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The New York Times

Mar 19 2018
In the Air: An Ode to Joyful, Self-consciously Naïve Design
In the Air: An Ode to Joyful, Self-consciously Naïve Design
The guilelessness of childlike art: Picasso’s joyful ceramic visages; Warhol’s unaffected early drawings; vibrant fashion and furniture that appeal to one’s playful side.
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The New York Times

Mar 19 2018
Anselm Kiefer Sculpture Will Go Up at Rockefeller Center
Anselm Kiefer Sculpture Will Go Up at Rockefeller Center
The piece, a colossal open book carried aloft by eagle’s wings with a 30-foot span, is Mr. Kiefer’s first ever site-specific outdoor public sculpture in the U.S.
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The New York Times

Mar 19 2018
Design Report: Three Venerated Design Companies Look Back to Move Forward
Design Report: Three Venerated Design Companies Look Back to Move Forward
Beginning again with the textile giant Maharam, the fabric line Fermoie and the furniture designer and interior architect Christian Liaigre.
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The New York Times

Mar 19 2018
Review: ‘Leonora and Alejandro’ and One Rather Trippy Encounter
Review: ‘Leonora and Alejandro’ and One Rather Trippy Encounter
A new show draws on the art and writings of Leonora Carrington and Alejandro Jodorowsky, and gives viewers a peek into an expansive world.
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The Guardian

Mar 19 2018
‘The vitriol was really unhealthy’: artist Sonia Boyce on the row over taking down Hylas and the Nymphs

When John William Waterhouse’s 1896 painting was taken off the walls of Manchester Art Gallery, furious critics described it as censorship or a publicity stunt. That couldn’t be further from the truth, says the artist at the centre of the storm

When John William Waterhouse’s painting Hylas and the Nymphs was removed from the walls of the Manchester Art Gallery at the end of January, all hell broke loose. Social media was electric with outraged cries of “censorship”. The critic Jonathan Jones asked whether this was the thin end of the wedge: would Picasso be off the walls next?

An Oxford professor of German wrote to the Guardian warning that this had happened before: Nazi curators had taken down works because they had “conflicted with their political aims and puritanical taste”. Messages poured into the museum’s website: some in support but more of them against. There were worries that the removal was an act of politically correct virtue signalling; wasn’t so far down the line from book-burning; was feminist extremism “at its worst”. There was also plain old irritation that a much-loved painting was not on view when visitors had travelled to see it.

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The Guardian

Mar 19 2018
Institute dedicated to Giacometti set up near artist's Parisian studio

More than 300 sculptures and many ‘debut’ artworks to go on show in Montparnasse exhibition centre opening in June

Dozens of artworks by Alberto Giacometti never before shown in public are to be exhibited for the first time, along with a reconstruction of his chaotic, plaster-splattered studio.

An exhibition, education and research centre in Paris, named the Giacometti Institute, will open on 20 June, dedicated to the tortured genius whose elongated figures are among the greatest masterpieces of 20th-century art.

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The Guardian

Mar 19 2018
Own an exclusive print of Martin Rowson's prime ministers

The Guardian celebrates the work of multi-award winning cartoonist Martin Rowson, following the launch of Gimson’s Prime Ministers. Rowson has illustrated this concise, sharp-witted and illuminating account of the lives of Britain’s leaders from Walpole to May by Andrew Gimson.

The GNM Archive is proud to offer Rowson’s inimitable illustrations, exclusively available for the first time as collectible fine art prints. These lively and entertaining works of satire bring our parliamentary history to life as never before

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The New York Times

Mar 19 2018
How Should Furniture Respond to the World Around It?
How Should Furniture Respond to the World Around It?
As the distinction between art and design becomes ever more blurred, more artists are making objects that function, and more designers are making sculpture.
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The Guardian

Mar 19 2018
Resilience and warmth in the face of adversity. Daily life in Haiti – in pictures

Photographer Hatnim Lee has been working with charities in Haiti for the last eight years, capturing the lives of people she met along the way

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The Guardian

Mar 18 2018
Boris Johnson under growing pressure over scrapped garden bridge

Labour asks foreign secretary to explain decisions behind failed project, which cost taxpayers £46m

Labour has written to Boris Johnson asking him to account for his role in the scrapped £46m London garden bridge project, after the foreign secretary had said he could not recall the reasons for key decisions he made.

The letter, from the shadow communities secretary, Andrew Gwynne, challenges Johnson over his claim earlier this month that a prominent journalist who has criticised the project was motivated by a personal dislike of its designer.

