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The New York Times

Nov 07 2018
What to See in New York Art Galleries This Week
Maruja Mallo’s Surrealist works get a long-overdue survey; Neil Goldberg makes the personal political; and Martha Edelheit’s paintings and drawings of the sexually permissive ’60s.
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The New York Times

Nov 07 2018
Matter: In Cave in Borneo Jungle, Scientists Find Oldest Figurative Painting in the World
A cave drawing in Borneo is at least 40,000 years old, raising intriguing questions about creativity in ancient societies.
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The New York Times

Nov 07 2018
G.I. Joe, Mickey Mouse and Captain America Walk Into … a Display
Heroes come to life at the Library of Congress this week by way of a major comics, toys and memorabilia collection.
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The New York Times

Nov 07 2018
Mario Segale, Developer Who Inspired Nintendo to Name Super Mario, Dies at 84
Mr. Segale rented a warehouse near Seattle to Nintendo in the company’s early days, and once berated its president about unpaid rent.
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The Guardian

Nov 07 2018
Queen Victoria's mourning dress among items in Disease X exhibition

Show at Museum of London highlights continued vulnerability of big cities to disease epidemics

The mourning dress worn by Queen Victoria after the death of her grandson from Russian flu is to go on display for the first time, as part of an exhibition highlighting the ongoing threat from epidemics.

The tiny black silk and crepe dress was made for the diminutive queen in 1892 following the death of Prince Albert Victor, known as Prince Eddy, who was 28 and second in line to the throne when he was struck by the illness a month before his wedding.

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The Guardian

Nov 07 2018
Death threats and denunciations: the artists who fear Bolsonaro's Brazil

Some have employed security guards. Others have fled. With Jair Bolsonaro about to take power, many artists in Brazil fear the censorship and intimidation they currently endure are about to get much worse

Wagner Schwartz received the first death threat two days after lying naked on the floor of a museum in São Paulo. It was October 2017 and the Brazilian artist had invited members of his audience, which included children, to adjust his body: move a limb, roll him over, that kind of thing. This was for a dance piece called La Bête, a work he had already staged many times at home and abroad. So it was a shock to suddenly find himself the target of an increasingly emboldened network of rightwing and evangelical Christian groups.

During La Bête, a four-year-old girl, encouraged by her mother, lifted Schwartz’s hand and then his foot, while another slightly older girl touched his head. These moments were caught on video and uploaded to Facebook. “The creators of this page,” says Schwartz, “put a caption on the video saying the museum incited paedophilia and that I was a paedophile. From this moment on, people who did not know me or the work decided La Bête was a threat.”

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The Guardian

Nov 07 2018
The bygone British dog show – in pictures

Nostalgic photographs by Shirley Baker capture the quirkiness of owners and their canine companions at that quintessential British event: the dog show. From pekingese to poodles, Dog Show 1961-1978 (Hoxton Mini Press) explores the relationship between humans and their dogs

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The New York Times

Nov 06 2018
Cannupa Hanska Luger Wins New $50,000 Arts Prize
The artist is the inaugural winner of the Museum of Arts and Design’s Burke Prize for contemporary craft.
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The New York Times

Nov 06 2018
Robert Indiana Estate to Sell Art Valued at Up to $4 Million
The executor of the estate, which is involved in several legal issues, said the money will go to pay lawyers and repair the artist’s leaky house.
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The New York Times

Nov 06 2018
His Three Loves: Photography, Art History and Lisa
A plain glass vase, a few simple flowers. The photographer Abelardo Morell offers a paean to his feelings — and evokes a cavalcade of art heroes.
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The New York Times

Nov 06 2018
Sex, Surrealism and de Sade: The Forgotten Female Artist Leonor Fini
She rejected art's traditional roles for women, and spent her life blurring the lines of gender and sexuality. So why is she so little-known?
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The New York Times

Nov 06 2018
‘Master Race’ Comic Book Story Comes Up for Sale
The original pages of an influential tale from 1955 published by EC Comics, illustrated by Bernie Krigstein, is at auction.
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The New York Times

