprising decision to bequeath his controversial collection to the Kunstmuseum Bern has triggered a new impetus for provenance research in the Swiss capital. The elderly recluse, who hoarded Nazi-looted art for decades in his Munich apartment and Salzburg home, unexpectedly named the museum as the sole beneficiary of a will written weeks before he died in May 2014.

Gurlitts legacy comprised more than 1,500 works of art, including paintings by Pablo Picasso, Henri Matisse, Claude Monet, Max Beckmann and Otto Dix. He had inherited the trove from his father, Hildebrand Gurlitt, a dealer for the Nazis who bought works that had been plundered from Jews or sold by Jews desperate to leave Germany.

The museum took possession of the first pieces from the collection in the first week of July. It had already begun laying the groundwork to manage the bequest. The art historian Nikola Doll was appointed in May to run a provenance research team of four and the museum held a conference on Nazi-looted art in collaboration with the University of Bern in early June.

It is impossible to separate the Gurlitt collection from [] the debate about Nazi-looted art, says Nina Zimmer, the director of the Kunstmuseum Bern. Gurlitt sparked [] international attention on the Swiss politics of provenance research.

At the time, the Kunstmuseum Bern hesitated before accepting Gurlitts art, describing it as a considerable burden of responsibility that carried a wealth of questions of the most difficult and sensitive kind. International groups such as the World Jewish Congress drew attention to Switzerlands spotty record in restituting Nazi-looted art.

Cornelius Gurlitts cousin contested his will, postponing the museums inheritance until December 2016. To finance the court costs incurred by her challenge, the museum is now planning to sell his Salzburg and Munich properties.

I am glad the museums board took on this responsibility, Zimmer says. The bequest, she says, has not only brought about a shift in attitude but also led to new policies.

One result of the debate was the federal governments decision to offer museums grants for provenance research last year. It allocated more than SFr900,000 to ten institutions, including SFr200,000 for the Kunstmuseum Bern. Private donors, including the Rudolf and Ursula Streit Foundation and the Ursula Wirz Foundation, have supplemented this with their own contributions. The funding so far is enough to support provenance research for two years. We have to keep fighting for long-term financing and a long-term structure, Zimmer says.

The museum is using the money to digitise its archives from the era of the Third Reich and make them accessible to researchers. It is also investigating and publishing the provenance of its own collection.

Meanwhile, the University of Berns Institute of Art History is in talks with potential sponsors for a new teaching post for provenance researchsomething Zimmer says is urgently needed given the current dearth of specialists in Switzerland. The Gurlitt collection remains in Germany for now, and the Kunstmuseum will only take possession of art with a provenance that is free from suspicion of Nazi looting. The remainder will continue to be investigated by the Gurlitt Provenance Research Project at the Magdeburg-based German Lost Art Foundation, at least until the end of this year.

Parallel exhibitions of the collection, called Dossier Gurlitt, are planned to open at the Kunstmuseum Bern and the Bundeskunsthalle in Bonn, Germany, in November. The Bern show will focus on works seized from German museums as part of the Nazis merciless campaign against art they considered degenerate. The Kunstmuseum is offering visitors a preview at the Gurlitt Workshop, where the works will undergo conservation before the exhibition. Guided tours are due to start on 18 August.

Gurlitt by numbers


Among 1,566 works:
Two paintings by Jean-Louis Forain have been identified as looted by the Nazis in France but still contain provenance gaps requiring further research.

Five pieces have been identified as Nazi-looted. Four of these have been returned to the heirs of the original owners, including Max Liebermanns Two Riders on the Beach (1901) and Matisses Seated Woman (1921).

55 pieces have been excluded from research because they were mass producedfor example, pages from a calendar.

As of 14 January 2016, 231 works were identified by the Schwabing Art Trove taskforce as degenerate art seized by the Nazis from German museums and are therefore not liable for restitution. Of these, 118 were acquired by the museums before 1933. They include works on paper by George Grosz, Oskar Kokoschka and Wassily Kandinsky, and are likely to be among the first works sent to Bern.

278 are works by or dedicated to Gurlitt family members, and therefore free of suspicion. They are likely to be in the first batch of works travelling to Bern.

1,039 works are undergoing research by the German Lost Art Foundation in Magdeburg.
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The Art Newspaper

Jul 23 2017
Art critic Michael Fried’s new poems dwell on past love, childhood—and his predilection for high Modernism
The New York-born art critic and historian Michael Fried's new book of poetry, Promesse du Bonheur, which is published by David Zwirner Books and nonsite.org, is something of a memoir. It includes many mentions of old friendsClement Greenberg, Frank Stella, Kenneth Nolandstories from Fried's childhood, memories of past love and reflections on his long-held critical convictions.
 
Those convictions come to him quickly. In a poem titled "Revelation," he describes his first experience of Anthony Caro's work at the artist's studio, where he saw the sculpture Midday (1960). The work overwhelmed Fried in "a moment/of metaphysical clarity, gone as soon as arrived".
 
His poetry also comes to him in flashes. "It's not something I'm really in control of," he says. "I find it very easy and straightforward to write critical or art historical prose. I just sit down and I'm clear in my head about what I want to say. Poetry is much more a question of inspiration and there are times when it starts to come. The one rule I have in my life has been that when that happens, when I think I can do it, I drop everything else. I mean everything. When I was teaching and had to cut a class, I would cut a class. That was my priority."
 
