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artforum.com

May 19 2020
Susan Rothenberg (1945–2020)
Painter Susan Rothenberg, whose equine imagery countered the dominant Minimalism of the 1970s by infusing it with representation, has died at seventy-five. The news was confirmed by Sperone Westwater
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artforum.com

May 19 2020
US Arts and Culture Sector Projected to Lose $6.8 Billion
A new https://culturaldata.org/pages/long-haul/ report published by Southern Methodist University’s DataArts center and the data consulting firm TRG Arts estimates that the net effect of the Covid-19
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artforum.com

May 19 2020
Museums Across the Globe Cautiously Reopen [UPDATED]
As the rate of new Covid-19 infections has slowed in certain parts of the world, more museums in Asia and Europe have begun to reopen their doors. Many are following 
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artforum.com

May 19 2020
Amy Taubin on The Eddy (2020)
THE EDDY, a sensational eight-episode Netflix miniseries, is named for a jazz club in Paris’s thirteenth arrondissement, home to a polyglot sextet led by American ex-pat Elliot Udo (André Holland).
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The Guardian

May 19 2020
Astrid Kirchherr: a stylish outsider who saw beauty in the Beatles

The photographer, who died last week, perceived something unique in the band she met in Hamburg in 1960, and the results changed pop for ever

As the various obituaries that marked her passing testify, Astrid Kirchherr’s fate was to be forever associated with the Beatles, a group she met almost by accident and whose image she remade so audaciously.

It was Kirchherr’s boyfriend, Klaus Voormann, who insisted that she and their friend, Jürgen Vollmer, came with him to the spectacularly seedy Kaiserkeller in Hamburg’s red-light district on an October evening in 1960. The previous night Voormann, a jazz fan who had never attended a rock’n’roll gig before, had been mesmerised by the Beatles’ raw on-stage energy as they performed to a motley crew of drunks, sailors and prostitutes. Kirchherr, though, immediately saw something else in them. “I was amazed at how beautiful they looked,” she said, later. “It was a photographer’s dream, my dream.”

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The Guardian

May 19 2020
'I wanted to give hope': the artists making upbeat coronavirus murals

An ambitious new project aims to create 1,000 new murals across the US to promote hope and community during the pandemic

A mural was recently painted in Santa Monica, California, with the word “Togetherness.”

It covers the front of a homeware store that closed during the pandemic, and is painted in hues of pink, yellow and red. This mural is no random gesture – it’s part of a new campaign called Back to the Streets, which aims to create 1,000 murals by 1,000 artists in 100 cities across the US, on walls owned by business and property owners.

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The Guardian

May 19 2020
What triggered the riot in this picture? The great British art quiz

Bristol Museum and Art Gallery have set today’s quiz, which allows you to explore the art collections of UK galleries closed due to coronavirus, while answering a few tricky questions on the way

This quiz is brought to you in collaboration with Art UK, the online home for the UK’s public art collections, showing art from over 3,000 venues and by 45,000 artists. Each day, a different collection on Art UK will set the questions.

Today, our questions are set by Bristol Museum and Art Gallery. Its collection includes art from the Renaissance to artists emerging on the global scene today. The art gallery opened its doors in 1905 but the museum was founded in 1823. As well as art, the collection boasts archaeology, applied art, biology, Eastern art, Egyptology, geology, social, industrial and maritime history and world cultures.

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The Guardian

May 18 2020
Ship builders and snow eaters: forgotten lives in the frame – in pictures

Witold Krassowski has witnessed countries such as India, Afghanistan and his native Poland undergo huge transformations – yet he always kept his camera trained on the lives of ordinary people

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The Guardian

May 18 2020
From cardboard castles to kitchen ziplines: how are you entertaining your kids in lockdown? – open thread

Parents are coming up with all kinds of creative ways to keep kids occupied while social distancing due to coronavirus. Tell us yours in the comments

An end to home schooling looks like it’s on the horizon in Australia, with many states now planning phased returns to classroom education. But the months of isolation and social distancing have seen parents and children drawing on deep reserves of creativity like never before.

For Sydney’s Simon Greiner, aka @TheCardboardDad on Instagram, isolation meant an escalation to his already impressive efforts to create a magical play world for his kids out of cardboard.

