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artforum.com

Nov 11 2019
Sally Dixon (1932–2019)
Sally Dixon, an early champion of avant-garde film, has died at age eighty-seven in Saint Paul, Minnesota. Minneapolis’s Walker Art Center, the institution to whom Dixon donated more than thirty rare
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artforum.com

Nov 11 2019
Tyler Maxin on Becoming Peter Ivers (2019)
THE MAJOR LABEL SOLO MUSIC CAREER OF PETER IVERS, a figure defined in the popular imagination less by his personal achievements than by his proximities to stardom, has largely been eclipsed by his
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The New York Times

Nov 11 2019
With ‘Shadow Stalker,’ Lynn Hershman Leeson Tackles Internet Surveillance
With ‘Shadow Stalker,’ Lynn Hershman Leeson Tackles Internet Surveillance
She pioneered interactive video and artificial intelligence in art. Now this new-media path-breaker scrutinizes technology’s abuses at the Shed.
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The New York Times

Nov 11 2019
With a Slave Rebellion Re-enactment, an Artist Revives Forgotten History
With a Slave Rebellion Re-enactment, an Artist Revives Forgotten History
Dread Scott is organizing a re-enactment in Louisiana that asks people to think about who the real heroes were in the 19th-Century South.
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The New York Times

Nov 11 2019
Searching for the Ancestral Puebloans
Searching for the Ancestral Puebloans
In the red rock desert of the Southwest, an ancient culture was thought to have vanished. A new view connects it to pueblo dwellers of today.
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artforum.com

Nov 11 2019
Rory Pilgrim Awarded the Netherlands’ $44,000 Prix de Rome
British artist Rory Pilgrim has won the Netherlands’ Prix de Rome, which honors cultural producers under the age of forty. The $44,000 award, which also comes with a residency at the American Academy
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The New York Times

Nov 11 2019
A Cozy, Minimalist Retreat Perched Among the Treetops
A Cozy, Minimalist Retreat Perched Among the Treetops
In upstate New York, one family’s treehouse mimics its rustic environment.
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artforum.com

Nov 11 2019
Andrea Kvas
Two self-supporting structures, resembling minimalist totems, form Andrea Kvas’s installation Untitled (Cornie), 2019, created for the space of the former Milanese studio of the late outsider artist
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The Guardian

Nov 11 2019
The time of her life: how Nnena Kalu turned Patrick Swayze videos into art

Kalu, who has autism, channelled her compulsive behaviour into creativity – and now her bristling, energetic work is wowing Hull

Humber Street Gallery in Hull was a blank slate two days ago, but by the time I arrive the ground-floor space is already half full with newly made sculptures. Nnena Kalu works fast and she works big. The artist repurposes waste material like old VHS tape, and as I watch her in action, she unspools it in long, satisfying reams to garnish her boldly expressive sculptures. A massive stockpile of raw material sits at one end of the gallery, from videotapes to assorted coloured adhesive tapes, and piles of fabric, like puzzle pieces waiting Kalu to fit them together and make sense of them.

She paces across the gallery at regular intervals to dive into this trove, beginning a process that repeats its basic steps yet produces something new each time. A pre-made group of boulder-like forms are bound together, and then attached to an ingenious system of adjustable frame-like structures, where they’re wrapped and bound further, to create messy forms that seem to bristle with energy.

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artforum.com

Nov 11 2019
London’s Institute for International Visual Arts Names Sepake Angiama Artistic Director
The Institute for International Visual Arts (Iniva) in London has appointed Sepake Angiama as its new artistic director. Angiama most recently served as curator of this year’s Chicago Architecture
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The New York Times

Nov 11 2019
An Art Show, by Veterans Armed With Cameras
A photography workshop for veterans offered an outlet to help them cope with the challenges of being home. An exhibit of their work is on display in Buffalo.
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artforum.com

Nov 11 2019
National Galleries of Scotland to Sever Ties with BP
The National Galleries of Scotland https://www.nationalgalleries.org/exhibition/bp-portrait-award-2019 announced on Monday that it plans on ending its relationship with the oil giant British Petroleum,
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The Guardian

Nov 11 2019
National Galleries Scotland to end BP ties over climate concerns

Move increases pressure on London’s National Portrait Gallery to sever its links

National Galleries Scotland (NGS) has become the latest arts organisation to end links to BP, citing its “responsibility to do all we can to address the climate emergency”.

