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artforum.com

Nov 14 2019
Amy Taubin on Mati Diop’s Atlantics (2019)
MATI DIOP’S ATLANTICS is a girl’s coming-of-age story wrapped in a magical realism thriller, edged with an unsparing depiction of economic exploitation in a rapidly modernizing Senegal. It’s a lot
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artforum.com

Nov 14 2019
Whitney Museum Announces Recent Acquisitions
The Whitney Museum of American Art in New York has added more than 250 works of art to its collection since last April, including eighty-eight works by forty artists who participated in the 2019 Whitney
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artforum.com

Nov 14 2019
Elif Saydam
Scattered throughout the gallery we find dead skin, old packaging, and other undesirables. This urban detritus is home to the bottom feeders of our world: parasites, insects, worms. For “Hotline,” 2019,
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The Guardian

Nov 14 2019
Desert ski slopes and outdoor aircon: can the scorching emirates really go green?

It is one of Earth’s biggest carbon emitters, a place where SUVs roar from manmade islands to malls with ski slopes. Can an architecture triennial in the UAE really teach us how to go green?

A perfectly manicured lawn lines either side of the eight-lane highway leading into the Gulf city of Sharjah. Punctuated by rows of palm trees and pink-blossomed flowerbeds, it is a lush, implausible vision, sustained by a constant mist of sprinklers beneath the scorching sun. Beyond the green ribbon, expansive gated villas sprout from the sand, giving way to mirrored glass towers, leading to a reconstructed “old town”, where air conditioning is pumped into the alleys of an open-air souk.

It’s not hard to see how the United Arab Emirates, of which Sharjah is the third largest city-state after Abu Dhabi and Dubai, is one of the highest emitters of carbon dioxide and consumers of water per capita in the world. It is a place where souped-up SUVs roar from man-made islands to malls with indoor ski slopes, where water is flushed by the gallon into ornamental gardens, where energy is guzzled with end-of-the-world glee, deaf to the pleas of Greta Thunberg. But before you start sneering, this petroleum-fuelled, water-hungry lifestyle is mostly the doing of British and American conglomerates, the result of an Anglo-centric idea of a city imposed on a desert climate that could never sustain it.

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The New York Times

Nov 14 2019
Out of Africa, a Collection and a Dedication to Giving Back
Out of Africa, a Collection and a Dedication to Giving Back
Mercedes Vilardell fell in love with the art when she visited Malick Sidibé’s studio. Now she travels to Africa several times a year.
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The New York Times

Nov 14 2019
Yvonne Rainer Revives Her ‘Mattress Monster’ Dance
Yvonne Rainer Revives Her ‘Mattress Monster’ Dance
In collaboration with Emily Coates, the choreographer has reconstructed the rarely seen 1965 “Parts of Some Sextets” for Performa.
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The Guardian

Nov 14 2019
George IV exhibition to show redeemable side to 'exuberant king'

Monarch drank and gambled, but also commissioned ‘extraordinary art’

He was a monarch who spent outrageously, drank and ate too much, womanised and gambled, but George IV was perhaps not as dim, uncultured or physically repulsive as he is often made out to have been.

An exhibition opening at Buckingham Palace on Friday is not trying to repair the reputation of a man they bill as Britain’s “exuberant king”, but it does argue he had many redeemable qualities.

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artforum.com

Nov 14 2019
Ed Ruscha Leads $325.3 Million Christie’s Postwar and Contemporary Art Sale
The Christie’s postwar and contemporary art evening sale fetched $325.3 million at Rockefeller Center in New York on Wednesday night. While it raked in significantly less than the auction house’s spring
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The Guardian

Nov 14 2019
Notre Dame fire: row as general tells architect to 'shut his mouth'

Army general rebuked after lashing out at chief architect over cathedral rebuild plans

The French government has rebuked the army general charged with the rebuilding of the fire-ravaged Notre Dame Cathedral after he told the chief architect to “shut his mouth”, in a sign of tensions over the cathedral’s future appearance.

