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artforum.com

Sep 13 2019
Daniel Johnston (1961–2019)
Singer-songwriter and artist Daniel Johnston, known for his candid lyrics and winsome Magic Marker cartoons, was found dead of a presumed heart attack on Wednesday at his home in Waller, Texas, at age
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The New York Times

Sep 13 2019
At 19 Art Shows, From Los Angeles to Manhattan, All Eyes Are on Inclusion
At 19 Art Shows, From Los Angeles to Manhattan, All Eyes Are on Inclusion
Full-career treatment for Betye Saar, Pope.L, Rachel Harrison and Beatriz González. Wangechi Mutu finds her niche at the Met.
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The New York Times

Sep 13 2019
Modernism Reboots at the Museums
Modernism Reboots at the Museums
Our critic hails the return of MoMA, and nine ambitious autumn art shows.
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artforum.com

Sep 13 2019
Pace’s New Global Headquarters Opens in Chelsea, Art Basel Miami Beach Names Participating Galleries, and More
Pace’s new 75,000-square-foot flagship space opens to the public this weekend. Located at 540 West Twenty-Fifth Street, the eight-story building encompasses a 2,200-square-foot gallery that will host
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artforum.com

Sep 13 2019
National Art Gallery of the Bahamas Offers Hurricane Relief to Dorian Survivors
In the wake of Hurricane Dorian, the National Art Gallery of the Bahamas is offering sanctuary for survivors of the category 5 storm that razed entire neighborhoods and decimated the islands last week.
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artforum.com

Sep 13 2019
Moscow’s Pushkin Museum to Merge with National Centre for Contemporary Arts
Russia’s National Centre for Contemporary Arts (NCCA)-which was founded in 1992 as the first institution in the country to regularly exhibit contemporary art and has nine outposts in cities including
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The Guardian

Sep 13 2019
Bloomberg New Contemporaries 2019 – Britain's young visionaries bite back

Leeds Art Gallery
Trump is remixed, Boris is deterged and Cronenberg gets a queer revamp in this pick of the country’s graduating artists

There is nothing new under the sun. Unless you’re an artist – and a student artist at that – overflowing with the inspiration that comes from days spent poring over the techniques of old masters and nights creating, shaping, thinking. To these fee-paying mavericks, everything is new. They ask questions. What happens if I reshoot David Cronenberg’s Crash from a queered perspective? What if I laser-cut newsprint plotting paper or stick yams in between mirrors or make an elderly man sit in a bag of compost and faeces while shouting “I think the fashion industry is a pile of shit”?

All these questions – and hundreds of others – are investigated thoroughly in the Bloomberg New Contemporaries exhibition. Now in its 70th year, the touring exhibition (it will arrive at South London Gallery in December) showcases the creations of 45 graduating artists from programmes in the UK. Guest selectors Rana Begum​, Sonia Boyce​ and ​Ben Rivers​ were set the task of trawling 1,500 applications to find the best emerging artists of today.

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The Guardian

Sep 13 2019
Estonian gallery told to remove fake Trump and Diana billboard images

Adverts with ‘photographs’ by UK artist Alison Jackson deemed to have broken law

Authorities in Estonia have ordered an art gallery to remove billboards showing mocked-up images of Donald Trump and Princess Diana by the British artist Alison Jackson.

A photograph of a Trump lookalike having sex with a fake Miss Mexico and a picture of Diana giving a middle-fingered salute were deemed to contravene local advertising laws. Tallinn’s Fotografiska gallery has been ordered to take down a billboard featuring the images that was advertising the exhibition. The ruling does not affect the display inside the gallery.

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The Guardian

Sep 13 2019
Bathers, Bauhaus and a bounding bunny – the week in art

Hares rise in the Midlands, laughing gas intoxicates London and Matisse’s graphics flood Bath – all in your weekly dispatch

Barry Flanagan
A welcome retrospective of the 1960s conceptual artist who later became a figurative sculptor of leaping animals. Hare raising.
Ikon Gallery, Birmingham, 18 September to 24 November.

