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The New York Times

Jan 13 2021
Pig Painting May Be World’s Oldest Cave Art Yet, Archaeologists Say
Pig Painting May Be World’s Oldest Cave Art Yet, Archaeologists Say
The depiction of the animal on an Indonesian island is at least 45,500 years old, the researchers say.
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artforum.com

Jan 13 2021
Marian Goodman Gallery and ICI Launch Emerging Curator Initiative Honoring Okwui Enwezor
Marian Goodman Gallery has announced an initiative in support of emerging BIPOC (Black, Indigenous, and people of color) curators and honoring the late curator Okwui Enwezor. The initiative, conceived
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artforum.com

Jan 13 2021
Documenta 15 Faces Possible Postponement
Organizers are grappling with the realization that the fifteenth edition of Documenta, the internationally known contemporary art show held every five years in Kassel, may have to be pushed back at
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The Guardian

Jan 13 2021
Swedish postage stamp celebrates work of Greta Thunberg

Illustration of activist is part of a series highlighting government’s environmental quality goals

The environmental activist Greta Thunberg has been featured on a new Swedish postage stamp, in recognition of her work to “preserve Sweden’s unique nature for future generations”.

Thunberg, who turned 18 on 3 January, is pictured standing on a rocky cliff top wearing a yellow raincoat, with swifts flying around her, as part of a set by the artist and illustrator Henning Trollbäck titled Valuable Nature.

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The Guardian

Jan 13 2021
Tupac Shakur bares his torso: Danny Clinch's best photograph

‘When he changed his top, I saw his tattoos and said: “Oh man, we should try something without your shirt on”’

I started shooting the music industry in 1992 just as hip-hop was becoming more popular. Some people thought it was going to be a fad and not all photographers were interested in these jobs. But I was, so I began to work with a lot of hip-hop artists, shooting everyone from Public Enemy to LL Cool J.

Many of the artists come with a huge entourage – they bring the party with them. Sometimes that’s fun but other times it can get in your way. When I got the assignment to photograph Tupac from Rolling Stone magazine in 1993, I didn’t know what to expect. I knew Tupac had been in trouble recently, but I grew up not judging people until I met them. He showed up with just one other guy. He was on time and very cordial, he came in and shook my hand. He had a couple of different changes of clothes with him – he was very prepared. I think he knew that at the time Rolling Stone was not putting a lot of hip-hop in the magazine, so saw a great opportunity for himself and his music.

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The Guardian

Jan 12 2021
Philippines' Taal volcano, one year on – in pictures

When Taal volcano, a popular tourist site in Batangas, erupted a year ago 5,000 people fled the island. It’s still considered dangerous. The government bans former residents from returning but some still live there in tents

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The Guardian

Jan 12 2021
Through the looking glass: Europe's captive primates – in pictures

These chimps, baboons and macaques look sombre as they stare out from their enclosures into Anne Berry’s camera. Her aim is to make viewers feel compassion with them

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The Guardian

Jan 12 2021
The Great British art tour: an image too risky for the Royal Academy

In the first of a new series, we’re bringing the art to you while Britain’s public art collections are closed. In partnership with Art UK we will each day be exploring highlights and hidden gems from across the country. Today’s pick: Stirling Smith museum’s Pipe of Freedom

The Pipe of Freedom was painted in 1869 by Thomas Stuart Smith, the artist and founder of the gallery in which it hangs today, the Stirling Smith Art Gallery and Museum, in central Scotland.

The painting celebrates the abolition of slavery in the US and depicts a formerly enslaved man as independent and free. The painting – considered radical at the time – is one of three portraits of black men by Smith, who painted them not as marginal figures but as the main subject occupying the centre of the canvas.