Gen Jean-Louis Georgelin lost his cool with Philippe Villeneuve in a dispute over whether to replace the spire, which collapsed in the fire in April, with an exact replica or a modern alternative.

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artforum.com

Nov 14 2019
Torkwase Dyson Wins Studio Museum’s $50,000 Wein Prize
At the Studio Museum in Harlem’s gala at the Javits Center on Wednesday night, Torkwase Dyson, a Brooklyn-based artist who creates abstract compositions that explore the relationships between subjects
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The Guardian

Nov 13 2019
Carnival: capturing all the fun of the fair across the US – in pictures

Between 1982 and 2001, the American photographer Mark Steinmetz travelled across the US recording life at country fairs, urban street fairs and small circuses.

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The Guardian

Nov 13 2019
Christopher Nunn's best photograph: a picnic in the shadow of war

‘I spotted them from a bus, two girls having a picnic in Ukraine. This was before the war turned bad. Back then, no one would have believed how bad things would get’

I took this in Donetsk, Ukraine, in 2014, just as the war with Russia started. It was immediately after the first battle for Donetsk airport, the first time war came to the city. I was on the bus back to my apartment when I spotted this car and people having a picnic next to it. I got off, and we got talking and had a few drinks. It was a chance meeting, they were all excited to meet a foreigner – they had never met an English person before.

I was taking pictures and they were posing, just young people having fun. This shot was a snapshot, they weren’t really paying attention to me when I took it, but when I looked through my photographs later it stood out. I like the fact you can’t see the girls’ faces. I don’t know them, so I would have felt uncomfortable sharing a picture of them drinking, which might represent them negatively.

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The Guardian

Nov 13 2019
Take a trip into the past: rare Australian vintage travel posters – in pictures

Early 20th century travel posters capture the era’s aesthetic sensibility. Two designers led the way promoting Australia to the world in the interwar period. James Northfield was best known for his work with the Australian National Travel Association, often spruiking the merits of train travel throughout the continent, appealing to the beauty of the Australian wilderness. Percival Albert Trompf painted thousands of posters for companies including Bryant & May Pty Ltd and Palmolive Co Ltd, as well as the magazine Walkabout. His most popular designs depicted historical events, such as the building of the Sydney Harbour Bridge. Works from both designers will be auctioned at New York’s Swann Auction Galleries this week. Here’s a selection of the Australian offerings – and some international ones

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The Guardian

Nov 13 2019
MoMA boss tops art power list after gallery's relaunch

Glenn Lowry named most influential art figure ahead of photographer Nan Goldin

A $450m revamp and relaunch of the Museum of Modern Art in New York has propelled the gallery’s head to top spot in an annual contemporary art power list.

Glenn Lowry has been named the world’s most influential art figure in the 18th edition of the Power 100, produced annually by the magazine ArtReview. In second place is the photographer Nan Goldin, who has led protests against galleries taking money from the Mortimer and Raymond branches of the Sackler family. Banksy, meanwhile, appears on the list for the first time since 2008.

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The Guardian

Nov 13 2019
Botticelli 'copy' in Welsh museum is genuine, experts say

Masterpiece’s ‘rebirth’ features in BBC Four series as conservators find doodle underneath painting

A doodle of a man’s head unseen for more than 500 years has helped to persuade experts that a painting in the national museum of Wales is almost certainly a genuine Botticelli.

National Museum Cardiff has put on display a painting of a Madonna and child that had for decades been dismissed as a crude copy of Botticelli’s style.

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artforum.com

Nov 13 2019
Kristian Vistrup Madsen on “Invocations” at SAVVY Contemporary
I SPENT THE WEEKEND IN A FORMER CREMATORIUM thinking about death. The occasion was a two-day symposium organized by SAVVY Contemporary as part of their exhibition “The Long Term You Cannot Afford. On
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The New York Times

Nov 13 2019
Cheeseburgers, Oil and Minimum Wage: Building a Museum of Capitalism
Cheeseburgers, Oil and Minimum Wage: Building a Museum of Capitalism
A roving exhibition, now on view in Manhattan, looks back on capitalism and its “artifacts” from an imaginary future after the system has disappeared.
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artforum.com

