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artforum.com

Sep 10 2019
Sticky Situations
OH THAT VOICE, that hoarse, insinuating whisper, which simultaneously sucks you in and spits you out. It was Vito Acconci’s stock in trade during the first two decades of his career, when he was what
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artforum.com

Sep 10 2019
Tiona Nekkia McClodden Wins Whitney’s 2019 Bucksbaum Award
Interdisciplinary Philadelphia-based artist Tiona Nekkia McClodden has won the Whitney Museum of American Art’s Bucksbaum Award, which was founded in 2000 by the Bucksbaum Family Foundation to recognize
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artforum.com

Sep 10 2019
Art Basel Plans to Launch Three-Day Summit in Abu Dhabi Next Year
Art Basel has announced that it is launching a new initiative that will bring together around three hundred thought leaders, entrepreneurs, and creatives from various industries, including technology,
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The Guardian

Sep 10 2019
Push review – a whirlwind tour of rocketing rents and personal tragedy

This powerful documentary, about a UN investigator travelling the planet to get to the bottom of the global housing crisis, lays bare a $217 trillion scandal

‘I don’t believe that capitalism itself is hugely problematic,” says Leilani Farha, as she marches along a pavement in Harlem, New York. The UN’s special rapporteur on adequate housing is on her way to visit a sprawling low-income housing project that was recently acquired by a private equity fund, leading to massive rent hikes and probable evictions. “Is unbridled capitalism in an area that is a human right problematic? Yes.”

The conflict between rights and profits lies at the heart of a thought-provoking documentary, Push, which follows Farha’s forays into the bleak depths of the global housing crisis, as she attempts to unpick exactly how we got here. In the Harlem estate she meets a man who already spends 90% of his income on his rent. Soon, his two-bedroom flat will cost $3,600 (£,2920) a month, and he will be forced to move.

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artforum.com

Sep 10 2019
Robert Frank (1924–2019)
The monumental Swiss-born photographer and filmmaker Robert Frank, whose artistic vision served as a seven-decade-long journey through the American vernacular landscape, has died. He was ninety-four
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The Guardian

Sep 10 2019
Robert Frank obituary

Photographer whose work captured the lives of ordinary people and those on the margins

Robert Frank, who has died aged 94, was to the photography of 1950s America what Walker Evans was to the 30s and Robert Mapplethorpe to the 70s. His black-and-white images captured the ignored and rejected lives of individuals existing on the edge.

In 1957, Frank met the beat writer Jack Kerouac at a party in New York and showed him a sheaf of photos he had recently taken on road trips around the US. Kerouac offered to write an introduction for what became Frank’s best known book, The Americans, published in Paris in 1958 and in New York the following year. Kerouac noted the coffins and jukeboxes that litter the work until “you end up not knowing any more whether a jukebox is sadder than a coffin”. He concluded: “To Robert Frank I now give this message: You got eyes.”

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The New York Times

Sep 10 2019
A ’70s-Era Stuttgart Apartment That Remains the Same
A ’70s-Era Stuttgart Apartment That Remains the Same
Hans-Dieter Lutz’s home is a lasting tribute to German neo-Modernism — and to the fanciful but functional legacy of one of its leading architects.
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artforum.com

Sep 10 2019
Mona Hatoum
Many of Mona Hatoum’s installations employ just one or two materials (barbed wire, cement and rebar, steel, hair) to transform recognizable symbols and forms (maps, globes, spheres, cubes) into portentous
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The New York Times

Sep 10 2019
Wangechi Mutu: A New Face for the Met
Wangechi Mutu: A New Face for the Met
Nourished by Kenyan culture, the transnational artist is filling the niches on the Fifth Avenue facade, for the first time in the Met’s history. It’s a step on the museum’s rocky road toward diversity.
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The Guardian

Sep 10 2019
Robert Frank, revolutionary American photographer, dies aged 94

Frank’s seminal book The Americans, with an introduction by Jack Kerouac, helped to change the direction of photography

Robert Frank, the American artist whose photographs captured the lives of everyday people and influenced a generation with his raw and evocative style, has died aged 94.

The Swiss-born photographer’s seminal book The Americans, which had an introduction from Jack Kerouac, beat generation author of On the Road, helped to change the direction of photography with its 83 pictures rejecting many conventions of the art form up to that point.

