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The Art Newspaper

Feb 03 2017
Louvre shuts after knife attack of ‘terrorist nature’
Soldiers have been on patrol at the Louvre since 2015 (Image: AFP Photo/Christophe Ena)
French police are evacuating 1,250 people from the Muse du Louvre in Paris after a man attacked a patrolling soldier near the museums entrance at 10am today. The attack, which happened on the stairway of the Carrousel du Louvre, an underground shopping centre, has been described as being of a terrorist nature by the French Prime Minister Bernard Cazeneuve. 

The attacker, who police say shouted Allahu Akbar during the assault, was seriously wounded after another soldier fired at him five times. A second man, who was reportedly acting suspiciously at the scene, has been detained. 

The Louvre has been closed until further notice and a safety zone has been set up around the museum, the Carrousel du Louvre and the gardens. The 1,250 people who were in the area at the time are being evacuated in small groups, according to a spokesman from the Ministry of the Interior. Trains are not stopping at the Palais Royal-Muse du Louvre metro station. 

Soldiers have been patrolling the streets of Paris since January 2015 when Isil militants attacked the office of Charlie Hebdo magazine and a kosher supermarket. On 13 November that year, 130 people were killed by gunmen and suicide bombers in a series of coordinated attacks. 

The Muse du Louvre, the worlds most visited museum, saw a 15% drop in attendance last year, which it attributed to the sharp fall in the number of foreign tourists to the city.
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The Art Newspaper

Feb 03 2017
Stolen Van Gogh paintings to go on show in Naples
Vincent van Gogh, View of the Sea at Scheveningen (1882)
Two stolen Van Gogh paintings are to be unveiled at the Museo di Capodimonte in Naples next week. They had been seized from the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam in 2002 and were secreted away by the mafia. On 30 September 2016 the two pictures were recovered by the Italian authorities in Castellammare di Stabia, a seaside resort 25 kilometres south of Naples. The pictures are believed to have been held by Raffaele Imperiale, a leader of the Neapolitan mafia.

On 7 February Van Goghs View of the Sea at Scheveningen (1882) and Congregation leaving the Reformed Church in Nuenen (1884-5) are to go on display in the Naples museum, until 26 February. The two pictures will then be returned to Amsterdam, to go back on show in March. Later this year they will be fully conserved.

Both paintings have survived their ordeal relatively well, particularly considering that the thieves removed their protective frames. The church scene has only minor damage around the edges of the canvas. The seascape has suffered more. It was painted on paper mounted on canvas, and one corner of the paper (around 5 x 2 cm) was torn away.

Antimo Cesaro, an undersecretary of the Italian ministry of culture, has written a moving introduction to the Capodimonte catalogue, imagining how the thieves might have regarded their haul. Cesaro thinks of a drug trafficker keeping such beauty to himself, before the paintings reached the austere environment of a police station or the spartan spaces of a customs officer. Now the Van Goghs will be given back their dignity, initially in Capodimonte and then back home at the Amsterdam museum.
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The Guardian

Feb 03 2017
David Hockney's perky logo for the Sun reminds us of the world's beauty

The artist’s redesign of the Sun’s masthead may be a dashed-off iPad sketch, but it shows his wit, optimism and interest in light are all undimmed as he nears 80

Roll over, Damien Hirst. Go tell Grayson the news. David Hockney has just proved he is still Britain’s canniest pop artist (even though he denies ever having being one). None of the younger generation of media-savvy artists has ever redesigned the masthead of the Sun. They are unlikely ever to be asked, either.

It is easy to forget how famous Hockney is. You don’t have to know anything at all about art to recognise his name or know his work. It is a level of popularity captured in the TV series The Sopranos when the mob boss and his girlfriend gaze at a swimming pool painting by “David Hockey” in a hotel room. Every tall, tiny-headed palm tree in LA bears his signature.

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The Guardian

Feb 03 2017
Vanity height: how much space in skyscrapers is unoccupiable?

From the Empire State to the 1km-tall Jeddah Tower, our roundup of skyscrapers in numbers examines the race to be crowned world’s tallest building

In a world of ever-reducing space, a skyscraper is an efficient way to create homes and offices without too large a footprint. It is interesting, then, that so many skyscrapers are full of hot air. In the race for the biggest buildings, architects have fallen back on antennae and pointed spires – with the result that skyscrapers are not so much efficient uses of space, but overblown vanity projects.

Take the world’s tallest building, the Burj Khalifa in Dubai. It’s impressive at 828 metres tall, but nearly a third of that (29%) is unoccupiable, according to the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat. The Burj al Arab, also in Dubai, is much worse in this respect, with 39% of the entire building unusable. In fact, Dubai has five towers listed as the tallest buildings in “vanity height” – unusable height for the sake of it. Across these five, some 31% of total space is completely wasted.

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The Guardian

Feb 03 2017
David Hockney and Robots: this week’s best UK exhibitions

Tate Britain hosts the latest retrospective of the influential Yorkshireman’s work, while the Science Museum tackles our obsession with automata

When David Hockney splashed into the swinging 60s in a gold jacket and pop art spectacles, he made more impact on the public than any British artist since William Hogarth. With his confident, funny and sexy early paintings of gay life, he helped to change British society. Then he went to LA and became its definitive painter of brainless palm trees in empty blue skies. Hockney is a truly popular artist yet also a sensitive and solitary one who has always followed his own visual curiosity, even when it led him back to his native Yorkshire to paint the landscapes of his childhood. This exhibition offers a bigger view of his richly pleasurable art.
Tate Britain, SW1, Thursday 9 February to Monday 29 May

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The Guardian

Feb 02 2017
Quiz: guess the city from its skyline

A city’s skyline can be its defining feature – from Sydney’s Opera House to New York’s skyscrapers – but can you identify places based on their skylines alone?

New York

Dubai

Cairo

Delhi

Shanghai

Toronto

Singapore

Seoul

Dublin

Edinburgh

London

Oxford

Bangkok

Dubai

Cairo

Singapore

Paris

Cairo

Moscow

Milan

Vancouver

Beijing

Chicago

Perth

Toronto

Mumbai

Seattle

Sydney

Frankfurt

Seoul

Cincinnati

Melbourne

Moscow

Istanbul

Sao Paulo

Shanghai

Frankfurt

Toronto

Ankara

Seattle

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The Guardian

Feb 02 2017
Live flesh: the fetish club art of Jo Brocklehurst – in pictures

Jo Brocklehurst’s vibrant illustrations were sketched out in the corners of 80s fetish and punk clubs, immortalising a flamboyant subculture. Her work is exhibited in the show Nobodies and Somebodies at the House of Illustration

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The New York Times

Feb 02 2017
Art and Museums in NYC This Week
Our guide to new art shows, and some that will be closing soon.
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The New York Times

