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The Guardian

Jan 15 2018
‘A tale of decay’: the Houses of Parliament are falling down – podcast

As politicians dither over repairs, the risk of fire, flood or a deluge of sewage only increases. But fixing the Palace of Westminster might change British politics for good – which is the last thing many of its residents want

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The Guardian

Jan 15 2018
Share your best photographs of the week with us

We’re highlighting the best reader photography in print on the letters page of the Guardian. Share your images with us here

From Monday the Guardian and Observer has a new tabloid format in print and we’re going to be highlighting the best of your photography in the paper.

Since 2014 our letters page has carried amazing images readers have shared via GuardianWitness: some of them being newsworthy, others more abstract.

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The Guardian

Jan 15 2018
Inside Manchester town hall – in pictures

Manchester’s neo-gothic town hall closed on Monday for a £330m repair and refurbishment programme lasting six years. The Alfred Waterhouse-designed building has stood in the city’s Albert Square since 1877

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The Guardian

Jan 14 2018
A modern engineer building classic bicycle frames – in pictures

Tom Warmerdam turned his passions for cycling and engineering into a career at Demon Frameworks in Southampton, where he designs and builds unique custom-made steel-frame road bikes

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The Guardian

Jan 14 2018
One hundred and eighty - a darts photo essay

Photographer Alicia Canter went to the Lakeside Country Club in Frimley Green to sample the unique atmosphere of the BDO Championships

The BDO World Darts championships is one of the two annual world professional darts championships, the other being the PDC Championships held at Alexandra Palace. The BDO event has been held at Lakeside since 1985, with the Women’s World Championship taking place at the venue since 2001. Despite the prize money being smaller in the less commercial BDO event, the prestige of its longer-running organisation and a more traditional feel means it is perhaps better-known and inspiring of more devotion from the fans, who attend year after year.

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The Guardian

Jan 14 2018
50 years since Sicily's earthquake, an urban disaster of a different kind

When a quake devastated Sicily in 1968, a bold plan was hatched – to build entirely new towns and move the inhabitants. But what looked futuristic on paper would herald a new decay

Fifty years ago, the ground began to shake in Poggioreale, an ancient village in the Belìce Valley of south-west Sicily.

Calogero Petralia was eating spaghetti with his family, just as he did every Sunday lunch. By the time the initial earthquake and the aftershocks that night had quietened, the house where Petralia was born and raised was gone. It was 15 January 1968 and he was 18 years old. “My heart remained in that room,” he says.

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The Guardian

Jan 14 2018
Lisa Reihana’s Cinemania – exquisite immersive experience is a must-see

Campbelltown Arts Centre, Sydney
The New Zealand artist’s massive signature work was lauded at Venice Biennale and is the centrepiece of a powerful career survey at Sydney festival

It’s rare to be in the presence of a work of contemporary art that transcends itself; that stops being about a thing and instead becomes that thing. Context of course is inescapable – and when artists and audience share a cultural history, memory or knowledge, it can be vital to the back story of a piece. But I’m more interested these days in art that creates an experience that doesn’t first require an explanation.

International artists such as Olafur Eliasson, AES&F, Ann Lislegaard and Tacita Dean combine their interests and fascinations into works that are stunning visual experiences in and of themselves. Their works have depth too – there is a wealth of research and thinking that went into the creation – but the experience of the piece rises above it, in contrast to the over-conceptualised and aesthetically dead contemporary art that litters galleries around the world.

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artforum.com

Jan 14 2018
SLANT: SUNRISE: January 14, 2018
SUNRISE: Ariana Reines’s January column
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The Guardian

Jan 14 2018
Revolt and Revolutions; Alfredo Jaar: The Garden of Good and Evil – review

Yorkshire Sculpture Park, near Wakefield
A survey of late 20th-century artistic activism feels unfocused alongside the Chilean artist’s dark forest of prison cells

The rousing chorus of The Internationale can rarely have sounded as fragile or halting as it does on a frosty morning in the walled garden of the Yorkshire Sculpture Park near Wakefield. The Scottish artist Susan Philipsz recorded the revolutionaries’ anthem as a sotto voce solo in 1999 almost as a funerary farewell to the idea of full-throated protest. In the open air, in 2018, hearing Philipsz’s breathy voice eddying on a biting wind is like being stopped in your tracks by Wordsworth’s otherworldly Solitary Reaper. If it is a call to arms, it is a distinctly tentative one. The song instead acts as a plaintive summons to the park’s Bothy Gallery, where other lost traces of the direct action of the last century are preserved, as if of a different time and place altogether.

Revolt and Revolutions takes as its reference point 1977, the year of punk and the year in which the Yorkshire Sculpture Park was founded, as an outsiders’ outside space, by the visionary Peter Murray, who is still its director. Forty years on, the gallery presents a small and thoughtful expression of things that then seemed loud and urgent – experience looking back at innocence. In one room, 2011 Turner prize winner Martin Boyce’s Souvenir Placards are piled on the floor or propped against a wall, a mix and match of marchers’ slogans: “Ban the Bomb”, “Coal Not Dole”, “Can’t Pay, Won’t Pay”. The signs are either discarded for good, or feasibly ready for action, depending on your point of view.

