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The New York Times

Jul 06 2017
Galleries: What to See in New York Art Galleries This Week
Two group shows; Araya Rasdjarmrearnsook’s delicately comic videos; and Erick Meyenberg’s allusion-filled installation are among the offerings.
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artforum.com

Jul 06 2017
FILM: Haunted House
Nick Pinkerton on David Lowery’s A Ghost Story
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The New York Times

Jul 06 2017
Art Review: How the East Was Won: A Photographic Portrait
Images at the National Gallery of Art offer a lesson in how the Eastern wilderness — beautiful and grand — was tamed, exploited and transformed.
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The New York Times

Jul 06 2017
Show Us Your Wall: Carrying On a Legacy of Early-American Collecting
Noah Wunsch has inherited the collectors’ gene from his grandfather Eric Martin Wunsch, who amassed antique American decorative arts.
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The New York Times

Jul 06 2017
Art Review: Henry James, a Pooh-Bah Who Painted With Words
The novelist began as a painter, wrote as an art critic and produced fiction animated by art-world personalities. His life is explored at the Morgan Library & Museum.
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artforum.com

Jul 06 2017
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The Art Newspaper

Jul 06 2017
Whitechapel Gallery to host first major Thomas Ruff retrospective in London
Thomas Ruff's L’Empereur 06 (The Emperor 06) (1982) (© the artist)
The Whitechapel Gallery is to stage the first major London retrospective of photographs by Thomas Ruff this autumn. Organised by the institutions director, Iwona Blazwick, the survey will include examples of all the German artists key seriesfrom his billboard-sized portraits of friends shot in Dsseldorf in the 1980s to his exquisitely coloured photographs derived from Japanese manga.

This is an artist who changed the language of photography, Blazwick says. His entire oeuvre is very complex, but there is one central theme running through it: what is photography?

Early on, Ruffs portraits cemented his reputation on the international art scene, but he rarely turned the camera on himself. The Whitechapel exhibition (27 September-21 January 2018) will include the only works to depict the artist: LEmpereur (1982), a sequence of eight images that show Ruff slumped over two chairs. At the same time, a selection of his colossal portraits from the 1980s will go on show at the National Portrait Gallery.

Astronomical imagery has played a key part in Ruffs 40-year career (after finishing high school he was faced with the decision of becoming either a photographer or an astronomer). In addition to his Sterne (stars) series (1989-92)photographs taken by a telescope at the European Southern Observatorythe retrospective will feature photographs of the surface of Mars captured by Nasa in space.

Other series to go on display include studies of suburban homes, a group of works based on negatives (conceived after Ruff realised his children had never seen a negative) and pixelated images of disaster scenes such as 9/11 taken from the internet.

The exhibition will close with two groups of photographs that resonate with todays debates about the power of images in the media and the capacity to generate fake news. The Zeitungsphotos (newspaper photographs), conceived in the early 1990s, reproduce clippings without headlines or captions, severing them from their original context. Meanwhile the recent Press++ series features archival photographs from US newspapers sourced on eBay. For Blazwick, Ruff is interested in photography as a carrier of world history.

The retrospective is the latest in a long line at the Whitechapel Gallery to premiere artists who use photography, including Cindy Sherman, Jeff Wall, Nan Goldin and Paul Graham. Its a great history, its something that is in our DNA, Blazwick says. 


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The Guardian

Jul 06 2017
Bryan Avery obituary
Architect who designed the London Imax and developed a vision of sustainability

Bryan Avery, who has died aged 73, was an architect whose fascination with advanced technology was matched by a passion for cities and landscapes, and a determination to innovate in everything he touched. His work ranged from graphic design and a patented light fitting through nationally significant cultural buildings such as the home of the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art (Rada) and the London Imax cinema to a visionary project for a sustainable future that he called Wilderness City. His sketchbooks were filled with details of architecture, plants and all kinds of machines.

Bryan came to national attention in 1988 with the British Film Institute’s Museum of the Moving Image, located beneath the approach to Waterloo Bridge. With its clip-on cladding and kit-of-parts structure it was unmistakably hi-tech but also evoked the glamour of film. It closed in 1999, but not before catching the eye of Richard Attenborough, the chairman of Rada’s governors, which led to Bryan being commissioned for the comprehensive redevelopment of the academy’s Bloomsbury base. The resulting intimate performance space is among the most flexible in London. At the heart of the development is a narrow cleft at whose base, on the summer solstice, the sun caresses a bust of George Bernard Shaw.