Feb 02 2017
My Space: A Tour of Ken Fulk’s Midcentury House in San Francisco
The exuberant designer, a favorite of Silicon Valley titans, believes great architecture can “lift you up.”
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The Art Newspaper

Feb 02 2017
Urs Fischer’s Kiss provides anger therapy at Sadie Coles
Urs Fischer's plasticine version of The Kiss after the private view—or therapy session—at Sadie Coles HQ (Image: Sadie Coles via Instagram)
Blame Trump, blame Brexit, blame the bleak midwinter blues. Whatever the cause, love was certainly not in the air at Sadie Coles on the night of 1 February, when Urs Fischer invited visitors to re-mould his larger-than-life plasticine replica of Rodins The Kiss. It all began quite genteellyin honour of the Brexit vote simultaneously unfolding in Parliament that evening, your correspondent embedded a euro into the back of the lovers accompanied by the words RIP. But as the private view unfolded, the tenderly embracing couple were rapidly subjected to a near-frenzy of gouging, tearing and mutilating, with some visitors climbing on to the figures to wreak maximum destruction. 

The Swiss-born, New York-based Fischer frequently subjects his work to unpredictable transformationspast pieces have included giant figures made from melting wax candles and clay sculptures randomly created by volunteersbut even he seemed nonplussed at the aggression meted out on his latest sculpture. But as Sadie Coles staffers started to wind down proceedings, the artist responded philosophically that he hoped the experience had provided a therapeutic outlet, commenting that everyone did seem quite angry. All in all, a rather hands-on example of the healing power of art.    
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The Art Newspaper

Feb 02 2017
TEFAF New York’s spring edition looks to offer solid bets in an uncertain world
New York’s Park Avenue Armory is home to Tefaf’s two US fairs. (Photo: © Julia Rubinic)
TEFAF New York, which returns to the Park Avenue Armory from 4-8 May, has released a list of exhibitors for its second US edition. Unlike the fall fairwhich was devoted to work from antiquity through the 19th centurythe spring edition is focused on (but not limited to) Modern and contemporary art, with the tableau rounded out by design and decorative arts, Oceanic and African artefacts, and antiquities.

Under the direction of fair organizers Jeff Rabin and Michael Plummer, whose Spring Masters fair used to occupy the same time slot and venue, the overall emphasis on Modern classics suggests that they intend to compete with the citys auctions later that month, rather than with the concurrent, more-contemporary Frieze New York (5-7 May).

Unsurprising for the Maastricht-based parent company, the list of 92 exhibitors is heavy on Europeans. It also features blue-chip heavyweights from both American coastsDavid Zwirner, Berggruen Gallery, Hauser & Wirth, Richard Grayand a large contingent of dealers in secondary-market 20th-century art, such as Applicat-Prazan, bringing postwar French paintings by Pierre Soulages and Nicolas de Stal as well as related works by Zao Wou-Ki and Wifredo Lam; and Tornabuoni Arte, offering abstractions by Enrico Castellani, Lucio Fontana, and Paolo Scheggi.

Eight participants from the fall edition will be back, including Axel Vervoordt, Bernard Goldberg Fine Arts, Bowman Sculpture, Cahn International, Charles Ede, Dickinson, Didier, and Galerie Jacques Germain.

A handful of exhibitors are relatively fresh to the New York scene, including the London-based contemporary gallery Hidde van Seggelen and the Latin masters-oriented Galeria Sur, from Punta del Este, Uruguay. Specialists in 20th-century works on paper, Wienerroither & Kohlbacher of Vienna, have previously exhibited in Master Drawings week in New York.

Design and decorative arts specialists include Dansk Mbelkunst, Carpenters Workshop, Demisch Danant, Laffanour/Galerie Downtown, and Vallois, with Art Nouveau and Bauhaus-era pieces at Yves Macaux and Oscar Graf. The tribal, Oceanic, and antiquities categories will be augmented by Tambaran Gallery, Galerie Meyer, and Daniel Ghezelbash Archologie.

I think its already a success, given the people who are participating, says N ew York dealer Christophe Van de Weghe. And the dates are amazing, everyone is already in town it will be a real destination.

Offering works by Calder, Picasso, Warhol, and Basquiat, Van de Weghe and other dealers seem poised to deliver on the demand for acknowledged masters with a proven resale record. However, with so many outlets for similar material by the same artists, the pressure will be on for dealers to source prime examples that will stand up toand out fromtheir peers offerings.
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The Art Newspaper

Feb 02 2017
Scottish artist Douglas Gordon to receive France’s highest honour
Douglas Gordon (Image: Colin Davison/Great North Run Culture/Locus+ Archive)
Douglas Gordon will receive the French title of Commandeur des Arts et des Lettres at the French embassy in Berlin, where he lives. The Scottish-born artist was awarded the title in 2012 and will accept the medal of honour from the French Ambassador to Germany at a private ceremony on 15 February.

Commandeur is the highest decoration granted to cultural figures by the French government. Only a handful of artists have received the award, which was established in 1957, including William Kentridge, Nan Goldin and Anish Kapoor. The only other Scotsman to receive the honour is the actor Sean Connery.

Gordon, who often works with film, is best known for installations like 24 Hour Psycho (1993), an adaptation of Alfred Hitchcoks film Psycho slowed down to play over 24 hours. He received his BA at the Glasgow School of Art (1984-88), and then undertook the post-graduate programme at the Slade School of Art in London (1988-90).



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The Art Newspaper

Feb 02 2017
Wrong in the right way: Kenneth Goldsmith on why Picabia’s false Modernism feels so true
Francis Picabia’s The Lovers, after the rain (1925)  from his “Romantic” period. (© 2016 Artists Rights Society [ARS], New York/ADAGP, Paris. Photo: © Musée d’Art Moderne/Roger-Viollet)
On the heels of a US election season riddled with cries of fake and rigged, it is worth remembering that certain Modern artists embraced those exact qualities as being more truthful than truth itself. None did this more so than Francis Picabia (1879-1953).

From the outset, he was blatantly fraudulent. Reeking of unabashed insincerity, he cannibalised every -ism he encountered, chewed it up and joyfully spit it back into the faces of the establishment. David Bowie used to say that he wasnt really a rock star, but an actor playing a rock star. The same could be said for Picabia: he played the role of an artist, producing an oeuvre of spectacular fakenessfake Cubism, fake Surrealism, fake Social Realism, fake Romanticism, and finally, in his last works, fake Dadaism. For a half century, Picabia brilliantly trolled the art world. Everything he did was purposefully wrong.

Nowhere is this more apparent than in his first body of mature work, a series of bad Impressionist-style paintings that he made in his mid 20s. Looking at them in his career survey at the Museum of Modern Art, you sense that something is very off. Instead of the lyrical play of light and air that are the hallmarks of Impressionism, these are wooden, static and claustrophobic. Desperate for some explanation, I turned to the wall text: Picabia is believed to have worked from photographic postcards rather than immersing himself in nature and painting outdoors. In this he travestied the original spirit of Impressionism and that styles en plein air (in the open air) techniques.


