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The New York Times

Jul 09 2018
Bicoastal Pairing of Curators for Next New Museum Triennial
Margot Norton of the New Museum and Jamillah James of the Institute of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, will organize the show featuring emerging artists.
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The Guardian

Jul 09 2018
Watch the throne: why artist Thierry Oussou faked an archaeological dig

When archaeology students unearthed a royal throne in Benin they were astonished. But it was actually a replica, planted to make a statement about the colonial looting of African art

Congolese art collector Sindika Dokolo didn’t hold back when requesting the return of African artefacts by European collectors and galleries. Calling it a “long-neglected historical wrong”, he compared the plunder of African heritage to the Nazi looting of artworks in the 1930s and 40s.

“Austria returned around 50,000 works of art and objects from public collections to the heirs of collectors whose works were looted by the Nazis,” he wrote. “Righting the plunder of Africa’s heritage should be no less urgent.”

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The Guardian

Jul 09 2018
Fifty billboards: an art project hopes to provoke debate across America

After raising $172,000 on Kickstarter, artists Hank Willis Thomas and Eric Gottesman will launch The 50 State Initiative, sharing artwork on billboards in every US state

In 1943 Norman Rockwell created a series of four oil paintings based on Franklin D Roosevelt’s “four freedoms”, which he declared as “the simple, the basic things that must never be lost sight of in the turmoil and unbelievable complexity of our modern world”.

They included Freedom of Speech, which Rockwell painted as a man standing up in a public meeting, Freedom of Worship, with praying people, Freedom from Want, with a family eating a meal and Freedom from Fear, with parents tucking children into bed at night.

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The Guardian

Jul 08 2018
Night of the Hunted: three southern gothic tales – in pictures

Vintage rides, bleeding heroines and mounted deer heads populate British artist Matt Henry’s stylised photo-stories staged in America’s deep south

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The Guardian

Jul 08 2018
Spencer Tunick's mass nude artwork in Melbourne – in pictures

The New York photographer is in Melbourne to create his latest mass nude photographic work. Almost 500 naked participants braved temperatures of 9C on top of a Woolworths supermarket in Prahran
• Warning: Images contain nudity

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The Guardian

Jul 08 2018
Letter: Michael Noakes obituary

Michael Noakes was extraordinarily helpful when I was writing Margaret Rutherford’s biography. She was the subject of one of his paintings for the National Portrait Gallery. When visiting her in 1970, he indicated the Oscar statue on her mantelpiece which she had received for her performance in The VIPs seven years previously.

Michael asked her, “When did you acquire that?” “Oh, I don’t know dear,” Rutherford replied. “Thursday, I think.”

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The Guardian

Jul 08 2018
Stairway to heaven: Jimmy Page’s castle is his home

The founder of Led Zeppelin shows off Tower House, his beloved Victorian castle in London

Growing up in London, there was a house I was fascinated by. It looked like a mini castle with a tower; red-bricked and handsome, a portal to another time with its stained-glass windows. Back then, I had no idea who lived there. Later, I discovered it belonged to the guitarist and music producer Jimmy Page, erstwhile of Led Zeppelin. I knew I had no hope of ever stepping inside. But life can throw some crazy stuff at you and three decades later, I am invited to visit. I tell Page all of this before he has even fully flexed the door on its hinges, “Well I’m so glad you came then,” he smiles, giving me a hearty handshake.

The Tower House actually has two front doors: the half bevelled-glass street door which leads into a mosaic lobby and the actual house door, adorned with brass sculptures showing the Ages of Man. Then, the only way I can describe what happens next is: imagine going to a party and all your best friends are there wearing the most opulent clothes of their lives, and they come and say hello all at once, and for a moment, you are so giddy you can’t compute. This is what entering the Tower House is like.

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The Guardian

Jul 08 2018
Vladimír Kokolia: Epiphany/ Francis Alÿs; Knots’n Dust review – a compelling double bill

Ikon Gallery, Birmingham
Czech renaissance man Vladimír Kokolia’s first UK show is a revelation, while Belgian daredevil Francis Alÿs heads to the eye of the storm

The paintings of the Czech artist Vladimír Kokolia are outstandingly beautiful. To stand before them is to be uplifted and revived. Airy fields of colour, not so much brushed as breathed on to large canvases, they shimmer with an internal light that seems both familiar and yet not of this world. With Kokolia, it is a case of love at first sight.

Look deep into a skein of turquoise, lemon and hazy green lines and your eye is seduced by the sense of something shifting among them, like dappled sunshine held in summer branches. The lines stutter ever so slightly as they sway around the pale surface, adding a strange frisson. The painting is called Looking at Ash Tree, and while the tree may be present, in the tangle of marks, the emphasis is entirely on the sensation of seeing; specifically, the way that leaves percolate sunshine and breezes shift leaves, so that one seems to be looking at flames of light.