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The Art Newspaper

Jul 06 2017
Three to See: Les Rencontres d'Arles photography festival
Joel Meyerowitz's Broadway and 46th Street, New York City (1976) (Courtesy of the artist and Howard Greenberg Gallery)
Joel Meyerowitz: Early Works (until 27 August)
Salle Henri-Comte

A woman peers out from a cinema box office booth, her face completely obscured by the voice grill. The black-and-white imageTimes Square, New York (1963)is one of Joel Meyerowitzs earliest pictures, capturing street life in the metropolis of Manhattan. Meyerowitz, who ventured into the city with two Leica cameras, has said: The best way is to look at the old guys like Brassa and Atget. The street teaches you to act quickly when you see something. If you dont, you miss it!

66 Iranian Photographers: Iran, Year 38 (until 27 August)
Eglise Sainte-Anne

The figure of 38 cited in the title relates to the number of years since the 1979 Islamic Revolution that has profoundly transformed Iran. The exhibition features 66 photographers, including Shadi Ghadirian (Qajar, 1998) and Sina Shiri (Silent Side, 2015). Shiris Instagram account, @sinashirii, includes more of her documentary images detailing life in Iran. It is not a coincidence that Iran has so many photographers. When todays Iranians want to express themselves, they use the tools given to them by history. The modern version of poetry is photography, of course, say the co-curators Anahita Ghabaian and Newsha Tavakolian. 

Jean Dubuffet: the Photographic Tool (until 24 September)
Atelier des Forges

The post-war titan Jean Dubuffet also turned to photography, using the medium to document the development of his artistic practice. Dubuffets holdings of several thousand imagescomprising negatives, prints, and albumsreflect Dubuffets goal of creating an exhaustive documentary archive of his oeuvre, both to serve his work in progress, and to control the spread of his work, say the curators, Sam Stourdz and Anne Lacoste, in a statement. A selection of images depicts Dubuffets Coucou Bazar animated painting, which was shown at the Guggenheim Museum in New York in 1973.
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The Guardian

Jul 06 2017
Dennis Hopper documents the 1960s – in pictures

Dennis Hopper: The Lost Album is an exhibition featuring his photographs taken in the 1960s, stored and forgotten until their discovery after his death in 2010. Covering the cultural landscape at the time, he shot Hells Angels, celebrities, artists and political events. The show runs at Kohn Gallery Los Angeles until 1 September 2017

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The Guardian

Jul 06 2017
‘Now I am what I used to criticise’: Mona's David Walsh plans major expansion

Walsh announces details of a hotel called Homo and moving summer festival Mofo from Hobart to Launceston

David Walsh, the multimillionaire gambler and founder of Hobart’s Museum of Old and New Art (Mona), has revealed full plans for the “next phase” of Mona: gallery expansions, a new on-site hotel and a move of the museum’s summer festival, Mona Foma, to Launceston.

Walsh is known for revitalising culture and tourism in Hobart with his gallery and its associated festivals. Bankrolled by his gambling fortune, they are now the beneficiaries of government support.

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The Guardian

Jul 05 2017
Freudian slips: the secrets hidden inside Emma Hart's ceramic art

Venus flytraps, socks with mouths and giant heads … as the artist’s new show Mamma Mia! opens, she tells us about putting therapy into clay

At Emma Hart’s studio, two assistants are helping the artist with last-minute touches to graphic patterns inside a group of outsized ceramic heads. The heads appear to be consuming them as they lean deep inside, torches strapped to their foreheads, delicate paintbrushes in hand. In a little over a week, the finished works will be moved to London’s Whitechapel Gallery where they’ll be strung from the ceiling like lamps: the centrepiece of Mamma Mia!, Hart’s show as laureate of the biennial Max Mara art prize for women.

Formed, fired and glazed in Italy, during Hart’s six-month residency for the prize, the heads show the influence of time spent both in professional ceramics studios, and as an observer in a centre for family therapy. “Both are driven by patterns,” Hart explains. “The psychiatrist is trying to unravel human behavioural patterns, and the studio to generate a visual pattern.”

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The Guardian

Jul 05 2017
Welcome to anywhere: Lewis Baltz's blandsville – in pictures

From garden cities built on contaminated ground to bland housing projects and towns devoid of landmarks, Lewis Blatz chronicled the dehumanised urban landscape of America, brick by brick

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The Art Newspaper

Jul 05 2017
Hepworth Wakefield wins Art Fund UK Museum of the Year prize
Simon Wallis, the director of the Hepworth Wakefield. Photo: Gabriel Szabo/Guzelian
The Hepworth Wakefield was named the 2017 UK Museum of the Year, winning last night (5 July) the Art Fund's prestigious, 100,000 first prize. The David Chipperfield-designed gallery in the Yorkshire town where the sculptor Barbara Hepworth grew up was competing in a strong field, which included London's recently expanded Tate Modern.