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artforum.com

Jan 12 2021
Takis
White Cube Hong Kong is pleased to present an exhibition of works by the late Greek artist Takis (1925–2019) until 27 February 2021. Featuring sculptures drawn from a thirty-year period – from the end
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artforum.com

Jan 12 2021
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artforum.com

Jan 12 2021
Ghada Amer
“The women I know”, focuses on a new body of works consisting of four moving portraits of female friends in Ghada Amer’s signature embroidered painting style, along with a black and white self-portrait.
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The New York Times

Jan 12 2021
Diego Rivera Mural to Get Landmark Status, Blocking Potential Sale
Officials unanimously voted to protect the $50 million artwork after the San Francisco Art Institute threatened to sell it to cover debts.
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The Guardian

Jan 12 2021
National Trust aims to save Yorkshire abbey from climate-linked flooding

A £2.5m scheme in the Skell Valley hopes to protect Fountains Abbey and the city of Ripon

Fountains Abbey, near Ripon, North Yorkshire, was originally set up by 13 Benedictine monks seeking refuge from the more extravagant, rowdy monks in York. Eight hundred years later, the abbey ruins and its gardens face another threat: the climate crisis.

The Skell Valley, where the ruins stand, has been flooded several times in recent years, raising fears that the UK’s largest monastic ruins are at risk of irreparable damage. Now a £2.5m National Trust project – aided by a £1.4m lottery grant – has been greenlit to improve the landscape’s resilience to changing weather.

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The Guardian

Jan 12 2021
'Brazilian horror story': internet melts down over sculptor's peculiar waxworks

Images of Arlindo Armacollo’s figures went viral after users unearthed video report about their exhibition in church

The first household name Arlindo Armacollo smothered in beeswax was Mother Teresa. Then came Albert Einstein, Pope John Paul II and a string of global luminaries who the entrepreneur-turned-artist admired.

“It might look simple, but to achieve this richness of detail was hard work,” a local television reporter gushed during a 2015 visit to Armacollo’s waxwork collection in southern Brazil. “The artist wanted to capture the character as well as the soul of each person.”

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artforum.com

Jan 12 2021
Miami Dade College Museum Accused of Censoring Forensic Architecture Exhibition
Miami Dade College’s Museum of Art and Design faces allegations that it censored the work of London-based research group Forensic Architecture (FA), whose major exhibition “True to Scale” opened at the
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artforum.com

Jan 12 2021
Luke Libera Moore on Cyberpunk 2077 (2020)
THE MOST WIDELY ANTICIPATED VIDEO GAME of the past several years, Cyberpunk 2077, was finally released in the twilight of 2020. Served up in over thirty countries across all major gaming platforms,
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artforum.com

Jan 12 2021
Gordon Parks
Jack Shainman Gallery is pleased to announce “Gordon Parks: Half and the Whole.” As a photographer, film director, composer, and writer, Gordon Parks (1912–2006) was a visionary artist whose work
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artforum.com

Jan 12 2021
VIA Art Fund Announces Record $1.5 Million in 2020 Grants
VIA Art Fund has announced its 2020 grant recipients, among whom the nonprofit will distribute $1.5 million, the largest disbursement it has made to date. The funds will be awarded to artists, collectives,
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The New York Times

Jan 12 2021
Blanton Museum Redesign Aims to Raise Its Profile
Blanton Museum Redesign Aims to Raise Its Profile
The $35 million initiative at the University of Texas museum, led by the firm Snohetta, features a Carmen Herrera mural commission.
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The New York Times

Jan 12 2021
Moynihan Train Hall: It’s Stunning. And, a First Step.
Moynihan Train Hall: It’s Stunning. And, a First Step.
A $1.6 billion transformation of a post office has given the city a lofty, light-filled steel, glass and marble cathedral, our critic writes.
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The Guardian

Jan 12 2021
Painted rock snakes preserved as bright mementoes of dark year

Lines of creatively painted stones are being relocated and turned into permanent features across the UK

When she first suggested it, she didn’t realise it would get so big. Andree Paterson had been coordinating the hiding and seeking of painted stones for local children via Facebook for a few years now. But when lockdown came to her home town of Kirkcudbright, south-west Scotland, there was a call for something bigger and brighter.

And so Rainbow, the Kirkcudbright stone snake, began. Over the weeks it grew around the St Cuthbert’s church wall, and grew longer again, stretching to 255 metres (837ft) of hundreds of painted stones by July. It attracted summer visitors to admire the stones, and rock artists of all ages to add their own contributions.

