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The Guardian

Jan 08 2021
David Medalla obituary
Filipino-born experimental artist who had a long-lasting influence on the British avant-garde art scene

Had you been in Cypress Hills cemetery, Brooklyn, one cold January day in 1993, you might have found yourself being handed a chrysanthemum by an elfin figure with soft brown eyes. This was the artist David Medalla, a pioneering figure in experimental and participatory art, who has died aged 82.

The chrysanthemums were part of a performance called Mondrian in Extremis – the Dutch painter is buried at Cypress Hills – itself one of a series of collaborative events to which Medalla gave the title The Secret History of the Mondrian Fan Club. Over the years – the Fan Club was still extant at the time of its founder’s death – these would come to include works of skywriting (the letter M, for Mondrian, drawn by a light aeroplane over New York); performance (of, among other things, Mondrian puppets dancing the boogie-woogie); film, neon animation and collaged photographs, the last of Medalla lying by Mondrian’s grave, laser-printed on to canvas and then overpainted.

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artforum.com

Jan 08 2021
Joyce Pensato
Petzel Gallery is pleased to announce the representation of the Joyce Pensato Estate. The gallery will present two solo exhibitions at its Chelsea and Upper East Side locations including paintings,
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The Guardian

Jan 08 2021
A giant vulva, Hockney for kids and the ultimate museum tour – the week in art

We look at how art can help you through lockdown, from virtual tours to Hockney, Oscar Wilde and Top Trumps – all in your weekly dispatch

As much of the nation home educates, there are some stimulating ways art can help. You can even still visit the British Museum – virtually. An easy-to-negotiate walk through of this vast gallery of world art and history with Google Street View is just one of the ways learners can explore it from home, as well as searching the collection, plus plenty of blogs and podcasts. There’s something for all ages, and infinite wonders to inspire.
British Museum, London

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The New York Times

Jan 08 2021
Curators Scour Capitol for Damage to the Building or Its Art
Curators Scour Capitol for Damage to the Building or Its Art
Initial reports indicate that despite multiple incidents of vandalism, smashed windows and broken doors, major damage to the building itself or its artworks was avoided.
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The Guardian

Jan 08 2021
'They adored each other': book casts new light on Francis Bacon's lover

Exclusive: Peter Lacy was not the sadistic fighter pilot and drunk he has been described as, authors say

He has been portrayed as a heroic fighter pilot in the Battle of Britain, with a sadistic streak that bordered on the psychopathic, beating his lover Francis Bacon and once hurling him through a glass window. But new research paints another picture of Peter Lacy, revealing that he was never a fighter pilot and that, beyond the sexual violence, the relationship with Bacon was real love for both men.

The Pulitzer prize-winning authors Mark Stevens and Annalyn Swan are publishing a major biography about one of the greatest artists of the 20th century. With the full cooperation of Bacon’s estate, they received access to archives and interviewed family and friends of the artist and his lovers, among others.

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artforum.com

Jan 07 2021
Kemang Wa Lehulere
“Where Did The Sky Go?” By Athi Mongezeleli Joja The title of Kemang Wa Lehulere’s exhibition “Where Did The Sky Go?” captures a sense of capriciousness and bewilderment. The disappearance of the
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artforum.com

Jan 07 2021
Hammer Museum and The Huntington
“Made in L.A. 2020: a version” is the fifth iteration of the Hammer Museum’s biennial exhibition highlighting the practices of artists working throughout greater Los Angeles, organized by Myriam Ben
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artforum.com

Jan 07 2021
Members of Art-Dealing Wildenstein Family Face Retrial in French Court
Members of the Wildenstein family, possessors of one of the world’s largest collection of Old Masters, have been ordered by France’s highest court to face a retrial after being acquitted of tax fraud
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artforum.com

Jan 07 2021
Amanda Coulson Departs National Art Gallery of the Bahamas to Lead New TERN Gallery
Amanda Coulson is stepping down from her post as executive director of the National Art Gallery of the Bahamas to take up the role of founding director of TERN Gallery, a new space in Nassau, Bahamas,
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The New York Times

Jan 07 2021
The Royal Academy of Dance: From Music Hall to Ballet Royalty
The history of the Royal Academy of Dance, outlined at an exhibition in London, is synonymous with the history of ballet in Britain.
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artforum.com

Jan 07 2021
Elvia Wilk on ecosystemic fiction
IN THE FIRST MONTHS OF QUARANTINE, my apartment became my personal ecosystem. The idiosyncrasies of daily life in isolation—the peculiar sleep hours, the midnight meals on the fire escape, the evening
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The New York Times

Jan 07 2021
3 Art Gallery Shows to See Right Now
Six outstanding sculptures by Martin Puryear; Gregory Edwards’s “pedestrian paintings”; and rarely seen works by Jack Whitten.
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The New York Times

Jan 07 2021
5 Things to Do This Weekend
5 Things to Do This Weekend
Our critics and writers have selected noteworthy cultural events to experience virtually.
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The Guardian

Jan 07 2021
The Kamoinge legacy: the black photographers who changed the game

A new exhibition shines a light on the long-running collective of photographers who started documenting black culture in the 60s and haven’t stopped since

In 1973, a group of 14 New York photographers huddled into a photo studio on West 18th Street in Manhattan, posing in front of a Hasselblad camera for a group shot authored by Anthony Barboza, who stands smiling in the picture.