Speaking at the award ceremony held in the Great Court of the British Museum, the chair of the Hepworth Wakefield, David Liddiment, attributed its success to the fact that over the past six years since it opened the gallery has stayed true to "The Plan". The television executive said it has avoided being parochial while being proud of Wakefield and Yorkshire's artistic heritage. "We have a world-class building and bring world-class artists to Wakefield," he said, adding that it had "reclaimed" Barbara Hepworth from St Ives in Cornwall where she lived and worked as well as London.

The leading sculptor Richard Deacon, who was one of the judges of this year's award, took a longer view of the gallery's achievement. Deacon praised the visionary curator of Leeds' Henry Moore Institute, the late Robert Hopper. "He had a very grand vision for Leeds, Barnsley, Halifax and Wakefield as a sculptural centre, that was not solely tied to the local heroes, Hepworth and Moore," Deacon told The Art Newspaper.

In the 1990s Hopper began to bring artists including James Turrell, Christian Boltanski and Michaelangelo Pistoletto among others to Dean Clough, former carpet mills in nearby Halifax. Hopper, who died aged 53 in 2000, also worked closely with Peter Murray, the founding director of the Yorkshire Sculpture Park, which is near Wakefield and won the Museum of the Year award in 2014, to make the region a centre for international art.

The Hepworth gallery's recent  achievements have included the launch of the Hepworth Sculpture Prize and exhibition. The inaugural prize was won in 2016 by Helen Marten, with David Medalla, Phyllida Barlow and Steven Claydon the runners up. Meanwhile, Magnum photographer Martin Parr celebrated the "rhubarb triangle" around Wakefield, documenting its growers for the gallery.

The win was especially satisfying for Simon Wallis, the director of the gallery, his team and Sophie Bowness, the art historian and artist's granddaughter, because the Hepworth gallery has been shortlisted twice before, in 2012 and 2015.

"It has been wonderful to see Simon Wallis and his team really bring the building into the community against all of the odds," David Chipperfield told us, recalling that the 35m project was initially turned down by the National Lottery for funding. The architect revealed that he "continually resisted" the idea that the museum was primarily about regenerating Wakefield, the traditional selling point to local politicians and other funders. "Don't aim for regeneration, if you build the best possible museum you can, and you put the right people in place, regeneration will come," he said.

This year the shortlisted museums besides Tate Modern were the Lapworth, a small university geology museum in Birmingham, Sir John Soane's Museum in London and Newmarket's national museum of horseracing and sporting art. Each receives a 10,000 consolation prize.
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artforum.com

Jul 05 2017
SLANT: Phantom of the Oprah
Jennifer Krasinski on Okwui Okpokwasili’s Poor People’s TV Room
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The Guardian

Jul 05 2017
Hepworth Wakefield art gallery wins museum of the year award

Gallery is praised for creating new prize for sculpture and staging string of ‘breathtaking’ exhibitions

The Hepworth Wakefield art gallery in West Yorkshire has been named winner of the world’s biggest museum prize after a year of “breathtaking” exhibitions, booming visitor numbers and the creation of an important award for contemporary sculpture.

The gallery, housed in a David Chipperfield-designed concrete building on the banks of the river Calder, opened in 2011 and has punched above its weight ever since.

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artforum.com

Jul 05 2017
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The New York Times

Jul 05 2017
Phone Booths Are Back in Times Square. No Quarters Required.
“Once Upon a Place,” an installation in which immigrants’ oral histories can be listened to by phone, touches on themes like belonging and displacement.
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The Guardian

Jul 05 2017
Royal Academy show to look back at 250 years of Summer Exhibitions

The Great Spectacle, to be held in London in 2018, will illustrate controversies and disputes of art world since 1768

The Royal Academy of Arts Summer Exhibition, as traditional a British summer fixture as Wimbledon, the Derby and underwhelming weather, will next year be bigger than ever before and accompanied by an exhibition charting its history.

The RA said it is planning an exhibition called The Great Spectacle which will run alongside what is the largest open submission art exhibition in the world.

