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The New York Times

Nov 22 2018
28 Art Exhibitions to View in N.Y.C. This Weekend
Our guide to new art shows and some that will be closing soon.
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The New York Times

Nov 22 2018
Critics’ Picks: 10 Under-the-Radar Art Shows to See Now
Critics’ Picks: 10 Under-the-Radar Art Shows to See Now
Our critics select museum and gallery exhibitions that provide a respite from carols and crowds.
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The New York Times

Nov 22 2018
Leaning Tower of Pisa Now Tilts a Little Less. 1.5 Inches Less.
Leaning Tower of Pisa Now Tilts a Little Less. 1.5 Inches Less.
Nearly two decades after engineers completed consolidation work to keep the tower from toppling over, officials said its famed tilt had been reduced by 1.5 inches.
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The New York Times

Nov 22 2018
Indelible Impressions From 3 Shows in Washington
There is plenty of art to see now in the nation’s capital, but three exhibitions stand out: Bill Traylor’s iconic drawings, Dawoud Bey’s haunting portraits and the savoir faire of Senegalese women.
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The Guardian

Nov 22 2018
Leaning Tower of Pisa is leaning less than before, say experts

It is half a degree straighter after restorative work and its stability is better than feared

Stabilisation work means the Leaning Tower of Pisa is leaning slightly less than it used to, experts have said.

The tower, which has leaned to one side ever since it began to take shape in 1173, has lost 4cm of its tilt over the past two decades, according to a report from the surveillance group that meets every three months to give updates on the monument’s condition.

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The Guardian

Nov 21 2018
Own a limited edition print from photographer Jane Bown

Jane Bown joined the Observer in 1949 and over the next six decades created a remarkably singular body of work that straddled all areas of photojournalism. It is, however, for her insightful, intimate and deeply respectful portraits that she is best remembered. Her working method was legendary – speed and simplicity. She used Olympus OM1s from the early 1970s, liked to expose no more than two films, never used a light meter, never had an assistant, used natural light only, and worked, almost exclusively, in black and white. Famously reluctant to talk about her working method, Jane once admitted that for the brief moment when she looked at somebody through a lens, what she felt could best be described in terms of an intense love

Order your limited edition Jane Bown print here

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The Guardian

Nov 21 2018
Dorothy Bohm's best photograph: two poor children in 50s Paris

‘They told me they were shopping for their mum. The little girl is carrying a box of Omo washing powder, the boy a bottle of wine’

In the mid-1950s, my husband and I were living in Paris and my brother came to visit. I showed him around the city, took him to all my favourite places. We were up in Montmartre when I saw these kids, who were about nine and five. My French was good enough to chat with them. They told me they were going shopping for their mum. The little girl is carrying a box of Omo washing powder, the boy a bottle of wine, I think. I took a few shots but this was the most interesting one. You can see they were perfectly at ease, looking up at my brother, who was talking to them.

I love their expressions, but what makes this image so poignant is that it is also a piece of history: the fact that the streets weren’t properly paved; the sign on the wall; the way the children are dressed. I look at it and wonder about the life they led, the boy looking after his little sister. Life did not seem to be luxurious.

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The New York Times

Nov 21 2018
Critic’s Notebook: From the Beach to the Boudoir
Exhibitions of the work of Berthe Morisot and her teacher, Camille Corot, explore the changing images of women in late-19th-century France.
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The Guardian

Nov 21 2018
How life drawing helped me rediscover my capacity for empathy | Nathan Dunne

What does sketching thigh hair and folds of skin have to do with understanding other people? Quite a lot, it turns out

Daily life is increasingly a relationship with the screen, a digital reality of reproduction, manipulation and surveillance. As Win Butler of Arcade Fire sang on Reflektor in 2013, “We’re so connected, but are we even friends?” Increasingly, I feel that the most persistent symptom of the internet age is a lack of empathy. In 2006 the then-senator Barack Obama referred to the US’s “empathy deficit”, while commentators have used the notion of an “empathy gap” as a talking point, often with regard to climate change or racial tensions.