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The Guardian

Jul 07 2018
London's beautiful launderettes – in pictures

“I love launderettes. I love the smell of washing, the sound of the dryers and the punning names,” says Joshua Blackburn. The London-based photographer plans to immortalise every launderette in the capital: out of more than 300 he has, since the spring, shot 40. “I want the project to be a record of these amazing businesses at a time when they’re struggling to survive,” he explains. Across the UK, there are now fewer than 3,000 launderettes – down from 12,500 in 1970 – mainly because nearly 97% of households own a washing machine, compared to 65% then. “The colours, signs, machines, surfaces and geometry are impossible to resist,” says Blackburn. “I’ve explained to many owners why I want to photograph their premises and they look at me like I’m mad.” Launderettes, he adds, are a part of the community, like pubs and post offices. “But the social space they create is unique.”

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The New York Times

Jul 07 2018
A Photography Prize That Shows the World as It Is, and Hopes to Change It
The Prix Pictet, worth about $100,000 to the winner, combines activism and art, inviting work that deals with the environment and sustainability.
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The Guardian

Jul 07 2018
The 20 photographs of the week

Cave rescue operations in Thailand, wildfires in Germany and England, the plight of Rohingya refugees in Bangladesh, and the drama of the World Cup in Russia – the week captured by the world’s best photojournalists

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The Guardian

Jul 07 2018
Stars, limos, clubs … Andy Warhol’s life exposed in unseen images

Book and exhibition will be followed by digitisation of pop artist’s photographs, giving public access to extraordinary ‘visual diary’

Tens of thousands of unpublished pictures taken by Andy Warhol of celebrity friends such as Liza Minnelli, Bianca Jagger and Debbie Harry are to be made public for the first time in what is described as an unparalleled collection of his photography.

More than 130,000 individual frames have been made available by the Andy Warhol Foundation for a forthcoming book, exhibition and the digitisation for the general public of every single image – most of which have not been seen before. Markings on 3,600 contact sheets show that Warhol printed only 17% of his photographs.

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The Guardian

Jul 06 2018
The faces of Fitzroy – in pictures

In 1978, Rod McNicol moved into an old warehouse on Smith Street in Melbourne’s Fitzroy, which he transformed into a unique, daylight studio-home. Since then he has been inviting people to put their lives on pause for a few moments and stare into the lens of his camera. His latest series is Portraits from my Variegated Village which is currently showing at the Centre for Contemporary Photography

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artforum.com

Jul 06 2018
DIARY: Breathe In
Michael Wilson on a White Columns benefit auction
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The Guardian

Jul 06 2018
David Goldblatt obituary
Photographer whose work chronicled half a century of social and political change in South Africa

The South African photographer David Goldblatt, who has died aged 87, began taking pictures as a teenager, and created a body of work that chronicled the country’s social and political change from the 1950s onwards. His images documented the racial divide in South African society, capturing everyday life, including, as he put it, the “banal normalities of white madness” through the traumatic decades of apartheid.

He was not one to turn up at a riot to film white police officers using their batons on black schoolchildren. These “events” did not interest him. He had originally tried to photograph news stories but came to realise that he was “interested in the cause of events”, how the main players in the vicious drama of apartheid interacted with one another – Afrikaner and African, at home, at work, but only rarely at the ugly meeting points.

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artforum.com

Jul 06 2018
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The New York Times

Jul 06 2018
Celebrities Love Old Masters, but Will Collectors Fall for Them?
Auction houses and fairs are looking for ways to make pre-20th-century art exciting and accessible in the digital age.
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The Guardian

Jul 06 2018
Rembrandt stuns Edinburgh and Tacita Dean hits the festival – the week in art

Tracey Emin raids the memory bank, Sabine Weiss kids around and two greats stage a showdown – all in your weekly dispatch

Rembrandt: Britain’s Discovery of the Master
This ramble through British attitudes to Rembrandt over the last four centuries is a bit diffuse, but it includes some drop-dead masterpieces including The Mill, which may well be the greatest landscape ever painted. Turner thought so.
Scottish National Gallery, Edinburgh, from 7 July to 14 October.

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The Guardian

Jul 06 2018
Kehinde Wiley’s Equestrian Portrait of Michael Jackson

The American painter known for his naturalistic and progressive work depicts the King of Pop in the majestic glory of old masters

In Kehinde Wiley’s 2010 commissioned portrait of Michael Jackson, the King of Pop is presented in the guise of a monarch of yore, atop a steed, in deluxe armour.