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The Guardian

Jul 05 2017
David Spero's best photograph: Samson the shire horse and his band of eco-haymakers

‘I felt like I’d arrived in a parallel reality when I got to Tinkers Bubble. I couldn’t believe anyone in Britain lived like this’

Tinkers Bubble will stay lodged in my memory for ever. When I recall it, I can smell the grass. It’s unique among low-impact, ecological communities around the UK in being almost entirely free of fossil fuel. They occasionally use paraffin lamps in winter, but all the work they do, they do manually. Haymaking takes place over a couple of days in June or July. I was spending a week there, volunteering and taking photographs, so I joined in.

We got up early each day, at about 4.30am, and worked until about 12, when we’d stop for lunch under a tree: bread, cheese, some cider. It is a beautiful bit of countryside, about a 20-minute walk from the nearest village, Stoke-sub-Hamdon in Somerset. And it was amazing to work in that ancient way, scything, using a pitchfork to turn the hay. You pick up a bundle and turn it in the air and watch it fall down. What made it really special was that we were doing it for Samson, the shire horse in the picture – it was all for his winter feed.

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The New York Times

Jul 05 2017
M. F. Husain’s Modern India at the Art Institute of Chicago
The Indian painter’s final works, eight triptychs depicting his country’s culture, are on view in the United States for the first time, in Chicago.
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The Guardian

Jul 05 2017
Greek gift: Athens’ new cultural centre

This stunning park, garden and culture hub, funded by the Stavros Niarchos Foundation and designed by Renzo Piano, will, controversially, be handed over to the state at the end of 2017

With apartment blocks wedged between busy roads, the Athenian suburb of Kallithea doesn’t really live up to its name, which means “beautiful view”. But thanks to a €596m gift from the Stavros Niarchos Foundation, and a visionary design by architect Renzo Piano, the neighbourhood has recently benefitted from an enthralling cultural landmark: the Stavros Niarchos Cultural Center. The views from it are definitely of the spectacular variety.

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The Guardian

Jul 04 2017
Sun, spliffs and ski masks: Jamaican party people – in pictures

‘The minute you arrive,’ says Ivar Wigan, ‘reggae blares out of every taxi.’ The British photographer relives the years he spent amid the hustlers, dancers and sound systems of Jamaica’s dancehall scene

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The Guardian

Jul 04 2017
What if women ruled the world?

An end to abuse, a law against mansplaining, and reparations for two millennia of injustice … as a new sci-fi art show imagines a female-led future, we ask comedians, writers, politicians and CEOs for their vision

Bridget Christie, comedian

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The New York Times

Jul 04 2017
Putting Doubts to Rest About Leonard Lauder’s Gift to the Met
Mr. Lauder says “there is no issue” with his Cubist trove, but the museum lacks lead donors as it tries to create a suitable home for the collection.
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The Art Newspaper

Jul 04 2017
Royal Academy of Arts to stage its greatest spectacle
William Powell Frith, A Private View at the Royal Academy, 1881 (1883) (Image: Royal Academy of Arts)
It was the setting for the fiercest rivalries in British art, the place where the countrys finest artists would reveal their creations in direct competition with one another. The Royal Academy of Arts (RA) annual Summer Exhibition, once the grandest social occasion of its day, is where Reynolds and Gainsborough, Turner and Constable, and many, many more, would battle for the publics attention and for highly coveted exhibition prizes. In 1832, when a seascape by Turner was hung alongside a canvas by Constable that brilliantly captured the effects of sunlight, Turner improvised: he added a bright red buoy to his own painting, its dazzling colour outshining anything in his rivals work.

The Summer Exhibitions represent the worlds longest-running series, with an unbroken record since 1768, and in 2018, the RA will mark its 250th anniversary by recounting many of these famous controversies in a historical show tracing the story of its development. Although not yet announced, the show will be called The Great Spectacle, reflecting how it was regarded by 18th-century London society.

Alongside The Great Spectacle, the 250th Summer Exhibition will be the largest ever, spilling over from the academys Main Galleries into the Sackler Wing. Visitors will then use a walkway that is currently under construction to reach the Burlington Gardens building, where the show will finish in three rooms on the upper floor.

The artist Grayson Perry, elected an Academician in 2011, will co-ordinate the hanging committee for the Summer Exhibition 2018. Speaking to The Art Newspaper, Perry said he is looking forward to the project with excitement. Charles Saumarez Smith, the academys chief executive, promises that the 250th exhibition will be even bigger and more celebratory than usual.