Nov 06 2018
The Week in Arts: Bryan Cranston in ‘Network,’ Lucas Hedges in ‘Boy Erased’
Ah, fake news and fury — a Broadway adaptation, starring Cranston, of the 1976 film feels rumblingly prescient now.
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The New York Times

Nov 06 2018
Martha Rosler Isn’t Done Making Protest Art
The artist’s work has been canonized, and feminist slogans are enshrined on T-shirts, but where does that leave her? A retrospective at the Jewish Museum takes us on her journey.
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The Guardian

Nov 06 2018
Philippines: five years after Typhoon Haiyan

Typhoon Haiyan hit the Philippines in November 2013 and left more than 7,360 people dead or missing. It damaged or swept away more than 1.1m houses and injured more than 27,000 people. More than 4 million were displaced. Five years on, photographer Ted Aljibe has revisited the scenes of the disaster where it struck Tacloban City

Typhoon Haiyan was one of the strongest tropical cyclones ever recorded. Relief efforts were slow following the typhoon and Tacloban, was devastated. All that remained was a mess of debris, its buildings reduced to rubble, 4,000 people in the city died.

The cost of rebuilding was estimated around $5.8bn. A year on, thousands of people were living in temporary shelters and four million people were still displaced

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The Guardian

Nov 06 2018
'It's a neverending story': inside the amazing world of Larry Bell

As the 78-year-old artist premieres a new exhibition, he talks about an extensive career filled with experimentation and discovery

Larry Bell’s cubes, arguably the star of the artist’s newly opened Institute of Contemporary Art Miami show, Larry Bell: Time Machines, sound so simple. Each consists of six panes of glass assembled into a box, but the effects of their sometimes smokey, sometimes iridescent surfaces “do improbable things to light that your eyes aren’t used to seeing”, according to Bell: they enhance the inherent ability of glass to reflect, transmit, and absorb light. The process that makes that possible is even more complex.

In Taos, New Mexico, where the 78-year-old artist has lived since the early 70s, Bell operates his studio like a lab. At the center of it is his 14-ton vacuum deposition chamber, The Tank, a cold war-era behemoth of pipes and protruding wires. He acquired it in 1969, having had it built outside of Niagara Falls and shipped cross country to his then-studio in Venice Beach. For each cube, the glass panes go inside its iron belly, where the air pressure drops dramatically. Using jolts of electricity, the machine heats various metals – recently a lot of aluminum and silicon monoxide, but his ICA show has pricier early works in gold and chrome – until they melt and evaporate. Sitting in a wooden chair at a pancake-sized peephole, Bell observes as the metallic mist redeposits itself as a fine sheen on whatever’s in the chamber.

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The Guardian

Nov 05 2018
The fire and fury of Forest Finns – in pictures

Terje Abusdal documents Forest Finns, farmers in the forest belt along the Norwegian/Swedish border who use the ancient agricultural method of fire-fallow cultivation, in his book Slash & Burn

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The Guardian

Nov 05 2018
'Some of the most appalling images ever created' – I Am Ashurbanipal review

British Museum, London
Whether wrestling lions or skinning prisoners alive, the Assyrian king ran a murderously efficient empire. This is the art of war – and it’s terrifying

You have to hand it to the ancient Assyrians – they were honest. Their artistic propaganda relishes every detail of torture, massacre, battlefield executions and human displacement that made Assyria the dominant power of the Middle East from about 900 to 612BC. Assyrian art contains some of the most appalling images ever created. In one scene, tongues are being ripped from the mouths of prisoners. That will mute their screams when, in the next stage of their torture, they are flayed alive. In another relief a surrendering general is about to be beheaded and in a third prisoners have to grind their fathers’ bones before being executed in the streets of Nineveh.

These and many more episodes of calculated cruelty can be seen carved in gypsum in the British Museum’s blockbuster recreation of Assyria’s might. Assyrian art makes up in tough energy what it lacks in human tenderness. It is an art of war – all muscle, movement, impact. People and animals are portrayed as fierce cartoons of merciless force.

