News

Displaying 51 to 100 of 10338 results

The New York Times

Jan 17 2018
Review: African Masterpieces With the Grace of Kings
A show of royal crests from Cameroon brings you face to face (and soul to soul) with African sculpture.
Read More
The New York Times

Jan 17 2018
Beyoncé Is Bonkers for This Woman’s Lace Jewelry
Monika Knutsson salvages delicate heirloom material, plunges pieces of it into silver or gold, and sells the results to an eager clientele.
Read More
The Guardian

Jan 17 2018
One Year of Resistance: the exhibit chronicling the year in anti-Trump art

In a follow-up show to last year’s exhibit, curator Indira Cesarine displays art addressing immigration, gun control, and the #MeToo movement

The morning after the 2016 election, curator Indira Cesarine knew she wanted to host an art show exhibiting women’s reactions to the impending presidency of Donald Trump. She posted on message boards and various social media groups and, lo and behold, corralled enough female artists together in just one month to open Uprise/Angry Women during inauguration week. Now, a year later, Cesarine is hosting a follow-up exhibit, titled One Year of Resistance, which opened Tuesday in New York. This time, submissions were open to artists of all genders; plus, the show had a lengthier gestation period, to say the least.

Related: Should Donald Trump's border wall prototypes be considered art?

Continue reading...
Read More
The New York Times

Jan 17 2018
Long Buried Colonial Pottery to Make Its Modern Debut
The slipware pottery, uncovered during excavation for the Museum of the American Revolution, will be at the New York Ceramics and Glass Fair.
Read More
artforum.com

Jan 17 2018
NEWS: The Awl and The Hairpin Prepare to Shut Down
The New York Times/Press/the WSJ
Read More
The Guardian

Jan 17 2018
Bridget Riley review – a blast of pure psychedelic energy

David Zwirner Gallery, London
In her new show Recent Paintings 2014-2017, the great shapeshifter rediscovers the hallucinogenic power of her youth, with dizzying works that turn perspective inside out

To walk into Bridget Riley’s exhibition of new works – everything here, with a couple of exceptions, has been created in the last four years – is to see a mighty brain fizzing away with ideas that blow away all the sentimental cobwebs from art. Riley is a philosopher who is interested in perception – and nothing else. For her, a work of art is not a picture nor a political comment nor a splurge of self-expression. It is a way to explore seeing. If it does not leave you with your sense of the visible world shaken and reborn, what’s the point of it?

In the early 1960s, she took on the epic sweep of American art and gave it a sharp scientific twist. Jackson Pollock’s paintings absorb the beholder in poetic tangles and forests of colour. Riley liked the scope and sweep, yet she put it all in a more solid psychological basis. The curves and eddies, twists and vortices of her early black and white paintings such as Hesitate (1964) are mathematically calculated. Their discombobulating effects are precisely planned. They turn perception inside out as you find spaces move and melt, shapes materialise in front of the canvas, reality itself burst open to reveal new dimensions. In the decade of psychedelia, Riley invented a legal hallucinogenic.

Continue reading...
Read More
artforum.com

Jan 17 2018
SLANT: SUNRISE: January 17, 2018
SUNRISE: Ariana Reines’s January column
Read More
The Guardian

Jan 17 2018
Betty Woodman obituary
Artist whose reinvention of the vessel helped raise ceramics into a significant art form

The ceramic artist Betty Woodman, who has died aged 87, was known for her highly original baroque forms and use of vivid colour. Her work was increasingly sculptural in her later career as she became absorbed by the relationship between structure, surface and colour in expressive hybrid objects and installations. “Painterly” would be an apt description of her fluent and opulent art, one that brought joie-de-vivre and decorative verve into modern American ceramics.

Endlessly experimental, gutsy and energetic in character, Woodman took the vessel, particularly the vase, as a metaphor as well as a historical reference and moved away from a pottery of pure function to an art that confidently spanned large spaces, straddling plinths, floors and walls. It was as if, in her later years, the vessel was something to be dissected, to be opened out and deconstructed, expressed in strong sensual lines and glazes, in multiple planes and sectional silhouettes.

