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The Guardian

Sep 10 2018
The underwater art of ‘wet unboxing’: why it’s so mesmerising, unsettling and weirdly emotional
From the lumpy carnage of soup let loose to the fizzy clouds of Berocca, artist Alex Frost’s video series submerges objects that reflect life on the go

In a glass tank filled with fresh water, the Glasgow-trained, London-based artist Alex Frost slowly opens consumer products, to strangely beautiful effect. A carton of New Covent Garden soup, for example, produces a glorious and lumpy vision of carnage as the contents slowly and decorously spill out into the water.

Long interested in repositioning packaged products (his mosaic sculpture of a Ryvita carton is in the permanent collection of Glasgow’s Gallery of Modern Art – GoMA), Frost explains that rather than a statement of anti-consumerism, the video series is redolent of old-fashioned public information films, while the underwater element renders them “emotional, ephemeral and sexy”.

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The Guardian

Sep 09 2018
Derry has a high suicide rate – but could redesigning the river help the city?

A project on the River Foyle is using design to try to improve wellbeing and mental health outcomes in the city

In 1977, an orca made its way up the River Foyle in Derry in search of salmon. For several days the animal, which locals nicknamed “Dopey Dick”, was a somewhat unlikely point of community cohesion – and a welcome distraction from the everyday violence of the Troubles.

Dopey Dick’s visit was a unifying event in an oft-divided city, says the designer Ralf Alwani: “It brought people together.” Forty years on, the orca has proved inspirational in addressing a significant challenge in Derry today.

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The Guardian

Sep 09 2018
Do you look like your dog? Canine-human lookalikes in pictures

Gerrard Gethings trawled Britain to find 50 canine-human lookalikes with characteristics – mostly hair, sometimes eyes – in common. The photographer’s full project, which was commissioned as a card game, will be released 10 September. Here are some of the couples

Gerrard Gethings says: “Certain breeds would be essential because of their unique characteristics: Afghan hounds, poodles, pugs, bulldogs etc. I put out the word on social media and was inundated with dogs. I chose 10 of them and then set out to find their human counterpart.

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The Guardian

Sep 09 2018
'It's impossible!' – Christian Marclay and the 24-hour clock made of movie clips

From the clock in High Noon to the watch in Pulp Fiction, the US artist turned thousands of film clips into a 24-hour epic that tells the actual time. As the cult work returns to London, the place of its birth, he relives three years of toil

The idea is brilliantly simple and completely audacious. Entitled The Clock and lasting 24 hours, the world’s most popular piece of concept art is a gigantic collage of film clips – old and new, black-and-white and colour – showing thousands of glimpses of clocks, watches, sundials and snatches of people telling each other the time, all set up to correspond to real time wherever it is shown, right round the clock.

It is a staggering, almost superhuman feat of research that has gained a cult following ever since it was unveiled at the White Cube gallery in London in 2010. The Clock’s easy-to-grasp governing principle coexists with the almost ungraspable fact that its creator, Christian Marclay, really has pulled it off, beguilingly combining the utter randomness of each individual clip with the strict form of his overarching idea, allowing everyone to meditate on time, how we’re obsessed with it, how there’s never enough of it.

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The Guardian

Sep 08 2018
I Object: Ian Hislop’s Search for Dissent review – one in the eye, from rump to Trump

British Museum, London
Easy mockery and courageous acts of defiance sit together uneasily as Private Eye’s Ian Hislop offers an absorbing history of rebellion

Augustus, in blue-green bronze, eyes furiously glaring, lies toppled on his side – the monumental head of a Roman emperor dead 2,000 years ago. This is not how we usually see him, upright and heroic in the hallowed purlieus of the British Museum. But it is exactly how he was rediscovered in 1910. His statue had been captured and decapitated by Kushite enemies of Augustus, who buried the head beneath the door to their victory shrine. Every visitor henceforth could trample it into the dirt.

This is as graphically symbolic as most acts of iconoclasm – the lopping off of sculpted genitals and noses, the blinding of painted eyes – but with a contrary twist. The head spent far longer under the ground, perfectly preserved, than it ever had above. Unlike most Roman statues, which have long since lost their sight, this one sees with flashing glass eyes. It still has a staggering force of personality.

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The Guardian

Sep 08 2018
The big picture: a street corner in civil rights-era Chicago
Dave Heath turned moments of solitude into moments of connection and common humanity in his street photography

Dave Heath took this picture in Chicago in 1956, the year that Martin Luther King Jr first spoke at the city’s university about the injustices of segregation: “This is a conflict between the forces of light and dark, and in the end there will be victory for justice and democracy because love will triumph!”