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artforum.com

May 18 2020
Untitled, Art Turns to Virtual Reality to Present Next Edition
Untitled, Art has become the latest fair to announce that it will be holding a virtual reality edition in lieu of a physical one. While many fairs and galleries had digital platforms before the outbreak
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The New York Times

May 18 2020
Venice Biennale Postpones Next Two Editions
Venice Biennale Postpones Next Two Editions
This year’s international architecture show moves to 2021, and the next art exhibition will also be delayed a year, to 2022.
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artforum.com

May 18 2020
Tate Announces Senior Appointments
The Tate has welcomed two new members to its senior leadership team. The institution has named Neil McConnon director of international partnerships and Katherine Montague director of people. McConnon
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artforum.com

May 18 2020
Ten Artists Awarded Sharjah Art Foundation Grants to Create New Work
The Sharjah Art Foundation has named ten artists as the recipients of its biannual Production Program grants. The 2020 grantees—Jumana Emil Abboud, Mohamed Abdelkarim, Noor Abuarafeh, Basma al-Sharif,
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The Guardian

May 18 2020
Not all culture ground to a halt during the second world war | letter

Antonia Fraser recalls how the cinema was the staple entertainment during the war and how the period sparked her lifelong love of the theatre

Charlotte Higgins’ excellent article on the need to support the arts when the pandemic is over (After the war, the arts came back stronger. They can do so again now, 18 May) does contain one rather odd sentence near the end: “the war was the last time cultural organisations ground entirely to a halt”.

Today we are unable to go to theatres or cinemas. During the war, the cinema was the staple entertainment (including the marvellous Pathé News), as was the theatre. It was the proud boast of the Windmill Theatre that, even during the blitz, “we never closed”. Perhaps the Windmill Theatre was not exactly a cultural organisation, though. I wouldn’t know: I used to wonder at the time exactly what it was. But the New Theatre and Playhouse in Oxford, where we were lucky enough to have no bombs, introduced me and many others to a lifelong love of the theatre.

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The Guardian

May 18 2020
‘It is a different world’: Damien Hirst takes to lockdown life and work

Artist admits he is in a privileged position as rainbow prints go on sale to raise money for charities

Damien Hirst has admitted taking well to lockdown life as he works on cherry blossom paintings in silence and without any assistants.

The artist released limited edition rainbow prints on Monday, which will be sold to raise money for coronavirus charities.

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artforum.com

May 18 2020
Spring Hurlbut
During week six of isolation, I heard a man yelling, “Black holes! Black holes!” into a train yard. The following week, I saw Spring Hurlbut’s “Dyadic Circles” in the Georgia Scherman Projects online
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The Guardian

May 18 2020
Pompeii Live: they didn't see catastrophe coming – and neither did we

Available online
The British Museum has resurrected its blockbuster show about the deadly volcanic eruption. In the age of coronavirus, it’s more chilling and vital than ever

In AD 79, a society that thought it was modern, sophisticated and fully in control of its destiny was taught otherwise by nature. Sounds familiar? The eruption of Vesuvius that overwhelmed Pompeii, Herculaneum and many villas dotted around the Bay of Naples caught the Roman empire by surprise. The parallels with the coronavirus crisis are uncanny. So the British Museum’s release this week of Life and Death in Pompeii and Herculaneum, an online tour of its harrowing 2013 blockbuster show, offers a troubling gaze into history’s mirror.

Related: Life and death in Pompeii and Herculaneum – review

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artforum.com

May 18 2020
Kaveri Raina
Kaveri Raina’s quiet triumph of six paintings and three drawings shows what it means to persist, hover, and remain responsive to a process. Pushing paint through burlap and swirling graphite into portals,
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artforum.com

May 18 2020
Venice Architecture and Art Biennales Postponed to 2021 and 2022
The art-world calendar has once again been reshuffled by the Covid-19 pandemic. The fifty-ninth edition of the Venice Biennale has been pushed to 2022, and the seventeenth Venice Architecture Biennale
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The Guardian

May 18 2020
Edvard Munch's The Scream needs to practise physical distancing, say experts

Art lovers may have to give 1910 version space due to damaging effect of humidity on impure paint

It is a masterpiece that seems to speak to the later horrors of war in the 20th century and even the anguishes of the 21st. Now Edvard Munch’s The Scream has another claim on modernity, after it emerged that an oversight by the artist means the 1910 version of the work needs to practise some physical distancing.

An international consortium of scientists seeking to identify the main cause of deterioration of the paint in the canvas has discovered Munch accidentally used an impure tube of cadmium yellow which can fade and flake even in relatively low humidity, including when breathed upon by crowds of art lovers.