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The New York Times

Nov 05 2018
You Can See What? Neighbors Take Tate Modern to Court Over Privacy
Owners of luxury apartments near the London museum have sued over a viewing platform they say offers a “relentless” invasion of privacy.
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The New York Times

Nov 05 2018
Chicago Pulls Kerry James Marshall Painting From Auction Following Criticism
“Knowledge and Wonder” was to be sold at Christie’s on Nov. 15, but arts advocates and Mr. Marshall had criticized the move by the city of Chicago.
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The Guardian

Nov 05 2018
Tate Britain to hold major Van Gogh exhibition in 2019

Sunflowers, Self-Portrait and Starry Night Over the Rhône among works to be shown

Tate Britain is to hold its first Vincent van Gogh exhibition since a 1947 show that was so wildly popular that the gallery’s floors were damaged.

“I think our floors are more robust these days,” said Alex Farquharson, Tate Britain’s director, as details were announced of the major 2019 show, which will explore Van Gogh’s relationship with Britain and his impact on British painters in new ways.

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The Guardian

Nov 05 2018
Guns and poses: Deutsche Börse photography prize shortlist revealed

From Sandinistas in the 70s to a history of misogyny and the legacy of the Baader Meinhof gang, the nominees for the prestigious prize produce powerful, complex and intriguing work

This year’s Deutsche Borse photography prize shortlist is a considered choice of four artists whose approaches draw on documentary, archival appropriation and conceptualism. They are: Susan Meiselas for her retrospective exhibition, Mediations; Laia Abril for her deeply-researched book, On Abortion; Arwed Messmer for his archival exhibition, RAF: No Evidence and Mark Ruwedel for his show, The Artist and Society.

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The Guardian

Nov 04 2018
Minnesota Experimental City: the 1960s town based on a comic strip

It had cars on rails, 100% recycling and a nuclear power station in the centre, all covered by a massive dome. So what went wrong with Athelstan Spilhaus’s vision of the future?

If Minnesota Experimental City had been a roaring success, you’d probably have heard of it. Perhaps you’d even be living there. You’d also have heard of its chief designer: Athelstan Spilhaus. The sci-fi name sounds too on-the-nose to be true, but Spilhaus was real and so, for a time, was his utopian brainchild – at least on paper. Originally from South Africa, by way of MIT, Spilhaus was a postwar polymath in the vein of Buckminster Fuller.

He seems to have been an expert in everything from engineering to urban planning to atmospheric science to oceanography. And, like Fuller, he believed that science and technology could solve most of humankind’s problems. If we could send a human into space, we could do anything. Spilhaus proposed such solutions weekly in his future-science comic-strip series Our New Age, which was widely syndicated in US newspapers from 1957 to 1973. Getting such visions off the paper turned out to be a different story, but an instructive one, as told in new documentary The Experimental City, directed by Chad Freidrichs.

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The Guardian

Nov 04 2018
The fashion photography of Marilyn Stafford - in pictures

As a freelance photojournalist based in Paris in the 1950s and early 1960s, Stafford covered fashion assignments from the established haute couture houses of the 50s to the birth of prêt-à-porter, moving to London in the 60s -where as one of a small number of female photographers she helped to pave the way for future women working on Fleet Street

  • Work on show at the Hull international photography festival 5-28 October, and at Lucy Bell Gallery, Hastings, from 28 October to 17 November
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The Guardian

Nov 04 2018
Guido Guidi: 'Many times I'm not looking when I press the shutter'

He photographs the in-between places, the ordinary and overlooked, rarely venturing far from his home in suburban Italy. Why do the results feel so monumental? We meet a modern master

Over the course of his 77 years, Guido Guidi has lived in the same neighbourhood just outside Cesena, a town in north-east Italy between Rimini and Bologna. It is flat, agricultural country, a landscape of straight lines: ploughed fields, a wide horizon, overhead wires, the long trundle of the old Roman road, the Via Aemilia, and the parallel rush of the A14 motorway. It is the landscape of his photographs, too, in which he has summoned up not the picture-postcard version of Italy, with its pretty countryside and medieval towns, but the peripheral, the overlooked and ordinary: the hastily built agricultural building by the highway; the straggle of buildings at the edge of town that the visitor usually rushes past. Even when he does venture into the centre – as in a series of images of Cesena from the early 1980s – he offers it up to the viewer as defiantly ungrand, shabby, a place like any other.