Heath himself had not long returned from a different conflict, the Korean war, where he had seen two years’ service as a machine gunner alongside Americans of all races. He had a camera with him in the army camp and used it to capture his fellow soldiers in private thought. When he came home, he employed that same eye on city streets and subways.

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The New York Times

Sep 08 2018
Virgin Mary With Turquoise Hair? Church Statues Get an Eye-Popping Paint Job
A Spanish shopkeeper’s restoration of 15th-century wooden statues is the latest attempt by devotees to apply their artistic talents, however limited, to the preservation of religious works.
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The Guardian

Sep 08 2018
Costumed canines by William Wegman – in pictures

Since the 1970s, the American artist William Wegman has photographed his dogs in a variety of poses; now a collection of his Polaroids is being exhibited in the UK for the first time. The series started with Man Ray, named after the surrealist artist, followed by Fay Ray and several generations of her puppies. All of them are Weimaraners: “As pointer-retrievers, they have an innate ability to hold still and focus,” explains Wegman. All his dogs enjoy the process of posing, he says, but each has a different attitude: “Fay, and now Flo, are very, very serious about working whereas Batty, Fay’s daughter, was blase almost to the point of narcolepsy. Some of my dogs, like Candy, were especially athletic. Chip, Batty’s son, was great with hats.”

William Wegman: Polaroids is at the Huxley-Parlour Gallery, London W1, 26 September-20 October

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The Guardian

Sep 08 2018
Goldsmiths Centre for Contemporary Art; South London Gallery – review

Two Victorian civic buildings have been given new leases of life as art galleries – largely by leaving things be

There’s something in the air, or the water. Two contemporary art galleries on the same long south London road are opening new spaces this month. Both repurpose the legacy of Victorian civic benevolence. Both employ architects who relish the as-found: the chance qualities of craftsmanship and time, damage, weathering, the authority of things made for a specific use that persists even when they are applied to another.

One is the Goldsmiths Centre for Contemporary Art, a new gallery attached to the art school that nurtured Young British Artists (as they once were). It will exhibit art from outside the school, so as to set up exchanges between students, teachers, the world of art and the general public. The £4.2m project occupies the functional rear of an 1895 public bath- and wash-house whose ornate front and former pool halls are already in use as studios; the structure’s sturdy walls once carried the weight of water in cast-iron tanks above.

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The Guardian

Sep 08 2018
For sale: treasures of wartime French spy who used art as his cover story
Resistance hero turned art dealer Daniel Cordier, now 98, is selling key works ranging from Dubuffet to Mapplethorpe

The early life of Daniel Cordier reads like something out of a John le Carré thriller: soldier, spy, resistance hero, art dealer. After parachuting into Nazi-occupied France in 1942 aged 22 on the orders of the exiled General Charles de Gaulle in London, Cordier worked with the leader of the French resistance, Jean Moulin.

Their mission – to unify the disparate underground network across the country – was vital to the war effort, but also sparked in Cordier a lifelong love of contemporary art as the pair criss-crossed France, posing as art dealers seeking paintings and collectable artefacts.

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The Guardian

Sep 08 2018
The 20 photographs of the week

Daily life in Pyongyang, protests in Gaza, the fire at the National Museum in Rio and Colin Kaepernick looks over New York – the week captured by the world’s best photojournalists

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The New York Times

Sep 07 2018
The Billionaire Who Bought Trump’s Mansion Faces Scrutiny in Monaco
Dmitry Rybolovlev, a Russian mining magnate, is suspected of using perks to curry favor with officials, who arrested a businessman he is feuding with.
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artforum.com

Sep 07 2018
SLANT: Days of Awe
Ariana Reines’s new moon report
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The Guardian

Sep 07 2018
Goodwood Revival festival – in pictures

The three-day classic car racing festival in West Sussex celebrates the mid-20th century heyday of the sport

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The Guardian

Sep 07 2018
The ticking Clock, Asians looking west and Orlando today – the week in art

Conrad Shawcross intrigues Mayfair, Brazil is dealt a blow and new sculptural work dances into Kettle’s Yard – all in our weekly dispatch

The Clock
Christian Marclay’s timely masterpiece of contemporary art uses film clips to magical and hypnotic effect.
Tate Modern, London, 14 September to 20 January.

