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The Guardian

Nov 13 2018
Polly Borland on art, bodies and Melbourne in the 80s: 'It was kind of a free-for-all’

As the LA-based Melbourne artist’s surreal photographs grace Australian galleries, she talks selfies, Nick Cave and shooting the Queen

The group of friends would go on to become some of Australia’s most important artists, film-makers and musicians. But in Melbourne in the 1980s, they were just kids: young, hanging out, with an inexhaustible appetite for partying.

It was the era of punk and the “little band scene”, where small bands formed and dissolved over the course of a night or a week, playing in venues around St Kilda and Fitzroy.

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The New York Times

Nov 13 2018
Critic’s Notebook: Amazon’s HQ2 Will Benefit From New York City. But What Does New York Get?
Amazon promises tens of thousands of new jobs, but should we expect more than that?
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The New York Times

Nov 13 2018
New Director Expands MOCA’s Board With Four Global Members
Klaus Biesenbach chose new members based in art capitals outside California — and three have ties to MoMA PS1, where he had been the director.
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The New York Times

Nov 13 2018
Leonard Cohen Exhibition to Come to New York
After its debut at the Musée d’Art Contemporain de Montréal, “A Crack in Everything” will open at the Jewish Museum next year.
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The New York Times

Nov 13 2018
Walker in Minneapolis Raids Long Island City for New Director
Mary Ceruti will lead the Walker after nearly 20 years at the SculptureCenter in Queens. The Walker’s last leader stepped down amid conflict over a sculpture.
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The Guardian

Nov 13 2018
The world’s most stunning super structures – in pictures

A floating concert hall in Mexico, guesthouses on stilts in rural China and a visitor centre inspired by Lego in Denmark are among the 535 shortlisted projects from 57 countries for the World Architecture Festival Awards. The building of the year will be announced in Amsterdam at the end of this month.

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The Guardian

Nov 13 2018
Hitchcock remade and fake IDs: Paris Photo's altered reality

From doctored passport pics to stick-on Hitler moustaches, maverick minds and painstaking processes reign at the photography show where art meets commerce

Laid out under the ornate vaulted dome of the Grand Palais, Paris Photo is a daunting prospect even for the seasoned photography buff. It is, first and foremost, a market: the increasingly well-heeled clientele who are drawn there reflect the commercial clout of photography’s equivalent of Frieze – with all the same tensions between art and the hard sell that entails. Your best bet is to ignore the sales pitches and wander through the vast network of exhibition booths at will, following your instinct.

On the contemporary front, I was taken with Eamonn Doyle’s big, vivid prints from his new series, K, which were on show at Michael Hoppen’s exhibition space. The series features a ghostly female figure, draped in all-concealing fabric and silhouetted in stark relief against the elemental landscapes of the Atlantic west of Ireland. The images are a dramatic contrast to traditional renderings of grieving and hauntedness and to Doyle’s previous series of works, which depict the passing parade of people he encountered on the streets of his inner-city Dublin neighbourhood.

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The Guardian

Nov 13 2018
Saffron harvest in Greece – in pictures

Saffron – the spice so expensive it’s called ‘red gold’ – has brought jobs and money to a region better known for coal mines and unemployment. Most are young people who were shut out of the job market during Greece’s economic downturn. They returned to the countryside to make a living off the land

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The Guardian

Nov 12 2018
New York's squalid core: Jane Dickson in Times Square – in pictures

She operated the billboard in New York’s Times Square – giving artist and photographer Jane Dickson a bird’s eye view of the busy crew of strippers, hustlers and tourists that she and her fellow downtown artists chronicled and were inspired by. Read an interview with her here

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The Guardian

Nov 12 2018
Sleaze, hustlers and strippers: Jane Dickson's lost Times Square

Living and working in the grimy heart of 70s New York, Dickson’s photographs and paintings gave a close-up view of the nocturnal activities that made the place so notorious – and alluring

In 1978, Jane Dickson answered a job advert in the New York Times that read: “Artist wanted, willing to learn computers.” Soon afterwards, she was hired to work on the first digital light Spectacolor billboard on Times Square.

“I sat in an office on the third floor of a building just behind the giant screen,” she recalls. “I mainly worked night shifts at the weekend, programming the digitally animated visuals and, for the first few years, I ran the countdown for New Year’s Eve. That was my introduction to Times Square after dark. It really couldn’t have been more exciting or surreal.”