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The Guardian

Sep 13 2019
Buy a classic Guardian photograph: Whitby Abbey at sunset

This week in our Guardian Print Shop series we have an image shot by Denis Thorpe in 1984 of Whitby Abbey at sunset

The dramatic gothic ruins of Whitby Abbey are captured here at sunset by the Guardian photographer Denis Thorpe. The still-glowing sky illuminates the empty windows of the abbey church and is reflected – along with the building, in sharp focus – in the small, still pond in the foreground. The dusk, the silhouetted landscape and the lights on the walls lend the 13th-century abbey an eerie atmosphere – you can see why it inspired Bram Stoker, the author of Dracula, when he visited the town in 1890. “I love photographing at twilight,” says Thorpe. “The landscape is transformed, taking on different hues and shapes.”

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The Guardian

Sep 13 2019
Ai Weiwei: I'm looking forward to arguing with Brits about Brexit

The Chinese dissident artist on his UK move and why no one wants to get on the wrong side of China

Ai Weiwei has described his recent move to the UK as a step into the unknown and said he was looking forward to getting involved in arguments about Brexit.

In an exclusive interview with the Guardian, speaking from the Berlin studio he has retained 10 days after moving with his family to Cambridge, the Chinese dissident artist said he had been following the heated debates about the UK’s withdrawal from the EU and was intrigued to watch the country’s future unfold. As long as he cannot return to China, the UK represents the preferred place for his family to make their home.

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The Guardian

Sep 13 2019
Hitler in Churchill's birthplace more shocking than the golden toilet – Maurizio Cattelan review

Blenheim Palace, Oxfordshire
The Italian art prankster redecorates Churchill’s birthplace with an 18-carat loo, hideous union jacks and Hitler himself. What a fitting show for a country unravelling into madness

At a time when Britain is slipping further down the toilet day by day, it is curious to visit Blenheim Palace, a colossal monument to our finest hours. The Battle of Blenheim in 1704 may not be remembered as one of those now, but John Churchill’s victory over Louis XIV’s France was so significant in its day that a grateful nation paid for this jaw-droppingly spectacular baroque palace. What kind of child might be born among its triumphant martial memories? Winston Churchill, that’s who. A set of memorabilia-crowded rooms commemorate the cigar-chomping hero’s childhood here.

Related: Your chance to feel very flush: the 18-carat golden toilet hits Britain

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The Guardian

Sep 13 2019
Peter Doig’s Bather (Night Wave): an unsettling dreamscape

The Scottish painter constructs a darkly sexual scene of cultural appropriation

Peter Doig’s paintings have the heightened feel of dreams and movie stills, meshing the landscape and people of his adopted home of Trinidad with personal history and pop culture.

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The New York Times

Sep 13 2019
How a Ceramist Transformed a Los Angeles Treehouse
How a Ceramist Transformed a Los Angeles Treehouse
Raina J. Lee bought her home in 2013, and with it came a woodsy perch that she turned into a one-of-a-kind showroom.
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The Guardian

Sep 12 2019
Reclaimed lakes and giant airports: how Mexico City might have looked

The Mexican capital was founded by Aztecs on an island in a vast lake. No wonder water flows through so many of its unbuilt projects

Ever since Mexico City was founded on an island in the lake of Texcoco its inhabitants have dreamed of water: containing it, draining it and now retaining it.

Nezahualcoyotl, the illustrious lord of Texcoco, made his name constructing a dyke shielding Mexico City’s Aztec predecessor city of Tenochtitlan from flooding. The gravest threat to Mexico City’s existence came from a five-year flood starting in 1629, almost causing the city to be abandoned. Ironically now its surrounding lake system has been drained, the greatest threat to the city’s existence is probably the rapid decline of its overstressed aquifers.