“I remember arranging the lighting and then my assistant took the photo,” said Barboza to the Guardian. “It’s a photo of a family. That’s what it is. A family photo.”

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The Guardian

Jan 06 2021
Great walls of China: Beijing's burgeoning graffiti scene – in pictures

A thriving graffiti culture has been brewing for decades in Beijing, featuring Chinese characters, animals of the zodiac ... and complaints about the price of pork

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artforum.com

Jan 06 2021
Hilma af Klint
Announcing the Hilma af Klint Complete Catalogue Raisonné. An authoritative and exquisitely produced seven volume set featuring the complete work of this visionary artist. When Swedish artist Hilma
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artforum.com

Jan 06 2021
Witch Hunt
At Kunsthal Charlottenborg, the witch becomes a figure for contemporary crises of representation and identity, as well as the epistemological violence inherent to Western modernity. While the broad
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The Guardian

Jan 06 2021
Grand Designs review: £4m down – and still no house?

Even seasoned presenter Kevin McCloud seems shocked by the huge scale of this megabasement project – yet it’s hard not to will it to succeed

As soon as Kevin McCloud sets the scene – a graveyard in south-west London – you know the latest instalment of Grand Designs (Channel 4) is going to be a classic. Surely nobody would build on such a place, “out of respect, for fear of desecration,” says McCloud, hamming up the potential for gothic drama. “But that’s exactly what my man’s going to do.”

It isn’t exactly what his man is going to do – the prospect of ripping up graves to build a “baronial architectural masterpiece” is a little much, even for Grand Designs – but his man, former army captain Justin Maxwell Stuart, is quite happy to live next to a graveyard, and has a big plan to do so. As series 20 of the ever-soothing, ever-ambitious show begins, we learn that Grand Designs’ latest builder/dreamer/victim has spent £1.8m on the warden’s lodge in a Victorian cemetery and an old toilet block next door to it. The plan is to knock down the loos, build a new extension where they once sat and then extend the neo-gothic Grade II listed lodge by excavating a hefty amount of ground underneath it, constructing a huge mega-basement.

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artforum.com

Jan 06 2021
Kim Tschang-Yeul (1929–2021)
Korean artist Kim Tschang-Yeul, who was widely known for his “water drop” paintings, which he characterized as a way of erasing his ego, died January 5 at the age of ninety-one. Along with Nam June Paik
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The New York Times

Jan 06 2021
5 Art Accounts to Follow on Instagram Now
5 Art Accounts to Follow on Instagram Now
Our critic recommends travel photography, a philosophical comic strip, a chronicler of Black life and the funerary monuments of old New York.
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artforum.com

Jan 06 2021
San Francisco Art Institute Explores Controversial Sale of Diego Rivera Mural
The beleaguered San Francisco Art Institute (SFAI) is contemplating the sale of its iconic 1931 Diego Rivera mural, The Making of a Fresco Showing the Building of a City, in order to supplement its
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The Guardian

Jan 06 2021
France's highest court orders retrial of art-dealing Wildenstein family

Guy Wildenstein and others face new trial after court annuls 2018 tax fraud acquittal

France’s highest court has ordered a retrial of members of the art-dealing Wildenstein family who were acquitted of tax fraud in 2018.

Guy Wildenstein, a close friend of former president Nicolas Sarkozy, and other family members, known in France as “les W”, were cleared of hiding an estimated €550m from the French tax authorities in offshore accounts in 2017 – a decision upheld on appeal.

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The Guardian

Jan 06 2021
Stories and spectacle: climbing Sydney Harbour Bridge for a First Nations view

Tourist attraction BridgeClimb has been reimagined from a First Nations perspective as part of Sydney festival

Climbing the Sydney Harbour Bridge, we are a small group of grown men and women finally learning some original language of place, plugging gaps in our Indigenous cultural ignorance.

We are taking part in Burrawa, which means “above” or “upwards”, a special Sydney festival event that imparts the words and lore of Indigenous peoples whose country this has always been, in a whole new take on the popular tourist attraction BridgeClimb.