Continue reading...
Read More
The Guardian

Jan 17 2018
The Bayeux tapestry: is it any good?

The epic portrayal of the Norman invasion of 1066 is bound for Britain. But does it really live up to its reputation as a great work?

If you want to know why the Bayeux tapestry truly matters, why it is one of the world’s great works of art and not just a corny bit of British heritage, the place to start is not the famous scene of Harold getting it in the eye at the Battle of Hastings, or even the wondrous image of Halley’s comet that was embroidered 600 years before Halley, but a far more unsettling detail: a depiction of a war atrocity.

As the Normans establish a beachhead on the south coast, two men are setting fire to a Saxon house. You can tell from their dull disengaged eyes they are only following orders. In front of the blazing building, on a smaller scale than the burly arsonists, a woman holds her boy’s hand as she asks for humanity with a dignified, civilised gesture.

Continue reading...
Read More
EosArte.eu

Jan 17 2018
Lisetta Carmi: l’ombra di un poeta
In occasione di Novecento italiano, Erratum rende omaggio alla grande fotografa Lisetta Carmi: presso lo spazio milanese vengono presentati i dodici scatti fotografici di Lisetta Carmi a Ezra Pound realizzati nel 1966 nella località ligure di Sant’Ambrogio. Le singole immagini, in sequenza, sono collocate all’interno dell’installazione sonora di Sergio Armaroli e Steve Piccolo dal titolo P.P.P. [...]
Read More
The Guardian

Jan 16 2018
Architect Patrik Schumacher: 'I've been depicted as a fascist'

He has proposed eliminating social housing and privatising streets – so is Zaha Hadid’s successor the most hated man in urbanism?

When Patrik Schumacher, who took over as head of Zaha Hadid Architects after its legendary founder’s death in early 2016, gave a speech at the World Architecture Festival in Berlin later that year, he nearly caused a riot. In the speech, which was about how to reduce sky-high urban housing prices, he proposed eliminating social housing, privatising all public spaces – including streets – and selling off most of London’s Hyde Park for development.

The London Evening Standard slammed him on its front page, mayor Sadiq Kahn criticised him as “just plain wrong”, protesters showed up at his offices, and some fellow architects called for denying him any future platforms to speak or write.

Continue reading...
Read More
The Guardian

Jan 16 2018
The new-look Britain – in pictures

What does it mean to be British today? Simon Roberts has been trying to find out – as a landscape photographer and an official general election artist

Continue reading...
Read More
The Guardian

Jan 16 2018
Rare Van Gogh sketches go on public display for first time in 100 years

Drawings, together with works by Govert Flinck, on show at the Singer Laren museum in the Netherlands

Art lovers are in for a rare treat as four forgotten works by Dutch masters Vincent van Gogh and 17th-century painter Govert Flinck have gone on display, after gathering dust for more than 100 years.

The works include a never-before-seen Van Gogh drawing, which had been in private hands until now.

Continue reading...
Read More
artforum.com

Jan 16 2018
PASSAGES: Tim Rollins (1955–2017)
Jay Gorney on Tim Rollins (1955–2017)
Read More
The New York Times

Jan 16 2018
Show Us Your Wall: Don’t Tell Ken Burns Quilts Are Quaint
The quintessential storyteller is fascinated by American quilts, saying it’s not so much a story as a question. Who are these people? Who made this?
Read More
The New York Times

Jan 16 2018
Newly Discovered van Gogh Drawing Is a ‘Stylistic Missing Link’
A drawing that the artist made in Paris in 1886 has been recognized by the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam, which researched its history.
Read More
The New York Times

Jan 16 2018
CRITIC’s NOTEBOOK: J.M. Coetzee’s Boyhood, in Black and White
Newly discovered photographs by the Nobel-winning novelist reveal a South African adolescence shaped by art and apartheid.
Read More
The Guardian

Jan 16 2018
Man Ray in LA: what happened when the pioneering artist hit Hollywood

A new exhibition sheds light on the visual artist’s time in Los Angeles and the many famous actors he captured on film

In the autumn of 1940, Man Ray met a travelling tie salesman at a party in New York. The American artist had arrived back in the US earlier that summer, having spent nearly two decades in Paris. The salesman said he was planning a cross-country trip to Los Angeles; Man Ray decided to catch a lift.