The master of kitsch


Its hystericalhe cheated! And whats more, when these paintings were shown, they were lauded. One reviewer enthusiastically declared: Never would we have dared imagine that M. Picabia could arrive so quickly at this maturity, this mastery. It was a great prank, but it was more than a mere leg-pull; it was an act of institutional critique perpetuated on Impressionism before the paint on their pictures had dried (Picabias works were painted in the early 1900s). Picabia outed Impressionisms secret relationship to technology; after all, as photographs of Monet in his studio prove, he did not always paint en plein air. And wasnt his serial way of working influenced, in part, by photography? In retrospect, Picabias faked Impressionism is every bit as authentic as Monets.

His take on Cubism was equally skewed. As opposed to Picasso or Braques finely crafted, small-scaled, monochrome, brainy canvases, he produced eight-foot tall Expressionist abstractions drenched in brash color. Instead of caf culture tropeschair caning, absinthe bottles and newspapersPicabias Cubist paintings depict what looks like the motion of fleshy bodies having sex seen from many angles. In the mid-1920s, after Cubism blew over and things swung back toward figuration, Picabia followed suit by using kitschy postcards as the basis for his Romantic figurative work. By the early 1940s, during the French Vichy regimeand shortly before his arrest as a Nazi collaborator (the charges were later dropped)he made bad Social Realist paintings derived from images he swiped from softcore porn magazines. Although they came awfully close to the style of Nazi-sanctioned artists, there was something wrong about them; they were too perversely weird to ever pass for official art. And so it goes until the early 1950s when he deconstructed Dadahis own movement, if he ever had onewith a series of painterly dots that referred back to his mechanical works of the 1910s. Bereft of any political or artistic urgency, he purposely deflated his own radical legacy into decorative pabulum.

Ironically, the only gallery that rings of true authenticity is the one dedicated to his earlier Dada period from 1915-22. The heroic mechanical paintings and drawings based on machines and industrial parts are entirely original. The same goes for his profusion of ephemeral journals, poems and prints, which are typographical masterpieces of invention, beauty and elegance. Yet weirdly, his Dada room contains the least amount of Dada sprit in the entire exhibition.


What Picabia predicted


There is no one iconic image that stands for Picabia in the way that, say, water lilies do for Monet or soup cans do for Warhol. By comparison, Picabias oeuvre is an ongoing series of purposely weak images that dance around Modernisms strong points in order to undermine them. But from a 21st-century digital perspective, the poor imageas critics like Hito Steyerl and Boris Groys have suggestedis an effective way of critiquing power structures. Picabia, it seems, predicted the way images would be circulated and consumed in the digital age.

The timing of the show is perfect: in Dadas centenary year, America elected a latter-day Ubu Roi for president. The Dada dictator first imagined by Alfred Jarry in his 1896 play of the same name is a narcissistic kleptocrat who impetuously invades various countries, swears like a sailor and sets about robbing his populace blind. He specialises in disinformation and is the early Modernist embodiment of post-truth. You can almost hear Picabia on the sidelines giggling with delight, saying: See? I told you so.

Kenneth Goldsmith is a poet and the author of Wasting Time on the Internet (Harper Perennial) and Capital (Verso)


Francis Picabia: Our Heads Are Round so Our Thoughts Can Change Direction, Museum of Modern Art, New York, co-organised by the Kunsthaus Zurich, until 19 March
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The Art Newspaper

Feb 02 2017
“Experimentation and bold moves”: Ben Genocchio tells us what to expect from the Armory Show
Genocchio decided to take the Armory Show’s industrial venue, Piers 92 and 94 on the city’s far west side, as his starting point
Change is coming to New Yorks oldest fair for new art. Since Ben Genocchio took over as director of the Armory Show (2-5 March) in late 2015 (from Noah Horowitz, who left to become director of the Americas for Art Basel), he has been on a mission to revitalise the format with the hope, he says, of putting the focus back on the art.

Genocchio, a former art critic and editorial director of Artnet News, decided to take the Armory Shows 250,000 sq. ft industrial venue, Piers 92 and 94 on the citys far west side, as his starting point. I think trying to understand what distinguishes the fair, good or bad, and making that a key component is a smart way of making it a more distinctive and memorable experience, he says.

For the first edition fully under his control he has enlisted the architectural firm Bade Stageberg Cox to revamp the floor plan of Piers 92 and 94known more for their capaciousness than their aestheticswidening the aisles, reorienting the booths, and adding lounge areas. Most significantly, he has jettisoned the Modern versus contemporary divide that long characterised the two piers. Instead, a sector called Insights will feature art made before 2000 in solo, two-artist and thematic presentations from 36 dealers; in comparison, this is nearly half of the 55 dealers that used to exhibit in the Modern sector on Pier 92. Quality has been the most important factor in our consideration this year, Genocchio says.

The full exhibitor list of 209 international galleries features 71 who are new or returning after an absence, including heavy hitters like Galleria Continua, Jeffrey Deitch, Lvy Gorvy, Pace, and White Cube; incubators of emerging talents like Various Small Fires and Galerie Fons Welters; and a strong contingent from Asia, including Tang Contemporary Art and Vitamin Creative Space.

Genocchio has brought back Eric Shiner of Sothebys, who curated the Focus section in 2013, to commission a new sector of large-scale installations called Platform, which will feature 11 works by artists such as Ai Weiwei, Olga de Amaral, Douglas Coupland, Patricia Cronin, and Ivn Navarro. Other fairs just put stuff in spaces that [dealers] cant sell. This isnt that, Genocchio says. These are works that are conceived for the space and installed in such a way that they reflect and hopefully draw attention to that space, such as an 11-piece sculpture commission by Yayoi Kusama installed in the middle of a new town square on Pier 94. Elsewhere, the art will dictate the architecture, with a curving, 63-foot painting by Jun Kaneko informing the shape of the VIP lounge.

The fairs Focus section, which was previously devoted to a geographic hook (last year, Africa; in 2015, China), is also getting a revamp, with Genocchio giving the Los Angeles County Museum of Art curator Jarrett Gregory carte blanche to curate a show of works that will be for sale by the artists galleries. Her themeWhat Is To Be Done?will feature works by Deana Lawson, Teresa Margolles, and Anna Titova, among others. Its a way of bringing important, relevant new art to the fair that I wouldnt otherwise have," Genocchio says. "Hopefully that preserves the idea of discovery that was so crucial to the geographical region and that people loved, but it puts the emphasis very much on quality and the relevance of the artist.