Related: Damien Hirst's gigantic uteruses are a bold correction to shocking ignorance | Hannah Clugston

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The Guardian

Nov 21 2018
We have liftoff: Edinburgh Observatory embarks on a new mission

The City Observatory on Calton Hill was a decrepit ruin until arts group Collective decided to make it their spectacular new gallery, giving new life to a monument to the Scottish Enlightenment

Edinburgh’s old and elegant skyline has a thrilling new attraction, a hilltop haven for art lovers and astronomers, dog walkers and coffee drinkers. The City Observatory on Calton Hill spent most of the past century descending into dereliction. In recent years, it has been hidden behind hoardings, letting the pillars, towers and spires elsewhere in the city take all the glory. But now this pretty little neoclassical building can be seen again, its dome glossy, its portico proud, its telescopes lovingly reconditioned.

The restoration of this scientific monument – designed in 1818 by William Henry Playfair – has been led, somewhat improbably, by Collective gallery, a small, not-for-profit visual arts organisation. The last eight years have transformed its director Kate Gray into a seasoned negotiator. Besides raising the £4.5m required, Gray and her team have managed to balance the conflicting demands of an enormous number of bodies: the city council, world heritage groups, architects, construction firms, astronomers, restaurateurs, tourists, revellers and even local dog walkers, not to mention all the artists the gallery supports. “The expectation was that people would see the site and expect the National Galleries,” says Gray. “And that’s really not who we are.”

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The Guardian

Nov 21 2018
Rembrandt painting featuring artist's 'fingerprints' to go on sale in London

Nearly 400-year-old oil sketch of Christ in prayer expected to fetch £6m at Sotheby’s auction

Two fingerprints almost certainly belonging to Rembrandt have been discovered on a small painting portraying Jesus, which is to be auctioned in London next month.

The artwork, called Study of the Head and Clasped Hands of a Young Man as Christ in Prayer, a rapidly painted oil sketch on an oak panel, is coming to the market for the first time in 60 years and is estimated to fetch about £6m.

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The New York Times

Nov 21 2018
Museums in France Should Return African Treasures, Report Says
Museums in France Should Return African Treasures, Report Says
Two academics, in a study commissioned by President Emmanuel Macron, recommended a process for repatriating artifacts if countries asked for them.
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The Guardian

Nov 21 2018
Female wrestling's teen star Gia Scott – in pictures

Kierra Scott – better known by her stage name Gia – is a rising star in the US pro wrestling scene. This month, the 19-year-old became the youngest ever female champion of the MCW wrestling league in Maryland.

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The Guardian

Nov 21 2018
Souls Grown Deep: the foundation helping to preserve black artists

The Atlanta-based group boasts work by roughly 160 artists of colour and a string of deals with major US museums hints at a vital shift in the art world

Through the 1960s and 1970s, Purvis Young, a self-taught artist from Miami, roamed the inner city streets of Overtown, scouring for cardboard, wooden crates and secondhand doors to use as canvas for his expressive paintings.

He learned the chops of art history – from Rembrandt to Van Gogh – through library books. He was often called an outsider artist and would paint trains, trucks and railroads to suggest an escape from inner city life, while his pieces told visual tales of racism, poverty and hypocrisy.

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The Guardian

Nov 20 2018
Doughnuts, drag and an extraterrestrial: 48 hours in Blackpool – in pictures

Benita Suchodrev spent two days in the Lancashire seaside resort, pointing her camera at its tourists and townsfolk, at the tattoo parlours, amusement arcades and the iconic Tower

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The New York Times

Nov 20 2018
A Stolen Picasso Buried in the Woods? Not So Fast
A Stolen Picasso Buried in the Woods? Not So Fast
A letter pointed to a spot in Romania where a painting stolen from a Dutch museum in 2012 could be found. But what, exactly, was under the rock?
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The Guardian

Nov 20 2018
From a 'racist' square to rotting beef: five lesser-known stories about modern art

Today Picasso would be called a misogynist and Gauguin a paedophile. But how does it influence how we see their works?

The scope of Russia’s power in the world is often measured in terms of military might but Masters of Modern Art from the Hermitage, an exhibition now showing at the Art Gallery of New South Wales, is a fine example of the state’s soft power.

Culled from the collection of modern French painting at the Hermitage Museum in St Petersburg, the exhibition represents the vision of two Moscow-based merchants, Sergei Shchukin and Ivan Morozov. Their vision of what constitutes a modern master is – as you may have guessed – a largely male affair but, with works from artists such as Monet, Picasso, Cézanne and Matisse, there’s still plenty of space for debate. From bizarre backstories to questionable ethics, here are some notes to get you talking.

