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The Guardian

Apr 16 2018
Housing policy and the big shrink | Letters
The so-called regeneration exercises by London boroughs are not only causing social cleansing, they are shrinking homes, writes Kate Macintosh. Plus Paul Nicolson says MP landlords should withdraw from debates and votes on housing and land

Your editorial (Britons will live in shoe boxes unless we resurrect housing standards, 11 April) is timely. That we have the lowest space standards in Europe was identified in an RIBA report, “Making Space”, published four years ago.

This was not always the case. The 1961 Parker Morris Report, “Home for Today and Tomorrow” published under a Conservative government, set what were then minimum space standards which were voluntarily adopted by all the London boroughs, when the main responsibility for the provision of public housing was transferred to them from the LCC in 1964 before the standards became mandatory. They were abolished by Thatcher in 1983, since when the big shrink set in.

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The Guardian

Apr 16 2018
Joseph Beuys review – a show steeped in fat, felt and fiction

Galerie Thaddaeus Ropac, London
The German artist may have lied about being shot down in a stuka in world war two – but he took his mythology seriously

He always wore a hat. Like everything else he touched, it became a totem drenched in personal meaning, the symbolic headgear of a self-appointed shaman. In reality, according to those who knew him, the hat covered scars from a Stuka crash, in which rear gunner Beuys was seriously wounded, on the eastern front in 1944.

That much is true. Probably. Yet the story Beuys later made up about his wartime experience has been discredited since his death in 1986 by people who bothered to check the Third Reich documents. Beuys claimed he was rescued, barely alive, from the burning Stuka by Tatar nomads and swathed in fat and felt to resurrect him. It was a tale that explained not just his survival but his rebirth as a radical visionary out of the ashes of his youth in the Nazi era. The trouble was, it was a lie. Does that matter? Is it still a useful fable, part of his crazy vision, or should we suspect that his entire artistic output is similarly dishonest, or even that it is tainted by a past he never truly rejected or explained?

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The New York Times

Apr 16 2018
In Memorial to War Dead, Israel Avoids Addressing Its Conflicts
The new National Memorial Hall for fallen soldiers seeks consensus in a divided society by paring down commemoration to its bare essentials.
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artforum.com

Apr 16 2018
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The Guardian

Apr 16 2018
Roy Spence obituary

My father, Roy Spence, who has died aged 93, made a remarkable journey from miner’s son to senior civil servant.

Most of his distinguished career was spent with the Ministry of Transport: his proudest achievement was a series of urban transportation studies, whose products included the Newcastle Metro rail network and the Liverpool loop tunnel constructed beneath the city centre in the 1970s.

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artforum.com

Apr 16 2018
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The Guardian

Apr 15 2018
Trick of the light: the artist holding nature’s mirror

Phillip K Smith III’s artworks reflect the beauty of nature in remarkable ways. Now he’s bringing one to urban Milan

During this month’s Milan Furniture Fair the California-based artist Phillip K Smith III, known for his light and mirror-based land artworks, is teaming up with the fashion brand Cos to create a site-specific, immersive installation called Open Sky. The horseshoe-shaped sculpture, a formidable 11.5ft high and 45ft in diameter, will be displayed in the courtyard of the 16th-century Palazzo Isimbardi, its mirror-polished steel facade reflecting the surrounding building and the sky. This is Smith’s first urban project and his first in Europe.

Cos creative director Karin Gustafsson, who launched the Milan project seven years ago, is known for offering artists creative carte blanche. “It’s about sharing a creator that we believe in, someone exciting for others to know about,” she says. “Phillip is someone we’ve been watching who always has an interesting dialogue with his surroundings.”

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The Guardian

Apr 15 2018
​A shed the size of a town:​ what Britain’s giant distribution centres​ tell​ us about modern life
Designed to disappear into the landscape​, Britain’s vast super-warehouses​ also​ reflect a world in which we expect online purchases to arrive as if by magic

When you click on a product, something, somewhere, moves. The item is shifted off its shelf by human or robot and on to a chain of delivery mechanisms that takes it to your door. That item, and millions others like it, plus the machinery that handles them, needs space. The more we shop online, the more such space is needed.

You’ll know all this, I expect, but you may only be dimly aware of the physical consequences: very big boxes, getting bigger and more numerous. Higher, too, as robotic distribution systems allow goods to be piled further from the ground than before.

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The Guardian

Apr 15 2018
Cardboard city: 16 April 1989

Neil Libbert visited the encampment of the disenfranchised near London’s Waterloo station on numerous occasions, capturing the despair of the homeless.

Meanwhile, beneath the bridge, there are other architectural fantasies. To the east, you look at a spider’s web of steel and glass; down below, you find a city of cardboard inhabited by those whose risks no one thinks it worthwhile to insure. The urine-perfumed alleys and stairwells under the South Bank concert halls house people who have fallen through society’s floor.