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The Guardian

Sep 10 2019
James Rosenquist: Warhol's favourite artist celebrated in London show

Pop art pioneer was a friend and contemporary of Warhol, Lichtenstein and Rauschenberg

Surreal, innovative and political paintings by an American artist worshipped by Andy Warhol have gone on display in London.

James Rosenquist was a pop art pioneer whose name is well known in America and parts of Europe, but far less so in the UK.

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The Guardian

Sep 09 2019
After the metal has gone – in pictures

In Britain in the 1980s, the Black Country’s metal industry was hit hard and a landscape that had been formed by the Industrial Revolution disappeared. John Myers’ book The End of Industry captures that time

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The Guardian

Sep 09 2019
'Is your school revolting?': protest art from Sydney in the 1970s – in pictures

The Sedition festival is celebrating the underground art and music subculture that challenged the government, society and the mainstream media in Sydney in the 1970s. Alongside performances by some bands of the era, more than 200 works – including posters, films and art – are being exhibited. For Guardian Australia, the co-curator and former Rolling Stone editor Toby Creswell has selected some of the posters that inspired the festival. ‘Before social media, the best way to get your message out there was with paper and flour and water and a creative expression of your ideas,’ he says. ‘They are angry, amusing, funny and provocative’

Sedition 2019 runs until 1 December across various locations in Sydney

‘We need to do something’: the poster art of a new political era

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artforum.com

Sep 09 2019
Chris Ofili and Jasmine Thomas-Girvan
A twenty-year artistic conversation between Trinidad-based artists and friends Chris Ofili and Jasmine Thomas-Girvan unfolds sparely but elegantly in “Affinities,” an exhibition of recent works that
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artforum.com

Sep 09 2019
Following Closure of Aichi Triennale Exhibition, Artists Speak Out Against Gender Discrimination in Japan
More than 370 artists and cultural workers have signed a https://www.art-it.asia/en/top_e/admin_ed_news_e/203165 statement protesting gender discrimination in Japan. In the days since the Aichi
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artforum.com

Sep 09 2019
Bea Schlingelhoff
In a two-part exhibition produced offsite by Kunsthaus Glarus at the landmarked 1648 Freulerpalast, Bea Schlingelhoff has staged a series of sculptures made of museum vitrines, either modularly displayed
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The New York Times

Sep 09 2019
Gus Van Sant’s Next Picture Will Be a Watercolor
Gus Van Sant’s Next Picture Will Be a Watercolor
The acclaimed film director will show his new paintings in his first solo exhibition in New York. And no, this is not a passing hobby.
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The New York Times

Sep 09 2019
The Windswept Scottish Islands Producing Beautiful Artisanal Goods
The Windswept Scottish Islands Producing Beautiful Artisanal Goods
One London gallery is determined to continue the tradition embraced for centuries by the Orkney chain.
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artforum.com

Sep 09 2019
Seth Brodsky Named Director of University of Chicago’s Gray Center for Arts and Inquiry
The University of Chicago announced that Seth Brodsky, an associate professor of music and the humanities, will become the next director of the Richard and Mary L. Gray Center for Arts and Inquiry,
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The New York Times

Sep 09 2019
Francisco Toledo, Celebrated Mexican Artist and Arts Philanthropist, Dies at 79
Francisco Toledo, Celebrated Mexican Artist and Arts Philanthropist, Dies at 79
He drew on his indigenous Zapotec heritage in his art and used his prestige to preserve the culture of his native Oaxaca.
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artforum.com

Sep 09 2019
Director of MIT’s Media Lab Steps Down over Ties to Jeffrey Epstein
Joichi “Joi” Ito, the director of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s esteemed Media Lab, has resigned following the controversy that stemmed from his connections to millionaire Jeffrey Epstein,
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The Guardian

Sep 09 2019
Kerry Downes obituary
Architectural historian who wrote definitive books on Hawksmoor, Wren and Vanbrugh

The architectural historian Kerry Downes, who has died aged 88, published two books on each of the greatest British successors of the Italian Baroque architect Francesco Borromini – Christopher Wren, Nicholas Hawksmoor and John Vanbrugh.