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The Guardian

Nov 20 2018
The world's best building? A remote Brazilian school made out of wood

This year’s Royal Institute of British Architects prize goes to the timber and mud-brick Children Village, which doesn’t need air-con even in 45 degree heat

A forest of eucalyptus columns extends inside the expansive dormitory complex of the Canuanã school in northern Brazil, as if the nearby woodland has taken over the building. Between the soaring trunks stand clusters of little mud-brick rooms arranged around open courtyards, while a wafer-thin metal canopy floats above the whole scene, providing merciful shade in the sweltering heat.

This is the Children Village, designed by young architects Aleph Zero with designer Marcelo Rosenbaum, named this year’s winner of the RIBA international prize for the best building in the world. It is an unlikely accolade to find bestowed on a remote school in a far-flung part of Brazil, designed by a duo in their early 30s who had built little more than a couple of private houses and a few installations before landing this commission.

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The Guardian

Nov 20 2018
'Portraits by an 18th-century feminist dad' – Gainsborough’s Family Album review

National Portrait Gallery, London
Thomas Gainsborough was often dismissed as a flatterer of the elites, yet these personal paintings of his two daughters are so full of life you sense they could walk out of the gallery

The love that glows in Thomas Gainsborough’s portraits of his daughters Mary and Margaret has not faded in 260 years. It manifests itself as actual light, illuminating their young faces, in his first painting of them together. They are romping through a bit of wild nature in about 1756, when Mary was around six years old and her younger sister Margaret was five. As Margaret reaches out to touch a white butterfly, her sister holds her hand warily, holding her back. They themselves make the shape of a butterfly, two wings of one fragile entity. In the National Portrait Gallery’s moving encounter with an 18th-century family, you see that butterfly grow, and see it broken.

The story of Margaret and Mary is like Jane Austen’s Sense and Sensibility, but with a tragic ending. Which is another way of saying it is a true story about women in the Georgian age. Yet it is not a sociological abstraction. It’s the intimate story of two sisters and their well-meaning father, and it has never before been told as clearly as by this lovely exhibition. The BBC should adapt it into a Sunday night drama. It’s got everything – frilly dresses, debonair youths, comic relatives – but instead of yet another posh house, it takes us into a world that’s joyously middle class.

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The New York Times

Nov 20 2018
A Tulip Planned to Rise Above a Gherkin on London’s Skyline
A Tulip Planned to Rise Above a Gherkin on London’s Skyline
The British architect Norman Foster’s studio has announced plans to raise a skyscraper shaped like an unopened blossom atop a concrete stalk in the city’s financial district.
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The Guardian

Nov 20 2018
Proud to be called a champagne socialist | Brief letters
Journal of Controversial Ideas | Cojones and nipples | Global warming | Co-op champagne | The Tulip

The people who tell us “We are the editors of the Journal of Controversial Ideas” (Letters, 19 November) claim in the next paragraph that “At present there is no Journal of Controversial Ideas” – funny set of editors then. They also recoil at the idea that publishing in the Journal of Controversial Ideas might lead to anyone “deliberately branding ideas as controversial”. If the letter shows how they intend to interpret “the highest standards of academic rigour” for Vol 1 No 1, heaven knows what it will be like when standards slip a bit, say by Vol 1 No 2?
Ken Patterson
Leeds, West Yorkshire

• Re Judith Abbs’ comment on men having nipples too (Letters, 17 November), decades ago, my fellow American women business owners and I agreed (probably after wine), that there was no reason to use “he has cojones” as a metaphor for strength. Why not “she’s got nips”? Everyone’s got ’em. Some are bigger than others. Get over it.
Kathleen Dixon Donnelly
Birmigham

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The New York Times

Nov 20 2018
A Popular Sight at Tate Modern: The Neighbors’ Apartments
A Popular Sight at Tate Modern: The Neighbors’ Apartments
A court is to decide whether the London museum’s viewing terrace invades the privacy of residents opposite. For now, many visitors still enjoy the view.
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The Guardian

Nov 20 2018
Surf's up: Florida's dazzling modernist holiday homes

Back in the 50s, architects Ralph Twitchell and Paul Rudolph realised their dreams of airy beach houses for carefree living in Sarasota – a place now overwhelmed by mega-mansions

A cushioned bench hangs over the water at the end of a wooden deck, projecting from a low timber-framed house that hovers on the edge of a pristine sand-spit. A freshly peeled orange rests on a table and, through an open door, you can make out slender steel-legged furniture silhouetted against the gleaming sand. Casually strewn sandals and a book await the well-leisured occupant, while a rowing boat bobs in the background.