Related: History gathers dust … photographers add an extra layer to the story of a century

Continue reading...
Read More
artforum.com

Jan 16 2018
500 WORDS: Dana Yoeli
Dana Yoeli discusses her show at the Herzliya Museum of Contemporary Art
Read More
artforum.com

Jan 16 2018
Read More
artforum.com

Jan 16 2018
NEWS: Markus Lüpertz Sculpture Stolen
Westfälische Nachrichten
Read More
artforum.com

Jan 16 2018
SLANT: SUNRISE: January 16, 2018
SUNRISE: Ariana Reines’s January column
Read More
The Guardian

Jan 16 2018
Three galleries, three genres – UK celebration of Tacita Dean

Film artist to address landscapes, portraiture and still life in upcoming shows at three of London’s major galleries

The reputation of Tacita Dean as one of the most important and influential British artists working today will be cemented this year with an unprecedented collaboration between three major galleries showing her work across three genres.

Details were announced on Tuesday of a partnership between the National Portrait Gallery, the National Gallery and the Royal Academy of Arts for what amounts to a Dean bonanza.

Continue reading...
Read More
The Guardian

Jan 16 2018
Mosul six months after Isis was ousted – then and now

Iraqi forces defeated Islamic State in Mosul in July 2017 after intense battles that reduced it to ruins. Six months on, photographer Ahmad Al-Rubaye compared sites across the historic city

An Iraqi youth carries a girl on his shoulders while fleeing from Mosul’s old city during fighting on 5 July 2017, and a car drives past the same place on 8 January 2018.

Continue reading...
Read More
The Guardian

Jan 15 2018
Same dream another time: under the skin of 80s Vegas - in pictures

Thirty years ago, gambling in the US was limited to three destinations: Reno, Las Vegas, and Atlantic City. Jay Wolke photographed the ordinary people who played, lived and worked in the rapidly expanding cities

Continue reading...
Read More
artforum.com

Jan 15 2018
SLANT: SUNRISE: January 15, 2018
SUNRISE: Ariana Reines’s January column
Read More
artforum.com

Jan 15 2018
NEWS: Jan Baum (1928–2017)
the Los Angeles Times
Read More
The New York Times

Jan 15 2018
Critic’s Notebook: Half-Measures Won’t Erase the Painful Past of Our Monuments
The city says leave three of four existing monuments. Our critic says that may not heal old wounds.
Read More
The Guardian

Jan 15 2018
‘A tale of decay’: the Houses of Parliament are falling down – podcast

As politicians dither over repairs, the risk of fire, flood or a deluge of sewage only increases. But fixing the Palace of Westminster might change British politics for good – which is the last thing many of its residents want

Read the text version here

Subscribe via Audioboom, iTunes, Soundcloud, Mixcloud, Acast & Sticher and join the discussion on Facebook and Twitter

Continue reading...
Read More
The Guardian

Jan 15 2018
Share your best photographs of the week with us

We’re highlighting the best reader photography in print on the letters page of the Guardian. Share your images with us here

From Monday the Guardian and Observer has a new tabloid format in print and we’re going to be highlighting the best of your photography in the paper.

Since 2014 our letters page has carried amazing images readers have shared via GuardianWitness: some of them being newsworthy, others more abstract.

Continue reading...
Read More
The Guardian

Jan 15 2018
Inside Manchester town hall – in pictures

Manchester’s neo-gothic town hall closed on Monday for a £330m repair and refurbishment programme lasting six years. The Alfred Waterhouse-designed building has stood in the city’s Albert Square since 1877

Continue reading...
Read More