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The New York Times

Nov 12 2018
50 Years Later, Chicago Artists Are Getting Their Due
“The Time Is Now!” at the Smart Museum of Art in Chicago examines a watershed cultural moment and the African-American artists figures who defined it.
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The New York Times

Nov 12 2018
Like a Diamond in the Sky: The Rockefeller Center Christmas Tree Has a New Glow
Daniel Libeskind’s architectural feat — all 900 pounds, 70 spikes, and three million Swarovski crystals of it — will light up the night at Rockefeller Center.
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The Guardian

Nov 12 2018
Sweat it out: how to make art from your own body fluids

Artists from Warhol to Duchamp have created pieces used their own excreta. Now RCA graduate Alice Potts has joined them

Name: Body-fluid art.

Age: In theory, as old as the human body, but generally considered to be a modern phenomenon.

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The Guardian

Nov 12 2018
From Manus Island to sanctions on Iran: the art and opinions of Hoda Afshar

The Tehran-born Melbourne artist’s confronting photography puts people on the margins in the centre of the frame

At first glance the video looks like a tourism promo. There is lush tropical jungle. Fat, glistening fish. White sands. Azure water. Remain, by Iranian-Australian artist Hoda Afshar, was not filmed in paradise, however, but in a prison: Manus Island.

“I wanted to [move beyond] images of a refugee behind bars,” says Afshar. “I wanted the subject to decide how to share the story: to give them autonomy and agency.”

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The Guardian

Nov 12 2018
Pop's dark star: the return of Andy Warhol

He predicted Trump, selfies and social media – but a blockbuster retrospective reveals that it’s the overlooked later work which can truly move us today

In the summer of 1968, Valerie Solanas, a disgruntled bit player on the New York arts scene, broke into Andy Warhol’s office and shot him twice with a .32 Beretta. The bullets punctured Warhol’s lungs, stomach, liver and spleen, cutting the Pope of Pop down at the peak of his fame. Doctors briefly pronounced him dead at the scene.

Warhol recovered – but he was never the same. He turned his back on the in-crowd and embraced high society. He balanced lucrative portrait commissions with melancholy abstracts that left the critics unmoved. “I stopped being creative when I was shot,” Warhol would lament, although one wonders if this is entirely true. More likely he embarked on a tactical retreat. He wanted to dismantle his image and script his own exit line, an impish control freak right to the end.

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The Guardian

Nov 12 2018
Tate Liverpool to stage major Keith Haring exhibition

US artist, who died in 1990 aged 31, is best known for his visual motifs and Aids activism

Tate Liverpool is to stage the first big UK show devoted to the American artist Keith Haring, who died in 1990 aged just 31.

Related: A brief history of protest art from the 1940s until now - in pictures

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The New York Times

Nov 12 2018
Five More Museums Acquire Art From Souls Grown Deep Foundation
To reshape the narrative of art told by American institutions, the foundation will transfer 51 works by black self-taught artists to additional museums.
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The New York Times

Nov 12 2018
In a Netherlands Museum Director, the Nazis Found an Ally
As Dutch museums scour their holdings for Nazi-looted art, historians are revisiting a wartime arts administrator associated with tainted works.
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The New York Times

Nov 12 2018
8 Artists at the Paris Photo Fair Who Show Where Photography Is Going
The world’s largest photography show features works that go far beyond traditional two-dimensional prints. Some were even made without a camera.
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The Guardian

Nov 12 2018
Portrait of Humanity photography prize entries – in pictures

A boy riding a wave and a family picking flowers … these are some of the striking entries for the Portrait of Humanity prize, which is backed by the Guardian. The competition is judged by industry leaders and invites photographers of all levels to submit images expressing individuality, community and unity. To take part, enter your photos before 8 January 2019. This is the first in a series of monthly galleries of pictures selected by a Guardian picture editor.

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The Guardian

Nov 11 2018
Punk rock to pottery studio: how Brendan Huntley changed his tune

The former frontman for cult Melbourne band Eddy Current Suppression Ring talks about his unexpected artistic transition

Brendan Huntley has two art studios. One where he lives in Melbourne’s inner-north; that’s where he does most of his painting. Then there’s another way down south in Frankston, at his mother’s rambling house where he grew up, surrounded by bush and birds. This is where I meet him and it’s where he makes his extraordinary, primordial clay sculptures.

It’s so quiet here. This is semi-rural land, nowhere near the malls and freeways. There’s just the sounds of birds in the trees here, nothing else. It’s an artist’s idyll. “This is where I have control of my little world, in these creations,” he says. “This is my world. There’s something very satisfying about just being in it.”