This sun-drenched image of a modernist Robinson Crusoe dream was splashed across a full page of the January 1951 issue of Architectural Forum, oozing the postwar promise of free-and-easy indoor-outdoor living that beckoned in the Florida city of Sarasota. Named best house design of the year by the American Institute of Architects in 1948, the tiny Cocoon House was the most distilled vision to date of the architectural practice of Ralph Twitchell and Paul Rudolph, a partnership that had created a buzz around this sleepy beach town with a series of dazzling modernist holiday homes.

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The Guardian

Nov 20 2018
Mohamad Hafez: how he uses artwork to celebrate Syria's past

With his new sculptures, the Syrian artist who lives in the US sees it as his ‘duty’ to create art that reminds people of the beauty of his country

In Mohamad Hafez’s sculptures, every detail brings a part of Syria to life.

A doll-sized porcelain plate represents how people would send food to their neighbors. Syrian and Jewish fabric fragments on a clothes line embody the region’s diversity. And the decorations on a building mimic Greek and Roman symbols all over old city streets.

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The New York Times

Nov 19 2018
Collectors Leon and Debra Black Give $40 Million to MoMA
Collectors Leon and Debra Black Give $40 Million to MoMA
The gift will help support the museum’s renovation and expansion project
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The New York Times

Nov 19 2018
Critic’s Notebook:  A 21st-Century Renaissance for Ford Foundation Landmark
Critic’s Notebook: A 21st-Century Renaissance for Ford Foundation Landmark
The building, a prescient example of civic architecture, sees the light after a two-year makeover.
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The New York Times

Nov 19 2018
A New Time for Christian Marclay
A New Time for Christian Marclay
The artist may have won acclaim for “The Clock,” but at a festival in England his music is the object of attention.
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The Guardian

Nov 19 2018
Pranksters plant 'stolen Picasso’ in Romania

Dutch writer who thought she’d found missing painting says she was victim of hoax

It almost sounded too good to be true: a Picasso painting stolen in one of the world’s most famous art heists had been found under a tree in a snowy Romanian forest.

On Monday it emerged it was totally too good to be true, part of an elaborate and carefully staged piece of performance art by a radical Belgian theatre company.

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The Guardian

Nov 19 2018
Edge of visibility: celebrating artwork with hidden messages

In a new exhibition in New York, works from artists such as Kerry James Marshall and Samuel Levi Jones take on racial, social and political visibility

In 2016, curator Susan Tallman was at an art fair in Chicago when one piece of artwork stopped her in her tracks. It was a series of 48 portraits of prominent African Americans, from Nina Simone to Maya Angelou, by Samuel Levi Jones, who had hung them all in a grid.

Related: From dolls to magazine covers: how early black designers made their mark

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The Guardian

Nov 19 2018
Like Norman Foster's Gherkin? Meet his cocktail cornichon

The Tulip, Foster’s strange proposal for a Mini-Me Gherkin on a stick, is a parody of architectural hubris he’s hoping will get the billionaire owner out of a pickle

Once the cheeky darling of the London skyline, the Gherkin has become increasingly crowded by a dense thicket of chunky towers and steroidal slabs. Hemmed in and overshadowed, the mischievous silhouette of 30 St Mary Axe now barely registers on most views of the city, merging into a lumpen glass heap of financial capital.

Now its architect wants to put that right. In one of the most extraordinary planning applications the City of London has ever seen, Norman Foster has proposed to build a Mini-Me version of the Gherkin right next to it, hoisted up on a great pole above the city for all to see.

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The Guardian

Nov 19 2018
Nick Cave on his darkly exquisite new work: ‘Is there racism in heaven?’

The US artist’s major installation at Carriageworks in Sydney is otherworldly and deeply political – and his most ambitious piece yet

Peering through the vast glass windows at Nick Cave’s latest installation in Sydney feels festive: like staring at an elaborate Christmas display in a posh London department store. Or perhaps a giant Christmas tree, which has grown and spread like magical weeds across the cavernous floor, bauble-like discs spinning slowly.

There are millions of plastic pony beads; thousands of ceramic birds, fruits, and animals; 13 gilded pigs; more than 15km of crystals; 24 chandeliers; one crocodile; and 17 cast-iron lawn jockeys.