As for the artists themselves, Genocchio has made sure to involve them in Armory Live, the accompanying series of talks and panels, with Shiva Ahmadi, Marilyn Minter, Charles Atlas, David Salle, Alex Katz, Dana Schutz, Chris Martin, and Shahzia Sikander scheduled to appear. And where the Armory Show has traditionally offered private collection tours to its VIPs, this year, artists studios will also be open for viewing.

Whether these changes will pay off in sales remains to be seen. Genocchio argues that timid tweaks will not suffice when his competition in March includes not only the concurrent Art Dealers Association of Americas Art Show at the Park Avenue Armory, but also the worlds best-attended fair, ARCO in Madrid, as well as Art Dubai and Art Basel in Hong Kong. New York is about experimentation and bold moves and the fair reflects that, he says. Dealers want to bring challenging and exciting work because they know the New York audience has the appetite.
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The Art Newspaper

Feb 02 2017
Bamiyan Cultural Centre gets under way
Construction on the Bamiyan Cultural Centre started in September 2016 (Photo: Ghulam Reza Mohammadi, courtesy of Unesco, Kabul)
A cultural centre at the Unesco World Heritage site in Afghanistan where the Taliban destroyed the Bamiyan Buddhas is due to open to the public in summer 2018. Construction began in September on the 2,450 sq. m building by the Argentinian firm M2R Arquitectos, which beat more than 1,000 other entrants in an international design competition. Formed by a system of negative spaces carved into the ground, the complex will house two galleries dedicated to Afghan archaeology, a performance hall and a tea-house. The South Korean government is funding the $2.5m project, while the Afghan ministry of urban development and housing has pledged $1.5m to create a garden.

Unesco experts are still debating the controversial plan to rebuild the pair of rock-cut Buddha statues demolished by the Taliban in 2001. The Bamiyan working group met in Munich in December to discuss the urgent conservation of the ancient site, particularly the fragile western niche. The groups last meeting in 2013 revealed that German archaeologists had partially rebuilt the eastern Buddhas feet and legs without authorisation from Unesco, which opposed reconstruction in 2011. The Afghan government continues to back the reconstruction of at least one of the statues. Unesco is expected to make its final recommendations in October.
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The New York Times

Feb 02 2017
My Space: Ken Fulk’s Lofty Perch
The designer counts Silicon Valley titans among his clients, and his own house is striking as well.
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The New York Times

Feb 02 2017
Show Us Your Wall: On Bernard Lumpkin’s Wall, a Visual Conversation About His Roots
The collector discusses recent acquisitions and why artists are part of his extended family.
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The New York Times

Feb 02 2017
The Guggenheim Museum’s Deputy Director Steps Down
The departure of Ari Wiseman, who is leaving to start a studio with his brother David Wiseman, comes as the museum also has no chief curator.
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The New York Times

Feb 02 2017
Santiago Calatrava to Design His First London Complex
The architect’s 1.4-million-square-foot project, next to the O2 arena, will have three curved towers, a domed passageway, an arcade and a footbridge.
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artforum.com

Feb 02 2017
PASSAGES: Klaus Kertess (1940–2016)
Billy Sullivan on Klaus Kertess (1940–2016)
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The New York Times

Feb 02 2017
The Hudson Theater Is Back on Broadway
The Hudson Theater, one of Broadway’s oldest, has been renovated and is reopening to a revival of “Sunday in the Park With George,” starring Jake Gyllenhaal.
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The New York Times

Feb 02 2017
Chocolate Sculpture, With a Bitter Taste of Colonialism
Cacao beans made fortunes in colonial Africa. Now they are a staple of sculptors in the Democratic Republic of Congo, whose work is at SculptureCenter.
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The Guardian

Feb 02 2017
The drop in museum visitors reveals a nation without aspiration or hope | Jonathan Jones

A government report shows that visitor numbers to UK museums and galleries are down by millions. This is not due to distracted young minds – it is a symptom of economic strife

Britain’s leading museums and galleries, according to figures released by the Department for Culture, Media and Sport, have dramatically lost visitors. Museums including the Tate galleries, National Gallery, V&A and British Museum collectively clocked up 47.6 million people from April 2015 to March 2016 – a significant fall from the previous year and the end of a British museum boom that had become a matter of national pride. Our museums are no longer on the up; the culture-hungry crowds are not growing. Why? And what is to be done?

Related: British museums and art galleries hit by 2m fall in visitors

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The Guardian

Feb 02 2017
The Sun gets a David Hockney on its masthead

British artist redesigns newspaper’s masthead for a one-off edition ahead of the opening of his biggest-ever exhibition at Tate Britain

Artist David Hockney has redesigned the Sun’s masthead for a one-off edition of the newspaper, which will be seen on newsstands on Friday.

Related: The last 10 years of David Hockney: from oil and canvas to iPad drawings – in pictures

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The Guardian

Feb 02 2017
Calatrava finally arrives in London – but is he rehashing old ideas?

Spanish architect Santiago Calatrava is loved for his striking designs and loathed for cost overruns. Will his £1bn project for Greenwich Peninsula stay on course?

The Star Wars theme tune was playing as London’s mayor, Sadiq Khan, arrived, flanked by his deputy mayors for housing and planning, to unveil a glowing perspex model of the capital’s new £1bn landmark on the Greenwich Peninsula. It was a suitably ominous tone to launch the first UK project by Spanish architect Santiago Calatrava, a man who has built a global reputation not only for his gleaming white space-age structures, but for leaving a trail of delays, inflated budgets and costly lawsuits in his wake.

Related: Greenwich Peninsula redevelopment to be crowned with £1bn glass landmark

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The New York Times

Feb 02 2017
For the Love of Italy
Take a 91-year-old Tuscan country chef, add the revered architect Renzo Mongiardino, and mix with the designs of Studio Peregalli — and you have some of the most exquisite restaurants in Milan, if not the world.
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The Art Newspaper

Feb 02 2017
Three to see: London
Lovely details in Do Ho Suh's distinctive fabric Hubs on show at Victoria Miro gallery in London (Image: The Art Newspaper/Instagram)
Do Ho Suh develops notions of dislocation and transience in a show of new fabric sculptures at Victoria Miro gallery (Passages/s, until 18 March). The exhibition centres on Hubs, a series of fabric pieces that Suh describes as in-between spaces, from the bedroom to the kitchen, for instance. But there is a departure in the show: Suh also shows a series of large-scale drawings that compress architectural features such as a staircase and a gate. These elements are sewn into gelatin tissue that dissolve once theyre immersed in water. So some parts are drawn out, and look almost 3D. The works are in between 2D and 3D as such. Again, its about playing with space, and transporting it, just like Ive done with the fabrics and rubbings. The drawings were made during a residency at the Singapore Tyler Print Institute.