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The New York Times

Nov 11 2018
Louvre Abu Dhabi Draws One Million People in Debut Year
Visitors from India top attendance, along with Germany, China, England, the U.S. and France. Some precious loans are returning to Paris — others are arriving.
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The Guardian

Nov 11 2018
Paula Rego: ‘It isn’t nice in my mind’

Visceral and unsettling, Paula Rego’s art has challenged us for decades. Now, at 83, she talks about cruel fables and the medicinal joy of champagne

There’s a moment in old age when some people become a little girl again, and it’s at this point in her life that I meet Dame Paula Rego, the 83-year-old artist who has always been fascinated by fairytales. “There’s a traditional Portuguese folk tale where a very poor couple have run out of food.” This is her favourite. “The children are crying so the wife cuts off her breast and cooks it for supper. The next day she cuts off her other breast. But on the third day she explains to her husband that there’s nothing left to eat, and he says, ‘We’ll have to start on the children.’” She likes it because it’s “ruthless and terrible,” which are also words that have been used to describe her work, along with comical and visceral and grotesque. She sits, slowly. “I’m very, very old. But I’m an idiot. I feel very young. How old do I feel?” She thinks for a second, her eyes slightly glazed. She smiles constantly. “Eight,” she settles on, firmly.

Paula Rego, who was born into a privileged family in Portugal during a dictatorship (though she was “being repressed and restrained by my mother, not Salazar”), began exhibiting with the London Group in the 1960s alongside David Hockney. She became the first associate artist at the National Gallery and today is one of our greatest living painters. Her themes are power and possession, childhood, and sexual transgression; in The Policeman’s Daughter (1987), a girl polishes her absent father’s jackboot, her fist rammed in deep. She offers me some ginger tea.

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The Guardian

Nov 11 2018
Home Futures review – a century of living the dream

Design Museum, London
An illuminating exploration of today’s home seen through the ideas of 20th-century architects and designers moves from the Russian revolution to 70s escapism and some strangely accurate predictions…

For a brief moment around 1970 everything was going to be inflatable. In the future, imagined some of the most progressive architects and designers of the time, homes would no longer be weighty and static. They would be portable plastic membranes that you could take to your nearest wilderness, with the help of a handy air pump, and blow up into a comfortable bubble.

It never happened, partly because these concepts assumed limitless supplies of cheap energy to heat and cool the wandering shelters, an illusion that the oil crisis of 1973 abruptly ended. The bubble popped, you might say. Architectural fashion moved on to postmodernism, a style that made no claim to change the world or people’s lives, but only to entertain and comfort them. Sometimes, as with the Austrian architect Hans Hollein, who moved from inflatables to postmodern boutiques, the shift was embodied in a single person.

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The Guardian

Nov 10 2018
The big picture: Young Conservative dandies, 1969

Bowler-hatted Tories show their class at a party rally in Westminster, captured by Homer Sykes

Homer Sykes, then a student at the London College of Printing, took this photograph at a Conservative party rally in 1969. Sykes had not long moved to the capital and, influenced by young American street photographers such as Garry Winogrand and Robert Frank, wandered the streets most weekends, looking for tribal gatherings and demonstrations that pitted one political class against another.

Several of his pictures, collected in a new book, My British Archive: The Way We Were 1968-1983, capture the divisions in wealth between London’s East End and West End, between Whitechapel and Westminster; others were taken at standoffs between the far right and the Anti-Nazi League. The young Tories in this picture in full pinstripe costume, were part of the movement that, against expectation, saw Ted Heath defeat Harold Wilson the following year.

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The Guardian

Nov 10 2018
The Syrian crisis – through artists' eyes

The plights of Syrian refugees are depicted in a new exhibition, Journeys Drawn: Illustration from the Refugee Crisis, at the House of Illustration, King’s Cross, until 24 March 2019

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The Guardian

Nov 10 2018
Japanese kabuki prints – in pictures

Kabuki is a form of traditional Japanese theatre that was hugely popular from the 1600s to the 1800s. Stylised and spectacular, it featured superstar male actors whose wild expressions were often immortalised by artists such as Utagawa Kunisada (1786-1865) and then reproduced using wooden printing blocks. Tim Clark, head of the British Museum’s Japanese section, has just acquired 359 of these prints that will go on display at the museum’s Mitsubishi Corporation Japanese galleries next year. “The prints served as a memento for fans of how a particular actor interpreted a particular role,” he says. “Each design was sold at an affordable price – proverbially, ‘for a bit more than a double helping of noodles’.” For Clark, they’re an amazing glimpse into the past. “They still transmit the energy and beauty of performances from 200 years ago.”

www.britishmuseum.org

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The Guardian

Nov 10 2018
Reunited: Syrian refugee and the artist who drew him in Calais
At a London exhibition on migrants, Olivier Kugler and Ammar Raad meet for the first time since their 2016 encounter in a shack

It was a bright Calais morning when Ammar Raad, a refugee, and Olivier Kugler, an artist from Germany, first met inside a makeshift shack in April 2016.