It said on Monday that the 2019 BP Portrait Award exhibition opening at the Scottish National Portrait Gallery in Edinburgh on 7 December would be the last time it would take place there in its present form.

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artforum.com

Nov 11 2019
Rachel Valinsky on Kristen Kosmas’s The People’s Republic of Valerie: Living Room Edition
“YOU HAVEN’T GIVEN UP / ON A WORLD HAVE YOU?” asked Bernadette Mayer in the epilogue to a slim volume of poems titled Utopia (1984). “You know traditional utopias are no place / as ours will ever be,”
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The Guardian

Nov 10 2019
'We had the same brain' – how Pennie Smith turned the Clash into icons

She photographed the biggest stars. But it was the Clash she clicked with. Pennie Smith relives their first explosive US tour – and reveals how she took ‘rock’s greatest photo’

Pennie Smith was standing less than six feet away when Paul Simonon, bass-player with the Clash, smashed his guitar to pieces on stage at the Palladium in New York. She’d been on the road with the band for two weeks, photographing their first US tour, but she’d always stayed on the other side of the stage, next to lead guitarist Mick Jones.

That night, to mix it up, she switched sides and remembers Simonon suddenly spinning toward her. “He was in a really bad mood,” she says, “and that wasn’t like him.” She took a step back to get a better focus with her 35mm Pentax – and then all hell broke loose. Simonon, seething, raised his Fender Precision like an axe, turned his back to singer Joe Strummer, and brought it crashing down. “It wasn’t a choice to take the shot,” Smith says. “My finger just went off.”

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The Guardian

Nov 10 2019
We should honour the art, not the artist | Letter
Maybe the time has come to stop deluding ourselves that great work must be created by great people, says Bernard Lyall

With yet another reminder of Roman Polanski’s problematic history (Woman accuses Roman Polanski of raping her in 1975 when she was 18, theguardian.com, 8 November) and the recent furore over Peter Handke’s Nobel prize (Report, 17 October), maybe the time has come to stop deluding ourselves that great work must be created by great people. Indeed, to acknowledge that it’s frequently the product of those whose morals range from dubious to disastrous. Why not just drop the idolatry wholesale: award the film not the film-maker, the sculpture not the sculptor, the poem not the poet. And, likewise, accept that some of the best people do the worst work. My parents, the writers Katharine Whitehorn and Gavin Lyall, explained their refusal to ever provide reviews by saying that anyone would do the same, who had as many good friends who wrote bad books.
Bernard Lyall
London

• Join the debate – email guardian.letters@theguardian.com

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The Guardian

Nov 10 2019
24/7: A Wake-Up Call for Our Non-Stop World review – in search of lost time

Somerset House, London
An enjoyably restless multimedia show explores the nonstop nature of our round-the-clock world, where day and night merge and elusive sleep is the last refuge

There is a painting by Joseph Wright of Derby, dated 1782, that looks as anomalous as anything by Magritte. It shows a landscape by night, eerie and dark beneath a clouded moon. But in the distance squats a five-storey building with all its windows illuminated like some modern apartment block. This is Richard Arkwright’s cotton mill in Derbyshire, where the 12-hour shifts ran right through the night, ending (and beginning all over again) at 5am. Arkwright’s machines never stopped.

Our 24/7 society began long ago, with industrialisation. Of course we have always been up through the night, with babies, bedside vigils, illness, anxiety. But the rest of the world mainly slumbered around us. With mass production came the erosion of any distinction between night and day. And now consumption has taken over: buying, watching, playing, tweeting, we are always online.

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The Guardian

Nov 09 2019
Martin brothers’ quirky bird jar expected to fetch up to £50,000 at auction

Avant-garde ceramics – made in the 19th and early 20th century by four siblings who lived in poverty – are back under the hammer

Eccentric ceramics made by the four Martin brothers, who lived and worked in near poverty in London in the late 19th century, are now highly prized by collectors. This month an unusual bird jar, originally made to store tobacco and typical of their surreal style, is expected to sell for up to £50,000 at a Salisbury auction house, despite the fact that it is just a few inches high.

In 1873 the brothers – Robert Wallace, Walter, Edwin and Charles – began their strange 50-year creative journey when they first fired up a kiln inside the family home. Four years later they moved into a disused soap works in Southall and together created an avant-garde cast of varied ceramic characters and animals, each made and sold as mugs, jugs, jars, vases and spoon-warmers. The brothers could only afford to fire the kiln once or twice a year, and had no money to pay for protective containers to keep the pots safe during firing.