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The New York Times

Jan 06 2021
San Francisco’s Top Art School Says Future Hinges on a Diego Rivera Mural
San Francisco’s Top Art School Says Future Hinges on a Diego Rivera Mural
The University of California is aiding the San Francisco Art Institute, but S.F.A.I. officials say selling a $50 million Rivera could save the school. Former students are outraged.
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The Guardian

Jan 06 2021
Maradona lifts the World Cup: David Yarrow's best photograph

‘I bribed a stadium guard with whisky and got dead close just as he was lifted on to another player’s shoulders. It was like a biblical scene. He looked magnificent’

On the final day of exams at Edinburgh University in the summer of 1986, most students partied, but I flew directly to Mexico City. I was 20 years old and studying business and economics while taking photos on the side. I’d never been to the Americas before, and I wasn’t at all a good photographer; in fact, I was incredibly average.

I arrived at the 1986 World Cup under the guise of being a freelance photojournalist, but I was a Scotland fan first and foremost – they always used to say that Scottish journalists are just fans with typewriters. I did have a press pass that I’d managed to blag off the Times, which granted me access to the media pen, but I was much more interested in watching football than taking photographs of it. There was a moment in the first round of a match with Uruguay when Scotland missed an open goal. Back at the Times they were watching the TV coverage of the game and could see the striker with his head in his hands, and in the background me with my head in my hands and with my camera nowhere near the moment. And they thought: “Well this guy, Yarrow, he’s not focused on the task at all.”

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The New York Times

Jan 06 2021
‘My Rembrandt’ Review: Seeing a Dutch Master Everywhere
‘My Rembrandt’ Review: Seeing a Dutch Master Everywhere
This documentary looks at art collectors whose interests in Rembrandt have taken on faintly obsessive dimensions.
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The Guardian

Jan 05 2021
The lives of others: Ute Mahler's images of the real East Germany – in pictures

In 1974, the German photographer set out to convey the truth about how people really lived in the communist GDR – depicting her fellow citizens with a ‘timeless coolness’

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The Guardian

Jan 05 2021
Beirut's wounds on show in display of art damaged by port blast

Exhibition presents torn paintings and grazed sculptures in a museum itself hit by explosion

Through the entrance is a version of Guido Reni’s 17th-century portrait of St John the Baptist, blown to shreds. Nearby, a chandelier lies splattered on the ground where it fell. Mirrors are cracked, paintings ruptured, and roofs in some rooms half-caved in.

Beirut is slowly rebuilding from the explosion on 4 August that destroyed much of its eastern seafront neighbourhoods and tore through galleries and hotel lobbies where some of Lebanon’s most renowned art was on display.

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artforum.com

Jan 05 2021
From James Cohan: Yinka Shonibare CBE—Earth Kids
In this video Shonibare discusses the connection between the history of colonial domination and humankind’s domination of the natural world and exploitation of its limited resources. The quartet of
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artforum.com

Jan 05 2021
Suyu Xiong
Suyu Xiong is a designer and artist, an observer who tells stories that depict fragments of daily life through illustration, comics, and interactive media. By collaborating with various industries, she
artforum.com

Jan 05 2021
OCAT Shanghai
OCAT Shanghai is pleased to present Refocusing on the Medium: The Rise of East Asia Video Art, the first exhibition to assemble key protagonists that initiated experiments with the medium of video
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artforum.com

Jan 05 2021
Rosie Lee Tompkins
Anthony Meier Fine Arts will present a solo exhibition of never-before-seen works by renowned American artist Rosie Lee Tompkins(1936–2006), considered one of the greatest quiltmakers of all times, and
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artforum.com

Jan 05 2021
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artforum.com

Jan 05 2021
Jasmine Gregory
Fluorescent green eyebrows arch across the ominously contented expressions of a Clifford-like big red dog and a woman with matching green nails in Jasmine Gregory’s “Trouble at Casa Amor.” It’s like
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artforum.com

Jan 05 2021
Five Philadelphia Museums to Reopen This Month
Five Philadelphia museums jointly detailed plans to reopen following a temporary city-mandated closure, caused by the continuing Covid-19 pandemic, extending from November 20 to January 5, when it was
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artforum.com

Jan 05 2021
Gagosian Closes San Francisco Gallery
Megagallery Gagosian has closed its San Francisco outpost after just four years and is instead seeking to elevate its profile in Los Angeles, where it recently struck a deal to occupy space in the former
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artforum.com

Jan 05 2021
Gagosian Takes over Former Marciano Museum, Closes San Francisco Gallery
Megagallery Gagosian has closed its San Francisco outpost after just four years and is instead seeking to elevate its profile in Los Angeles, where it recently struck a deal to occupy space in the former
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artforum.com

Jan 05 2021
Pedro Wirz
Last year at Marc Selwyn Fine Art in Los Angeles, in the show “Termite Terminators,” Pedro Wirz exhibited grids of toy automobiles drowned in beeswax, a kind of apian gridlock. Cars give the illusion
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The Guardian

Jan 05 2021
India's supreme court gives go-ahead for controversial new parliament building

Critics say Narendra Modi’s $3bn redevelopment of Lutyen’s central vista is ‘expensive vanity project’

India’s supreme court has given approval for a new parliament building that critics have called an “expensive vanity project” for the prime minister, Narendra Modi.