When he produced Hawksmoor (1959), this idiosyncratic architect was not a widely or highly regarded figure. His Christ Church, Spitalfields, was no longer in use, but the book’s appearance helped save it from destruction. Instead, a thorough restoration programme was initiated, a music festival flourished and parish worship returned in 1987.

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artforum.com

Sep 09 2019
Heath Franco
With “VALLEY,” an exhibition of a 2019 walk-in installation of the same name, Heath Franco stages a bold physical extension of the video-based work for which he’s best known. Entering Passage, 2018–19,
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The Guardian

Sep 09 2019
Ban Marvel's gay kiss? You might as well ban the Sistine Chapel

The mayor of Rio de Janeiro’s attempts to censor an Avengers comic isn’t just bigoted. It ignores the fact that Christian artists pioneered same-sex snogging

He may be an evangelical bishop, but you do have to wonder how much Christian art the mayor of Rio de Janeiro has seen. Marcelo Crivella ordered an Avengers comic book to be removed from a book festival, because it featured two men kissing – a move that triggered a dramatic response from Brazil’s biggest newspaper, Folha de S Paulo, which reproduced the image on its front page, to highlight this attempt at censorship.

The mayor was so incensed by Avengers: The Children’s Crusade, he insisted it be given a black plastic wrapper. In a video posted on Twitter, he said it was not right for children “to have early access to subjects that do not agree with their ages”. But to find fault with this kiss is not just bigoted. It shows an ignorance of the origins of same-sex kissing in art.

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artforum.com

Sep 09 2019
Playful Slash Erotic
IT BEGINS IN UTTER BLACKNESS. A Pierre Soulages kind of blackness, that is, uptown at Lévy Gorvy, where the nonagenarian French painter is being celebrated in advance of a major to-do at the Louvre
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artforum.com

Sep 09 2019
Cristina Salmastrelli Appointed Director of PULSE Art Fair
PULSE Art Fair announced that Cristina Salmastrelli has been named its new director. She will oversee the fair’s programming for its fifteenth edition in Miami Beach, which will take place during this
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artforum.com

Sep 09 2019
Amira Gad Joins Lehmann Maupin as Artistic Director, Kasmin Now Represents Ali Banisadr, and More
Lehmann Maupin has announced the appointment of Amira Gad as artistic director. Gad joins the gallery from the Serpentine Galleries, where she has served as curator of exhibitions and architecture since
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The Guardian

Sep 09 2019
William Blake review – blazing heresies from the artist who blows Constable and Turner away

Tate Britain, London
We rightly acclaim his writing, but this exhibition brings us Blake the consummate visual artist, depicter of humanity’s divided nature

The poster for Tate Britain’s exhibition of William Blake uses the three Rs to sell this icon of the Napoleonic age to the turbulent Britons of 2019: “Rebel, Radical, Revolutionary.” It may seem an over-eager attempt to contemporise him – but Blake was all these and more. You could add pacifist (albeit a militant one who once got arrested after a heated debate with a soldier) and anti-racist, for as Blake’s devastating portrayal of a hanged slave in this show illustrates, he passionately protested against Africa’s subjugation.

Related: Heavenly visions of hell: Alan Moore on the sublime art of William Blake

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The Guardian

Sep 09 2019
'We had to fight the NF': but can London's first black housing co-op survive latest threat?

In the mid-90s, residents of Nubia Way defied racist attacks to become Europe’s largest black-led self-build scheme – but austerity has brought new danger

It is more than two decades since Tim Oshodi stood between a row of partly built houses in Downham, south-east London, and a gang of men who intended to burn them to the ground. Oshodi, now 53, has a calm and meditative presence. But alone, he was shaken. “I was absolutely terrified, he says. “But I was absolutely sure I wouldn’t let them burn the houses.”

That evening, in June 1996, Oshodi was packing up his tools. He had just finished fitting a skylight in his home-to-be in Nubia Way: a row of 13 timber frame chalets being gradually assembled by members of the city’s first black self-build housing co-operative.