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The Guardian

Jan 12 2021
Want to understand the Capitol rioters? Look at the inflamed hate-drunk mobs painted by Goya

The horrific visions of the Spanish painter are about to go on display at New York’s Met. Americans should flock to this timely show – because no artist better captured collective delusion and mass fanaticism

The macabre art of Francisco Goya, the first truly modern artist, is due to be exhibited at the Metropolitan Museum in New York next month and there could hardly be a more urgent moment for Americans to look at his images. For, over 200 years ago, this Spanish artist perfectly captured the kind of collective delusion and mass fanaticism that swarmed the US Capitol last week. The mob of Trump supporters who assaulted the home of American democracy were as inflamed as the crowd who march with crazed eyes behind a manic musician in The Pilgrimage to San Isidoro, as dangerous as the hate-drunk crowd in The Second of May 1808, spellbound by their goat-headed charismatic idol.

And then there’s The Burial of the Sardine, in which a delirious crowd cavort around a huge banner of a madly grinning face. At first glance, it seems to be a joyous carnival scene, but look closer and the intensity of their rite becomes unsettling as you notice that face on the banner, their vacant lord of the dance. It has a definitive Trumpian air.

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The Guardian

Jan 12 2021
Western Sahara's diplomatic opening – in pictures

US plans to open a consulate in Western Sahara mark a turning point for the disputed territory. US recognition of Morocco’s authority over the land frustrates indigenous Sahrawis seeking independence but others see the future US consulate as a boost for Western Sahara cities like Dakhla

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The Guardian

Jan 11 2021
American girl behind the camera: the pioneering work of Ruth Orkin – in pictures

A new auction marks 100 years since the birth of US photographer Ruth Orkin, who travelled the world making waves in an industry dominated by men

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artforum.com

Jan 11 2021
Raven Halfmoon
Ross + Kramer is pleased to announce the New York debut solo exhibition of Raven Halfmoon, entitled Okla Homma to Manahatta. Halfmoon is a citizen of the Caddo Nation, a tribe based in Oklahoma. During
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artforum.com

Jan 11 2021
Wayne Thiebaud
“[Painting] is a wonderful combination of memory, imagination, and direct observation. A lot has to do with yearning. Primarily, what I’m interested in and always have been is this wonderful, personally
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artforum.com

Jan 11 2021
on her Top Ten
For her Top Ten, author Torrey Peters imagines a model for gender transitioning through the stories of divorced women. Peters splits her time between Brooklyn, New York, and rural Vermont. She is the
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artforum.com

Jan 11 2021
Doug Aitken
Regen Projects is pleased to present “Flags and Debris,” an exhibition of new work by Los Angeles-based artist Doug Aitken. The works form an ecosystem of interconnected mediums, mixing dance, performance,
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The New York Times

Jan 11 2021
First Inventory of Damage to U.S. Capitol Building Released
First Inventory of Damage to U.S. Capitol Building Released
The damage was largely limited to broken glass, busted doors and graffiti, the report said.
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artforum.com

Jan 11 2021
New Year Brings New Art Spaces to Australia
Australia will welcome a slew of new art institutions this year, along with several refreshed galleries slated to open following renovation. Of these, a number are expected to open before the summer.
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artforum.com

Jan 11 2021
Expo Chicago Postpones 2021 Edition
Expo Chicago has announced that it is postponing its in-person art fair, planned for April, becoming the first international art fair to push back a 2021 IRL event. No new dates have been announced for
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The New York Times

Jan 11 2021
What Did Museum Sign Up For: Exhibition or Investigation?
As part of an exhibition at Miami Dade College’s art museum, Forensic Architecture planned to examine the treatment of migrant children at a nearby facility. The pandemic is only one reason that never happened.
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The Guardian

Jan 11 2021
'I wanted to honor this moment': what to expect from US artists in 2021

After an unusual, unprecedented year, upcoming art will reflect as well as soldier on with a range of outdoor and indoor projects

In an unusual year for the art world, with cancelled exhibitions and shuttered galleries, new work made its way on to the streets instead. Whether it was the many George Floyd murals, a portrait of Kamala Harris in a Kansas field, creative placards from the Black Lives Matter protests, or the makeshift art fence outside the White House, a majority of the most impactful work over the past year has been outdoors.