Under the $3bn development project, Delhi’s iconic central vista at the heart of the capital, home to its parliament and the famous India Gate monument, will be transformed by a new triangular parliament building, government and legislature offices and a new home for the prime minister.

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The Guardian

Jan 05 2021
Work to preserve the beauty of brutalism | Letter

Brutalist buildings are a crucial part of our country’s architectural heritage, says Catherine Croft – the government must recognise their significance and protect them

Great to start 2021 with Simon Phipps’ fantastic images of brutalist buildings, many of which the C20 Society is campaigning for (Destruction of brutalist architecture in north of England prompts outcry, 3 January). Scandalously few of them are listed. If the government were to recognise their significance in this way, imaginative new uses would be much more likely to be forthcoming, and their owners would be more disposed to view them in the optimistic light of these photographs. In many cases, all the necessary research has been completed.

For instance, Dunelm House (Durham University’s student union building, by the Architects’ Co-Partnership, 1964-66) seen through the frame of the dramatic Kingsgate Bridge in the larger selection of Phipps’ photographs on your website, has been in limbo since January 2017. Both Historic England and the C20 Society have no doubt that it should be listed; it just awaits a final decision from the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS). We agree that brutalist buildings are “a crucial part of the country’s architectural history”. Phipps’ book is an excellent wake-up call: let’s hope the DCMS is listening.
Catherine Croft
Director, C20 Society

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The Guardian

Jan 05 2021
Scars and fresh shoots: Australia's traumatised landscape after the bushfires – in pictures

Photographer Tom Goldner was compelled to photograph the Australian Alps following the 2020 fires as a way of recording the changes in the landscape brought on by humans. Goldner’s beautiful medium-format colour photographs are a glimpse into what he calls a traumatised environment

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artforum.com

Jan 05 2021
Maya Schweizer
By training her camera on everyday places, film essayist Maya Schweizer conjures the lingering memory of atrocities, reworking B-roll into a kind of metaphor for the diffuse yet ubiquitous nature of
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The New York Times

Jan 05 2021
Art World Sets Plans for 2021 Fairs (in Pencil)
Art World Sets Plans for 2021 Fairs (in Pencil)
Exhibitors and collectors are looking cautiously forward in the coming year, knowing that their schedules will be at the mercy of the coronavirus.
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The Guardian

Jan 05 2021
Yinka Shonibare to create Leeds memorial for Nigerian killed by police in 1960s

Artist hopes his forthcoming work will act as a ‘fitting legacy’ to David Oluwale

The British-Nigerian artist Yinka Shonibare is creating a sculpture in memory of David Oluwale with the aim of cementing a “fitting legacy” for the Nigerian who drowned in the 1960s after harassment by police in Leeds.

Shonibare, who was nominated for the Turner prize in 2004 and is known for work that addresses identity and colonialism, said the sculpture would serve as a permanent “hopeful” memorial and a reminder of a dark chapter in the city’s history.

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The Guardian

Jan 05 2021
Yinka Shonibare to create Leeds memorial for Nigerian who died after police harassment in 1960s

Artist hopes his forthcoming work will act as a ‘fitting legacy’ to David Oluwale

The British-Nigerian artist Yinka Shonibare is creating a sculpture in memory of David Oluwale with the aim of cementing a “fitting legacy” for the Nigerian who drowned in the 1960s after harassment by police in Leeds.

Shonibare, who was nominated for the Turner prize in 2004 and is known for work that addresses identity and colonialism, said the sculpture would serve as a permanent “hopeful” memorial and a reminder of a dark chapter in the city’s history.

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The Guardian

Jan 04 2021
Enter the void: photographs that find beauty in emptiness – in pictures

Paul Cupido’s Japan series is inspired by a saying of the Chinese philosopher Zhuangzi: ‘An empty room will be filled with light because of its emptiness’

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artforum.com

Jan 04 2021
Christian Marclay
Fraenkel Gallery is pleased to present new work by Christian Marclay, incorporating collage, video animation, and photography. The exhibition continues Marclay’s investigation into the relationship
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artforum.com

Jan 04 2021
Liu Wei
For most artists, the desire to portray the world took on a new urgency this year. The descriptive language Liu Wei chooses, to use his own words, “has no images, only shapes.”  Take, for example,
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