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The Guardian

Mar 31 2021
'It keeps her alive': remembering Breonna Taylor through art

A new exhibition, involving Breonna Taylor’s mother Tamika Palmer, aims to honor her legacy one year after her killing at the hands of police

Last year, Baltimore artist Amy Sherald painted Breonna Taylor, a 26-year-old medical worker who was killed by police, as a commission for the cover of Vanity Fair, depicting Taylor in hues of turquoise and blues, standing elegantly, like a goddess, in a long, flowy dress. “Producing this image keeps Breonna alive forever,” said Sherald.

Now, the portrait – which will be jointly owned by the National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington, and the Speed Art Museum in Louisville – is going on view in a new exhibition honoring Taylor, a year after her death.

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The Guardian

Mar 31 2021
Hippies, huntsmen … and human dogs: 80s and 90s Britain – in pictures

From Greenham Common to a day out at Crufts – via nuns, gnomes and rag-and-bone men – photographer Homer Sykes guides us through Thatcherism and beyond

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The Guardian

Mar 31 2021
The Great British Art Tour: the little dog that caused violent riots

With public art collections closed we are bringing the art to you, exploring highlights from across the country in partnership with Art UK. Today’s pick: Brown Dog by Nicola Hicks, in Battersea Park

In a secluded area of Battersea Park in London stands a sculpture of a small terrier on a plinth. Its diminutive size and situation belies a fascinating history that includes mass demonstrations, violent riots and one of the country’s most famous libel cases. It is also unusual because, in effect, it is a memorial to a memorial, an extremely rare focus for a piece of public sculpture.

The bronze statue is 46cm (18in) high and was sculpted by Nicola Hicks, who used her own terrier, Brock, as a model. It surmounts a 138cm high Portland stone plinth and was unveiled on 12 December 1985.

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artforum.com

Mar 31 2021
Yuri Pattison
A slate-gray sea flecked with scattered embers of evening light. Beyond, shrouding the horizon, the hot-pink haze of a crazy lurid sunset. At this unique passing moment in the trippy real-time drift of
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artforum.com

Mar 31 2021
Raúl de Nieves
Walking into “Eternal Return & the Obsidian Heart,” Brooklyn-based artist Raúl de Nieves’s survey exhibition here, felt like entering a carnival-like space that was part Gothic cathedral, part queer
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artforum.com

Mar 31 2021
Margit Rowell on Barbara Rose
I MET BARBARA ROSE in early 1969 in Minneapolis, where I was living for a year with my husband, the French painter Georges Noël. Barbara came out to give a lecture. She was already a well-known New
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artforum.com

Mar 31 2021
Nora N. Khan on Anne de Vries’s Deep Scroll
Deep Scroll, edited by Anne de Vries. Eindhoven, the Netherlands: Onomatopee, 2020. 380 pages. DEEP SCROLL is a book for this precise mediated moment. It’s a chaotic journey in which the reader
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artforum.com

Mar 31 2021
Mira Schor
Perhaps you know of Mira Schor as an alumna of the legendary “Womanhouse” exhibition of 1972, a coeditor of the journal M/E/A/N/I/N/G (1986–96, 2002–16), and the author of Wet: On Painting, Feminism,
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artforum.com

Mar 31 2021
Yuji Agematsu
In one scorching 1973 performance, jazz drummer Milford Graves unleashes a maelstrom of thunderous high-speed slams upon his kit. This display, captured on black-and-white film and recirculated as the
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artforum.com

Mar 31 2021
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artforum.com

Mar 31 2021
Sasha Geffen on SOPHIE
SOPHIE BELONGED TO THE FUTURE. At the last SOPHIE concert I attended, the central item on the merch table was a black T-shirt with white lettering. LIVE IN PERSON! SOPHIE LA000010302017, it announced.
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artforum.com

Mar 31 2021
Ina Blom on the art of Florian Hecker
TWO HUNDRED AND SEVENTY-SEVEN PAGES, column after column of digits so tiny and so densely packed that, even with my reading glasses on, I have to use a magnifying glass. Three sets of numbers in each
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artforum.com

Mar 31 2021
PROJECT: WICKERHAM & LOMAX
> If it is a human thing to do to put something you want, because it’s useful, edible, or beautiful, into a bag, or a basket, or a bit of rolled bark or leaf, or a net woven of your own hair, or
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artforum.com

Mar 31 2021
David Rimanelli on Jack Pierson’s Silver Jackie, 1991
JACK PIERSON’S SILVER JACKIE looks like nothing much: a rickety little postage stamp of a stage, just a raised platform made by the artist himself, and he says he’s no carpenter. (“Those early stage
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artforum.com