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The Guardian

Sep 12 2019
Crumbling Yorkshire rail tunnel could form part of new cycle route

Abandoned Queensbury tunnel is in Victorian Society’s list of most endangered buildings

An abandoned and flooded Victorian railway tunnel hundreds of feet under the Pennines could be restored for use by cyclists and tourists but instead faces being filled with concrete and allowed to collapse.

The Victorian Society on Friday threw its weight behind a campaign to bring new life to the 1.4-mile (2.3km) Queensbury tunnel.

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The New York Times

Sep 12 2019
New York Galleries: What to See Right Now
Sarah Sze’s enchanting installations; Peter Voulkos’s monumental stacks; Andrew Ohanesian’s hidden show; and Guadalupe Maravilla’s shrine-sculpture.
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The New York Times

Sep 12 2019
Paul Revere, Beyond the Midnight Ride
Separating the fictive Longfellow poem from fact, a new show reveals that the rebel messenger was also a peerless networker, propagandist and proto-industrialist.
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The New York Times

Sep 12 2019
Collectors With a Focus on the Contemporary and Conceptual
Collectors With a Focus on the Contemporary and Conceptual
Three Mel Bochner pieces remind the family’s children to watch their language.
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The New York Times

Sep 12 2019
Sam Gilliam Unfurls an Exuberant Rainbow at Dia:Beacon
Sam Gilliam Unfurls an Exuberant Rainbow at Dia:Beacon
Is it a painting or a sculpture? It’s both. The octogenarian artist keeps surprising.
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The New York Times

Sep 12 2019
Russ & Daughters History Goes on Display
Russ & Daughters History Goes on Display
“Russ & Daughters: An Appetizing Story,” from the American Jewish Historical Society, offers a taste of New York’s rich food and cultural history.
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The New York Times

Sep 12 2019
28 Art Exhibitions to View in N.Y.C. This Weekend
Our guide to new art shows and some that will be closing soon.
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artforum.com

Sep 12 2019
Where Angels Fear to Tread
I WAS A TOUCH DISPIRITED, then thwacked by nausea—and that was before fashion week started. It was not an auspicious beginning to what’s supposed to be the most. . .perhaps not wonderful, but certainly
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The New York Times

Sep 12 2019
Robert Frank Dies; Pivotal Documentary Photographer Was 94
Mr. Frank, best known for his groundbreaking book, “The Americans,” had a visually raw and personally expressive style that made him one of the most influential photographers of the 20th century.
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artforum.com

Sep 12 2019
Tate Modern Hires Curators of African, Middle Eastern, and South Asian Art
Tate Modern is expanding the curatorial team of its international art department with three new hires: Nabila Abdel Nabi, who will focus specifically on art from the Middle East and North Africa; Osei
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artforum.com

Sep 12 2019
Fatima Hellberg to Lead Germany’s Bonner Kunstverein
Swedish curator Fatima Hellberg, who has served as artistic director of the Künstlerhaus Stuttgart since 2015, has been named the next director of the Bonner Kunstverein in Bonn, Germany. Hellberg takes
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artforum.com

Sep 12 2019
“Human Free Earth”
This exhibition of work by thirteen artists belongs to a larger long-term inquiry by Ujazdowski Castle that confronts, without cynicism, both Catherine Malabou’s concept of “plasticity” and, as curator
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artforum.com

Sep 12 2019
California African American Museum Names Cameron Shaw Deputy Director and Chief Curator
The California African American Museum (CAAM) announced that curator, writer, and editor Cameron Shaw has been appointed as its new deputy director and chief curator. The Los Angeles native most recently
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artforum.com

Sep 12 2019
Ronald Jones (1952–2019)
HOW WILL ANYONE fill the void Ronald Jones leaves behind? The spaces he created could only be inhabited by him. Ron was an interdisciplinary experimentalist, a perverse conceptualist, a virtuoso
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The New York Times

Sep 12 2019
Francis Bacon Read Just as He Painted: Deep, Dark and Bleak
A new exhibition at the Centre Pompidou in Paris looks at how literary figures like Eliot, Conrad and Aeschylus shaped the painter’s work.
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artforum.com

Sep 12 2019
Biennale of Sydney Names Artists Participating in Its 2020 Edition
The 2020 Biennale of Sydney has released the list of the ninety-eight artists and collectives-including several hailing from Afghanistan, Ecuador, Georgia, Nepal, and Sudan-that will be featured in its
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The Guardian

Sep 12 2019
Buy a limited edition print from photographer Don McPhee

In 2017, ten years on from the death of the great Guardian photographer, we gave readers the chance to buy three limited edition prints of his work.