But the poems still have to be refined. "Intensity without formal perfection is just some kind of shouting, or whining," Fried says. The intensity needs to be channeled into something that feels "absolutely right," which Fried also finds in the artists he respects, like Jeff Wall or Thomas Demand. "I've been very consistent over the past 50 years about the qualities I admire in art and they all have to do with some kind of absolute motivated-ness. Everything should be called for," he says, adding that poetry is like building a sculpture, which is done part-by-part.
 
Many of the poems in his new book have an elegiac feel, which a friend, the literary critic Walter Benn Michaels, pointed out to Fried. "What struck him was that there was a sense of a worldmy worldin the book, and part of that world is that, at this point, I'm not 25 anymore," Fried says. "A lot of people who have meant a lot to me aren't around anymore." Among them are the writers Ian Hamilton and Allen Grossman and the composer Seymour Shifrin (both have inspired poems).
 
The melancholic tone also comes through in James Welling's accompanying photographs, which have not been published elsewhere. Fried says the pictures give the book a kind of "density" and preserve it from disappearing. "When you bring out a book of poems, it's very much a non-event, as if you wrote it in the middle of the night and let it off the boat," he says. "It just sinks to the bottom." But with Welling as a collaborator, the book "has an existence in the world".
 
As with his criticism and his historical writing, Fried is concerned most of all with tapping into a long tradition. "It's all closely related to high Modernism, which was supposed to have been totally blown away," he says. "Of course, my allegiance to it never waivered. And those essential values have never really gone away."
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The New York Times

Jul 23 2017
Angela Merkel’s Humanity, Captured in an Elizabeth Peyton Oil
For a profile, Vogue rendered Ms. Merkel, the German chancellor, not in a glossy photo shoot but in muted hues by Ms. Peyton, the American artist.
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The Guardian

Jul 23 2017
Nathan David obituary

My husband Nathan David, who has died of cancer aged 87, was a sculptor who created bronzes of ballet dancers, including Rudolf Nureyev, Anthony Dowell, Antoinette Sibley, Natalia Makarova, Mikhail Baryshnikov and many others.

In 1980, Dame Margot Fonteyn unveiled the over-life-size bronze of herself that he was selected to create for her birthplace in Reigate, Surrey. There are editions of her portrait head at the Royal Opera House and Sadler’s Wells.

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The Guardian

Jul 23 2017
The billion-dollar palaces of Apple, Facebook and Google

From California to London, the tech giants are employing top architects to build spectacular symbols of their immense global power. But they have their critics…

We know by now that the internet is a giant playpen, a landscape of toys, distractions and instant gratification, of chirps and squeaks and bright, shiny things – plus, to be sure, ugly, horrid beasties lurking in all the softness – apparently without horizon. Graphics – rounded corners, lower case, Google’s primary colours, Twitter’s birdie, Facebook’s shades of blue – enhance the innocence and infantilism. It is a world, as Jonathan Franzen once said, “so responsive to our wishes as to be, effectively, a mere extension of the self”. Until we chance on the bars of the playpen and find that there are places we can’t go and that it is in the gift of the grown-ups on the other side to set or move the limits to our freedom.

We’re talking here of virtual space. But those grown-ups, the tech giants, Apple, Facebook, Google and the rest, are also in the business of building physical billion-dollar enclaves for their thousands of employees. Here too they create calibrated lands of fun, wherein staff offer their lives, body and soul, day and night, in return for gyms, Olympic-sized swimming pools, climbing walls, basketball courts, running tracks and hiking trails, indoor football pitches, massage rooms and hanging gardens, performance venues, amiable art and lovable graphics. They have been doing this for a while – what is changing is the sheer scale and extravagance of these places.

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The Guardian

Jul 23 2017
Your pictures: share your photos on the theme of 'dazzling'

Wherever you are in the world, this week we’d like to see your pictures on the theme ‘dazzling’

The next theme for our weekly photography assignment in the Observer New Review is ‘dazzling.’ Share your photos of what dazzling means to you – and tell us about your image in the description box.

The closing date is Thursday 27 July at 10 am. We’ll publish our favourites in The New Review on Sunday 30 July and in a gallery on the Guardian site.

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The Guardian

Jul 23 2017
Is the Stirling becoming a prize ass?

The Stirling prize 2017 shortlist displays a woeful lack of adventure – not least in its omission of Tate Modern’s Switch House

The Stirling prize has done it again. The award for the UK building that “has made the greatest contribution to the evolution of architecture over the past year” has a magnificent record of not recognising the projects that define their time, of favouring everyone’s second choice and nobody’s first choice, with the result that you could write a convincing history of modern British architecture based on the projects that haven’t won: the Eden Project, the British Library, Birmingham Selfridges, David Chipperfield’s Neues Museum in Berlin, the Saw Swee Hock student centre at the London School of Economics.

This time, the most memorable building of the year, the Switch House extension to Tate Modern, hasn’t even made the shortlist. This omission completes a double: when Tate Modern phase one was completed in 2000, its Swiss architects Herzog & de Meuron were ineligible under the then rules. One of the most significant cultural endeavours of the century has therefore been completely missed by the Stirling radar.

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