In 2021, with social distancing measures continuing across the country, artwork in New York, California, Florida and Washington, will continue to be outdoors while limited indoor exhibitions will also be in operation.

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The Guardian

Jan 11 2021
Letter: Martin Lambie-Nairn obituary

By some way, Martin Lambie-Nairn was the leading exponent in the world in his field of design and branding. His genius, enthusiasm and kindness would have merited public recognition.

He added millions of pounds to the bottom line of such companies as O2 and BT. He also gave his time free to help charities brand and re-brand. Inevitably, because he was sensitive to your needs he would gently win you over to his designs without you really being aware of him doing so.

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The New York Times

Jan 11 2021
Carol Johnson, Leading Landscape Architect, Dies at 91
Carol Johnson, Leading Landscape Architect, Dies at 91
Her firm, one of the largest owned by a woman, was known for large-scale projects in Boston, Washington and elsewhere.
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artforum.com

Jan 11 2021
Donald Moffett on contagion, compassion, and his “glory hole” paintings
Since cake decorating led him to take up painting in 1994, Donald Moffett’s materially suggestive surfaces of extruded pigment and poured resin have addressed environmental collapse and political
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The Guardian

Jan 11 2021
Crescent moon and a drone show: Monday's best photos

Guardian’s picture editors bring you a taste of events from across the globe through outstanding photography

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The Guardian

Jan 10 2021
The Wodge: can London's tallest new skyscraper survive the Covid era?

Nicknamed The Wodge because of its girth, the capital’s tallest ever office has just muscled onto the skyline. But in the age of coronavirus, who wants to jostle for 60 lifts with 12,000 others?

With the City of London deserted once more, its streets only populated by the occasional Deliveroo driver or tumbleweed-seeking photographer, it seems a strange time to be completing the largest office building the capital has ever seen, not least because the very future of the workplace is now in question.

But, rising far above the Cheesegrater and the Walkie-Talkie, dwarfing the now fun-sized Gherkin and boasting the floor area of almost all three combined, 22 Bishopsgate stands as the mother of all office towers. It is the City’s menacing final boss, a glacial hulk that fills its plot to the very edges and rises directly up until it hits the flight path of passing jets. The building muscles into every panorama of London, its broad girth dominating the centre of the skyline and congealing the Square Mile’s distinctive individual silhouettes into one great, grey lump.

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The New York Times

Jan 10 2021
Entrepreneurs Bet Big on Immersive Art Despite Covid-19
Entrepreneurs Bet Big on Immersive Art Despite Covid-19
For-profit experiential art centers are investing hundreds of millions of dollars in a business where audiences have evaporated because of the pandemic.
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The Guardian

Jan 09 2021
Here’s one that sailed earlier … sketch that launched the Blue Peter badge

Auction reveals how Tony Hart’s work on another BBC project inspired his galleon for the children’s show

Cresting the waves for more than 60 years, the jaunty maritime emblem of the BBC children’s television programme Blue Peter, remains one of the most recognisable vessels in Britain. Designed by the popular English television artist Tony Hart, it has always suggested adventure on the high seas to young viewers, serving as the flag ship of BBC’s flagship children’s show.

Now Hart’s original drawings, due to go under the hammer this month, have revealed that the first crew of this famous ship were in fact a band of egg-shaped pirates. The galleon, with its trademark billowing sails and streaming pennants, was initially drawn by Hart for another BBC project, according to the son of the artist’s close friend and agent, Roc Renals.

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The Guardian

Jan 09 2021
Art markets: New York bodegas in watercolour – in pictures

“Bodegas play an essential role in the New York City lifestyle and define its landscape,” says illustrator Gabi Lamontagne of the corner stores that she’s been depicting since moving there from Quebec in 2012. “I was attracted to their hand-painted awnings framed with colourful lightbulbs… once in a while, you will find a working cat inside a store.”