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The Guardian

Jan 13 2018
Embroidered cultural heroes – in pictures

In her portraits, installations and street art, Mexican textile artist Victoria Villasana applies colourful embroidery to pictures of artists, musicians and politicians. “I started using portraits of people who I consider visionaries,” she says, “as well as vintage photographs and cross-cultural portraits.” Inspired by expressionism, surrealism and pop art, she often chooses feminist icons such as Frida Kahlo, Nina Simone and Beyoncé. The use of embroidery is her nod to female empowerment. “Working with fabric makes me feel connected with an inner rebellious femininity. Embroidery is undervalued as just a ‘woman’s craft’ – but it’s something that reminds us of all those amazing women in our lives that nurture us.”

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The Guardian

Jan 13 2018
Summers past: why the British do like to be beside the seaside
Seagulls, ice-cream, chips and pebbles. Britons’ love for their beaches is captured in a new photography exhibition

In pictures: The Great British Seaside

Over many decades the distinctive British beach experience – pebbles, wind, deckchairs, seagulls and chips – has come close to a national badge of pride for a stoic nation. This spring the salt-lashed island story of that love of our shoreline is to be celebrated through the work of four photographers: Martin Parr, Tony Ray-Jones, David Hurn and Simon Roberts.

From 23 March to 30 September the National Maritime Museum in Greenwich, south-east London, will look at the key elements of a visit to the beach and show how our many coastal resorts have altered over the years.

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The Guardian

Jan 13 2018
The Great British Seaside - in pictures

An exhibition of the best of British beach photography from the 1960s to the present, featuring work by Martin Parr, Tony Ray-Jones, Simon Roberts and David Hurn, is at The National Maritime Museum from 23 March to 30 September 2018.

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artforum.com

Jan 13 2018
SLANT: SUNRISE: January 13, 2018
SUNRISE: Ariana Reines’s January column
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The Guardian

Jan 13 2018
The 20 photographs of the week

Mudslides in California, Rohingya refugees in Bangladesh and airstrikes in Syria - the week’s biggest news stories captured by the world’s best photojournalists

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artforum.com

Jan 12 2018
DIARY: Shining Armory
Fuck Theory on The Shape of Things at Park Avenue Armory
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The New York Times

Jan 12 2018
The Authenticity of Modigliani Paintings Questioned Once Again
An expert for Genoa prosecutors says that 20 of 60 works exhibited last year are fakes, but the owners of the works demand independent appraisals.
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artforum.com

Jan 12 2018
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artforum.com

Jan 12 2018
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The New York Times

Jan 12 2018
Heiress Plotted 19 Grisly Crimes. Investigation Underway.
Frances Glessner Lee, the first lady of forensic science, was a cult curiosity. With her “Nutshell Studies” at the Renwick Gallery, she rises to art star.
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The Guardian

Jan 12 2018
Bridget Riley dazzles, Turner is a winter wonder and Damien goes dotty ... again – the week in art

The abstract artist unveils brilliant new work, Hirst’s spot paintings invade a Palladian mansion and Turner’s watercolours bring magic to Edinburgh – all in your weekly dispatch

Bridget Riley
Britain’s most brilliant abstract artist returns with new works created in the past four years. Riley’s intelligence is a marvel to behold.
David Zwirner gallery, London, 19 January to 10 March.

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artforum.com

Jan 12 2018
NEWS: Neave Brown (1929–2018)
The Guardian, Dezeen
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The New York Times

Jan 12 2018
Arab and Coming Out in Art That Speaks Up
A museum show highlights the apprehensions and discrimination L.G.B.T. artists of Arab descent face.
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The Guardian

Jan 12 2018
Neave Brown obituary
Architect whose street-based housing projects showed great empathy for people and won him the RIBA royal gold medal

Neave Brown, who has died aged 88, was the architect of what is widely considered the finest housing built in Britain in the last 50 years. In the 1960s, through a series of housing projects in Camden, north London, of increasing scale – first five houses (Winscombe Street), then 72 (Fleet Road), then 522 (Alexandra Road) – he demonstrated a street-based alternative to high-rise housing that was immediately acclaimed both in Britain and abroad. But then in the 1970s and 80s, when the reaction against the welfare state set in, he was left high and dry, and it was solely in mainland Europe that he was to build further projects. Only in his final years, and especially in the last six months of his life, was his work recognised with the award of the Royal Institute of British Architects royal gold medal in September 2017 and a series of public appearances to sell-out audiences, culminating in a “for one night only” performance at the Hackney Empire, at which he received a 10-minute standing ovation.

What distinguished Brown as an architect of housing was that the technical ingenuity of his planning was matched by his passionate empathy for the people who would be living in the homes he designed. His flat and house plans were a masterpiece of compression, with not an inch of space wasted – allowing him to create in Britain, within the space and cost constraints of local authority housing, interiors that felt remarkably open and spacious. But these plans he saw not as an end in themselves but as the setting which the various residents would take and use as they wished. This humanistic quality was fundamental to his approach.