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The Guardian

Nov 09 2019
The big picture: Henri Cartier-Bresson flying his kite
The photographer didn’t like having his picture taken. Luckily, his wife had a diverting prop at hand…

Henri Cartier-Bresson, the great photographer, hated to be photographed. In 1987, however, he reluctantly agreed to have a portrait made for Life magazine to publicise a forthcoming exhibition of his work at New York’s Museum of Modern Art. John Loengard, the picture editor of Life at the time, and a distinguished documentary photographer, took no chances and assigned himself to do the portrait.

When Loengard arrived to meet Cartier-Bresson at his summer house in Provence, the master insisted that he would only be photographed from behind. There was a little debate about this. Aged 79, Cartier-Bresson was, Loengard recalled, “still a simmering teakettle. There’d be steam and the lid would be rattling. Then just as quickly he’d quiet down and be his attentive self again.”

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The Guardian

Nov 09 2019
Sign of the times in Hollywood: LA photographer seeks moving pictures

New book from artist Matthew Frost collects pictures of tourists capturing their own moments in front of the famous sign

Two years ago, on his morning run up the Hollywood Deep Dell, Matthew Frost began taking pictures of tourists capturing their own moments in front of the famous sign.

Related: LA suspends Uber’s scooters and bikes permit after company refuses to share data

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The Guardian

Nov 09 2019
Meltdown: the urgent art of our disappearing glaciers

An arresting exhibition from activist charity Project Pressure uses conceptual photography to capture the decline of the ice caps

‘What is it about those melting glaciers and desperate polar bears that makes us want to look away?” the activist and author Naomi Klein asked in 2015. In her book This Changes Everything, she laid the blame on powerful global corporations and acquiescent governments, which both simultaneously underplay the scale of the climate emergency and exploit our collective sense of helplessness in the face of it. Since then, a new urgency has driven climate activism, most successfully in the disruptive protests of Extinction Rebellion. Can art, though, have a meaningful role in raising awareness of that urgency?

A forthcoming exhibition, Meltdown: Visualising Climate Change, at the Horniman Museum in London sets out to answer that question in the affirmative. It focuses on the fate of the world’s glaciers through the prism of art, photography and film. “We are using art as a kind of seduction to draw people in, then shock them,” says photographer Simon Norfolk, one of the artists involved.

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The Guardian

Nov 09 2019
A celebration of Muslim women in Lagos – in pictures

In 2011, visual artist Medina Dugger, from California, moved to Lagos, Nigeria, where she was inspired by local Muslim women to create her series Enshroud. “The series doesn’t take a stance in favour or against veiling, but supports both a woman’s right to choose and her religious expression,” she says. Each digital collage is created by layering two separate images: first, Dugger photographs the women in hijabs, then she superimposes them on top of plastic prayer mats. “I photographed them twirling, jumping and skipping to recreate moments I’d witnessed in the city, which were often incongruent with my previously held notions of women in hijab.”

See more at medinadugger.com

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The Guardian

Nov 09 2019
Hello, Robot review – where human and machine don't quite meet

V&A Dundee
From pet cyber-seals to cars with minds of their own, an exploration of the science and fiction of robots raises more questions than it answers

There was a time when Nineteen Eighty-Four required some suspension of disbelief: it didn’t seem possible, in the first several decades after the book’s publication, that any government or institution would have the resources and organisation to put transmitting and receiving devices in every home and then monitor the information they captured. We now know how very plausible that is. What Orwell didn’t guess was that people would, at the prompting of Amazon and Apple, actually invite such things into their homes. No state programme of installation was needed.

That the future has become the present, in shapes that weren’t quite predicted, is part of the premise of Hello, Robot, an exhibition now showing at the V&A Dundee. Its aim is less to stargaze the future than to question what is actually going on, now that smartphones, for example, have in effect made people into cyborgs – that is to say into interdependent alliances of the organic and the electronic. The show, to make its intention clear, is subtitled Design Between Human and Machine.

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The Guardian

Nov 09 2019
Manet made the doodles in his letters look effortless ... by using tracing paper
Art historian uncovers secret behind impressionist master’s ‘off-the-cuff’ sketches

The snails and curled-up cats that decorate the margins of Édouard Manet’s letters are admired for their effortless spontaneity. But an art historian has discovered that the artist recycled these enchanting watercolour doodles by tracing them from designs he had prepared earlier.