Nov 13 2019
The Met Receives Historic Bequest of $80 Million and 375 Artworks
The Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York has received a major bequest of $80 million and more than 375 artworks from the late Jayne Wrightsman (1919–2019), a trustee emerita whom the institution
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The Guardian

Nov 13 2019
Artemisia Gentileschi's painting Lucretia sells for almost €4.8m

Amount exceeds estimate amid growing interest in female baroque painter’s work

A newly discovered canvas by the female 17th-century Italian painter Artemisia Gentileschi sold for almost €4.8m (£4.1m) on Wednesday, a record for the artist, auction house Artcurial said.

The sale came amid a surge of interest in the rare female baroque painter’s extraordinarily dramatic work and easily exceeded the base estimate of between €600,000 and €800,000.

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The New York Times

Nov 13 2019
A Sculpture for Brooklyn’s New Golden Age?
A Sculpture for Brooklyn’s New Golden Age?
Hank Willis Thomas strives for “Unity” in his public artwork at the Brooklyn Bridge.
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The Guardian

Nov 13 2019
Joana Choumali wins 2019 Prix Pictet photography prize

Artist becomes first African to win the prestigious prize, for embroidered pictures created following terrorist attack

See a photo essay of the Prix Pictet 2019 shortlist

Joana Choumali, a 45-year-old photographer from Ivory Coast, has become the first African artist to win the Prix Pictet. The announcement was made this evening in a ceremony at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London for the opening of an exhibition of the 12 shortlisted artists.

The theme of the eighth Prix Pictet, a global award for photography and sustainability, was Hope. The jury, which included last year’s winner, Richard Mosse, praised Choumali’s “brilliantly original meditation on the ability of the human spirit to wrest hope and resilience from even the most traumatic events”.

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The New York Times

Nov 13 2019
Penn Museum Redesign Aims Beyond Academics
Penn Museum Redesign Aims Beyond Academics
Hundreds of objects from a collection of almost one million artifacts will go on public display for the first time when new galleries open this week.
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artforum.com

Nov 13 2019
Magdalena Fernández
A visit to Magdalena Fernández’s retrospective feels like taking a quiz on modernist abstract art—her works echo that era’s compositions and motifs, summoning such icons as Malevich, Mondrian, Lygia
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The New York Times

Nov 13 2019
This Mexican Village’s Embroidery Designs Are Admired (and Appropriated) Globally
This Mexican Village’s Embroidery Designs Are Admired (and Appropriated) Globally
The distinctive iconography used by the Indigenous Otomí people has attracted unsolicited attention from fashion houses, which have incorporated similar images in their designs, often without credit.
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artforum.com

Nov 13 2019
Sawangwongse Yawnghwe Withdraws from Exhibition in Protest of Rohingya Genocide and EU “Hypocrisy” in Myanmar
Myanmar-born artist Sawangwongse Yawnghwe announced his withdrawal from the European Union–backed exhibition “Everyday Justice,” which opens Friday in Yangon, Myanmar, formerly known as Burma—the largest
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The New York Times

Nov 13 2019
A Trustee Leaves Trove of Old Masters Works to the Met
A Trustee Leaves Trove of Old Masters Works to the Met
In her bequest, the longtime donor Jayne Wrightsman left more than 375 works to the museum, along with $80 million for acquisitions.
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artforum.com

Nov 13 2019
Cultural Institutions Close as Venice Endures Worst Flooding in Fifty Years
The mayor of Venice, Luigi Brugnaro, has declared a state of emergency after the Italian city became submerged in floodwaters, the result of severe weather and an exceptionally high tide. According to
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artforum.com

Nov 13 2019
Moscow to Break Ground on Massive Storage and Arts Complex in 2020
The city of Moscow has announced it will open a sprawling 750,000-square-foot arts storage facility that will house the collections of twenty-three city-run museums and four national galleries, the
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artforum.com

Nov 13 2019
Art Missing from Embassies May Be Linked to Government Officials
Several recent cases of art missing from embassies have raised questions over whether government officials are abusing their diplomatic immunity, the https://www.theartnewspaper.com/news/abuse-of-diplomatic-privilege
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The Guardian

Nov 13 2019
Richard Snell obituary

My friend Richard Snell, who has died aged 69 of a brain tumour, was a furniture designer with an international reputation, specialising in chair design. His ergonomic furniture is widely used in care homes, schools, restaurants and concert venues, including the Royal Albert Hall.