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The New York Times

Mar 18 2018
Masterpiece Rental: My Life in the ‘American Gothic’ House
Masterpiece Rental: My Life in the ‘American Gothic’ House
I laughed when I saw it, exactly as Grant Wood had depicted it. Now “the world’s second most famous White House” was mine — for $250 a month.
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The New York Times

Mar 18 2018
Zaha Hadid’s Desert Think Tank: Environmental Beauty and Efficiency
Zaha Hadid’s Desert Think Tank: Environmental Beauty and Efficiency
The sprawling, $1 billion showcase in Saudi Arabia was inspired by the geometries found in honeycombs and soap bubbles.
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The Guardian

Mar 18 2018
Tacita Dean: Portrait; Still Life review – pensive, elegiac, ever inventive

National Portrait Gallery; National Gallery, London
The painter turned multimedia artist communes with vanishing worlds in the first two compelling instalments of her unprecedented three-museum triple bill

Three great actors appear on a screen not much bigger than a smartphone in a small, dark room of the National Portrait Gallery. Ben Whishaw is filmed in summer sunshine, a young man dreaming, reading, or waiting for some offstage presence. David Warner shifts in his seat, a mysterious interior monologue played out in his magnificently senatorial features. Stephen Dillane retreats from the camera, or turns directly into it with all the intimacy of an impending soliloquy. Each has been a famous Hamlet in his time – but what part are they playing now?

Tacita Dean’s new film, His Picture in Little, takes its title from Shakespeare’s tragedy. It twinkles in the gloom between two cases of Elizabethan miniatures and opposite the Chandos portrait of the Bard, all the connections subtle and superb. The actors turn in and out of profile or three-quarter view – captivating, brooding, confrontational, composed. They look like the painted people of the past (Whishaw exactly resembles the young John Donne) and they might seem to be acting. Yet they have not been directed, and nor are they posing.

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The Guardian

Mar 18 2018
Forty years of hi-tech: from the Sainsbury Centre to Apple Park

In 1978, Norman Foster’s Sainsbury Centre for Visual Arts at the University of East Anglia was a gleaming vision of the future. A forthcoming exhibition there celebrates a distinctly British architecture driven by free-form technology and high ideals

Ah yes, the 1970s. The three-day week, the winter of discontent, Austin Allegros, punch-ups with the National Front, mutterings of rightwing coups, the Sex Pistols swearing on family TV. They included, to be sure, such now unavailable non-trivia as free higher education, affordable housing and a functioning health service. But it was a decade that, having flared into being in the psychedelic glow of its predecessor, embrowned itself into the tones of hessian and muesli and the guttering shadows of power cuts. It was the time when architectural modernism, imploding under the weight of self-doubt and external criticism, gave way to a meek “neo-vernacular” of bricks and pitched roofs.

And then, in Norwich (to misquote the opening credits of the epoch’s epic game show, Sale of the Century), appeared an assured and beautiful statement of faith in the new: a shining shed on, if not quite a hill, this being Norfolk, at least an upward incline. The Sainsbury Centre for Visual Arts at the University of East Anglia, designed by the fortysomething architect Norman Foster, was, as he now says, based on “an optimistic view of the future”. The era’s mood of malaise and decay could only bounce off its aluminium hide.

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The Guardian

Mar 17 2018
Monet and Van Gogh reborn as hi-tech magic brings back ruined masterpieces
Water Lilies and Sunflowers among paintings being resurrected using 3D scanners

Artists using cutting-edge technology and forensic analysis have reconstructed a series of lost masterpieces, including versions of Monet’s Water Lilies and Van Gogh’s Sunflowers.

The re-creations are the work of Factum Arte, a group of artists and technicians whose projects have included an exact reproduction of the burial chamber of Tutankhamun. The Concert, a 17th-century work by Vermeer which was stolen in 1990 in the biggest art heist of modern times, has also been re-created, along with a 1954 portrait of Winston Churchill by Graham Sutherland, which the wartime leader’s wife, Clementine, destroyed in disgust.

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The Guardian

Mar 17 2018
London will lose creative crown if rents keep forcing artists out
Head of Space network issues warning in book marking 50th year of studios set up by artists Bridget Riley and Peter Sedgely

The head of a leading arts organisation has warned that London’s status as a world-class creative city is at risk because artists are being forced out of the capital.

Anna Harding, the chief executive of Space studios, which provides premises for nearly 800 artists including three Turner prize winners, blamed rising property prices and shrinking studios for dramatically squeezing the time and space available for creative activity. Artists now face a choice between working full time to pay the rent and fitting in a few hours in their studios at weekends, or giving up entirely, she said.