Just a few months shy of his 80th birthday, the British artist David Hockney and his early etchings are the focus of a show in London that coincides with his much-anticipated retrospective at Tate Britain (9 February-29 May). The Complete Early Etchings 1961-64 at Hazlitt Holland-Hibbert (until 10 March) charts the rise of Hockney during his formative years whilst he finished his formal education at the Royal College of Art (RCA), began a professional career and won an art-prize trip to America; a country that became a lifelong reoccurring theme in his work. The show has several previously unseen works from private collections, a generously loaned self-portrait from Tate and a number of later paintings alongside the black, white and red etchings that elucidate the early career of an artist who candidly refuses to talk about it.


Hear the name Kipling and you are more likely to think of The Jungle Book than of Indian Arts and Crafts. Yet the lesser-known Lockwood Kipling (1837-1911), father of the English writer and poet Rudyard, was an influential figure in the Arts and Crafts movement in England and a champion of traditional Indian craftsmanship. After 30 years in India, Lockwood joined what is now the Victoria and Albert Museum and played a significant role in shaping its collection. Lockwood Kipling: Arts and Crafts in the Punjab and London at the V&A (until 2 April) traces his career, beginning with Indian objects he encountered at the 1851 Great Exhibition, including an enamelled gold bracelet set with diamonds. Also on display are objects Kipling sent home for the V&A, including a Buddha bust (around 1st- or 2nd-century) that is being shown for the first time in 60 years.




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The Art Newspaper

Feb 02 2017
Donald deserves an exhibition nod—for his sexist comments
President Donald Trump, left, and his wife Melania Trump at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, DC on 19 January. (Image: AP Photo/Evan Vucci)
Donald Trump has (unwittingly) contributed to a major exhibition focusing on male and female identity at the Stdel museum in Frankfurt. The show, entitled The Battle of the Sexes  (until 19 March), explores gender roles in art and society between 1860 and 1945 through works by Edvard Munch and Frida Kahlo, among others. But in a surprise turn, the US president is thanked in the exhibition catalogue. The curators, Felicity Korn and Felix Krmer, explain why Donald deserves their gratitude. With his comments made during the US election campaign, Donald Trump hasunintentionallyconvinced plenty of sceptics that the battle of the sexes is still a relevant topic, they told The Art Newspaper.
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The Guardian

Feb 02 2017
Greenwich Peninsula redevelopment to be crowned with £1bn glass landmark

Spanish architect Santiago Calatrava unveils spectacular London building that will sit on top of renamed tube station

A £1bn building topped with a crown-shaped cluster of glass towers, inspired by the 19th-century designs of Isambard Kingdom Brunel, is planned as part of a major redevelopment of the area around London’s O2 Arena.

The Peninsula Place development will sit on top of North Greenwich underground station beside the O2, covering 1.4m sq ft and featuring 800 apartments including 200 “affordable” homes, as well as offices, shops, restaurants, a cinema, a performance venue and hotel.

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The Guardian

Feb 02 2017
Jimmie Durham: At the Center of the World review – America's native son finally comes home

The Native American artist’s most trenchant political statement remains his choice to live abroad – making his first US retrospective all the more potent

Jimmie Durham’s retrospective, At the Center of the World, curated for the Hammer Museum by Anne Ellegood, landed almost prophetically in the aftermath of a big American week: the new president loosed the dogs of oil on the Standing Rock water protectors, withdrew funds from reproductive service providers, and pulled up the drawbridge against refugees.

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The Guardian

Feb 02 2017
Mechanical silver swan that entranced Mark Twain lands at Science Museum

An 18th-century automaton admired by US writer to be star attraction at London museum’s Robots exhibition

A robotic swan that entranced Mark Twain and generations of other viewers will be a star attraction at the Science Museum’s Robots exhibition when it opens next week.

The banal truth behind the piece – the nuts and bolts, levers and cogwheels that for almost 250 years have powered a lifesize silver swan to play music and catch a golden fish out of a crystal stream – has been laid bare in a workroom at the west London museum.

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The Art Newspaper

Feb 02 2017
Director

Salary Package:  Competitive




Location:    Great Pulteney Street, Bath




The Board of the Holburne Museum in Bath is inviting applications for their next Director, following the appointment of the current Director to the post of Sackler Director at Dulwich Picture Gallery, London from the Spring of this year.




The Holburne Museum, whose mission statement is Changing Lives through Art, is a treasure house of Old Master paintings, portrait miniatures, porcelain, Renaissance bronzes and ceramics, silver, embroidery and eighteenth century British portraits, most notably by Ramsay, Stubbs, Zoffany and Gainsborough. With a national profile for high quality exhibitions and a reputation for working with leading contemporary artists, creating a fresh and exciting response to the historic collection, the Holburne attracts an audience of over 100,000 visitors each year, engages about 9,000 people in its learning and community engagement programme and operates on an annual budget of 1.3m with a staff of 21 FTEs.




The key role of the next Director of the Holburne Museum is to ensure its long-term future by working with the Board to establish a business model that can combine artistic excellence and innovation with the financial under-pinning that ensures the Museums longer-term future. Building on what has been achieved to date, including the development of the Endowment Fund, the new Director will be required to improve the organisations income generation and fund-raising capability while ensuring its artistic integrity is maintained.




In the new Director, the Trustees are looking for a museum professional who has a track record of driving change to improve financial performance within a broader remit which also includes ensuring the excellent reputation of the organisation and attracting an ever-increasing and diverse audience. A good leader with experience of managing change and an excellent track record of nurturing stakeholder relations, candidates will bring to the Holburne a judicious mix of commercial savvy combined with the pursuit of artistic excellence to ensure its place among the top small museums of the world in perpetuity.




To learn more and to receive an application pack, please be in touch with Liz Amos or Mary Deegan of Liz Amos Associates on +44 (0)20 7464 4351 or at liz.amos@lizamosassociates.com or mary.deegan@lizamosassociates.com


CLOSING DATE FOR APPLICATIONS:  Friday 3rd March 2017 (close of business)   
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artforum.com

Feb 02 2017
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The Guardian

Feb 02 2017
Q is for quality: share your artwork now

For this month’s art project, curator of Emma Hamilton: Seduction and Celebrity Quintin Colville invites you to share your artwork on the theme of quality

In her own time, Emma Hamilton was never considered a “woman of Quality” – the term often used to describe the elite in 18th-century Britain. Born into poverty in rural Cheshire in 1765, the daughter of a blacksmith, society’s gatekeepers never considered her one of the club. History has also been cruel, usually remembering Emma only as a temptress and seductress who won the heart of the great naval hero Horatio Nelson. Caught between social prejudice on one side and misogyny on the other, Emma had the odds stacked against her.