“It was cold when we met. I know we were using the heater,” recalls Raad, a Syrian who was 24 when the war started in his home. Kugler later drew a picture of Raad just as he had found him, sitting on the floor beside the heater and a pile of plastic cups, his green eyes leaping from the image.

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The Guardian

Nov 10 2018
Art dealer’s family’s latest bid to find Degas looted by the Nazis
Descendants of Paul Rosenberg hire detectives to solve the mystery of the plundered painting

Somebody, somewhere knows its location. But the one man who could help is refusing to talk. Portrait of Mlle. Gabrielle Diot (1890), a painting by Edgar Degas, hung above the desk of a renowned Jewish art dealer at his Paris gallery until 1940 when, along with numerous other works, it was confiscated by the Nazis.

Now, the descendants of Paul Rosenberg have hired London-based art detectives to try to recover it, almost 60 years after the art dealer’s death. “It’s not impossible that somebody has seen it,” said Marianne Rosenberg, Paul’s granddaughter. “We reserve the right to seek recourse to the law in all jurisdictions.”

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The Guardian

Nov 10 2018
Lorenzo Lotto Portraits review – singular psychological genius

National Gallery, London
A rare show of this great Venetian artist’s work reveals his exceptional understanding of his subjects – and becomes a vivid portrait of Lotto himself

His portraits are puzzles, his life enigmatic, his reputation bizarrely neglected. Yet anyone who visits this tremendous exhibition will be instantly struck by one clear and certain truth about the Venetian master Lorenzo Lotto (c 1480-1557), which is his singular psychological genius.

It is right there in the first portrait, of the bishop of Treviso, his light blue eyes tenacious and shrewd, face as tense as the hand gripping a legal scroll probably related to his campaigns against corrupt local grandees. Lotto shows him as a formidable force, brave enough to survive their assassination attempts: the Renaissance equivalent of today’s courageous anti-mafia lawyers.

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The Guardian

Nov 09 2018
The 20 photographs of the week

The migrant caravan in Mexico, wildfires in California, another fatal suspected stabbing in London, protests in Gaza and the US midterms 2018 – the week captured by the world’s best photojournalists

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The Guardian

Nov 09 2018
'Youngfellas': artists come to grips with legacy of Indigenous servicemen

APY artists say the stories of Aboriginal men and women who fought for their country remain ‘camouflaged in history’

Vincent Namatjira and Kamurin Young are two of the “youngfellas” who belong to one of the most remote artistic collectives on earth, spanning a vast proportion of central Australia, larger than many European countries.

Their studios are in the heart of the lands of the Anangu Pitjantjatjara Yankunytjatjara people – APY country – which stretch from the Stuart highway to South Australia’s border with Western Australia and as far into the Northern Territory as Uluru, a five-hour drive away.

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The New York Times

Nov 09 2018
Exhibition Review: Salon Art + Design, a Fair With Wit, Cheek, History
A show at the Park Avenue Armory embraces Modernism’s classics, new craft and artists rooted in South African culture. Here are some highlights.
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The New York Times

Nov 09 2018
Value Soars for Leonardo da Vinci Drawing After ‘Salvator Mundi’
A rediscovered drawing by the Renaissance master was priced at about $15.8 million in 2016. Now, the sky is the limit.
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The Guardian

Nov 09 2018
Brexit visions of 'Cold War Steve' showcased on Liverpool billboard

Darkly comic Twitter photomontages have attracted a legion of online followers

Considered by some a “modern Hogarth” and better known as Cold War Steve by his legion of online fans, Christopher Spencer’s surreal visions of Brexit Britain have been showcased in public for the first time on a Liverpool billboard.

Spencer was an unknown fledgling artist two years ago. He failed to get into university to study fine art and had been floundering between one menial job and another. He had a breakdown and attempted suicide.