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The Guardian

Mar 17 2018
The big picture: Frida Kahlo in New York, 1939

The artist in traditional Mexican costume photographed by her Hungarian-born lover Nickolas Muray at the end of their secret affair

The Hungarian-American photographer and Olympic fencer Nickolas Muray took this photograph of Frida Kahlo in traditional Mexican dress and cigarette in hand on a rooftop in Greenwich Village, New York, in March 1939. The pair were at the end of a secret love affair that had begun in Mexico eight years earlier.

Kahlo, whose life will be celebrated in a large-scale exhibition of her personal belongings at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London opening on 16 June (for which tickets have just gone on sale), was then 32. She was in a moment of typically contrasting fortune, having just returned by boat from France where the surrealist André Breton had organised an exhibition of her work and where a painting of hers, the self-portrait The Frame, had been purchased by the Louvre. While in Paris she had, however, been ill once again: in hospital with a kidney infection. A few months earlier, her first solo show in New York had been a great success – the actor Edward G Robinson had bought four of her paintings – but all the time she was aware that, back in Mexico, her incendiary marriage to the painter and revolutionary Diego Rivera was unravelling.

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The Guardian

Mar 17 2018
Sketch in the city: the artist capturing urban clutter – in pictures

Urban Sketchers (also known as USk) is a worldwide group of more than 60,000 people who create drawings of the places they visit. Founded by journalist Gabriel Campanario in Seattle in 2007, the movement quickly went global with the help of social media. It is important that the drawings are done in situ. “It makes you look at things,” says Simone Ridyard, architect, senior lecturer at Manchester School of Art and a founder of the Manchester and Salford Urban Sketchers group. “Some of the things I really like are the tramlines and litter bins and postboxes – the urban clutter. It’s not about drawing beautiful things; it’s about what’s in front of you.”

Ridyard mainly uses fine-liner pens overlaid with watercolour, and has drawn places from Rio de Janeiro to Singapore to Padstow. The Manchester branch has more than 2,000 members, many of whom meet regularly to sketch individually or in groups. ”There’s no pressure; you might do one drawing, you might do five,” says Ridyard. “It’s about slowing down and enjoying the view.”

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The New York Times

Mar 17 2018
New Banksy Mural in New York Protests Turkish Artist’s Imprisonment
New Banksy Mural in New York Protests Turkish Artist’s Imprisonment
Banksy’s latest work, a 70-foot-long piece at Houston and Bowery, honors the artist Zehra Dogan, who was jailed for painting Turkish ruins.
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The Guardian

Mar 17 2018
The 20 photographs of the week

From arctic surfing to a special election in the US, protests against gun violence to the shooting of a popular politician in Rio, Russian fashion to the diplomatic row caused by the Skripal incident; we take a look at the week captured by the world’s best photojournalists

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The Guardian

Mar 17 2018
Oh Jonny boy: mid-20th century Ireland in glorious technicolour

To mark St Patrick’s Day, the Photographers’ Gallery in London is releasing newly restored pictures of rural Ireland in the 1950s and 1960s by a pioneer of British and Irish postcard art, John Hinde

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The Guardian

Mar 16 2018
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The New York Times

Mar 16 2018
Readers React to Misconduct Accusations Against Richard Meier
Readers React to Misconduct Accusations Against Richard Meier
Hundreds of Times readers weighed in on the sexual harassment allegations against the star architect and the apology he gave in response.
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The Guardian

Mar 16 2018
French impressionism: masterpieces chart the revolution of colour – in pictures

From Claude Monet’s radiant water lilies to Paul Cézanne’s rendering of the verdant French countryside to the rosy pigments of Auguste Renoir, more than 65 masterpieces on loan from Paris’s Musée d’Orsay celebrate the 19th century’s most important art movement.

Tony Magnusson, coordinating curator at the Art Gallery of South Australia, talks Guardian Australia through the latest show

Colours of Impressionism: Masterpieces from the Musée d’Orsay is on at the Art Gallery of South Australia from 29 March – 29 July

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The New York Times

Mar 16 2018
Two by Design: The Creative Couple Bridging the Worlds of Hospitality and Embroidery
Naina Shah and Abhishek Honawar work between New York and India: she in fashion, he in hospitality. Next, they will team up on their own design studio.
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artforum.com

Mar 16 2018
500 WORDS: Huong Ngo and Hong-An Truong
Huong Ngo and Hong-An Truong on their work in “Being: New Photography 2018”
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artforum.com

Mar 16 2018
SLANT: Pop Is Pop
Canada Choate on Charli XCX and Scritti Politti
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The Guardian

Mar 16 2018
Salvador Dalí reburied after exhumation for paternity tests

Samples taken for DNA tests that disproved paternity claim rejoin artist’s body in Catalonian tomb

Three decades after he died and eight months after his remains were disinterred to settle a paternity claim, Salvador Dalí has once again been laid to rest, in his entirety, beneath the museum he designed as a shrine to his own life and art.