Don McPhee’s picture of a picketing miner facing up to an officer is one of the abiding images of the 1984 coal strike and is now available again in a second limited edition run, in two sizes.

Produced on premium heavyweight Hahnemüele Photorag paper, the prints are supplied with a Guardian Archive certificate of authenticity.

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The New York Times

Sep 12 2019
Art That Is Political and Personal
Art That Is Political and Personal
Shirin Neshat’s work touches on topics like exile, political revolution and Iran’s past and future.
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The Guardian

Sep 11 2019
Two, four, six, eight, anticipate! – in pictures

Gamblers wait for the wheel of fortune to stop spinning. Ice creams start to drip. A family photo in mid-burn. What do these shots of the moments inbetween tell us about the world?

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The Guardian

Sep 11 2019
Christopher Anderson's best photograph: Marion breastfeeding, Brooklyn

‘This is my partner breastfeeding in our loft, which was one step up from a squat in an area full of painters and sculptors. It’s a luxury condo now’

This image was made in a loft in Brooklyn, New York, where I lived with Marion, my partner and now my wife, and where we started our family. It’s where I came of age, I guess, and where I photographed most of the pictures for my book Son. It represents youth and love and home, and it’s also particular to a place where we lived, and Brooklyn as a community.

That loft had a lot to do with my development as a photographer, particularly my use of light and colour, because it was bathed in bright sunlight most of the day. Though it was one step up from a squat, it was one of the important nodes of the creative community of Williamsburg. Many photographers lived there – including Tim Hetherington, Alex Majoli, Stanley Greene and Thomas Dworzak – and all these well-known sculptors and painters. Then it was bought by developers and we were all evicted in 2016. It was the end of an era. Now it’s luxury condos.

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The Guardian

Sep 11 2019
Sydney Contemporary 2019: Australia's largest art fair scales it down

More than 450 artists from around the world have work on show at Carriageworks but, with a potential recession on the way, who’s buying it?

What a difference two years make. The first time we checked in on Sydney Contemporary in 2017 the event had consolidated its position as Australia’s largest and most commercially successful art fair.

That event was marked by both its ambition and scope, and in total the fair sold just over $16m worth of art. That record was topped in 2018 with $21m in sales. At the press launch on Wednesday for the 2019 outing, Tim Etchells, director of Art Fairs Australia – the company that stages the event – speculated that they would see perhaps $26m in sales if the upward trend continued.

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The New York Times

Sep 11 2019
Robert Frank Revealed the Truth of Postwar America
He redefined the expressive potential of documentary photography — until he gave it up.
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artforum.com

Sep 11 2019
Sacklers Will Pay $3 Billion to Settle Lawsuits over US Opioid Epidemic
Members of the Sackler family associated with Purdue Pharma, the Stamford, Connecticut–based pharmaceutical company that manufactures OxyContin, will hand over $3 billion in cash over the next seven
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artforum.com

Sep 11 2019
Helene Schjerfbeck
The transformation of Helene Schjerfbeck from an accomplished if unremarkable salon painter at the end of the nineteenth century to a radical modernist from the 1900s onward is so abrupt that it could
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artforum.com

Sep 11 2019
Mary Abbott (1921–2019)
The American painter Mary Abbott, who used bold colors and gestural brushstrokes “to draw the imagination,” died on August 23 at ninety-eight years old. Abbott, whose influence permeated the circle of
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artforum.com