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The New York Times

Nov 09 2018
Critic’s Pick: Meet Warhol, Again, in This Brilliant Whitney Show
A sweeping retrospective shows a personal side of the Pop master — his hopes, fears, faith — and reasserts his power for a new generation, Holland Cotter writes in his review.
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The New York Times

Nov 09 2018
No Waiting to Play This ‘Godot’
The highly physical Irish actor Aaron Monaghan came late to Beckett, and is young to portray Estragon. But the role fits (even if the shoes don’t).
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The New York Times

Nov 09 2018
Following Outcry, Washington Arts Council Reverses Course on Amendment
An amendment to prohibit grant recipients from producing “overtly political” work was rescinded on Thursday, after criticism from arts groups.
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The Guardian

Nov 09 2018
Warhol meets his match and Martin Parr does the royals – the week in art

Warhol and Paolozzi hit Edinburgh, Martin Parr returns to Manchester, and the two-minute silence gets its own show – all in our weekly dispatch

Machine Gods: Art in the Age of Technology and Warhol and Paolozzi: I Want to Be a Machine
Modern art’s fascination with the age of mass production and information is explored in two shows that stretch across the 20th century from Picabia to Pop.
Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art, Edinburgh, from 17 November until 2 June.

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The New York Times

Nov 09 2018
The Week in Arts: Andy Warhol, Viola Davis, the Met’s Sleeper Hit
With 350 pieces, the Warhol retrospective at the Whitney sets aside the icon’s persona and focuses on his art.
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The New York Times

Nov 09 2018
In Search of the Real Thing: China’s Quest to Buy Back Its Lost Heritage
Chinese collectors flock to London to buy items from their country’s Imperial past, attracted by pieces with ownership histories that guarantee authenticity.
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The Guardian

Nov 09 2018
Milena Dragicevic’s Supplicant 10: party for the undead

The Canadian-Serb painter references various cultures and styles in this series of pale and shadowed portraits based on her friends

Milena Dragicevic’s 2008 series of small, identically sized paintings, Supplicants, are based on photos of female friends. Yet they are not portraits. The Canadian-Serb artist has said that using a face was a “simple starting point” for a painting, like a circle on a canvas.

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The New York Times

Nov 09 2018
Genesis P-Orridge Has Always Been a Provocateur of the Body. Now She’s at Its Mercy.
The Throbbing Gristle and Psychic TV musician is battling leukemia. But after a lifetime of making challenging art, she isn’t done shocking the world yet.
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The Guardian

Nov 09 2018
Sex, supermodels and champagne: Guy Bourdin – in pictures

In 1987, Chanel asked the fashion master to shoot an ad campaign for its new watch. The strange, dreamlike images he produced are at Paris Photo this weekend, alongside other rare Bourdin photographs

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The Guardian

Nov 08 2018
Trafalgar pyramid? A look at an alternative London

These rejected architecture and transport plans give a glimpse of how different the city might have been

London has been the focus for some questionable urban design ideas over the years – from remaking Soho as a concrete office complex, to building a wheel-shaped airport that would have squatted over Kings Cross, to straightening the Thames.

Working with the rendering agency CG Orange, the developer Barratt Homes has superimposed 3D images of several proposals reported by Guardian Cities over Google Earth images of where they would have stood, and our design team has allowed you to switch back and forth.

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The Guardian

Nov 08 2018
Paris Photo international art fair – in pictures

Paris Photo is the largest international art fair dedicated to photography and is held each November in the capital’s Grand Palais. The fair comprises displays by up to 200 exhibitors from around the world, offering an unparalleled presentation of contemporary and historical photography, from modern masters to young talents.

The 22nd edition of Paris Photo takes place from Thursday 8 November until Sunday 11 November

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The Guardian

Nov 08 2018
Kerry James Marshall named most influential contemporary artist

American painter’s dealer, David Zwirner, tops ArtReview Power 100, with #MeToo third

Kerry James Marshall, the American figurative painter who set a record at auction this year for the most expensive work by a living black artist, has been judged the world’s most influential artist in an annual contemporary power list.

He is No 2 in the 17th edition of the ArtReview Power 100, pipped to the top spot by his dealer, the gallery owner David Zwirner.

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The New York Times

Nov 08 2018
22 Art Exhibitions to View in N.Y.C. This Weekend
Our guide to new art shows and some that will be closing soon.
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The New York Times

Nov 08 2018
Jeff Koons Is Found Guilty of Copying. Again.
A French court found that Mr. Koons’s 1988 sculpture “Fait d’hiver” breached the copyright of the creator of a 1985 advertising campaign.
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The New York Times

Nov 08 2018
After Strife in Berlin, Chris Dercon Is to Run the Grand Palais in Paris
The former head of Tate Modern had to resign from his last job after protests. France’s culture ministry said he will take over one of the country’s largest exhibition spaces.
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