However, the narrow confines of “quality” could never encompass Emma’s astonishing story – one of the most remarkable female lives of the era. While still in her teens, she rose from domestic service to become the muse of the great portrait painter George Romney. Her gifts for capturing theatrical expressions and personas shone still more brightly in Naples, where she lived with the British envoy Sir William Hamilton. Known as the “Attitudes”, Emma perfected this new performance art, and became famous from Madrid to St Petersburg. She also became the close friend of Maria Carolina, queen of Naples and daughter of the Habsburg empress Maria Theresa. Together they were deeply involved in the political and military machinations of the French revolutionary war. It was through these state affairs that her own affair with Nelson would later begin.

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The Guardian

Feb 02 2017
Striking a pose: your art on the theme of portraiture

We asked you to share your art on the theme of portraiture. Lucy Peter, Assistant Curator of Paintings at the Royal Collection Trust, has selected her favourites, with captions by the artists themselves

Share your artwork for this month’s theme – Q for “quality” – by clicking on the button below

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The New York Times

Feb 02 2017
Art Review: Tattoo Ink: How It Got Under New York’s Skin
“Tattooed New York,” a colorful show at the New-York Historical Society, explores the city’s long fascination with skin as canvas and the art of self-presentation.
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The Guardian

Feb 01 2017
Out of many, one people: Jamaica in the 1890s – in pictures

An archive of images from 19th-century Jamaica shows a country freed from the bonds of slavery but still under white rule

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The Art Newspaper

Feb 01 2017
Uffizi to show more female artists
The Uffizi Galleries in Florence will show more work by female artists starting this spring, as one of the worlds oldest art museums seeks to redress a historic gender imbalance in a long-term initiative. An exhibition aiming to revive the reputation of Suor Plautilla Nelli (1523-87), a nun who is Florences first-known female Renaissance painter, is due to open at the Uffizi on 8 March to coincide with International Womens Day (Plautilla Nelli: Convent Art and Devotion in the Footsteps of Savonarola, until 4 June). Two weeks later, the Uffizis sister museum across the River Arno, the Pitti Palace, will open a show of self-portraits by the late Austrian artist and feminist Maria Lassnig (Maria Lassnig: Woman Power, 24 March-23 June).

The Plautilla Nelli display will be the first in an open-ended annual series of exhibitions dedicated to female artists from history, says Eike Schmidt, the director of the Uffizi and the Pitti Palace. The German-born art historian, who was formerly a curator at the Minneapolis Institute of Arts, is one of seven foreign directors appointed in a dramatic shake-up of Italys top state museums in 2014. Around a dozen paintings by Nelli, several of them only recently identified in churches and museums across central Italy, will be shown alongside works from her Dominican convent, Schmidt says. The Florence-based Advancing Women Artists Foundation, which has restored a number of Nellis works, is funding the publication of a catalogue.

Meanwhile, the decision to show Lassnigs paintings was inspired by the Uffizis famous collection of self-portraits, which dates back to the 17th century. The selection of around 30 worksdrawn from the Albertina in Vienna, which is staging an exhibition of Lassnigs drawings in Mayis also a statement of feminist intent. Lassnig was always concerned about her body as a female body, and the relationship between male and female bodies, Schmidt says. The exhibition could herald a parallel programme of annual contemporary shows by female artists at the Pitti Palace.

The initiatives were sparked by the directors conversation in 2015 with the US-based activist collective the Guerrilla Girls, who have spent three decades challenging inequality in the art world. The Uffizi was not among the almost 400 European art institutionsall Modern and contemporary spacesrecently surveyed by the group about their efforts to increase diversity. (The results of that campaign are on view at the Whitechapel Gallery in London until 5 March.) But the museum created by the Medici family and opened in 1769 by the grand duke of Tuscany holds what is arguably the largest collection of [works by] female artists before the 19th century, Schmidt says.

Many of these belong to the well-known but little-seen collection of self-portraits that formerly lined the narrow Vasari corridor between the Uffizi and the Pitti Palace. In November, the corridor closed for refurbishment. Works by Old Masters such as Raphael and Rembrandt, as well as lisabeth Louise Vige-Le Brun and Marietta Robusti, the daughter of Tintoretto, were accessible only to private tour groupsfar less than 1% of the more than two million visitors who flock to the Uffizi every year, according to Schmidt. Female self-portraits could fill more than an entire room of the museums main building when the collection is reinstalled there this autumn, he says.

In an interview with The Art Newspaper last year, Frida Kahlo of the Guerrilla Girls warned that tokenism is more a part of the problem than the solution. The Uffizi staged an exhibition of around 100 historical and contemporary self-portraits by women in 2010. Now, by giving female artists regular exhibitions and a permanent presence in the collection displays, the museum aims to avoid ghettoisation, Schmidt says. This is not just a special initiative to do for three or five years. I dont know if Im still going to be director, but I think we could easily go on for 20 years.

Other major art museums are also expanding the canon. Exhibitions devoted to overlooked female artists, or Old Mistresses, have included Vige-Le Brun at the Grand Palais in Paris, which last year travelled to the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. Last October, the Prado in Madrid opened its first solo show of a female artist, Clara Peeters (until 19 February). Schmidt says: Some of the most famous artists of the present day happen to be female, so that alone prompts the question: where did this all start and how did this evolve? I think we are overdue and ready to put great female artists of the past back on view.

UPDATE: This article was updated on 10 February to include new titles and dates for the Plautilla Nelli and Maria Lassnig exhibitions. 
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The Art Newspaper

Feb 01 2017
Three to see: New York
Lois Dodd, Cows and Clouds (1961). (© Lois Dodd, courtesy Alexandre Gallery, New York)
With no context, you might wonder what Alexandre Gallerys concurrent solo exhibitions Lois Dodd: Early Paintings and Sally Hazelet Drummond: Selected Paintings (until 25 February) are doing together. Both artists belonged to the Tanager Gallery (Dodd was a founding member) and both are included in the current exhibition Inventing Downtown: Artist-Run Galleries in New York City, 1952-65 at New York Universitys Grey Art Gallery (until 1 April). Enjoy losing yourself in the hypnotic colour fields of five of Drummonds pointillist monochrome canvases or delight in the clever lines of Dodds works, which sometimes depict cows.

Those outraged by recent events can take a break from marching and head to the International Center for Photography for the exhibition Perpetual Revolution: the Image and Social Change (until 7 May), which looks at how social media is a catalyst for change. The show includes still and moving images split into themes like #BlackLivesMatter, climate change, terrorist propaganda and the right-wing fringe. Striking images include Rachel Schragiss massive, 12-foot-long mixed media collage Confronting the Climate: A Flowchart of the Peoples Climate March (2014) and Sheila Pree Brights 8-minute, two-screen video #1960Now: Art + Intersection (2015), which features footage from protests after the killings of Michael Brown and Freddie Gray.