The surrealist’s body was exhumed from its tomb in Figueres, Catalonia, in July after a judge gave the go-ahead to DNA tests to establish whether Dalí was the father of Pilar Abel, a tarot card reader and fortune teller who had long claimed to be his daughter.

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The Guardian

Mar 16 2018
Art buffs: naked gallery tour wows Parisian naturists

A one-off Facebook invitation to see the latest Palais de Tokyo exhibition nude out-stripped expectations – and left thousands on the waiting list

The Association des Naturistes de Paris (Association of Naturists of Paris) has announced – and rapidly closed, due to a rush on the limited spaces – a naked tour of the Palais de Tokyo on 5 May. The French capital’s contemporary art hotspot will host an exclusive matinee for members of the association to visit the museum-wide Discorde, Fille de la Nuit exhibition.

The tour will, l’Internaute reports, commence at 9:30am, guided by a member of the gallery staff, also in the nude, and take in works by eight different artists, including the British artist George Henry Longly and French collaborators Kader Attia and Jean-Jacques Lebel.

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The New York Times

Mar 16 2018
Thomas Cole, American Moralist
Thomas Cole, American Moralist
Why this 19th-century master of the Hudson River landscape, who used his art to argue against industry’s assaults, is politically right for right now.
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The New York Times

Mar 16 2018
After Social Media Outcry, French Museum Removes Video of Burning Chickens
After Social Media Outcry, French Museum Removes Video of Burning Chickens
The Museum of Contemporary Art in Lyon withdrew a video by Algerian artist Adel Abdessemed after it drew online criticism from animal rights activists.
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The Guardian

Mar 16 2018
Call Me By Monet: how Instagram hybrids turned pop into art

High art and pop culture have often been mashed together – but rarely as effectively as on three Instagram accounts delighting fans of Monet, Alexa Chung and Harry Potter

First there were the memes. Then there were the funny animal videos. Now, a third wave of Instagram accounts has arisen; that of the high/low-culture hybrid, a beast that sees Hogwarts wizards decked out in Dior, and the lovers of Call Me By Your Name transplanted into the landscapes of Monet.

This phenomenon arguably began in January 2015, with the account Art-lexa Chung. Begun by Spanish sisters María and Beatriz Valdovín, its premise is simple: take a photo of Alexa Chung and place it next to a painting that resembles it. The results are uncanny. A post from January 2016 shows Chung in a bow-tied navy blue dress coat. Alongside, the 1895 Portrait of Baronne Madeleine Deslandes by Edward Burne-Jones depicts said Madeleine in almost the same dress. It’s downright eerie.

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The New York Times

Mar 16 2018
Grant Wood at the Whitney Both Thrills and Disappoints
Grant Wood at the Whitney Both Thrills and Disappoints
The first New York retrospective in 35 years of this Regional painter has ups, downs, detours and lots to see and think about.
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artforum.com

Mar 16 2018
SLANT: Liberté or Death
Dennis Lim on Albert Serra’s Liberté
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artforum.com

Mar 16 2018
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The Guardian

Mar 16 2018
Banksy mural in New York highlights case of jailed Turkish artist

Zehra Doğan was reportedly imprisoned for her painting of a damaged Turkish city

Banksy has unveiled a mural in New York highlighting the case of a Turkish artist who was jailed for nearly three years over a painting.

Zehra Doğan was reportedly imprisoned in 2017 for her painting of a damaged Turkish city.

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The Guardian

Mar 16 2018
Moody modernist masters and a world of gender-fluid glamour – the week in art

Edward Hopper lights up America’s jazz-age, while the Barbican celebrates a refuge for transvestites and the Tate welcomes Anthea Hamilton – all in your weekly dispatch

America’s Cool Modernism
The desolate urban vision of Edward Hopper contrasts with Charles Demuth’s futurist hymn I Saw the Figure 5 in Gold in this survey of American art in the jazz age.
Ashmolean Museum, Oxford, 23 March to 22 July.

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