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The Guardian

Jul 06 2018
National Gallery buys Artemisia Gentileschi masterpiece for £3.6m

The 17th-century painter’s self-portrait, which alludes to her rape trial, is only the 20th work by a woman to enter a collection of more than 2,300 European paintings

They tried to break her on a wheel, but she survived. This is how the great female 17th-century painter Artemisia Gentileschi portrays herself in a sensational, newly uncovered masterpiece that has just been bought by the National Gallery for £3.6m – a record for her work.

Self-Portrait as Saint Catherine of Alexandria is a stunning collision of art and reality that sends a raw and intimate message straight from the 1600s to us. Her eyes look away, as if thinking of a painful memory, yet there is a calm in her monumental pose. She’s got the strong, muscular arms Artemisia always gave the women in her paintings and as she ponders the past, the fingers of her left hand rest on a shattered wooden wheel with vicious metal spikes embedded in its rim.

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The Guardian

Jul 05 2018
Agence MYOP photographers at the Arles festival – in pictures

For the opening week of the Rencontres Internationale de la Photographie, Agence MYOP photographers occupy an abandoned school in the heart of the old city and present 18 exhibitions of new and unseen work

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The Guardian

Jul 05 2018
'Breathtakingly beautiful': Tate St Ives wins museum of the year award

Gallery beats Brooklands Museum, Weybridge, Glasgow Women’s Library and the Postal Museum in London to £100,000 prize

The elegant £20m extension of Tate St Ives, a gallery that was overwhelmed by its own success when it opened in 1993, has won the £100,000 museum of the year award, the most lucrative museum prize in the world.

The artist Melanie Manchot, one of the judges, said it had been “a profound experience” to visit after the work, which she believes has transformed the gallery.

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The New York Times

Jul 05 2018
23 Art Exhibitions to View in N.Y.C. This Weekend
Our guide to new art shows and some that will be closing soon.
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The Guardian

Jul 05 2018
Celebrating Harlem: 'It's important to show art that reflects different people'

A new project aims to showcase the work of artists who reflect one of New York’s most diverse and historic neighborhoods

“Harlem is the most culturally diverse community in New York City, period,” says Lisa DuBois, co-curator of a new project aiming to pay homage to the neighborhood’s cultural legacy.

Together with Ademola Olugebefola, she’s behind Cultural Diversity, a venture featuring young artists from the area that’s brought to life with SaveArtSpace, a public art initiative and Harlem-based X Gallery.

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The New York Times

Jul 05 2018
Jacqueline Kennedy’s Notes for Dallas Are Found, Starting a Quiet Tug of War
Her packing list for the trip in November 1963 surfaced three years ago. Since then, it has sat at the Kennedy library: unnoticed, unpublicized — and perhaps off-limits.
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The New York Times

Jul 05 2018
Met Museum Sets Record With 7.35 Million Visitors in a Year
Michelangelo’s drawings drew them in and a new mandatory admission fee didn’t keep them away.
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The New York Times

Jul 05 2018
The Art of Staying Cool: 10 Can’t-Miss Summer Shows in New York
When summer weather turns sultry, museums are very chill places to be.
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The Guardian

Jul 05 2018
Hepworth Wakefield uses £100,000 prize to buy Helen Marten sculpture

Remainder of the prize money will be used to turn a nearby patch of land into one of the UK’s largest public gardens

The Hepworth Wakefield art gallery in West Yorkshire has announced it will use the £100,000 it was awarded for being named as the Art Fund museum of the year for 2017 on acquiring a Helen Marten sculpture and developing a new public garden in its grounds.

Half the prize money will go towards a newly commissioned piece by Marten – who won the Turner prize in 2016 – for the Wakefield Permanent Art Collection. The Macclesfield-born artist was also the recipient of the inaugural Hepworth prize for sculpture.

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The Guardian

Jul 05 2018
Rembrandt: Britain's Discovery of a Master review – mediocrity beside magic

Royal Scottish Academy, Edinburgh
The Dutch genius shows up the glib emptiness of his progenies, and the attempt to trace his legacy is flimsy. Yet it is impossible not to come away spellbound

If I were an artist invited to exhibit alongside Rembrandt, what would I say? I hope I’d have the humility and good sense to refuse. The bit of me that likes the paintings of Glenn Brown wishes he’d done the same.

This artist, whose ornate, glossy oils pastiche everything from the covers of sci-fi novels to the paintings of – you guessed it – Rembrandt, said yes. He also agreed to appear in a film that introduces the Scottish National Gallery’s blockbuster exhibition tracing how British collectors, critics and artists have seen Rembrandt over the last four centuries.