Saumarez Smith admits that historical exhibitions about institutions can become a bit narcissistic, so the academy invited two external curators to organise The Great Spectacle: Mark Hallett, the director of studies at Londons Paul Mellon Centre and an 18th-century specialist, and Sarah Turner, the centres deputy director for research and a 19th- and 20th-century specialist.

Not just a parade of masterpieces


Hallett describes The Great Spectacle as a journey through the history of the Summer Exhibitionand the history of British art. The narrative will be told through 115 works (90 paintings, plus 25 sculptures and works on paper). Nearly all the works, from a wide variety of museums and private collections, were once exhibited at the academy. (A few rejections will also be displayed.) Hallett says that it will not just be a parade of masterpieces, but every work will have its own story.

The Great Spectacle will begin, appropriately, in the suite of Fine Rooms at the front of Burlington House, dating from the 18th and 19th centuries. The show will open with a focus on Georgian portraits, with important works by Reynolds and Gainsborough. The circuit will then continue to the Weston Galleries, with 19th-century paintings, and the first two of the Main Galleries, for the 20th century. The final room will cover the period from the 1997 Sensation exhibition with works by the Young British Artists up to the present. This will include pieces by R.B. Kitaj, David Hockney, Michael Craig-Martin and Yinka Shonibare. Altogether there will be ten rooms, each covering a roughly 25-year period.

This approach will explore key moments and events in the Summer Exhibitions 250 years, focusing on the high points (and occasional low points). Although precise figures have not yet been calculated, this series of shows may have presented around 250,000 works of art and may have been seen by well over 25 million people since 1769.

Democratic experience of fine art


It is an astonishing achievement that the Summer Exhibition has survived for 250 years. Hallett says this is because the show is attached to an institution, the RA. The works on show have always been a combination of those by well-known Academicians and not-so-well-known outsiders. Visitors love that sense of variety, he explains. As Saumarez Smith puts it: In the 1760s, the Summer Exhibition broadened the democratic experience of fine artand in my view, it still does so.

The 2016 exhibition attracted 229,000 visitors, an excellent number for a two-month show. Next year, with the anniversary, it should do even betterbut it will struggle to break the record of 391,000 in 1879.

Meanwhile, this years show runs until 20 August. Of the 12,000 outside submissions, only a small proportion made it onto the walls. There are 1,200 works (including 514 by Academicians, Honorary Academicians and invited artists) now on display, ranging from the highly traditional to the cutting-edge.

  The Great Spectacle: the Royal Academy and its Summer Exhibitions 1769-2018 and the Summer Exhibition 2018, Royal Academy of Arts, London, 12 June-19 August 2018
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The Art Newspaper

Jul 04 2017
David Shrigley takes the nation’s temperature
David Shrigley made How’s my Brain? for a parliamentary report. Photo: © the artist for APPG on Arts; Health and Wellbeing's Inquiry into arts and health
The mischief-making artist David Shrigley has made a series of quirky works for a new report that gauges the health of the UK. Health and social care professionals, artists and academics have contributed to the inquiry, which looks at the links between the arts, health and wellbeing. The all-party parliamentary group behind the report is due to present its findings in the House of Commons on 19 July. The report presents the most substantial argument yet for the integration of arts and creativity into our health and social care services for wide-ranging benefits, says a spokeswoman for the London Arts in Health Forum, a lobby group. Shrigleys image gets to the heart (or brain) of the matter, of course.
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The Art Newspaper

Jul 04 2017
Object lessons: a Venetian scene by Guardi, an ancient Egyptian relic and an artefact from an important collection of ethnographic art
Venice: the Rialto Bridge with the Palazzo dei Camerlenghi by Francesco Guardi (around 1765) by Francesco Guardi. Photo courtesy of Christie's Images Ltd.
London
Christies, King Street

6 July: Old Masters Evening Sale


Venice: the Rialto Bridge with the Palazzo dei Camerlenghi by Francesco Guardi (around 1765)

Est. around 25m
A dramatic painting by Francesco Guardi of the Rialto Bridge and the bustling Grand Canal is being sold for the second time since it was painted in the mid-1760s, having been handed down through generations of the Guinness family. The work, which shows one of a pair of views that Guardi painted of the famous Venetian scene (one looking north and one looking south), is one of the greatest 18th-century view paintings of Venice and one of the greatest pictures Guardi ever painted, says Henry Pettifer, the head of Old Master paintings at Christies. Both views were first acquired, most likely from the artist, in 1768 by a young English grand tourist called Chaloner Arcedeckne and stayed in his family until 1891, when they were sold privately for 3,850 to Edward Cecil Guinness, the chief executive and then chairman of the brewing company. The paintings were eventually separated in 2011 when the pendant, Rialto Bridge from the Fondamenta del Carbon, was sold to an anonymous bidder at Sothebys for 26.7ma record for a Venetian view painting. The work returned to Venice for the first time for an exhibition at the Aman Hotel earlier this year and then travelled to Hong Kong before it is being auctioned in London this week.A.S.  