Theodoros Stamos is among the most poorly-known of the first generation of Abstract Expressionist painters, which is a situation that the exhibition Theodoros Stamos: Contemplations on the Universal (until 4 March) at Hollis Taggart Galleries aims to remedy. The show includes around 35 works and covers the 40-year period between the late 1940s and the late 1980s. In the latter half of his career, Stamos began spending extensive time in Greece. Some works, like the painting Olympia Sun-Box (1967), channel ancestral myths. The show especially focuses on biomorphic pictures from 1949 and colour field paintings from the late 1970s. It is accompanied by a catalogue with an essay by the art historian Jeffrey Grove.
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The Art Newspaper

Feb 01 2017
It's time the art market got tough on fakes
In a court sketch from March 2016, the Knoedler legal team confers before announcing a settlement in the case brought by the collectors Domenico and Eleanore De Sole against the gallery. The De Soles had sought $25m, alleging that the gallery’s director,
With the Knoedler trial still fresh in peoples minds and an Old Master forgery scandal linked to works attributed to Cranach and Hals among others recently uncovered, the question of how to reduce the number of fakesof everything from Ming vases to post-war paintingscirculating on the market is more urgent than ever. At the annual art-crime symposium held in November at New York University, participants agreed that the culprit was the markets notorious secrecy. But discussions revealed deep divisions about what should be done. Insurers, auction houses, dealers and other players each have their own interests to protect in a market where, as one participant remarked, the level of greed... is so great.

Information is the currency of the art market, said lawyer Steven Thomas, the head of the art law practice at the Los Angeles law firm Irell & Manella. He offered an example showing how information was withheld in trying to close a sale. When one of his clients learned that an Impressionist painting he was interested in had been restored so extensively it was no longer considered authentic, he confronted the dealer, a prominent New York gallerist. Oh, you found out, was the cavalier response. Such is the attitude in a market where the burden of due diligence as a practical matter may fall on the buyer.

Mr X



But even simple provenance research may be impossible when a dealer or an agent mediates on behalf of an anonymous seller. The Knoedler scandal, of course, highlighted the problem of non-disclosure writ large, with buyers handing over a total of nearly $70m for more than 30 paintings from the collection of a mysterious Mr X. As was revealed at trial, although some experts told the gallery they doubted the paintings authenticity, Knoedler did not pass on that information to the buyers. Further, Knoedler never actually knew Mr Xs identity. But the buyers assumed it did, having only been told by the gallery that the owner preferred the usual industry practice of anonymity. Had Knoedler disclosed these facts, the plaintiffs said, they never would have bought the paintings. When a potential purchaser presented gallery director Ann Freedman with a contract requiring her to state, among other things, that the gallery did not know anything putting the works authenticity into question, she refused: that just was not how the art market worked.

In this system, dealers are not the only ones who benefit by keeping silent. Judd Grossman, the chair of the New York County Lawyers Association Art Law Committee, spoke of a Jackson Pollock expert who admitted that he sees forgeries all the time but doesnt do anything about it. After all, scholars have their own interests to protect; they may stay silent because they are afraid of being sued on an expanding array of grounds, from disparagement to professional negligence. Even if the authenticity of a work is called into question, a spooked seller may dump it without disclosing the compromising evidence. No one tells an owner his Franz Kline is faux. The result, the art consultant Martha Parrish told The Art Newspaper, is that all the fakes are roaming around and coming to market again.

To regulate or not?


So what is to be done? With art market participants unwilling to proffer critical information voluntarily, Christiane Fischer, the chief executive of AXA Art Americas, suggested that the government should require it: Its better for everyone if theres more regulation. But when the government does it, its ham-handed, objected Christopher Marinello, the chief executive of the Art Recovery Group, which maintains a database of stolen and fake art. He cited US regulations intended to curb the illegal slaughter of elephants by banning the sale of items with even a sliver of ivory. Its so over-regulatedthat its difficult to sell and affects the value of the work, he said.

And who would enforce the regulations? Attorney Lawrence Kaye, the co-chair of the Art Law Group at Herrick, pointed out that there is no dedicated enforcement agency in the US and it would be very hard to get a regulator that could enforce laws around the world. That is if those laws can get passed at all. In New York, a proposal to encourage scholars to sound the alarm by protecting them from frivolous lawsuits has been stalled in the state legislature for nearly three years.

Insurance companies could be a powerful force in keeping fakes out of the market, Marinello suggested. If buyers cannot get insurance, they might be more careful before they buy and sellers might be forced to step out of the shadows. When you buy property, you have a survey done or you cant get a mortgage. Banks control the market. Why dont insurers refuse to insure unless you have good due diligence? he asked. Ron Fiamma, the global head of private collections at AIG, which insures 52% of the people on ArtNews Top 200 Collectors List, had a simple answer. Insurers dont push for documents because its a competitive business, he said. Companies like his would be at a disadvantage unless everyone did it.

Some suggested that the market should police itself. But competing interests make self-regulation a mirage. There is no cohesive alliance, said Sherri Cohen, a director at Bonhams trusts and estates department, who noted that she sees art crime daily. Further muddying the waters, some of the most active buyers are also sellers. Big collectors control the market, so they prefer to see it go on as business as usual, noted one panellist.

Risky business


Given the impasse, Steven Thomas suggested an alternative. Attention should be focused not on due diligence but rather on who should bear the risk that a work is fake. He had no doubt it should be the dealers: they put the work on the market, get the money and control the information shared.

Thomas notes that market is already regulated, just inadequately. He cites two New York statutes designed to protect buyers and reduce the number of questionable works in circulation. Under one, when a dealer or auctioneer writes on an invoice that a work is by a particular artist, the invoice serves as a four-year guaranty that it is by that artist. The other statute applies only to multiples, theoretically at greater risk of unauthorised duplication. If a multiple is proven to be a fake, the dealer must refund the purchase price with interest, and if the buyer proves the seller was deceptive, the seller has to pay the buyers legal feesa protection, Thomas suggested, that could be extended to unique works as well.

At the very least, he says, the statute of limitations for each scenario is too short. Most owners do not discover they own a fake until they try to sell it typically after more than four years. Contrary to the statutes purpose, the risk of loss is then shifted back to the buyer. Thomas supports amending both laws so that the statute of limitations begins not on the date the buyer purchased the work but on the date they discover (or should have discovered) that it is fake.

Even this step to bring the laws effect back in line with its intent might meet resistance. Auction houses and dealers would likely have strong objections to a revision or expansion of the statute of limitations, said Gregory Clarick, of Clarick Gueron Reisbaum, who represented some of the Knoedler plaintiffs in their claims against the gallery. In his experience, sellers think four years is long enough to be held liable. They want that finality, he said. Clarick believes the judgments supporting the Knoedler buyers claims of fraud are the starting point to regulate the industry because they require honest and frank disclosure about works a dealer is selling. Marinello, though, doubts that relying on the courts is a suitable answer. Judges are on the same level as criminals when it comes to fine art, he said. They dont know much.