Their impromptu shelters seem to imitate the whimsies of Richard Rogers, whose building can afford to joke about its own flimsiness. But on the embankment the joke is sourer. Last summer a family lived behind a barricade of cartons below some stairs leading down from the Queen Elizabeth Hall. The space was dry, but cramped: they could only crouch inside, or – literally – squat, since their box had a roof of looming concrete. For their outer wall they had chosen a square of cardboard with a wine glass stamped on it, next to the cautionary word “fragile”.

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The Guardian

Apr 14 2018
Back in favour: Japanese master who outshone Picasso in 1920s Paris
Léonard Foujita was the toast of the art world but vanished from view in the 1930s. A new show returns him to the public gaze

Fifty years ago, while French youth were simmering with anger and dreaming big, one of the greatest artists of Montparnasse discreetly passed away. The painter, who died as a French Catholic named Léonard Foujita, had been born 81 years earlier as Tsuguharu Foujita, the son of a general in Japan’s imperial army.

This year, celebrations marking the anniversary of his death, organised in Paris, Reims, Tokyo, Osaka and Kyoto, hope to bring him back from obscurity. For Foujita was one of the most successful artists of the 1920s, worshipped by the critics and art lovers who paid a fortune for his drawings, watercolours and oil paintings. As Paris’s shining art star, he was more successful than Picasso and more acclaimed than Matisse. Now he is the subject of a major exhibition at the Maillol Museum which focuses on the artist’s most prolific period, between 1913 and 1931.

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The Guardian

Apr 14 2018
Surface Work review – women abstract artists dazzle in historic show

Victoria Miro Mayfair and Wharf Road, London
This magnificent, century-spanning survey of abstract painting, all of it by women, many of whom are unknown, is as poignant as it is momentous

There are certain shows that change one’s sense of art. Surface Work is one of them. Spread across two sites, it is nothing less than an anthology of abstract painting spanning an entire century, from early constructivism to post-digital sampling, in which every work holds its own and every work is by a woman. This is a rare and historic event.

It is also clear proof, if more were needed, of the institutional bias of the art world. So many of these women’s names are unfamiliar, so many have been stinted, forgotten or ignored, that it is quite possible to walk through rooms full of magnificent works without having heard of their makers. Abstract painting, roughly as represented in British museums, tends to run from Kandinsky, Malevich and Mondrian to Pollock, Rothko and Barnett Newman, through to Richard Diebenkorn, Cy Twombly and – if you’re very lucky – Joan Mitchell, an artist easily as great as Twombly yet appallingly neglected in this country. Bridget Riley and the ever-visible Yayoi Kusama are eminent exceptions too, and last year’s Russian Revolution shows brought us the amazons of the avant garde as never before. But still this show is guaranteed to surprise with its surge of artistic revelations.

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The Guardian

Apr 14 2018
Revealed: ‘perfectly realised’ early work by Leonardo da Vinci
Half of altarpiece panel was painted by master as an apprentice, say researchers

A small Renaissance painting owned by an American museum and not on public view for most of the past two decades has been identified as partly the work of Leonardo da Vinci.

A Miracle of Saint Donato of Arezzo, an altarpiece panel in the Worcester Art Museum, Massachusetts, had long been attributed to the lesser Florentine artist, Lorenzo di Credi. But according Laurence Kanter, chief curator of the Yale University Art Gallery in New Haven, Connecticut, aspects of the painting, commissioned in 1475, bear the unmistakable stamp of Leonardo.

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The Guardian

Apr 14 2018
Objects of desire: the design delights of my favourite things

An old typewriter, a wooden chair, a worn cuddly toy… The things we surround ourselves with loom large in our lives. Here, eight people reveal why they love the design of their prized possession

The Olivetti Lettera 22 typewriter This is widely regarded as the greatest typewriter of all time. It’s the best ergonomically; it has a light action on the keyboard, but it still has a rhythm. It has an amazing set of features for a tiny machine. It has a half space insertion so you can delete a five-letter word with Tippex and then type it in again; if it’s one letter longer you can do a half space and squeeze up words. It’s also got much more sophisticated tabulation

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The Guardian

Apr 14 2018
The big picture: Window Nurses, NYC, 1966
The racial divide in 1960s America is captured in a rediscovered image by Italian photographer Mario Carnicelli

When Mario Carnicelli landed in New York in 1966 and saw the city’s skyline, it brought to mind “Edward Hopper, Elia Kazan’s On the Waterfront, the notes of Gershwin – it seemed as if Humphrey Bogart would appear at any moment from a side street,” he remembers. He had won a photography competition in Italy at the age of 29 and the prize was a trip to America. “It was a dream.”

Once there, however, reality intruded on this fantasy: the restaurants all produced the same nauseating smell and there was a sense of loneliness. “As a European, you imagined all this enormous wealth, but walking around there was also a lot of poverty.” Influenced by the humanist approach of New Deal photographers such as Dorothea Lange, Carnicelli focused his lens not on the skyscrapers but on what was happening at street level: on commuters, builders, shopkeepers, passersby.