Richard was born in Guernsey and raised with his brother, Eric, on their parents’ smallholding. Jack and Mary (nee Vidamour) worked together growing tomatoes and flowers for export to mainland Britain. Following his education at Guernsey grammar school, Richard enrolled at Birmingham College of Art, where he gained a DipAD, then a master’s degree in 1975.

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The New York Times

Nov 13 2019
‘The Hare With Amber Eyes’ Comes Home
An exhibition in Vienna puts the figurine at the center of Edmund De Waal’s 2010 memoir on show, and tells the story of a family forced from their home by prejudice.
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The Guardian

Nov 12 2019
Mona Lisa suckling, a raffia tutu and one-sided kisses: Photo Vogue festival 2019 – in pictures

This year’s Photo Vogue festival in Milan is divided into three: title show A Glitch in the System, tackling stereotypes; Fashion Moving Forward, an exploration of film in fashion; and Inez & Vinoodh: Hi-Lo Transformers, showcasing the duo’s work. Here are our highlights from all three

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The New York Times

Nov 12 2019
In Uruguay, Many New Vacation Homes Favor Simple, Modern Design
“The coast’s gentle, open landscape really lends itself to these minimalist boxes,” an architecture professor said.
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The Guardian

Nov 12 2019
Steamrollers, explosions, and 'cartoon violence': the artistic eruptions of Cornelia Parker

The launch of her first major show in the southern hemisphere sees the UK artist trying to disrupt the cosy and suburban

Cornelia Parker is softly spoken and bird-like; an artist who peppers her conversation with nervous little laughs. Yet her work is all about blowing things up.

Over her career, the Turner prize-shortlisted English artist, who was appointed an Order of the British Empire in 2010, has made a name treating objects with what she terms “cartoon violence”. Silver cutlery has been crushed with a steamroller. A garden shed has been blown to smithereens. Wedding rings have been stretched. And stretched. And stretched.

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artforum.com

Nov 12 2019
Facing Criticism, El Museo del Barrio Instates Community Outreach Initiatives
Earlier this year, community activists sharply criticized El Museo del Barrio in New York for being out of touch with its roots as an institution founded by a coalition of Puerto Rican educators, artists,
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artforum.com

Nov 12 2019
Masha Tupitsyn discusses Picture Cycle
Composed over the past decade, Masha Tupitsyn’s https://mitpress.mit.edu/books/picture-cycle Picture Cycle (2019) is a book of essays that considers the shift from analog to digital as an analogy
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artforum.com

Nov 12 2019
Blue Republic
Previous exhibitions by Blue Republic, a collective based in Toronto and Krakow, have involved ephemeral drawings, sculptures, and video works that speak to transience and fragility. This more focused
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artforum.com

Nov 12 2019
Chiara Parisi to Lead Centre Pompidou-Metz
The Italian art historian and curator Chiara Parisi has been chosen as the successor of Centre Pompidou-Metz director Emma Lavigne, who was named president of the Palais de Tokyo in Paris this summer.
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artforum.com

Nov 12 2019
“AIL PALACES ARETEMPORARY HALACES: A Shanzhai Lyric”
Regardless of whether it’s “high” or “fast,” fashion shouts (or dog-whistles) its way through the crowds with branded signifiers. But the linguistically opaque garments gathered here are shanzhai:
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The New York Times

Nov 12 2019
Maya Lin to Conjure Dying Trees to Make a Point
Maya Lin to Conjure Dying Trees to Make a Point
Her public art installation at Madison Square Park, opening in June, will focus on the so-called ghost forests that have died off because of climate change.
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artforum.com

Nov 12 2019
Phillips Names New Regional Directors of Scandinavia and Switzerland
Phillips has appointed Lori Spector as senior international specialist of twentieth-century and contemporary art and as regional director of Zurich, and Kirsten MacDonald as regional director for
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The Guardian

Nov 12 2019
Dragging parliament into the 21st century | Letters
Judith Martin and Jol Miskin agree that moving parliament away from London is a good first step

John Forsyth (Letters, 8 November) says he would vote for the party that opts to move on from the constraints imposed by the built fabric of the “mother of parliaments”. Writing from Penzance, he generously suggests parliament should be moved to the Midlands or the north.