Legislation against frivolous lawsuits


The worth of a work of art hinges on its authenticity, so experts who render opinions are in everyones crosshairs. A proposal to protect them from frivolous lawsuits was introduced by Senator Betty Little and Assemblywoman Linda Rosenthal in New York in 2014.

Initially, the twin bills said that if a lawsuit against an authenticator was unsuccessful, the plaintiff must pay the defendant's legal fees. The costs can be steep: the Andy Warhol Foundation paid nearly $7m to defend itself in one lawsuit and later disbanded its authentication board. The bills do not protect any person or entity with a financial interest in the work of artsuch as a dealer who represents an artist's estate.

It was hoped the prospect of paying the other sides fees would discourage nuisance suits. However, in yet another instance of competing interests impeding change, the New York State Trial Lawyers Association lobbied for adjustments; as amended, the judge would decide whether the losing plaintiff has to pay. Even in its revised form, the law has not been passed. It will be reintroduced in early 2017, says Dean Nicyper, the lawyer spearheading the proposal.

Whose job is it anyway? what the experts say


All the fakes are roaming around and coming to market again. Martha Parrish, art consultant










Why dont insurers refuse to insure unless you have good due diligence? Christopher Marinello, Art Recovery Group









 

Because insurance is a competitive business. Ron Fiamma, AIG









 

The courts are "the starting point to regulate the industry. Gregory Clarick, Clarick Gueron Reisbaum
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The Art Newspaper

Feb 01 2017
How US museums are celebrating Black History Month, coast to coast
Njideka Akunyili Crosby, Super Blue Omo (2016) is on view at the Norton Museum of Art, West Palm Beach, Florida in the show Spotlight: Recent Acquisitions. (Image: courtesy the Artist and Victoria Miro, London. © Njideka Akunyili Crosby)
Museums around the United States have organised exhibitions and special events throughout February to celebrate Black History Month. If you were disappointed by the American presidents comments yesterday, turn to one of these venues instead.

The National Museum for African American History and Culture in Washington, DC celebrates Black History Month for the first time on the National Mall with a series of programmesincluding two film screenings, a symposium, a chamber performance and book signings and discussionsthat are free and open to the public. The programme kicked off with a screening of the 2016 film I Am Not Your Negro, in which the late author James Baldwinin archival footage, and narrated by Samuel L. Jacksontold a history of race relations in the US through reminiscences of the civil rights leaders Medgar Evers, Malcolm X and Martin Luther King Jr. Future events include a screening of the documentary Olympic Pride, American Prejudice about the hard victoriesboth in sports and culturewon by Black athletes at the 1936 Olympic Games in Berlin.

Susan E. Cahan, the dean of arts at Yale, discusses her recent book Mounting Frustration: the Art Museum in the Age of Black Power, written after 10 years of investigative research into racial inequality in the New York art world, in the talk What Is Contemporary? at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles on Thursday, 2 February (7pm). She will speak about the politicisation of New York museums and how institutions have historically dealt with black identity and works of art created by African Americans.

The Brooklyn Museum in New York is dedicating this months Target First Saturday events programme, on 4 February, to Black History Month. The programme includes screening and discussion with the co-producers of Fit the Description (6:30pm), a series of video interviews between black male civilians and black male police officers; and a live design presentation by Black Gotham Experience (6pm-9pm), a group that puts on walking tours and produces graphic novels to highlight how the African diaspora has shaped the history of New York City. The design team for the upcoming graphic novel Other Side of Wall Street will turn museum visitors into graphical art and display them live.

On 23 February, the Studio Museum in Harlem in New York will host Bearing Witness as Protest (6-8:30pm), which will include a walk through of the current exhibitions The Window and the Breaking of the Window and Circa 1970 (until 5 March). A public conversation is also planned focussing on dissent in art and how bearing witness can be a form of protest, led by the artist Oasa DuVerney, whose work is currently on show. The event is part of the Harlem-wide events programme AFROPUNK The Takeover-Harlem.

The Chrysler Museum of Art in Norfolk, Virginias events programme includes Deep River: The Marian Anderson Story on 4 February (1-2pm), a performance in collaboration with the Virginia Opera to tell the story of the career and civil rights advocacy of the celebrated opera singer.

Expanding Tradition: Selections from the Larry D. and Brenda A. Thompson Collection (until 7 May) at the Georgia Museum of Art at the University of Georgia in Athens is a show of around 60 works from the 19th century to the present by African American artists, including Kara Walker and Beauford Delaney. The couple donated around 100 works from their collection to the museum in 2012.

The Norton Museum of Art in West Palm Beach, Florida will stage the exhibition Spotlight: Recent Acquisitions (2 February-5 March), which shows new works by black artists in the collection, including Njideka Akunyili Crosbys Super Blue Omo (2016), Mickalene Thomass Naomi Looking Forward #2 (2016) and severak works by Willie Cole.

If you cant make it to a museum, head to the website of Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art in Bentonville, Arkansas for a blog series about African American artists in its collection. The first artist featured is the sculptor Mary Edmonia Lewis, who was also honoured with a Google doodle on Wednesday.

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The Art Newspaper

Feb 01 2017
Hockney’s early prints make London debut ahead of Tate retrospective
David Hockney, Jungle Boy (1964)
Just a few months shy of his 80th birthday, the British artist David Hockney and his early etchings become the focus of a show in London that coincides with his much-anticipated retrospective at Tate Britain (9 February-29 May). The Complete Early Etchings 1961-64 at Hazlitt Holland-Hibbert (3 February-10 March) in Londons St Jamess charts the rise of Hockney during his formative years whilst he finished his formal education at the Royal College of Art (RCA), began a professional career and won an art-prize trip to America; a country that became a lifelong reoccurring theme in his work.  

An idea hatched between the London gallery and the US-based print dealer Lyndsey Ingram, it is the first comprehensive show to contain an impression of every one of Hockneys pioneering early prints, which exalt the artists natural gift for draughtsmanship in a form he admits to only having adopted as a result of not being able to afford paint while studying.

Beginning with his first-ever etching Myself and My Heroes (1961), where Hockney strikes a portrait of himself aside his idols, the homosexual American poet Walt Whitman and the civil rights leader Mahatma Gandhi, the show establishes him as a young explorative and rebellious artist. Highlights include The Diploma (1962), a satirical self-awarded university qualification (which he was initially denied by the RCA after refusing to complete the written element of his course), and a complete series of A Rakes Progress (1961-63), Hockneys semi-autobiographical account of his first time in America based on William Hogarths 18th-century series in which a spendthrift heir squanders his fortune upon arrival in London. The show has several previously unseen works from private collections, a generously loaned self-portrait from Tate and a number of later paintings alongside the black, white and red etchings that elucidate the early career of an artist who candidly refuses to talk about it. Having recently set an $11.7m record for a single work at auction, it looks set to be a bumper year for Hockney.
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