Mar 31 2021
Karen Archey on the art of Evelyn Taocheng Wang
THERE IS NO ONE THING that we could call the “immigrant experience,” but certainly everyone who has immigrated is familiar with how mundane misunderstandings can reveal cultural tectonics, of how
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artforum.com

Mar 31 2021
Margaret Lee
The visitor to Margaret Lee’s latest exhibition at Jack Hanley Gallery, her first New York solo show in five years, might be forgiven for having thought they’d walked through the wrong door. In the main
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artforum.com

Mar 31 2021
Julia Haft-Candell
In “Carrier Bag of Fiction” at Candice Madey, Julia Haft-Candell’s ceramic sculptures were imbued with language; they read as origin stories in a state of revision. The show was named after and inspired
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artforum.com

Mar 31 2021
Sohrab Hura
Images bombarded the retina in quick succession in Sohrab Hura’s furiously fast-paced single-channel video The Lost Head & The Bird, 2016–19. A live performance by Hannes d’Hoine and Sjoerd Bruil,
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artforum.com

Mar 31 2021
Qiu Xiaofei
Some viewers might have expected this two-part solo show to be a retrospective—“Part I: RED” ran through October, while “Part II: Trotskyky Grew into a Tree” was on view through January—especially since
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artforum.com

Mar 31 2021
Sheila Hicks
Textiles were long widely dismissed as craft rather than art. Sheila Hicks’s exhibition “Thread, Trees, River” demonstrates how to wash away the stigma. Though Hicks defends manual labor and artisanship,
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artforum.com

Mar 31 2021
James Casebere
It is no accident that utopian philosophers situated their ideal societies on islands, which in the imagination appear to provide both security and solitude. But if such isolation is often portrayed as
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artforum.com

Mar 31 2021
Kiluanji Kia Henda
Othello, Shakespeare’s tragic protagonist, suffers from epileptic seizures, one of which takes place when he is told that his wife has betrayed him. The event is a foreshadowing of things to come and
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artforum.com

Mar 31 2021
Daniel Buren and Philippe Parreno
In 1985 Pontus Hultén founded the Institut des Hautes Études en Arts Plastiques (Institute for Advanced Studies in Fine Arts), an alternative art school in Paris modeled after the Bauhaus and Black
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artforum.com

Mar 31 2021
Karen Carson
For painter Karen Carson, an early West Coast Minimalist, the abstract has been, and continues to be, a quiet and powerful tool for navigating the maelstrom of life in the here and now. This notion was
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artforum.com

Mar 31 2021
Jonathan Lyndon Chase
“Big Wash,” Jonathan Lyndon Chase’s first institutional exhibition—at the Fabric Workshop and Museum in the artist’s hometown of Philadelphia—is a paean to queer Black sociality in layers of ecstatic
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artforum.com

Mar 31 2021
Julia Pelta Feldman on the limits of accessibility
IN AN INTERVIEW with the Sundance Institute’s Adam Piron this past November, filmmaker and video artist Sky Hopinka discussed the freedom he has found in making work for Indigenous viewers: “It’s
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artforum.com

Mar 31 2021
Adam Curtis
Adam Curtis is a British documentary filmmaker and a journalist at the BBC. His most recent film, the six-part Can’t Get You Out of My Head: An Emotional History of the Modern World, was released on
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artforum.com

Mar 31 2021
Jonathan Horowitz
In 1942 Ben Shahn, employed by the United States Office of War Information to create propaganda in support of the Allied cause, borrowed imagery from his fellow artists for a series of five posters
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artforum.com

Mar 31 2021
Marsha Pels
Frankly, I was a little taken aback by “Solace,” New York sculptor Marsha Pels’s solo exhibition at Lubov. Previously unfamiliar with her career—her sprawling welded site-specific pieces made of discarded
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artforum.com

Mar 31 2021
Lee Seung Taek
Less is not always more, as the art of Lee Seung Taek shows. “Lee Seung Taek’s Non-Art: The Inversive Act,” curated by Bae Myungji, offered a welcome elucidation of Lee’s complex, maverick, and frequently
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artforum.com

Mar 31 2021
Mariola Przyjemska
In the gouache-on-cardboard Little Cannons (One-Niners), 2005, Mariola Przyjemska painted tubes of lipstick that look like bullets, their pink points sharpened such that they recall both makeup and
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artforum.com

Mar 31 2021
Anna Boghiguian
Anna Boghiguian tells stories. The daughter of a Cairene Armenian family, the artist—who celebrates her seventy-fifth birthday this year—has led an itinerant life: traveling between Europe, Asia, and
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artforum.com