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The Guardian

Sep 09 2019
Peter Lindbergh obituary

Photographer hailed for his unadorned black-and-white pictures that graced the pages of magazines such as Vogue and Harper’s

The portrait photographer Jane Bown used to grumble that nobody had faces any more, that people had become afraid to let the camera capture their true character in their visages. But the photographer Peter Lindbergh, who has died aged 74, could persuade even those whose image was their fortune – actors, musicians, fashion models – to show their real face to his lens, to reveal their identities and natural forms.

Lindbergh probably did not mean to change, radically, how fashion was shown in print, bringing it closer to the black-and-white photography he admired, Dorothea Lange’s portraits of the American poor, and photojournalism à la Henri Cartier-Bresson, but that’s what happened.

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The Guardian

Sep 08 2019
The industrious thatcher: Country diary, 15 September 1919

15 September 1919 All day long he fetches and carries, working in a sea of dazzling gold straw

Kent, September 14
They have almost finished carrying the corn here, and the thatcher is hard at work. It is lonely. All day long he fetches and carries, working in a sea of dazzling gold straw in the blazing sun of the rickyard, and does it all unassisted in a way that makes a person used to town-workers marvel. He has two wooden battens jointed together with string, and he lays these on the ground and piles on the straw; then closing them together with a hitch, he heaves the huge bundle on to his shoulder and runs erect up the steep ladder to the top of the rick. Here he has driven a stake in upright half-way down the slope, and he pitches his bundle above this. Starting at the edge, he places the first layer of straw overhanging it slightly, and tucks the upper ends into the corn. Successive layers are placed, overlapping each other. Then he trips down the ladder and fills and carries up a bucket of water, with which he sprinkles his work, tapping and stroking the slope downwards. His ingenuity in working his ladder round the stack from above and in preventing himself and his tools from sliding down, is a delight to watch.

Related: Country diary: thatching is a job to take your time over

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The New York Times

Sep 08 2019
Architecture Award Honors Five Women
Dana Cuff, Sharon Johnston, Toshiko Mori, Claire Weisz and Mabel O. Wilson were chosen in categories ranging from activism to education.
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The New York Times

Sep 08 2019
Michael Rakowitz Wins Nasher Prize for Sculpture
The prize comes with $100,000, which Mr. Rakowitz would use for his continued work centering on Iraq.
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The Guardian

Sep 08 2019
Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2019 – highly commended pictures

The Natural History Museum’s Wildlife Photographer of the Year showcases the world’s best nature photography and photojournalism.

The overall winners will be announced on 15 October at an awards ceremony in the Natural History Museum’s iconic Hintze Hall. Winning images are selected for their creativity, originality, technical excellence. This year’s competition attracted almost 50,000 entries from professionals and amateurs across 100 countries.

The exhibition at the Natural History Museum opens on Friday 18 October.

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The Guardian

Sep 08 2019
'We are living in disturbing times': artist Barbara Walker on Margate and racism

Place, Space and Who looks at the experiences of five black women living in the Kent town

An artist who spent four months recording the experiences of black women and migrants in Margate came face to face with racism in the seaside town that will play host to the Turner prize later this year.

Barbara Walker relocated to Margate for a residency that allowed her to take over one of the Turner Contemporary’s galleries – a light-filled, cavernous space with floor-to-ceiling windows that look out over the Kent coastline. Although the room faced outwards over the North Sea, Walker decided to use the commission to look inward and explore race, migration and modern Britain in the form of five imposing portraits of black women, all of whom have moved to the local area.

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The Guardian

Sep 08 2019
Say a prayer: the Muslim woman who photographed Bradford's last synagogue

Nudrat Afza, a single mother who can’t afford her own camera, talks us through her new show – of poignant shots capturing the last 45 Jewish worshippers in the city’s only remaining synagogue

The last UK census, which took place in 2011, found that there were just 299 Jews left in Bradford, a tiny number for a city that became home to so many German Jews in the 19th century that the warehouse district they created is still called Little Germany. The Muslim population, meanwhile, hit 129,041 the same year.

The city’s synagogue, a grade II-listed building, almost shut down in 2013, unable to afford roof repairs – until the Muslim community raised funds to cover costs. A £103,000 lottery grant followed, enabling full repairs, but the number of worshippers has stuck stubbornly at just 45 – with occasional newcomers balancing out the deaths of elderly worshippers.