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artforum.com

May 18 2020
Nanda Vigo (1936–2020)
Italian artist, designer, and architect Nanda Vigo, the Italian modern and contemporary art pioneer whose more than six-decade practice inspired generations of cultural producers, has died. She was
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The Guardian

May 18 2020
What year was this parcel sent to the front? The great British art quiz

The Imperial War Museum in London has set today’s quiz, which allows you to explore the art collections of British institutions closed due to coronavirus, while answering some brain-teasers

This quiz is brought to you in collaboration with Art UK, the online home for the UK’s public art collections, showing art from more than 3,000 venues and by 45,000 artists. Each day, a different collection on Art UK will set the questions.

Today, our questions are set by Imperial War Museums. IWM’s exceptional collection is one of the most important representations of 20th-century British art in the world. It includes many great artworks from the British government war art schemes of the first and second world wars. IWM continues to commission artists and the collection reflects recent and contemporary conflicts included in paintings, posters, sculpture and much more.

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The Guardian

May 17 2020
Snipers, stylists and Staff Benda Bilili: Andy Hall's Africa – in pictures

For decades, the Observer photographer Andy Hall has documented major events and daily life throughout Africa – from the Cuban withdrawal from Angola and the last days of apartheid to music, the obsession with football and the effects of climate change

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The Guardian

May 17 2020
After the war, the arts came back stronger. They can do so again now | Charlotte Higgins

Covid-19 has devastated our theatres and museums. But with imagination we can create something better than before

The arts in Britain are in a dire situation. Mighty household names, such as London’s Old Vic and the Royal Albert Hall, have warned that they are close to collapse. The overwhelming majority of British cultural workers – freelance artists, musicians, composers, directors, actors, technicians – saw their livelihoods destroyed in a matter of hours this March. They are hanging on by a thread, notwithstanding government support for the self-employed.

In England, every available penny of Arts Council money has been directed into emergency funds to keep arts organisations alive until September, and the furlough scheme is a lifeline; but some are already disintegrating. Nuffield Southampton Theatre called in the administrators on 6 May. After a decade of austerity, there is absolutely no fat in the British system.

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The New York Times

May 17 2020
The Museum Is Closed, but Its Tomato Man Soldiers On
The Museum Is Closed, but Its Tomato Man Soldiers On
Although the Guggenheim’s “Countryside” show was shuttered by the pandemic, its crop of cherry tomatoes is still growing, and feeding New Yorkers.
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The Guardian

May 17 2020
Astrid Kirchherr obituary

German photographer and artist best known for her pictures of the Beatles, whose distinctive image she helped to shape

“Black and white means photography to me,” said Astrid Kirchherr in 1995. “It’s much easier to take a good colour photograph, but you can get more drama into a black and white one.” It was in black and white that Kirchherr, who has died aged 81, captured the unknown Beatles in 1960, shooting them in leather jackets against industrial Hamburg and helping to form their distinctive image.

It was her mastery of light and shade in her 1962 portraits of John Lennon and George Harrison that influenced the cover of the 1963 album With the Beatles. However her influence went further than photography. It was Kirchherr who brushed out the flat-top hairstyle sported by her then Beatle boyfriend Stuart Sutcliffe, which led to the rest of the band adopting the famed “moptop” look.

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The Guardian

May 17 2020
Welcome to the yurt-opolis! How Mongolia is helping its nomads adapt to big city life

Travelling herders are moving to the Mongolian capital but they’re having trouble with urban ways. We step inside the yurt-inspired hub that’s fixing their culture shock

Visit Ulaanbaatar on Google Earth – the only way most of us are likely to get there for some time – and you will find that the Mongolian capital looks like no other city. Scattered around the Soviet-era urban centre are hundreds of thousands of tiny white dots. It is as if someone has emptied an enormous bag of confetti across the landscape, the white specks clustering in the folds of the valleys, extending outwards for miles in long, snaking tendrils.

These dots – separated in their own plot and sometimes accompanied by the orange rectangle of a tin-roofed shack, visible when you zoom in close – are yurts (or gers in Mongolian). For thousands of years, these transportable tents, made of wooden latticework wrapped with insulating felt and canvas, have been the house type of choice for the Mongolian herders on the plains. But the nomadic tent-based mindset is not something easily given up when herders move to the city – with problematic results.