Update: the lot achieved around 27m.


London
Bonhams

6 July: Antiquities


An Egyptian granite head of a priest (around 610-525 BC)

Est. 60,000-80,000
When intact, this fragmentary statue of an ancient Egyptian priest, carved from pink-speckled granite with a solid face had a fascinating two-tone effect, with the body likely being the pinkish colour shown on the back of the head, making an arresting contrast to the face that is wholly carved from the black element, says Francesca Hickin, a senior specialist of antiquities at Bonhams. The work exemplifies a category of ancient Egyptian sculpture reserved for priests known as the "egg-head" type, which emerged in the Late Period (around 664-332 BC) and is characterised by a shaved, slightly elongated head that poses a strong contrast to elite Egyptians who wore wigs, setting the priesthood visually apart in real life and funerary sculpture, Hickin says. The relicwhich would have been depicted standing, sitting or kneelingwas placed in the subjects tomb to receive offerings and ensure his continued well-being in the afterlife. Few similar examples exist in private hands. According to Hickin, the best parallel for such a work, can be found in the collection of the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, Richmond.G.Ai  

Update: the work sold for 137,000. 

Chicago
Wright
13 July: A Life in Ruins: Douglas Dawson, 35 Years of Art and Antiques
Guan Yin Goddess of Mercy (around 1368-1644)
Est. $30,000-$40,000
The dedicated sale includes over 200 objects from the collection of the Chicago-based dealer Douglas Dawson, who has dealt works of art from Africa, Asia and the Americas for over three decades. In the catalogue of the sale, Dawson notes that while contemporary art fairs and auctions have become the commercial and social focus of art activity, non-Western art [...] provides the collector with an opportunity to deeply explore how the human mind is compelled to make experience tangible through art. One highlight of the sale is a Ming period (1368-1644) statue depicting Guan Yin, the female (portrayed as male in other cultures) Buddhist Bodhisattva known as the "goddess of mercy". The work, which is being is being sold with a 19th-century Chinese black lacquered table, is made from blocks of wood that were gessoed and polychromed (of which some traces remain) and contains a square hole on the back where offerings would be placed. Other notable lots being offered include a vessel used to brew beer, called a chomo, created by Shipibo people of the Amazon forest of eastern Peru (est. $3,000-$5,000) and an ornate 20th-century bed for a king of the Oku Province in Cameroon that is carved from a single tree trunk with motifs intended to express prestige and power (est. $10,000-$15,000).G.Ai

Update: the work did not sell. 
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The Art Newspaper

Jul 04 2017
Gary Hume creates new works for Sprüth Magers London reopening
Gary Hume is to show new works on paper at Sprüth Magers
The German art dealers Monika Sprth and Philomene Magers are to reopen in their newly expanded home on Grafton Street in Londons Mayfair at the end of September, just in time for Frieze art fair. 

The pair are relaunching with an exhibition over three floors of new works by Gary Hume, opening 29 September (until 23 December). It is the former YBAs first solo show in the UK since his retrospective at Tate Britain in 2013, which ran in tandem with a survey of works by the painter Patrick Caulfield. 

Known for his shiny gloss paintings on aluminium panels, Humes new works mark a departure from his previous practice, which involved scraping back the painted surface and reworking the image. Created on paper, the works recall scenes and photographs from Humes childhood.

Sprth Magers, which had its last show in the ground floor gallery in April 2016, had been due to move to a townhouse at 29 Sackville Street, just metres from Savile Row, but the dealers were given the opportunity to take the lease for the entire 18th-century building on Grafton Street. 

This is the perfect scenario for us, Magers previously told The Art Newspaper. We can now remain where we have been for the past decade in London and the extra space will provide our artists with different opportunities to exhibit their work.

At the end of 2015, Hume parted ways with the London gallery White Cube, maintaining representation in New York with Matthew Marks and in London, Berlin and Los Angeles with Sprth Magers. 
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The Art Newspaper

Jul 04 2017
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The Art Newspaper

Jul 04 2017
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The Art Newspaper

Jul 04 2017
London poised to regain Old Master crown from New York
Turner’s Ehrenbreitstein, or the Bright Stone of Honour and the Tomb of Marceau, from Byron’s Childe Harold (1835) (Courtesy of Sotheby’s)
The fracturing of the New York Old Master auction market with Christies moving away from the traditional major sales in January has given London a chance to become once again the worlds Old Master capital. This year, both Sothebys and Christies have produced formidable catalogues for their July sales.