By comparing Manet’s illustrated letters with his sketchbook drawings, all thought to date from 1880, Dr Emily Beeny has realised a “reuse of motifs” with which he created “an illusion of effortlessness”. She believes that he made “extensive use of tracing” in an apparent attempt to “conceal the effort … required to produce these ‘spontaneous’ works”.

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The Guardian

Nov 09 2019
How the art of black power shook off the white gaze

Soul of a Nation, at San Francisco’s De Young Museum, celebrates artists and activists in the home of the Black Panthers

Long before the rise of tech corporations, high rents and Lime scooters, the Bay Area was a breeding ground for for black artists and activists. Artists such as Emory Douglas created Soviet-influenced protest art for the Black Panther newspaper; Raymond Saunders strived to highlight the beauty of blackness with his coal-dark backdrops and figures; Cleveland Bellow brought art into the streets with his public murals and billboards.

During this period, black art became louder, prouder, and unconcerned with the white gaze.

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The New York Times

Nov 09 2019
Kusama Arrives. Is It Worth Your Time to Wait in Line?
Kusama Arrives. Is It Worth Your Time to Wait in Line?
You’ll get to spend one minute in the artist’s newest “Infinity Mirrored Room” at David Zwirner in Chelsea. Expect dancing lights to infinity, or as far as your cameraphone allows.
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The Guardian

Nov 09 2019
20 photographs of the week

Day of the Dead in Mexico, protests in Chile and Iraq, South Africa celebrate winning the Rugby World Cup and the New York marathon – the best photography in news, culture and sport from around the world this week

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artforum.com

Nov 08 2019
Rahel Aima around Qatar
“THIS CAMEL, we waited a long time for it to be born,” museum development specialist Karen Exell told members of the press one morning at the stunning new National Museum of Qatar (NMoQ), which opened
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The New York Times

Nov 08 2019
Marciano Art Foundation Is Accused of Unfair Labor Practices
Employees were laid off after moving to unionize. Now a union is filing a charge at the National Labor Relations Board.
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artforum.com

Nov 08 2019
Two Indigenous Art Exhibitions to Split $250,000 Sotheby’s Prize
This year’s Sotheby’s Prize, which honors curatorial excellence and celebrates institutions that are working to present shows on under-recognized areas of art history, has been awarded to two exhibitions
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artforum.com

Nov 08 2019
Liv Bugge
In close-up, a hand insistently models a piece of clay. The soft shape alters under the pressure, as one imprint is immediately exchanged for another. On an opposite screen, in Liv Bugge’s Instructions
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The New York Times

Nov 08 2019
Galerie St. Etienne Going Nonprofit Route
Galerie St. Etienne Going Nonprofit Route
The gallery helped build an American market for artists like Käthe Kollwitz and Egon Schiele. It is winding down business and transitioning to a nonprofit foundation by the end of 2020.
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The New York Times

Nov 08 2019
Victoria and Albert Museum Names Leader for East London Outpost
Victoria and Albert Museum Names Leader for East London Outpost
Gus Casely-Hayford, who has served as the director of the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African Art since 2018, will be the V&A East’s inaugural director.
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artforum.com

Nov 08 2019
Gus Casely-Hayford Named Inaugural Director of V&A East
The Victoria & Albert Museum in London announced today that Gus Casely-Hayford will become the first director of its new outpost, V&A East, which is currently being constructed in Queen Elizabeth Olympic
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The Guardian

Nov 08 2019
Newly found work by Artemisia Gentileschi to be auctioned

Lucretia set to raise at least €800,000 as interest in post-Caravaggio era painter surges

A newly discovered canvas by the 17th-century Italian painter Artemisia Gentileschi will go up for auction in Paris next week amid a surge of interest in her dramatic work.

The auction house Artcurial will on Wednesday offer the painting Lucretia with a base estimate of €600,000-€800,000 (£518,000-£690,000).