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The Guardian

May 17 2020
Ming Smith: Painting with Light - in pictures

In 1978, Ming Smith was the first African American female photographer to have work bought by MoMA. Her shots of black culture are enjoying a revival. See her new online exhibition for the Pippy Houldsworth Gallery, Painting with Light, is on Vortic Collect from 21 May

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The Guardian

May 17 2020
Ahead of the curve: an eco dome by the sea

An architect’s striking home in a dome on the New Zealand coast is as visually interesting as it is groundbreaking

There is an unusual sight to be found in the small hamlet of Peka Peka, on the windswept west coast of New Zealand’s North Island. At first, it looks like a series of modest hillocks, but on closer inspection some of them have windows and small white towers rise above the landscape like periscopes.

Friedrich (“Fritz”) and Helen Eisenhofer’s idiosyncratic dwelling lies beneath the grass of these knolls; it is a prototype domestic biodome for what Fritz, a modernist architect who was trained at the Kunstakademie in Vienna, has called the Eco Home. Fritz travelled from Austria to the Pacific in 1953 to begin a career there that now spans more than half a century.

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The Guardian

May 17 2020
Mr Theatre: the marvellous playhouses of Frank Matcham – in pictures

Commemorating the centenary today of the theatre architect’s death – who is estimated to have built or rebuilt more than 150 theatres including the Blackpool Tower Ballroom and the London Palladium – all existing venues have been asked to post pictures and stories on social media using #Matcham100

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The Guardian

May 17 2020
Ming Smith: 'I've always had to break boundaries'

Photographer Ming Smith has been making pioneering work since the 1970s. Finally she is receiving the acclaim she deserves

In 1978, when Ming Smith took her portfolio to an open call at the Museum of Modern Art in New York, the receptionist presumed she was a courier. “When I returned to collect my work and the museum wanted to buy it, she treated me very differently,” she says. But when Smith heard MoMA’s offer for her work, she almost didn’t take it. “I thought I was going to be rich, but it didn’t even really cover my supplies.” A curator convinced her to leave two images with the museum for the weekend in the hope that she would change her mind. She did (her boyfriend convinced her to take the money) and Smith became the first African American female photographer in MoMA’s collection.

Smith has often been at the forefront of change. As a child in the 1950s, hers was one of the first black families to move into a white neighbourhood in Columbus, Ohio. In her 20s she moved to New York and befriended Grace Jones, who invited her to Studio 54 the first night she performed there in 1978. Smith was the first woman to join Kamoinge Workshop, a pioneering group of black photographers who, she says, “introduced me to the idea of owning the images we saw of ourselves”. Now, in her “senior years” (she doesn’t share her age), Smith is one of a group of artists finally receiving recognition from an art world becoming more diverse in its representation. But Smith, by her own admission, is a loner and only now feels comfortable to use her voice.

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The Guardian

May 17 2020
Berlin's cultural capital in peril from exodus of billionaire art collectors

Thousands of works will disappear from galleries as rent rises and a stand-off with city government take their toll

Home to some 400 galleries and an estimated 8,000 artists, Berlin has long aspired to be what its politicians call the cultural capital of Europe.

Yet in the coming year, thousands of works by artists including Joseph Beuys, Louise Bourgeois, Bruce Nauman and Gerhard Richter are set to vanish from its galleries, as the city debates what lengths it should go to to protect art collectors from the sharp edge of a property boom.

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The Guardian

May 17 2020
Your pictures: share your photos on the theme of 'treasure'

Wherever you are in the world, this week we’d like to see your pictures on the theme ‘treasure’

The next theme for our weekly photography assignment, published in print in the Observer New Review is ‘treasure’.

Share your photos of what treasure means to you – and tell us about your image in the description box.

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The Guardian

May 16 2020
Banning knockoff buildings might bring a renaissance in Chinese architecture

After decades of allowing ersatz imitations, the government is finally returning to the country’s culture for inspiration

In bad news for postmodern ironists, the People’s Republic of China has announced a ban on “plagiarising, imitating and copycatting” foreign architecture. For a good quarter of a century, Chinese developers have been entertaining the world’s urban theorists and architectural pontificators (as well as good number of the country’s own people) with imitations of western buildings. It wasn’t just a case of make-believe English villages and multiple Eiffel Towers but also new-minted icons, fresh from the pages of architecture magazines. Norman Foster’s Century Tower in Tokyo, for example, popped up in Shenzhen, with somewhat less crisp detailing. Sometimes Las Vegas hotels, themselves knockoffs of historic monuments, would in turn be knocked off.