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The New York Times

Sep 07 2018
In Search of ‘Shabby Chic’ at the Braderie de Lille
The huge annual flea market in northern France no longer draws the high-end antiques dealers. But it’s still a fun day out.
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The New York Times

Sep 07 2018
The Week in Arts: Childish Gambino, Eddie Izzard, Gael García Bernal
See Donald Glover as his musical alter ego before he makes good on his promise of retiring it; and watch Eddie Izzard as he workshops new material.
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The New York Times

Sep 07 2018
‘To Protect Napoleon Is My Career,’ One Collector Vows
Pierre-Jean Chalençon has become renowned for buying, selling and showing art and antiques related to the emperor.
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The New York Times

Sep 07 2018
Beaux-Arts Beauty Stands the Test of Time in Paris
The Biennale takes place at the Grand Palais, but that is far from the only emblem of a gilded age to visit in a spectacular city.
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The Guardian

Sep 07 2018
Marcel Dzama’s A Time Will Come

The Canadian artist known for his whimsical illustrations reworks the famous biblical tale with a firm focus on female empowerment

In this neat inversion of the Bible story, the temptress Delilah is transformed into a freedom fighter, the underdog who slays the giant.

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The Guardian

Sep 06 2018
Dark days and starry nights: Tony Vaccaro – in pictures

The Pennsylvania-born photographer Michael A ‘Tony’ Vaccaro is best known for the powerful images he took in Europe during and after the second world war. Later, he won acclaim for his work on popular US fashion, travel and lifestyle magazines

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The Guardian

Sep 06 2018
Step right up: the world’s most spectacular staircases

Plain stone or concrete was just too boring for these colourful sites in Asia, Europe and the Americas, where tiles, paint, music and geometric implausibility create striking ‘stairways to heaven’

The Batu Caves temple on the outskirts of Kuala Lumpur in Malaysia has, from last week, a vibrant new entryway, with the 272 steps up to the popular site painted in rainbow hues. Why should ascending and descending ever be bland? Mosaic, musical or mountaintop, statement staircases the world over offer ever more fanciful ways to go up and down. But while devotees and visitors might be tickled pink by Batu’s Technicolor makeover, the government’s national heritage department is seeing red.

Related: Best foot forward: the world's most striking pedestrian bridges

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The New York Times

Sep 06 2018
Funhouse for Selfies: The Immersive 29Rooms Pops Up (Again)
For two weekends, this annual exhibition presented by the media site Refinery 29 takes over a Brooklyn warehouse.
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The New York Times

Sep 06 2018
Contractor Sues Glenstone Museum Foundation for $24 Million
A dissonant note before the opening of the revamped private museum to the public — by reservation — next month.
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The Guardian

Sep 06 2018
Poppies sculptures to be installed in London and Manchester

Striking works will be part of commemorations to mark 100 years since the Armistice

Poppies: Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red captured the public’s imagination like no other art installation, so it is fitting that it will form part of national commemorations to mark 100 years since the Armistice.

Two sculptures from the artwork – Wave and Weeping Window – will go on display at the Imperial War Museums in London and Manchester at the culmination of a four-year tour during which they have been displayed at locations across Britain.

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The New York Times

Sep 06 2018
A Good Year for Younger Artists, Immigrant Citizens and Outrage
Museums are tightening borders, too. Where are the big shows of art from Africa, Asia, South America? The United States and Europe dominate.
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The New York Times

Sep 06 2018
25 Art Exhibitions to View in N.Y.C. This Weekend
Our guide to new art shows and some that will be closing soon.
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The New York Times

Sep 06 2018
3 Outdoor Art Shows and One Trusty Dog (With Tricks!)
From political art on the High Line to a playful sculpture on the East Side, a handful of exhibitions across the city will make you want to linger outdoors.
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The New York Times

Sep 06 2018
Sarah Lucas, Unmasked: From Perverse to Profound
Not widely known on this side of the Atlantic, the British sculptor has a show at the New Museum this fall that may cause jaws to drop.
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The New York Times

Sep 06 2018
Museum Fire in Brazil Was ‘Bound to Happen’
Warnings, including a citizen complaint to the federal prosecutor, that neglect had turned the National Museum into a tinderbox piled up for years.
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The New York Times

Sep 06 2018
Art Review: Revealing a Secret Art Life: A Painter’s Sculptures
The Met Breuer unveils unknown sculptures by Jack Whitten rooted in Africa, the ancient Mediterranean and the American South.
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The New York Times

Sep 06 2018
What to See in New York Art Galleries This Week
Paul Bloodgood’s collage-poems; Lutz Bacher’s examination of Mao Zedong’s cult of personality; and a Jack Smith retrospective at Artists Space.
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The New York Times

Sep 06 2018
Frank Lloyd Wright House for Sale After Donation Falls Through
The David and Gladys Wright House in Phoenix is listed for almost $13 million after a planned to donate the house was canceled in June.
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