Sep 11 2019
Marianne Keating
“The Ocean Between”—the Atlantic—connects Ireland and the Caribbean, two territories here explored by Marianne Keating in a group of films. Keating built Landlessness, 2017, the exhibition’s key work,
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The New York Times

Sep 11 2019
Just Outside Paris, a Very Old, and Very New, Castle
Just Outside Paris, a Very Old, and Very New, Castle
Owning a Louis XV-era chateau means deciding whether to honor the past or completely upend it. But for Jean-Louis Tapiau, the solution was somewhere in the middle.
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The Guardian

Sep 11 2019
David Hockney is right: five reasons it's better to live in France than Britain

The painter is moving to France due to a mistaken belief he can smoke in its restaurants. But there are plenty of other reasons for Brits to envy our friends across the Channel – from French working hours to La Marseillaise

In an interview with the Wall Street Journal this week, David Hockney announced he is moving to France. Enthusing about €13 lunches and claiming “the French know how to live”, Hockney expresses the traditional British belief that – with its charming village markets, sexy public intellectuals, endless cheese and lunchtime wine – France does things better.

As a fellow Francophile, I applaud his decision, but not his reasoning (his apparent belief that he can smoke in restaurants is wrong for a start). France is superior, but not because they don’t shed Pret crumbs over their keyboards. These are the real reasons.

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The Guardian

Sep 11 2019
Robert Frank: the outsider genius whose photographs laid bare America's soul

His stark masterpiece The Americans changed photography. Yet there was more to this countercultural hero who captured the debauchery of the Stones – and his own personal tragedies

‘People want to know so much,” Robert Frank answered wearily when I asked him back in 2004 about the lasting resonance of his classic photobook, The Americans. “All the time, this wanting to know. Where does it lead? Nowhere.”

We were sitting in the spartanly furnished kitchen of his apartment on Manhattan’s Bleecker Street, my tape recorder resting on a rickety table between a large brick of a mobile phone and a single bread roll. He was, it strikes me now, a man for whom fame and its comforts meant very little, whose sadness seemed more palpable than his genius. Almost 80 then, he seemed ineffably world-weary.

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The Guardian

Sep 11 2019
Robert Frank: a life's work in pictures

The giant of 20th-century photography, who has died aged 94, captured singular, candid moments of the 1950s and helped free picture-taking from the boundaries of clean lighting and linear composition

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The Guardian

Sep 10 2019
The masked shoe shiners of Bolivia – in pictures

On the streets of La Paz, the Bolivian capital, a tribe wearing ski masks go about their work buffing up shoes. The disguises are to keep their identities secret – and avoid discrimination

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The Guardian

Sep 10 2019
Manchester Art Gallery tackles gender gap with female self-portraits

Untitled (Red) and In wake donated by Valeria Napoleone, who only collects art by women

An art gallery has unveiled two new works in an attempt to address its gender imbalance, where less than 10% of its permanent collection are by women. The self-portraits by the Cape Town-based visual artist Berni Searle have been added to the permanent collection at Manchester Art Gallery, in a move to extend “the discourse around representation and identity”.

Untitled (Red) and In wake were donated by the art collector and philanthropist Valeria Napoleone, who only collects art by women, as part of a scheme to redress criticisms of a historical lack of female representation.

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The New York Times

Sep 10 2019
Is This the World’s Most Accessible Museum?
Those without disabilities might not notice the innovations, but a museum in London is winning plaudits for its design and content.
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The New York Times

Sep 10 2019
It’s the Art Form of the Moment (but It’s a Hard Sell)
It’s the Art Form of the Moment (but It’s a Hard Sell)
Performance art has never been so popular. But at a fair devoted to it in Brussels, some collectors wondered exactly what they were buying.
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artforum.com

Sep 10 2019
Vasıf Kortun to Helm the Istanbul Painting and Sculpture Museum
Curator, writer, and educator Vasıf Kortun has been named the director of the Istanbul Painting and Sculpture Museum (IHRM),  http://www.artasiapacific.com/News/VasifKortunToLeadIstanbulPaintingAndSculptureMuseum
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