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The Guardian

May 16 2020
From Godard's big mouth to Drake's Toosie Slide: the Observer culture quiz

Test your arts knowledge with these questions from our critics

What can you see in every scene in David Fincher’s Fight Club?

A copy of the New York Times

A knife

A Starbucks cup

Jean-Luc Godard is known for his pithy pronouncements on cinema. Which if the following did he not say?

"The hardest thing to do is genuine simplicity."

"All you need to make a movie is a girl and a gun."

"Tracking shots are a question of morality."

What do Angelina Jolie, Matt Damon and Jeff Bridges have in common?

They all turned down offers of roles in the Transformers series

They all won Oscars but then subsequently lost the statuettes

They are all fluent in Spanish

Before Megan Fox was famous, she had a job which required her to dress up as what?

A banana

Smurfette

A wedge of gouda

Which Young British Artist did not exhibit in the first, pioneering Freeze show?

Sarah Lucas

Tracey Emin

Damien Hirst

Jacopo Robusti is also known as…

Tintoretto

Titian

Giorgione

Puccini described the disastrous premiere of one of his most popular operas as “a lynching”. Which opera?

Madam Butterfly

La Bohème

Tosca

Which drug-addicted fictional detective played a stringed instrument?

Sherlock Holmes

Lord Peter Wimsey

Hercule Poirot

Villanelle, the protagonist in the book series behind the TV show Killing Eve, is the creation of which former specialist writer for a national newpaper?

The Times’s crime correspondent

The chess columnist of the Washington Post

The dance critic of the Observer

The title card (a shot with images and/or text, also known as an intertitle, inserted at segment intervals) for which UK TV series featured a penny farthing?

The Prisoner

Tales of the Unexpected

Adam Adamant Lives!

Which terrestrial channel broadcast a soap opera at 8pm on its launch night?

Channel 5, Family Affairs

Channel 4, Brookside

ITV, Coronation Street

Which star of the BBC con artist show Hustle recorded an audiobook of Chris Ryan’s Alpha Force: Survival?

Adrian Lester

Robert Glenister

Robert Vaughn 

Which was the first original play by a living female dramatist to be produced on the National’s Olivier stage?

Top Girls

Her Naked Skin

Blasted

Which play contains a conjuring governess?

The Cherry Orchard

Arcadia

The Children’s Hour

Which playwright inspired Nina Simone’s To Be Young, Gifted and Black?

Lorraine Hansberry

August Wilson

Langston Hughes

When asked “What is jazz?” who replied “Madam, if you don’t know by now, don’t mess with it!”?

Fats Waller

Duke Ellington

Louis Armstrong

Only one member of the Beach Boys actually surfed. Was it…

Dennis Wilson

Carl Wilson

Mike Love

How do you do the Toosie Slide, as per Drake’s recent single?

“To the left, take it back now y’all, one hop this time, right foot two stomps”

“Right foot uhhp, left foot slide, left foot uhhp, right foot slide”

“You put your left leg in, you put your left leg out, in out, in out, shake it all about”

Ed Sheeran names his guitars. Which of these is not a Sheeran axe?

Herbert

Cyril

Nigel

Who designed Florence’s Pazzi Chapel?

Borromini

Bernini

Brunelleschi

Which architectural style came first?

Perpendicular

Early English

Decorated

20 and above.

Flipping heck! You'll be putting us out of a job next. Well done.

16 and above.

Wow, impressive stuff! Maybe next week you can hit full marks…

11 and above.

Pretty good stuff, hotshot!

6 and above.

A solid result. But we know you can do better than solid. Come back next week to really impress us…

0 and above.

Uh-oh. It's fair to say you could do with a bit of work on your cultural immersion… better get revising for next week!

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artforum.com

May 16 2020
Lynne Cohen
Lynne Cohen’s online exhibition focuses on photographs the late artist took between 1973 and 2012 that capture spaces devoid of human protagonists but structured by human existence. Cohen often remarked
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The Guardian

May 16 2020
Positive results: uplifting coronavirus posters – in pictures

Stay Sane/Stay Safe is a poster platform created by Hague-based graphic designers Max Lennarts, Menno de Bruijn and writer Ronald de Leeuw “to support lifesavers and to inspire home-stayers”. The platform, now home to more than 1,500 bright and witty posters contributed from 82 countries, allows anyone to submit, download, print or share them.