The Sothebys sale (5 July) is the stronger of the two, and in terms of the pre-sale estimate of 48.4m to 73.5m, it is the most valuable it has ever offered in London. Much of this is due to J.M.W. Turners view of Ehrenbreitstein in Germany, one of only a handful of large-scale oil landscapes by Turner left in private hands and estimated at 15m to 25m. It should match the performance of the last two major Turners sold by Sothebys: Rome from Mount Aventine (1835) at 30.3m and Modern RomeCampo Vaccino (1839) at 29.7m. These both exceeded their estimates of 15m to 20m and 12m to 18m respectively.

Turner used to say, when one of his pictures was sold, I have lost one of my children, and the pattern with these major Turners is that they leave the UK. We should probably expect Ehrenbreitstein to go outside the UK, too, not least because the post-Brexit referendum pound has made the country cheaper for overseas buyers. If you are looking for a Turner, but do not have at least 15m to spend, then Sothebys drawings sale (also 5 July) has two of his views of Lake Como on offer (est 12,000-18,000 each).

Elsewhere in the Sothebys evening sale is a fine Ecce Homo (around 1660-70) by Murillo, which is estimated at 2m to 3m. Formerly in the Cook collection, it was last at auction in 2005 at Christies, where it made 2.47m (with premium), setting a new record for Murillo. Will the owner get their money back?

No less interesting, but significantly cheaper, is a full-length portrait from 1677 by Murillo at Christies day sale (7 July) estimated at 80,000 to 120,000. It is a rare thing: one of only a dozen full-length portraits by an artist better known for his religious pictures. This is another Murillo auction reappearance, last seen in New York in 2011, where it made $182,500 (with premium). Similarly, a portrait by Allan Ramsay of Anne, Lady North (around 1740-97, est 150,000-250,000), in Christies evening sale (6 July) was last seen soaring above its low estimate of 15,000 to 20,000 to make 421,250 (with premium) in 2008all of which tells us that art is often impossible to value.

The highlight of the week at Christies is a picture that has never been to auction before: a large Venetian scene (around 1765) by Francesco Guardi. This is described as estimate on request, but is expected to make in the region of 25m. The painting ticks every box for Venetian Vedute collectors: it shows the Rialto Bridge, with the busy Grand Canal leading up to it, and is described by Christies as impeccably preserved. The paintings pendant, showing the Rialto from the other side, was sold by Sothebys in 2011 for 26.7m.
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The Art Newspaper

Jul 04 2017
Lavish show celebrates 70th anniversary of the fashion house that Christian Dior built
The luxury brand Dior is celebrating its 70th anniversary with the largest ever exhibition of its haute couture clothes in the Muse des Arts Dcoratifs in Paris.

It includes more than 400 dresses made between 1947 and 2017 that were designed by the founder of the house, Christian Dior (1905-57), and his successors: Yves Saint Laurent (1936-2008), Marc Bohan (born 1926), Gianfranco Ferr (1944-2007), John Galliano (born 1960), Raf Simons (born 1968) and, most recently, Maria Grazia Chiuri (born 1964). Most of the works are from the Dior Hritage collection and have never been shown in Paris before, but the collection toured Beijing, Shanghai, Tokyo and Seoul between 2013 and 2015 under the title Esprit Dior. The current shows co-curators are Florence Mller of the Denver Art Museum and Olivier Gabet, the director of the Muse des Arts Dcoratifs.

There is also a section on Dior as a collector of 18th-century antiques, Art Nouveau and works by his contemporaries, including Alberto Giacometti, Salvador Dal, Alexander Calder, Leonor Fini, Max Jacob, Jean Cocteau and Christian Brard. An idea of the value of the brand that Dior founded is given by the purchase in April by LVMH Mot Hennessy Louis Vuitton of Christian Dior Couture for 6.5bn.


DRESSED BY DIOR

The London-based art collector and benefactor Jill Ritblat describes her Dior experience

Lady Ritblat, why did you choose Dior for your wedding dress?

I became engaged to a Frenchman in March 1966 and as soon as it was announced, my mother and future mother-in-law, who dressed at all the couturiers, transported me to Paris to choose a dress. We went around the various couture houses and I found the clothes rather dull and dowdy. Then we came to Dior.