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The Guardian

Nov 19 2018
Damien Hirst's gigantic uteruses are a bold correction to shocking ignorance | Hannah Clugston

Why the outrage? Hirst’s sculptures of uteruses for Qatar are a rare celebration of women’s bodies – vividly quashing art’s tendency to sanitise birth

As a child, I remember asking my mum where babies came from. Whatever she said left me with the distinct impression that it involved her eating some sort of magic egg. Later, after my sister was born, I drew a picture of a woman in a delightfully patterned dress, beaming as a baby popped down from between her legs. The “labour” of labour had clearly not been made known to me. The whole affair was shrouded in mystery.

In my 14 years in the education system I learned scarcely more of the female anatomy. It’s only with the arrival of apps such as Hormone Horoscope and Natural Cycles that I have finally managed to fathom out what that mystical “cycle” really means. And what a revelation it was to discover that what we refer to as the vagina is actually the vulva!

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The Guardian

Nov 19 2018
Restored Gainsborough painting on show at National Portrait Gallery

Conservation work on portrait of the artist’s nephew reveals previously obscured elements

A Thomas Gainsborough portrait of his nephew has had more than a century’s worth of yellowing varnish removed revealing just why one friend of the artist described it as “more like the work of God than man”.

A conservator at the National Portrait Gallery has cleaned the 1773 portrait of Gainsborough Dupont, and the result has been a revelation. Dupont, the gallery said, looks less the son of a humble Suffolk carpenter and more a gilded youth who could have stepped straight from the court of Charles I.

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The Guardian

Nov 19 2018
Home is where the art is: the joys and sorrows of Gainsborough’s family portraits

He was known as an expensive painter who captured high society, but a rare exhibition of Gainsborough’s works at the National Portrait Gallery reveals a poignant story of parental love

Thomas Gainsborough and his wife, Margaret, had three daughters, the eldest of whom, Mary, died in infancy. We may see her with her parents in Gainsborough’s earliest family portrait, which he painted c1748 when he was about 20. The well-dressed group, complete with dog, poses formally but comfortably in a wooded rural landscape, with the little child standing pink-cheeked, doll-like and a little stiffly between her mother and father. The painting, as has often been pointed out, marks Gainsborough’s claim to gentlemanly status, as a social equal of the wealthy landowners and titled gentry who were to be his principal subjects. Little about it suggests the affectionate concern and informality that were to glow from his later paintings and drawings, mostly unfinished, of his two surviving daughters (another Mary, another Margaret), gathered together at the National Portrait Gallery for the first time. These tell a moving, intimate and ultimately sad story of parental love, and catch informal moments of domestic life in an age when childhood was recognised as something more than a necessary preparation for adulthood, as a period with its own particular joys and sorrows.

Gainsborough came to be known as the expensive painter of expensive people in expensive dress, and some critics have unkindly remarked that he was better at costumes than at people – “flashy” is the word the art historian Michael Kitson once used. (I had always assumed portrait sitters chose their own clothes, to show off the glories of their wardrobe, but we learn here that sitters for Joshua Reynolds and George Romney and possibly Gainsborough himself sometimes wore costumes chosen for them – an interesting sidelight on the relationship between artist and subject.) We know that privately Gainsborough preferred painting landscape, but landscapes did not sell. Family finances depended on “this curs’d Face Business” and commissions from wealthy patrons “with their damn’d faces”, and money motivated his move from his native Suffolk to Bath, a showy and rich resort that was the centre of fashionable leisured life. He lived there with his family from 1759 to 1774, and painted the high society of Vanity Fair: men in high public office, men and women of rank, a few successful artists, musicians and physicians. Satins, jewels, ribbons, buckles, brooches, bonnets and fantastic hairstyles were his trade. There was a lot of money in hats: his sister, who lived next door to him in Bath, was a milliner.

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The Guardian

Nov 18 2018
The human cost of conflict: Lynsey Addario's Of Love & War – in pictures

Photojournalist Lynsey Addario’s disarming and compelling images personalise the most remote corners of our world. Her new book of more than 200 photographs reveal the devastating consequences of human conflict from Afghanistan to South Sudan

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The Guardian

Nov 18 2018
Qatar hospital visitors greeted by Damien Hirst foetus sculptures – video

Patients visiting a $8bn (£6bn) hospital in Qatar are welcomed by 14 huge bronze sculptures that graphically chart the growth of a baby, from conception to birth. Created by British artist Damien Hirst, The Miraculous Journey culminates with a 14-metre (46ft) statue of a newborn. The foetus sculptures sit outside the entrance of Doha's new Sidra medicine hospital. They were originally unveiled in 2013 but have been covered up until the hospital’s offical opening this week.