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artforum.com

Nov 08 2019
Lin-Manuel Miranda Partners with Google to Digitize Art from Major Puerto Rican Museums
Google Arts & Culture is teaming up with the Tony Award–winning composer, singer, actor, playwright, and producer Lin-Manuel Miranda, the creator of the hit Broadway musical Hamilton, and his father,
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The New York Times

Nov 08 2019
Wangechi Mutu’s Works to Grace the Met Facade Until June
Wangechi Mutu’s Works to Grace the Met Facade Until June
The four bronze sculptures embedded in the Met’s Fifth Avenue facade will get an extended run, after what the director called an “extraordinary outcome.”
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The New York Times

Nov 08 2019
The Designer Bringing Sunlight Back to Manhattan
The Designer Bringing Sunlight Back to Manhattan
James Carpenter created the facade for the new Nordstrom store, fashioned from 17-foot-tall sections of glass.
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artforum.com

Nov 08 2019
Betye Saar Wins 2020 Wolfgang Hahn Prize
Betye Saar has been named the winner of the twenty-sixth Wolfgang Hahn Prize. Administered by the Society for Modern Art at the Museum Ludwig in Cologne, the institution will soon add a work, or a series
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The New York Times

Nov 08 2019
He Can’t See All the Art, but He’s One of Germany’s Top Dealers
He Can’t See All the Art, but He’s One of Germany’s Top Dealers
“I don’t choose artworks, I choose artists”: Johann König says his near-blindness makes him a smarter gallerist.
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artforum.com

Nov 08 2019
Newark Museum Announces Name Change
The Newark Museum in New Jersey, the largest cultural institution in the state, has changed its name to the Newark Museum of Art in order to communicate to the public a clearer sense of its identity
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The Guardian

Nov 08 2019
Steve McQueen's school sensation, R2-D2 and a hi-tech Leonardo – the week in art

McQueen puts Britain’s next generation on billboards, droids take over Dundee, and the National Gallery goes inside the mind of Da Vinci – all in your weekly dispatch

Steve McQueen Year 3
Portraits of an entire generation of young Londoners – displayed on hundreds of billboards across the city – that foreground the future of Britain, just as it prepares to vote in a general election. Read more in this interview.
Tate Britain, London, 12 November to 3 May.

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The Guardian

Nov 08 2019
Gus Casely-Hayford to lead V&A's new east London museum

Historian and broadcaster feels ‘enormously privileged’ to join V&A East, due to open in 2023

The cultural historian and broadcaster Gus Casely-Hayford is to head the V&A’s new outpost in east London, a five-storey museum due to open in 2023.

Casely-Hayford has been the director of the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African Art in Washington DC since 2018, but has returned to London, where he was born, for what is likely to be one of the biggest museum projects of the next decade.

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The Guardian

Nov 08 2019
Nature's disco: Elsa Leydier's pop-art paradise – in pictures

From glitchy parrots to pop-art champagne, the photographer’s work explores our perceptions of nature, influenced by strong colour and the climate crisis

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The Guardian

Nov 08 2019
Buy a classic Guardian photograph: Loch Tummel, October 2019

In our weekly series of exclusive Guardian print sales we have an autumnal view of Loch Tummel, near Pitlochry in Scotland, by Murdo MacLeod

The Guardian photographer Murdo MacLeod recently took a morning drive around Loch Tummel, north-west of Pitlochry, in Perth and Kinross, Scotland – a stunning, narrow freshwater loch surrounded by forest, trails and breathtaking views. “I was on a mission to capture the autumn colours,” he says. “There was a light frost, and a mist loitering in the hollows. It was very still and beautiful.” The trees on the shoreline and the peak above are reflected in the water, framed by silhouetted branches: the perfect autumn scene.

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The Guardian

Nov 08 2019
William Klein’s Shoes Polisher … urban codes and libidinal currents

Ahead of his time in bringing street photography to the mainstream, Klein captures the male energy of the 1980s

Soho street life in the early 1980s is captured as a confusion of male energy in this classic 1980 shot, Shoes Polisher, Rocky II, etc, Piccadilly, by the great American experimental photographer William Klein. Signs shout about movie boxing hero Rocky, money, beer and cameras. In an era when this area of central London was infamous for the sex trade, only men pound Klein’s pavements, the women waiting in backstreet rooms.

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The New York Times

Nov 08 2019
The Matisse Name Lives On
The Matisse Name Lives On
The artist’s descendants have created a home décor business, with art pieces and products inspired by Matisse’s work.
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The Guardian

Nov 07 2019
Pride of space: Australia's 2019 National Architecture Award winners, in pictures

Sustainability-minded and socially conscious design dominated the Australian Institute of Architects’ awards

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The New York Times

Nov 07 2019
At 88, Agnes Denes Finally Gets the Retrospective She Deserves
She set out to change humanity. Now a superbly installed survey at the Shed charts this visionary artist’s 50-year journey.
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The New York Times

Nov 07 2019
16 Art Exhibitions to View in N.Y.C. This Weekend
Our guide to new art shows and some that will be closing soon.
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