I had no idea what to expect as Dior himself had died, Saint Laurent was no longer there, and Marc Bohan was the chief designer. The salon was in the Avenue Montaigne, where it still is, although there was, of course, only couture at that time. The rooms were light-filled, pale grey and white, very quiet and serene. The vendeuse was somewhat forbidding in an austere French way.

I was shown the wedding dress of the spring-summer collection, a very simple but structured, translucent organza, A-line dress that stood away from a slim silk sheath. It had short sleeves, which, like the hem, were trimmed with hand-made organza roses. The short veil was attached to a juliet cap completely made up of the same but smaller roses. The shoes had a chisel toe and a delicate block heel, also in white organza, hand-made to order.

It was finished with a pair of short, white, kid gloves, but I did not have these made to measure as then everyone in London who got dressed up wore gloves, and I already had a pair. They were to be the something old, but Dior shortened them at the wrist and put a button on. The whole thing was modern, young, exquisite and different.

Bohan also designed my bridesmaids and pageboys outfits. The bridesmaids had smaller, belted versions of my dress, and the pageboys had red velvet knickerbockers, white socks, white silk shirts with floppy black silk bows at the neck, and black, silver-buckled, patent leather shoes.

My mother also organised me into a grey and white pinstriped tweed suit. The skirt was made in three tiers, with the pinstripes going in alternate directions. It hung from a silk bodice over which was a short, white, linen top with a col officier and large, amusing, white buttons and a short collarless jacket with the same fun button in grey.

It was deceptively simple, but most elaborately constructed, although feather light, fastened with a complicated series of hooks and poppers. It had been shown with a jaunty, red, straw boater, which was also ordered.

For my going away, I had a pink silk faille dress and coat with a matching juliet cap and pink silk shoes. I got changed into this outfit at the end of the reception, and when I came out of the lift into the hotel lobby everyone applauded.

Apart from being exquisite and original, all the outfits were fun. You did not choose the fabric but accepted the models as a work of art. They were perfection.

What was the fitting process like?

A chief fitter looked after the essayage. Each piece had its own expert, so a milliner came to fit the headdress, and their shoemaker the shoes. I had had marvellous ball gowns made in London for the many galas and dances that took place in the 1960s, but the first fitting at a Parisian couture house is like the final fitting anywhere else.

Dior insisted that the dress be delivered in person by the fitter, and so she brought it over to London and dressed me for the ceremony, tut-tutting as the hairdresser had made my chignon slightly too big for the juliet cap. But she redressed it and all was well. I remember that we put her up, not in the grand hotel where the reception was held, but in a small hotel near our house. Dior was visibly miffed.

All the outfits are now in the Victoria and Albert Museum except the wedding dress, as I insisted on cutting off the train so that I could wear it at parties. Great mistake.

Christian Dior, Couturier du Rve, Muse des Arts Dcoratifs, Paris, 5 July-7 January 2018
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The Art Newspaper

Jul 04 2017
Parry and thrust and pregnant pauses at unveiling of Frieze Sculpture
Takuro Kuwata's Untitled and Untitled (both 2016) is one of the 25 works unveiled in Regent's Park for Frieze Sculpture (Photo: Stephen White. Courtesy of Stephen White/Frieze)
Never mind the angst of installing an outdoor exhibition of often immense works to remain in Regents Park throughout the summer. Or the risk of a downpour on the entirely al-fresco opening. The primary concern of the Frieze artistic director Jo Stella-Sawicka was that, despite their near-identical due dates, the appearance of her impending offspring would not coincide with last nights (4 July) unveiling of the newly extended Frieze Sculpture. The exhibition now runs from 5 July until the closing of the art fair on 8 October. As it was, the eager throng of inviteesincluding many of the participating artists and their galleristsgathered under dry skies and S-S Junior remained obediently in utero. 

The only slight frisson of the evening came courtesy of the recently appointed Tate supremo Maria Balshaw who, in her ribbon-cutting speech, remarked that 20 years ago contemporary art was: a little bit like fencing in the Olympics, it needed quite a lot of explaining and you would only see it in the late-night schedules. And now its like athletics, its the thing that we want at the heart of our public parks.  

However, at the celebratory dinner later in the evening Frederic Dufour, the president of Ruinart champagneand major sponsor of Friezejocularly took issue with La Balshaws analogy, gently pointing out that in France fencing is a widely enjoyed popular sport. En garde! Or, as we used to say in happier pre-Brexit times, vive la difference! 
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