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The Guardian

Sep 08 2019
Peter Doig; Jasmine Thomas-Girvan & Chris Ofili review – tall tales on distant shores

Michael Werner Gallery; David Zwirner, London
Peter Doig’s new paintings are typically mysterious and entrancing, but a joint show from his Trinidadian neighbours glitters less for all its gold

Peter Doig’s latest paintings are as bewitching as ever – but even stranger. Given that lingering mystery has been the uppermost trait of his art for more than 30 years, this is no small feat. Many of his motifs remain the same, what is more – lone divers, solitary figures on glowing shorelines, curious birds, the scorching streets and blue shadows of Trinidad, where Doig has lived since 2002 – yet their significance has deepened with time, like recurring characters in a long sequence of novels.

A blue pierrot is partially visible in the deep fronds of the forest. A bather comes up to a beach at dusk, the sea like moire silk behind him. Three figures in antique costumes, one in a tricorn hat, two holding guitars, stand ready for some outlandish performance to begin. Watteau in the jungle.

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The Guardian

Sep 08 2019
‘I was Lucian Freud’s spare pair of eyes’
Former Observer art critic William Feaver was a friend of Lucian Freud for 30 years. As the first volume of his biography of the painter is published, he recalls their time together, and Freud’s journey from obscurity to global fame

The phone went. After midnight, so it could only be him. “Hello Villiam. How goes it?” That faintly Germanic tinge and, as always, straight to the point: “I’ve got her a dog.”

Alice, my youngest daughter, just 13, had been ill for some time and felt wretched. A whippet, Lucian knew (“Don’t you agree?”), would do her good, whippets being brisk yet graceful, affectionate enough – he disliked the slobbery characteristics of lesser breeds – and, he’d found, exemplary sleeper-sitters. Pluto, a whippet bitch bought some years before for Lucian’s daughter Bella, but soon adopted by him, had long been adored, not to say coveted, by Alice.

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The Guardian

Sep 08 2019
LSE’s new Centre Building review – a study in shades of Pompidou

Into the cramped hive that is the London School of Economics, Rogers Stirk Harbour and Partners have inserted a bright, shared space designed to lure students and staff alike out of their rooms

A square. We all like squares, orderly places of public enjoyment, signs of civilised city-building, agents of urban harmony across the centuries. Architects especially like squares, their being both conspicuous symbols of a commitment to the public good and geometric figures. Architects like to do good and be seen to do good. Geometry is a tool of their trade. A square neatly wraps symbol and instrument up in one word and four lines.

The London School of Economics, unusually among institutions of higher education, has had, until now, no squares. No quads, no courts either. It occupies instead a dense tissue of narrow streets squeezed between the semi-circle of the Aldwych, the rectangle of Lincoln’s Inn Fields and the ramrod of Kingsway. All available regular shapes having seemingly been used up by its neighbours, this world-famous seat of learning has patched its campus together from a morphology of crookedness, grown from spores seemingly scattered by a wonky 16th-century cottage in its midst, on whose front large gothic letters wrongly proclaim it to have been the Old Curiosity Shop that inspired one of Charles Dickens’s novels.

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The Guardian

Sep 07 2019
Abandoned wall tiles reimagined as fashion – in pictures

Since 2014, for her series Second Hand, Ukrainian artist Zhanna Kadyrova has been exploring “the history of buildings that have changed ownership and function” by making visual analogies with recycled clothing, in a former silk factory in Kyiv, for example, or an abandoned bus station near Chernobyl.

The results, including those exhibited at the Venice Biennale this year, encourage viewers to see old buildings and castoffs in a striking new light

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The Guardian

Sep 07 2019
'A way of life clobbered overnight': photographs of Britain's industrial landscape in the 80s

Photographer John Myers documented the industry of the West Midlands as it collapsed under Thatcherism. His stark images, now enjoying a revival, give context to our current divisions

John Myers took these photographs in the Black Country of the West Midlands in the mid-1980s. They are included now in a book of his photographs called The End of Industry, but at the time Myers had no sense that the foundries and yards they depicted would shortly join many other iron and steel and metal-bashing companies in the region and be gone for good.