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The New York Times

Nov 18 2018
Met’s Leaders Move Ahead With Modern and Rockefeller Wings
Met’s Leaders Move Ahead With Modern and Rockefeller Wings
Max Hollein and Daniel H. Weiss, in their first joint interview, on making a home for contemporary art and the wing devoted to Africa, Oceania and the Americas.
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The Guardian

Nov 18 2018
$90m David Hockney is not a ‘break-up picture’, says ex-lover

Peter Schlesinger rejects interpretation of work that has broken record for living artist

It has been interpreted as the depiction of a very particular moment in the romantic life of David Hockney. Portrait of an Artist (Pool with Two Figures), which sold for $90.3m (£70.3m) at auction in New York last week, shows his former lover and muse standing beside a pool – and a man who might be the painter’s new boyfriend swimming under water.

But Peter Schlesinger, Hockney’s ex-partner who was one of his students at the University of California, Los Angeles, has rejected the interpretation of the work that has now made the Yorkshire-born painter the world’s most highly valued living artist. He says it is not an “emotional” depiction – and is probably not even, in any meaningful sense, a portrait of him.

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The Guardian

Nov 18 2018
The world according to Archigram

The hugely influential collective Archigram mixed 60s space race ideas with British provincial humour to visualise ‘pulsating’ mobile cities of the future. Fifty years on, three surviving members discuss – and defend – their legacy

I am holding in my hand a single sheet of paper, wrapped in protective plastic, with words and drawings wriggling all over the available space, on both sides. The possibilities of offset litho printing in the year of its making, 1961, are fully explored. A pinkish splodge decorates one edge – “a potato print”, explains one of its authors now, Professor Sir Peter Cook, “to add a bit of colour”. “The poetry of bricks is gone,” intones some of the original scrawled text, “we want to drag into building som [sic] of the poetry of countdown, orbital helmets, Discord of mechanical body transportation methods.”

This document was Archigram 1, the first issue of a magazine – if a single sheet can be called that – that was to grow in pagination and significance. Its price was sixpence, in old money. “You couldn’t give it away,” says Cook, “only friends and numbskulls would buy it.”

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The Guardian

Nov 18 2018
Ilse D’Hollander; Fiona Tan: Elsewhere – review

Victoria Miro, London; Frith Street Gallery, London
Ilse D’Hollander’s serene landscapes from the 1990s betray no sign of this young artist’s inner turmoil. Plus, Fiona Tan’s utopian LA skylines

Ilse D’Hollander was so young when she died that almost the first response to her work might be a kind of shocked sorrow to think of such brilliance so abruptly extinguished. The artist killed herself at the age of 28. But the paintings she left defy such melancholy thoughts. Small, calm and balanced, these landscapes are exceptionally beautiful. Whatever was going on in her life does not seem to have been happening in her art.

D’Hollander was born in East Flanders in 1968. She studied first in Antwerp and then in Ghent; the earliest works in this show – painted on cardboard when the artist was about 24 – invoke the countryside between the two cities in all the rich greens of spring and summer. In 1995 she moved to the provincial village of Paulatem, where she seems to have worked with increasing energy and seclusion for the last two years of her life. Her career may have been short, but D’Hollander was prolific. More than 500 paintings survive.

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The Guardian

Nov 17 2018
The big picture: one billboard in Arizona

Rob Hann’s image of a road sign in Arizona is simple, upbeat… and still something of a mystery

One rainy evening in London, Rob Hann was sitting at home watching a TV programme about modern art in Texas. Transfixed by the sunny blue skies and the sprawling desert landscapes, he decided to plan a road trip to America’s south-west.

Usually a portrait photographer (his subjects range from Daft Punk and JG Ballard to Chloë Sevigny), on the road, Hann turned his lens to the strange sights along the way. He became particularly interested in signs, inspired in part by Ed Ruscha’s use of text in his paintings and Wim Wenders’s photography book Written in the West.

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The Guardian

Nov 17 2018
'They're making their own kind of world': two Mona shows challenge the visitor

The new commissions play with concept and craftsmanship – but don’t expect easy answers

For 24 hours on 15 October, 12 adults, 11 children and a baby transformed a cavernous, sunken gallery at Hobart’s Museum of Old and New Art into a post-apocalyptic communist utopia, set on a Dyson sphere in the year 7231.