Lamontagne first photographs the bodegas and then uses concentrated watercolour ink to illustrate them. “I try to lightly abstract them with washes and colours, hoping to capture their idiosyncratic beauty.”

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The Guardian

Jan 09 2021
On my radar: Chantal Joffe's cultural highlights

The artist on the bright lights of Tate Britain, a TV teen drama, and why Artemisia Gentileschi makes her want to scream

Chantal Joffe is an American-born British painter. She completed an MA at the Royal College of Art in 1994 and her work has been shown at the National Portrait Gallery and Saatchi Gallery in London, and the Jewish Museum in New York. Joffe’s large-scale paintings mainly depict women and children, and includes many self-portraits. In 2018, she painted herself each day as she went through a divorce and, in 2019, she created the series Pictures of What I Did Not See, which captured a traumatic illness. Her latest show, Story, focuses on ageing and motherhood and will open at Victoria Miro Gallery, London N1, when restrictions are lifted.

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The New York Times

Jan 08 2021
The Smithsonian Is Collecting Objects From the Capitol Siege
Curators are gathering posters and banners from the riot and the protests that preceded it to “help future generations remember” Jan. 6, a museum director says.
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The New York Times

Jan 08 2021
Who Said Art Is Only for the One Percent?
Who Said Art Is Only for the One Percent?
Marian Goodman Gallery and MoMA are reviving interest in multiples — art produced in affordable editions for the ’60s middle-class. Now, some artists are taking up the cause.
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artforum.com

Jan 08 2021
Inauguration of Pinault’s Bourse de Commerce Postponed
The Pinault Collection’s Bourse de Commerce, Paris, which was to welcome visitors January 23, has been forced to delay its opening as French prime minister Jean Castex has ordered cultural institutions
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artforum.com

Jan 08 2021
Curators Assess Damage to Capitol Artworks in Wake of Pro-Trump Mob
It appears that the majority of the many historical paintings and sculptures on display in the US Capitol escaped lasting harm amid the damage done by pro-Trump supporters who stormed the building on
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The Guardian

Jan 08 2021
20 photographs of the week

The storming of the Capitol in Washington, the Epiphany in Bulgaria and the enduring impact of Covid-19: the most striking images from around the world

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The New York Times

Jan 08 2021
In 177 Portraits, an Artist’s Homage to His Bed-Stuy Muse
In 177 Portraits, an Artist’s Homage to His Bed-Stuy Muse
Over five years, Kambui Olujimi created paintings in tribute to Catherine Arline, a mentor from childhood on. Years after her passing, they speak more intimately than any statue could.
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The Guardian

Jan 08 2021
Lorca, Hockney, Byatt, Berger – how Mike Dibb got the greats to open up

He’s revered for shooting Ways of Seeing with John Berger, but Mike Dibb has made films about all the giants of culture – as well as Wimbledon tennis balls. He looks back on a dazzling career

This morning, like most mornings, Mike Dibb is sitting in his conservatory. “It’s where I spend many, many, many hours,” he says. “And it’s very nice, because I look out into a little garden.” There is a desk, a painting by an old friend, and a vine that twists up the back wall. He’s speaking via Zoom from west London and it feels strange to see this documentary-maker on screen. Over the course of more than five decades, Dibb has rarely ventured in front of the camera. Instead, he’s the voice off-screen, the steady hand steering the story.

A retrospective of Dibb’s work is about to begin online, courtesy of the Whitechapel Gallery in London. It encompasses portraits of Keith Jarrett, Federico García Lorca, Miles Davis, CLR James, Barbara Thompson, Roger Deakin and Edward Said. There are studies of place: Chicago through the eyes of Studs Terkel; Cuba, via its music and dance; Ireland, through spoken word and song. And there are his more discursive works: the 1982 series Fields of Play, which looked at human notions of play, from humour to gambling to war. And of course, it features Ways of Seeing, Dibb’s 1072 landmark collaboration with the writer John Berger, which offered a new perspective on visual imagery, from the female nude and the male gaze, to oil paint, advertising, and the theories of Walter Benjamin.

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