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artforum.com

Jan 12 2018
SLANT: SUNRISE: January 12, 2018
SUNRISE: Ariana Reines’s January column
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artforum.com

Jan 12 2018
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The Guardian

Jan 12 2018
‘Teargas is awful – it gets you in the back of your throat’: escaping a gas attack

Benn Keaveney escapes a CS gas attack in Derry, 1971

Teargas is awful – it gets you in the back of your throat and burns your eyes. It drifts quickly, and even when you think it has disappeared, the wind then changes and it’s back. As soon as you see it coming, you run.

This CS gas attack had taken place seconds before this photograph was taken, in a burnt-out sorting office in the Little Diamond area of Derry. We were jumping off the wall to get away from it. There had been a riot, and I remember we were trying to help some older people get away. I was 14.

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The Guardian

Jan 12 2018
Tim Rollins obituary
Artist whose collaboration with young New Yorkers the Kids of Survival pioneered socially engaged conceptual art

Tim Rollins, who has died aged 62 of cardiovascular disease, was a conceptual artist and pioneer of socially engaged art. Always more interested in people than theory, Rollins made work in collaboration with young people from disadvantaged areas of New York City, and exhibited it under the moniker Tim Rollins and the KOS, or Kids of Survival.

Typically, the group painted on to pages torn from a classic book of western literature, mounted as a grid on large-scale canvases. Made collectively, the work ranges in aesthetic: Amerika (1984-89), a series of paintings in which a tangle of elongated drooping trumpets, painted in gold acrylic over pages of the Franz Kafka novel, recall abstract expressionism. In Animal Farm (1989-92), depictions of world leaders, each with the body of a beast, overlay Orwell’s parable. At the Hayward Gallery’s alternative art school, Wide Open School, in 2012, the group took inspiration from Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream, using ink, mustard seed, glue and apple juice to paint on Felix Mendelssohn’s score for the play.

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The Guardian

Jan 12 2018
Should Donald Trump's border wall prototypes be considered art?

Swiss-Icelandic artist Christoph Büchel claims that the significant cultural value of the president’s structures should be recognized – not everyone agrees

It was a sunny day in San Diego, last October, when President Trump unveiled eight prototypes for the proposed 1,900-mile border wall between the US and Mexico. Large slabs of concrete and metal stood tall like public art sculptures, some looked like the Berlin Wall; others were striped with jail cell-like bars.

Related: As Leonardo masterpiece sells for $450m, Trump effort goes for … slightly less than that

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The Guardian

Jan 12 2018
Thomas Ruff’s ma.r.s. 01–II: a pink-tinged haze of alien clouds and exotic fiction

The astronomy nut’s images of the red planet are a comment on how modern photography is doctored in the digital era

The swirling pink-tinged haze of alien clouds parts to provide a tantalising glimpse of violet terra firma – the surface of Mars – in this awesome image created by German photographer and astronomy nut Thomas Ruff.

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The Guardian

Jan 11 2018
Life in London's working-class pubs – in pictures

We Could Be Heroes, an exhibition of images by the photographer Marco Sconocchia, is billed as ‘bringing to life the world and underworld of modern Britain’. The show will be at the Italian Institute of Culture from 26 January-3 March

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The New York Times

Jan 11 2018
Design Review: When Wall Street Was Unoccupied
At the Skyscraper Museum, a reminder of how Lower Manhattan was recast in the 1990s as a residential and cultural destination.
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The New York Times

Jan 11 2018
Director of New Contemporary Art Institute in Richmond Abruptly Steps Down
The institute, poised to open at Virginia Commonwealth University in April, announced the departure of its inaugural director, Lisa Freiman.
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The New York Times

Jan 11 2018
Critic’s Notebook: Back in the Bronx: Gordon Matta-Clark, Rogue Sculptor
The Bronx Museum’s beautifully staged, streamlined version of the artist’s career still conveys a full picture of his radical sensibility.
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The New York Times

Jan 11 2018
Gardner Museum Extends $10 Million Reward for Information in Art Heist
The museum board’s action keeps the reward from dipping to $5 million in the quest for tips to recover works valued at $500 million stolen in 1990.
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artforum.com

Jan 11 2018
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artforum.com

Jan 11 2018
SLANT: SUNRISE: January 11, 2018
SUNRISE: Ariana Reines’s January column
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The Guardian

Jan 11 2018
Helen Maudsley on how to read art: ‘Learn to do what the picture tells you’

After a career spanning seven decades, the 90-year-old Australian artist still expects her audience to put in an effort

“Have you ever been pregnant?” artist Helen Maudsley asks me.

We are standing in a room papered with earthy pinks and purples, in front of a series of paintings peppered with an array of motifs – roses, columns, geometric hands, splashes of colour. Maudsley, one of Australia’s most tenacious and perhaps most underrated artists, is trying – valiantly – to help me understand her work.

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