Mar 31 2021
Ali Banisadr
The seventeen paintings and prints in Ali Banisadr’s exhibition “Ultramarinus: Beyond the Sea,” curated by Polina Kosmadaki, swarmed with inchoate figures and dynamic forms that incited viewers to search
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artforum.com

Mar 31 2021
“The Forgotten Exhibition and a Reading of Four Chilean Artists”
Curated by Mariana Marchesi and Sebastián Vidal Valenzuela, “La exposición olvidada y una lectura a cuatro artistas chilenos” (The Forgotten Exhibition and a Reading of Four Chilean Artists) restaged
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artforum.com

Mar 31 2021
Alvin Baltrop
In an interview, gender-queer author Mattilda Bernstein Sycamore declared, “If I had to choose one piece of art that has been the most damaging to urban life over the last few decades, I would choose”—wait
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artforum.com

Mar 31 2021
Sam McKinniss on the art of Catherine Czudej, Jean-Baptiste-Siméon Chardin, and Luke O’Halloran
THE TWENTY-FOUR-HOUR NEWS CYCLE, or whatever we’re calling it, served us roundups of reheated takes from the year being put down to rest. It had us believing our instincts that 2020 was bad, while
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artforum.com

Mar 31 2021
Emmelyn Butterfield-Rosen on Félix Fénéon
> One spring evening in Paris in 1894, an elegant young man was strolling alone near the Luxembourg gardens. . . . He jumped on the platform of a departing bus and climbed to the top open deck. He
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artforum.com

Mar 31 2021
Tourmaline
A debut solo show is typically a watershed moment for an artist. But for Tourmaline, it was more of an object lesson in self-understanding, underscored by a sensitivity and maturity you don’t see often
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artforum.com

Mar 31 2021
Isa Genzken
“My sculptures will be bought by the world’s most significant museums. Biographers will be writing about my work over and over, and in the end I will be amongst the greatest artists of the century”—so
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artforum.com

Mar 31 2021
Franco Vimercati
Franco Vimercati (1940–2001) was the artist with whom Raffaella Cortese opened her gallery in 1995. This show, “Un minuto” (One Minute), accompanied by a book full of illuminating essays and interviews,
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artforum.com

Mar 31 2021
William Kentridge
“Universal Archive” is a haunted show in which absence makes itself felt as presence. Even the artist is a kind of ghost. William Kentridge, with pitch-black ink, obsessively painted repeated variations
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artforum.com

Mar 31 2021
Mara Hoberman on Victor Brauner
Curated by Sophie Krebs with Jeanne Brun, Nadia Chalbi, and Camille Morando IN THE CATALOGUE for the Victor Brauner retrospective at the Musée d’Art Moderne de Paris, director Fabrice Hergott
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artforum.com

Mar 31 2021
Samson Pollen
Pulp is the raw material used for manufacturing paper, making it the ideal substrate for the pulpy men’s magazines for which brush-for-hire Samson Pollen (1931–2018) created his lovely, lurid illustrations.
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artforum.com

Mar 31 2021
“Engraved into the Body”
Curated by Keyna Eleison and Victor Gorgulho, the group exhibition “Escrito no corpo” (Engraved into the Body) examined existence and resistance in a country where systemic violence, especially that
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artforum.com

Mar 31 2021
Cooking Sections
If you have the chance to see a whole salmon at the fish market, observe its tail: It will likely be small and withered. This is because most salmon have never used their tail fins—have never swum
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artforum.com

Mar 31 2021
Taipei Biennial
Right away, the latest edition of the Taipei Biennial announced itself as a thesis exhibition with its pseudo-provocative title: “You and I Don’t Live on the Same Planet.” Bruno Latour asserts that this
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artforum.com

Mar 31 2021
Cassi Namoda
Dreamlike pastel greens, browns, and blues punctuated “To Live Long Is to See Much,” Cassi Namoda’s first exhibition in Africa outside her birth country of Mozambique. The work of the New York– and Los
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artforum.com

Mar 31 2021
Lauren Satlowski
In her solo exhibition at Bel Ami, “Watch the Bouncing Ball,” which spanned the holidays and stretched into the new year, Lauren Satlowski turned a studied eye onto the trinkets and textures of our
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artforum.com

Mar 31 2021
Chloe Wyma on The Tarot of Leonora Carrington
The Tarot of Leonora Carrington, by Susan Aberth and Tere Arcq with an introduction by Gabriel Weisz Carrington. Lopen, UK: Fulgur Press, 2020. 120 pages. THE VOICE OF ART EDUCATOR Jackie Armstrong
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artforum.com

Mar 31 2021
Mernet Larsen
Think back a hundred years ago to the high-water mark of Russian avant-garde art, when, in stark contrast to our present day, utopianism was at a peak. Currents of revolutionary fervor, coupled with
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