I agree, but the first step is to prevent the ludicrous waste of public funds about to be spent on turning Richmond House on Whitehall into a replica parliament while the historic site is worked on. Not only is Richmond House Grade II*-listed, it represents a vast amount of embodied energy, all of which will be lost because parliamentarians cannot conceive of anything other than the division arrangements they have now.
Judith Martin
Winchester, Hampshire

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artforum.com

Nov 12 2019
Gillian Jagger (1930–2019)
Sculptor Gillian Jagger, known for her incorporation of natural materials like animal carcasses and fallen trees into formidable installations, died at eighty-eight years old on October 21. Her death
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artforum.com

Nov 12 2019
Virginia Commonwealth University’s ICA Announces Research Fellows and Staff Promotions
The Institute for Contemporary Art (ICA) at Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU) announced today its inaugural research fellows, Paul Rucker and Nontsikelelo Mutiti, and the promotion of two staff
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artforum.com

Nov 12 2019
Hank Willis Thomas Statue Unveiled in Brooklyn
On Saturday, November 9, a new, monumental public artwork by Hank Willis Thomas, titled Unity, was permanently installed near the entrance to the Brooklyn Bridge in New York City. According to the
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The Guardian

Nov 12 2019
Buy a classic sport photograph: 'Gone swimming!'

The seventh of a new Guardian Print Shop series featuring classic sports images from the likes of Gerry Cranham, Mark Leech and Tom Jenkins – yours to own for just £55 including free delivery

A shallow depth of field focused on the tips of the swimmer’s toes; a flurry of bubbles rising upwards; an unidentifiable torso powering serenely into the distance … sometimes a picture only needs a few simple ingredients to make it magical. This shot by Gerry Cranham is a classic example of his ability to craft timeless images. It depicts the Scottish swimmer Bobby McGregor, who would go on to win a silver medal in the 100m freestyle at the 1964 Tokyo Olympics (although arguably it’s not so important now whom the picture is of). For those wondering how it was shot … isn’t there magic in the mystery, too? Let’s just say that while the early 1960s had seen a boom in underwater photography with the release of the Calypso camera, which was conceived by the famed oceanographer and film-maker Jacques-Yves Cousteau, there were other options. Competitive swimming pools began to install special viewing windows at their perimeters, allowing photographers seeking “underwater-style” images to remain dry while capturing the beauty of a tumble-turn.

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The Guardian

Nov 11 2019
Queer continent: Mikael Owunna's Limitless Africans – in pictures

Homosexuality is illegal in more than 30 African countries and punishable by death in four. There is also the widespread belief that homosexuality is ‘un-African’. In his new book Limitless Africans, Nigerian photographer Mikael Owunna documents stories of LGBTQ immigrants, refugees and asylum-seekers

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The New York Times

Nov 11 2019
Will Global Jitters Dull the Glitter of New York’s Art Gigaweek?
Will Global Jitters Dull the Glitter of New York’s Art Gigaweek?
A rediscovered David Hockney and a welded hippo are among some 2,000 works coming to auction. But only a handful are trophies.
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The New York Times

Nov 11 2019
Inside the Last Occupied Apartments of the Chelsea Hotel
A new book celebrates the colorful living spaces of the New Yorkers who still call the legendary building home.
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artforum.com

Nov 11 2019
Ayodeji Rotinwa at Art X Lagos
LAST WEEKEND, Ahmadu Bello Way was without chaos, surprising for a road routinely choked with bumper-to-bumper congestion. The facilitators of this calm were none other than the Nigerian army and
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