The museum was shut to the public that day, meaning the only witnesses were eight cameras and two French artists, Fabien Giraud and Raphael Siboni, who watched as their subjects battled with the encroaching forces of time, mortality and capitalism.

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The Guardian

Nov 17 2018
Pet project: Amsterdam's animal photographer – in pictures

As the Dutch capital’s first official pet portraitist, Isabella Rozendaal has created an eye-catching portfolio of animal photography. Here we show some highlights.

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The Guardian

Nov 17 2018
Meet Amsterdam’s official pet photographer
Isabella Rozendaal realised there was something missing from Amsterdam’s population archive. She tells of her life – and new book – as the city’s first official pet portraitist

• See a gallery of Isabella Rozendaal’s photographs

In 2016, the photographer Isabella Rozendaal convinced Amsterdam’s city archives that a significant portion of the city’s inhabitants were being unfairly snubbed. Rozendaal was born in Amsterdam, and, when she is not travelling on assignment, she still lives there. Like other Amsterdammers, she considers the archives an invaluable resource – the public collection of historical documents (drawings, films, maps, photographs) is the largest in the world – but whenever she visited she always sensed something was missing. “Pets are a huge part of Amsterdam’s population,” Rozendaal says, “but they were totally underrepresented. My plan was to photograph the pets.”

Rozendaal began photographing animals in 2006, during her last year of art school. (She studied at the Royal Academy of Art, in The Hague.) To sharpen her documentary skills, she visited a dog show, where she was drawn not just to the animals but to candid moments shared between the pets and their owners. Rozendaal asked a couple of owners if she could visit them later, at home. She wanted to better understand how pet and owner interacted out of the public eye. “I just thought these people were so fascinating,” she says. “And I found this wonderful obsession.”

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The New York Times

Nov 17 2018
Domains: Amazon to Queens? Jonathan Adler is Ready
Domains: Amazon to Queens? Jonathan Adler is Ready
The designer on bongs, white jeans and his new get-it-quickly collection, Now House.
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The Guardian

Nov 17 2018
Recycling the old masters – in pictures

Dutch artist Suzanne Jongmans creates photographs that echo the old masters, but with a modern twist: she crafts intricate costumes using recycled plastics, old blankets and used packaging. Jongmans finds inspiration in painters such as Jan van Eyck, Rembrandt and Holbein, whose level of detail she aims to replicate. “When you look at the old masters, you can really see the time that is put into the paintings,” she says. “And that fits with the method I developed.” There is an implicit environmental message in her work but, she says, her primary objective is giving a new life to these old materials. “I’m a collector mostly – I collect all kinds of things, like blankets, wool, things from nature. And I would like all these materials to tell a story.”

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The Guardian

Nov 17 2018
An £18m saint… but is Sebastian drawing really by Leonardo?
After the Salvator Mundi mystery, opinion is split on another Renaissance work

The art world was stunned earlier this year by the sudden and mysterious postponement of the unveiling of the Salvator Mundi by the Louvre Abu Dhabi. The painting, which had been sold for a record-breaking $450m (£342m), had become the subject of an increasing number of claims by experts that, far from being Leonardo’s forgotten masterpiece, it might not have been his work after all.

Now a French auctioneer has put another Leonardo up for sale, a small drawing of St Sebastian that is estimated to fetch more than €20m (£17.7m). And a leading Oxford art historian who was among those to cast doubt on the Salvator Mundi’s authenticity is questioning whether this picture, too, should be fully attributed to Leonardo.

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The Guardian

Nov 17 2018
The 20 photographs of the week

The migrant caravan in Mexico, wildfires in California, the armistice centenary and a symbolic funeral prayer for Jamal Khashoggi – the week captured by the world’s best photojournalists

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The New York Times

Nov 16 2018
Glenn Lowry, MoMA Director, Will Continue Through 2025
Glenn Lowry, MoMA Director, Will Continue Through 2025
The museum leader had suggested he would retire after the expanded museum building opens in 2019. He will stay in his post for seven more years.
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The Guardian

Nov 16 2018
When Tillmans met Britten: a radical War Requiem – in pictures

The Turner prize-winning photographer Wolfgang Tillmans has collaborated with ENO to design the set for Benjamin Britten’s devastating war piece. Here are his exclusive images of the production

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