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The Guardian

Jul 05 2018
The art of football: an exhibition devoted to the beautiful game

At the Pérez Art Museum Miami, the intersection of art and football is being explored in an expansive new show featuring work from Andy Warhol and Kehinde Wiley

Art and sports aren’t always closely associated – one is more niche, the other intended for the masses. But these cultural opposites are being brought together in a new exhibition that has us thinking about the World Cup beyond the scorecard.

The World’s Game: Fútbol and Contemporary Art, which is on view at the Pérez Art Museum Miami until 2 September, is an exhibition dedicated to the intersection of art and football.

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The Guardian

Jul 05 2018
Magic mushrooms: how fungus could help rebuild derelict Cleveland

Could a process that uses mycelium to help recycle old buildings into new ones solve the problem of the city’s many abandoned homes?

Over 7,000 abandoned or condemned homes litter the urban landscape of Cleveland, Ohio, where a stunning population loss of about 100,000 residents in 25 years and widespread foreclosures have sparked a housing crisis marked by growing racial and economic disparities. Posing concerns in terms of economic stability, public health and safety, the abandoned homes that line many of the city’s streets are at once symbols of its resilience and ongoing obstacles to growth and prosperity.

Cleveland native Christopher Maurer, founder and principal architect at local humanitarian design firm Redhouse Studio and adjunct professor at Kent State University, has plenty of ideas about how to address the city’s complex challenges.

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The Guardian

Jul 04 2018
Inside La Fondation Carmignac's island gallery – in pictures

Porquerolles Island off the coast of southern France is home to a new gallery complex and sculpture garden featuring the collection of Édouard Carmignac. Photographer David Levene sets sail for a visit

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The Guardian

Jul 04 2018
Fake fun: when holiday photos aren't what they seem – in pictures

From impossible museum displays to made-up tourist sights, Austrian photographer Thomas Albdorf’s images play with the familiar and the absurd, and address the inherent flaws in technology

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The Guardian

Jul 04 2018
Viviane Sassen's best photograph: her son Lucius cast in shadow

‘We all cast shadows on our children. This felt like a glimpse into the future, the way my body appears to lengthen his … as if he already has long legs. And one day he will’

I shot this picture of my son, Lucius, on a beach somewhere between Cape Town and Mossel Bay, in South Africa. He’s 10 now, but he was two at the time.

I had taken my family on a trip to install an exhibition. I was also working on a project with seaweed. My husband and Lucius were helping me throw large pieces of kelp up into the air and photograph the shapes they made.

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The Guardian

Jul 04 2018
Retreat to Blue Lagoon: the Indigenous art camp inspiring a community

The Cairns Indigenous art fair project gives celebrated artists the chance to mentor emerging talent and disengaged youth

A sombreness returns to the artists as we exit the airport shelter. Moments earlier, with their eyes flashing and faces glowing, they were pointing out the contours of traditional family lands passing some 1,000 metres below the droning twin engines of the light aeroplane. Abuzz, they traced by hand the rivers, swamps and distant coastline to demarcate their unique connection to each.

But as the pilot levelled the wings and readied to land in the red-earth township of Aurukun, the artists became subdued. Stepping out on to dusty Kang Kang Road, and back to the reality of Aurukun, a wariness replaced their previously cheerful demeanour.

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artforum.com

Jul 04 2018
FILM: Sorry Not Sorry
Amy Taubin on Boots Riley’s Sorry to Bother You
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artforum.com

Jul 04 2018
PASSAGES: Sabina Ott (1955–2018)
Chris Kraus on Sabina Ott (1955–2018)
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The Guardian

Jul 04 2018
Leonard McComb obituary
Artist who caused controversy when he exhibited a nude sculpture in Lincoln Cathedral

In terms of publicity, the high point of the career of Leonard McComb, who has died aged 87, came in 1990 when his sculpture Portrait of a Young Man Standing was shown at Lincoln Cathedral. The work, modelled on one of McComb’s students at the West of England College of Art in Bristol, had first been cast in the early 1960s; originally in plaster, then in bronze (1977), then finally – the version exhibited at Lincoln – in 1983, in bronze that had been gilded by the artist’s wife, Barbara.

McComb’s claims for the piece were modest: he wanted it, he said, to be “an image of a whole person, his physical and spiritual life inseparably fused”. This, however, was not how the sculpture was viewed by the then dean of Lincoln. If its clenched right fist lent Portrait of a Young Man Standing a vulnerable air, the work’s nudity and anatomical exactness struck the priest as brazen. Accordingly, McComb’s gilded man was fitted with a loin cloth; when this proved insufficiently chaste, he was moved from the nave to a side aisle.

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