Myers, born in 1944, a student and then lecturer in fine art, had during the 70s been taking sly social realist photographs of his suburban neighbourhood in Stourbridge, and of more urban Dudley and beyond. “We spend a lot of our lives blocking out the world that we live in, just how awful it is, just how boring it is,” he says. His photography, inspired equally by the pioneering documentarist Eugène Atget and the urban American geometries of Ed Ruscha, was all about looking, about not blocking out. Some of the pictures that have become known as “the boring pictures” were careful series of dual carriageways, electricity substations and idle televisions in the corners of neat, pinched sitting rooms.

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The Guardian

Sep 07 2019
The 20 photographs of the week

Hurricane Dorian, protests in Hong Kong, Extinction Rebellion activists in Paris and the West Indian day parade in New York – the last seven days, as captured by the world’s best photojournalists

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The New York Times

Sep 06 2019
The 18th-Century Paris Apartment That Elegantly Blends Past and Future
The 18th-Century Paris Apartment That Elegantly Blends Past and Future
Studio KO reimagines a Place des Victoires pied-à-terre as a minimalist sanctuary — out of time, yet completely contemporary.
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artforum.com

Sep 06 2019
Women in Architecture Award Winners Announced
Architectural Record announced today the five honorees of this year’s Women in Architecture Awards: Toshiko Mori, Sharon Johnston, Claire Weisz, Mabel O. Wilson, and Dana Cuff. The award, now in its
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The New York Times

Sep 06 2019
‘Meet Me in the Bathroom’: An Art Show of Stuff From Under Musicians’ Beds
‘Meet Me in the Bathroom’: An Art Show of Stuff From Under Musicians’ Beds
An exhibition, curated by Lizzy Goodman and Hala Matar, will bring you back to the aughts and make you feel “a little unsafe, a little unsure.”
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artforum.com

Sep 06 2019
Shanghai Himalayas Museum Founder Arrested for Illegal Lending Schemes
The Shanghai-based collector Dai Zhikang, founder of the $1.4 billion finance and real estate conglomerate the Zendai Group, surrendered himself to the police last week after being investigated for an
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The Guardian

Sep 06 2019
Age should be no bar to naked doorways | Brief letters
Marina Abramović | Asterix and Obelix | Steam railways | Brogues | Starbucks

I am disappointed in Marina Abramović’s apparent insistence on using young models for her naked living doorway (Royal Academy recreates infamous artwork, 4 September). A more challenging work would include different ages, with less sculpted body lines. How about facing your mortality when you are passing between pot bellies and man boobs and drooping breasts and child-bearing stomachs?
Val Mainwood
Wivenhoe, Essex

• Without detracting from Goscinny and Uderzo’s skill in devising “cultural and linguistic gags” in the saga of Asterix and Obelix (G2, 30 August), we must remember also the sympathy and wit of his English translators, who gave us the wizard Getafix, the chieftain Vitalstatistix, and the small boy Picanmix, among many others.
Sebastian Robinson
Glasgow

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artforum.com

Sep 06 2019
Museum of Contemporary Art Australia Welcomes New Board Members
The Museum of Contemporary Art Australia (MCA) announced two new additions to its board: Alan Joyce, the CEO of the Qantas Group, and Christine Evans, the chief education officer of aboriginal education
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artforum.com

Sep 06 2019
Francisco Toledo (1940–2019)
Francisco Toledo, the eminent Mexican artist whose protean, richly mythological work plumbed both the Mesoamerican indigenous imagination and the legacy of art brut, died yesterday at the age of
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The Guardian

Sep 06 2019
No art lover left behind: how galleries are finally welcoming disabled people

After years of being shunted to the sidelines and made to feel in the way, disabled people are finally getting galleries to listen – and enable access to all

A few weeks ago, Tate Modern found itself at the centre of a storm after wheelchair-user Ciara O’Connor took to social media to protest that there was no ramp to enable her to enter and experience a key cylindrical work in an exhibition by the Danish/Icelandic artist Olafur Eliasson.

Within days, more than 2,000 people had retweeted her words and more than 100 had piled in with their own angry anecdotes, drawing apologies from the London museum and from the artist’s studio, which pointed out that it was an old work, created in 2002. There is now a video at the side of Your Spiral View, showing what it is like to pass through. Tate and Eliasson have promised to do better in future.

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