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The Guardian

May 16 2020
On my radar: Saoirse-Monica Jackson's cultural highlights

The Derry Girls star on the TV adaptation of Normal People, Irish rappers and a podcast about mental health

Actor Saoirse-Monica Jackson was born in 1993 in Derry, Northern Ireland. She trained at the Arden School of Theatre in Manchester and made her TV debut in miniseries The Five in 2016. She stars in Channel 4 sitcom Derry Girls, playing the role of Erin Quinn and next appears in Headlong theatre company and Century Films’s Unprecedented: Theatre from a State of Isolation on BBC Four from 26 May, part of BBC Arts’ Culture in Quarantine initiative.

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The Guardian

May 16 2020
Reviewing the arts in lockdown: 'Life is lonelier, but also more thoughtful'

Guardian critics on working from their living rooms, and why wifi could be the saviour of culture

The biggest surprise of the lockdown is realising I can still do my job as a theatre critic, even when every theatre has gone dark. The industry responded quickly, first by putting archive shows online (many of them available free of charge) and then by creating specially commissioned works, online festivals, and other ingenious ways to keep audiences connected to venues.

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The Guardian

May 16 2020
Park and recreation - in pictures

Photographer Suki Dhanda captures the early morning beauty of London’s Hackney Marshes

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The Guardian

May 16 2020
‘It's our sanctuary’: gardens in lockdown, as seen by drone

Photographer Robert Ormerod uses his aerial camera to document how neighbours are finding solace in their green spaces. By Rhiannon Lucy Cosslett

Robert Ormerod had just moved house when lockdown began. “We lived in a flat before. We moved for a garden,” he says. “So when this kicked off, we couldn’t believe how lucky we were to have moved in time.”

As with most photographers, his ability to work has been limited, so Ormerod hit upon the idea of shooting his Edinburgh neighbours in their gardens. These outdoor spaces have been a boon for millions of families across the UK, who have over the past two months used their patch, however small, to get some fresh air, exercise, escape, grow their own food or get to know the wildlife.

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The Guardian

May 15 2020
20 photographs of the week

Physical distancing, lockdown and protests about the death of Ahmaud Arbery – the most striking photographs from around the world this week

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artforum.com

May 15 2020
Christine Sun Kim, Pedro Reyes Among Artists Creating Digital Billboards for NYC’s Essential Workers
Carrie Mae Weems, Christine Sun Kim, Duke Riley, Jenny Holzer, Pedro Reyes, and Xaviera Simmons are among the thirty-five artists and designers who are making works to display across digital screens
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artforum.com

May 15 2020
Niele Toroni
Opening May 16, 2020 Galerie Marian Goodman is pleased to announce an exhibition of new work by Niele Toroni. In keeping with the working method he defined in 1966, Toroni will display imprints of a
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artforum.com

May 15 2020
Schellmann Art
https://schellmannart.com/thonet200 “Thonet Reimagined ” celebrates the iconic furniture company’s 200th anniversary. Works by fourteen artists—created for this exhibition by invitation from Schellmann
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The Guardian

May 15 2020
Beatles photographer Astrid Kirchherr dies aged 81

Innovative German artist recorded group’s rise to fame after seeing them play in Hamburg

Astrid Kirchherr, the photographer whose shots of the Beatles helped turn them into icons, has died aged 81.

The Beatles writer Mark Lewisohn confirmed the news on Twitter, posting: “Intelligent, inspirational, innovative, daring, artistic, awake, aware, beautiful, smart, loving and uplifting friend to many. Her gift to the Beatles was immeasurable.”

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artforum.com

May 15 2020
Sotheby’s Contemporary Art Day Sale Smashes Previous Online Auction Record
The inaugural online Sotheby’s contemporary art day auction, which concluded on Thursday, May 14, netted $13.7 million—the highest total ever for an online sale at the auction house. The sum is more
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artforum.com

May 15 2020
Sotheby’s Contemporary Art Day Sale Breaks Previous Online Auction Record
The inaugural online Sotheby’s contemporary art day auction, which concluded on Thursday, May 14, netted $13.7 million—the highest total ever for an online sale at the auction house. The sum is more
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The New York Times

May 15 2020
Christie’s Gets Creative for 20th-Century Art Auction in July
The sale, which includes works that were to be sold in New York in May, will be a hybrid: in-person (where allowed) and online in a format tailored for the coronavirus era.
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The New York Times

May 15 2020
This Atlas of Art and Memory Is a Wonder of the Modern World
This Atlas of Art and Memory Is a Wonder of the Modern World
With nearly 1,000 images, Aby Warburg’s radical form of visual study is also an artwork itself. Now you can see it online.
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