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The Guardian

Apr 14 2018
Lapland's changing seasons by drone – in pictures

Between the late 19th century and 1980, Kotisaari Island was a meeting point for the lumberjacks of Rovaniemi in Lapland, Finland. Now a tourist attraction, it can be reached by a daily boat and one of the lumberjack buildings has been turned into a tavern. In 2015, local nature photographer Jani Ylinampa took an aerial photograph of the island using a drone, and when the photo went viral on social media he decided to document the island’s changing seasons. “The seasonal changes in Lapland are drastic and this little island is the perfect way to display them,” says Ylinampa, who also works as a tourist guide. Just four miles south of the Arctic Circle, the island ranges from an average temperature of -8.2C in January to 19.7C in July, presenting a challenge for the photographer. “Especially in winter, I need the weather to be dry so the propellers don’t freeze.”

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The Guardian

Apr 14 2018
Mutts-have: architects create luxury kennels for pet charity auction

Celebrities and designers also turn their hand to producing pooch palaces for event

For devoted owners of pampered pups seeking the next level of doggy luxury, help is at hand. A jewel-encrusted canine castle, a velvet-lined golden egg and a floating doghouse complete with diving board are just some of the elaborate kennel designs concocted by dog-loving architects and designers to be auctioned off this month in aid of the pet charity Blue Cross and the US-based Outdoor Arts Foundation.

Zaha Hadid Design has turned its expertise in streamlined space-age forms to the humble dog basket, producing a curvaceous cocoon, machine-milled from plywood with the retro-futuristic air of something from the Jetsons.

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The Guardian

Apr 14 2018
The 20 photographs of the week

Protests in Gaza, World Press Photo award winners, Mark Zuckerberg in his congressional testimony and the Commonwealth Games in Australia – the week captured by the world’s best photojournalists

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artforum.com

Apr 13 2018
FILM: Get Real
Leo Goldsmith on the fortieth edition of “Cinéma du Réel” at the Centre Pompidou
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artforum.com

Apr 13 2018
DIARY: The Mori the Merrier
Michael Wilson attends Mariko Mori’s tea ceremony at Sean Kelly Gallery
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artforum.com

Apr 13 2018
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The Guardian

Apr 13 2018
Radical women: how Latin American artists rebelled with their work

A new exhibition looks back at 120 women from 15 countries who created groundbreaking art between the 60s and 80s at a time when their voices were being silenced

In 1968, Argentinian artist Graciela Carnevale created an unlikely art exhibition: she invited people into an empty gallery, locked them inside, and left.

But Lock-up Action, as the artwork was called, came to a swift end when the trapped gallery-goers flagged down a pedestrian, who broke a glass wall and set them free. To Carnevale, it was a comment on freedom in Argentina under a military dictatorship, and the broken glass was a metaphor for political resistance.

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The Guardian

Apr 13 2018
Beuys keeps swinging and Brazil burns bright – the week in art

The visionary artist’s most powerful sculptures go on show while a new landmark floats on a London lake and Newcastle surveys Bomberg – all in your weekly dispatch

Beatriz Milhazes: Rio Azul
Dazzling abstract explosions of colour that update the modernism of Sonia Delaunay to 21st-century Brazil.
White Cube Bermondsey, London, 18 April-1 July.

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The Guardian

Apr 13 2018
Tracey Emin’s love letter to Europe woos St Pancras commuters

Passengers and passersby ‘captivated’ by neon pink artwork in London station

It might have been meant as a love letter to Europe, but commuters and passersby are projecting their own feelings on to Tracey Emin’s latest artwork, the 20-metre pink neon text emblazoned across St Pancras International station that reads: “I want my time with you”.

Behind it, Paul Day’s bronze statue of two lovers embracing and the large Dent clock that ticks on, a constant reminder of the frailty of time.

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The New York Times

Apr 13 2018
Looming Ivory Ban Will Create a Mountain of Unsellable Antiques
Heirlooms like the ones in Edmund de Waal’s “The Hare With Amber Eyes” are set to become unsellable when Britain brings in new laws aimed at protecting elephants.
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The Guardian

Apr 13 2018
Wim Wenders’s Drive-In, Marfa, Texas: romantic fascination with decay

The German film-maker and photographer explores his passion for travelling, storytelling and recording things as they are

This shot of the back of a drive-in cinema screen in Texas is typical of the kind of landscapes that hook the German film-maker and photographer Wim Wenders’s attention. Windswept and bereft of people, this lonely scene speaks of a romantic fascination with decay.

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The New York Times

Apr 13 2018
A Collector Follows His Nose Through the Maze of Modern Art
Sylvio Perlstein’s accumulations of avant-garde art from the past 50 years comes to Hauser & Wirth this month.
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The New York Times

Apr 12 2018
25 Art Exhibitions to View in NYC This Weekend
Our guide to new art shows and some that will be closing soon.
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The New York Times

Apr 12 2018
Boston Museum Closes Nicholas Nixon Photography Show Early
The Institute of Contemporary Art had initially decided to keep the exhibition open, despite accusations of inappropriate sexual behavior against Mr. Nixon.
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artforum.com

Apr 12 2018
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