A new book, Per Strada (On the Roads), which is accompanied by a small exhibition in London, draws together more than 200 photographs from the 1980s and 90s of this closely observed territory. He might show the corner of a rather plain church with a municipal rubbish bin shouldering into the shot; or heaps of blackened, weeks-old snow in front of a dingy palazzo with a bricked-up window; or the shuttered, blinded facade of a tobacconist’s with a shadow playing delicately over it.

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The New York Times

Nov 04 2018
Queens Museum Looks to Liverpool for New Director
Sally Tallant, a British arts professional, will start next spring as the replacement for Laura Raicovich, who resigned after clashing with the museum’s board.
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The New York Times

Nov 04 2018
As Nigerian Fashion Booms, Women Lead Its Coverage
Spurred by the leadership of entrepreneurial women and Nigeria’s cultural cachet around Africa and the world, the country’s fashion magazine industry has found a receptive audience.
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The Guardian

Nov 04 2018
Martin Jenkinson retrospective to go on show in Sheffield

Who We Are features some of the most striking photographs of British industrial struggle

From the mundanities of everyday life in South Yorkshire to some of the most striking images of British industrial struggle, the first major retrospective of the work of photographer Martin Jenkinson is to go on display in Sheffield.

Jenkinson, a former steelworker, is known for his enduring images of British protests in the 1980s as well as his moving and humorous insights into the steel city’s character.

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The Guardian

Nov 04 2018
Klimt / Schiele review – their obsessions were mutual

Royal Academy, London
Ferociously brilliant young Egon Schiele and established master Gustav Klimt share the spotlight in this compelling Viennese double bill

Egon Schiele drew Gustav Klimt many times in life, but also in death. Three drawings exist of Klimt in the morgue, his handsome face deformed by a massive stroke at the age of 55. Not many months later, Schiele himself was carried off by Spanish flu in the space of three devastating days. He was 28. Both men died in Vienna in the year 1918.

Death steals like a cold breath through the Royal Academy’s centennial commemoration of their art. It is there in the gaunt faces of Klimt’s old women and his syphilitic femme fatales. It is there in the emaciated bodies of Schiele’s teenage prostitutes, prematurely aged, and in the bony fingers that clutch at the bare ribs of his female nudes. It is the look of an era, of a society cursed by decadence and poverty, hunger, disease and war. But it is also art nouveau in late-stage mutation, an aesthetic of nervous whiplash lines and extraordinarily adroit drawings where a whole human being may be summarised in a few incisive curves.

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The Guardian

Nov 04 2018
Murdered mob boss gave stolen Boston art to IRA, says former Met detective
Rembrandt and Vermeer masterpieces taken in 1990 heist linked to James ‘Whitey’ Bulger are stashed in Ireland, says sleuth

It is a beautiful crime scene. On the first floor of the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum in Boston, the Dutch Room is lined with green silk wallpaper from its terracotta cobbled floor to oak-timbered ceiling. On the walls hang works by Rubens, Dürer, Van Dyke and others. But it’s the empty frames that catch the eye.

There’s an easel on which once stood The Concert, a masterpiece by Johannes Vermeer. It is now the world’s most valuable missing work of art, worth an estimated $200m. On the far wall, a gilded rectangle frames only silk wallpaper.

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The Guardian

Nov 03 2018
The artist putting rubbish to visionary use – in pictures

“I wanted to give trash a second chance,” says Cyrus Kabiru, 34, who makes art – including highly decorative eyewear – out of wires, pins, bottle tops and other detritus he finds on the streets of Nairobi and around the world. Kabiru, who grew up in a Nairobi slum, started making glasses as a child. “I tried to get my dad to buy me a pair. He was like, ‘I can’t, maybe you design your own.’” There was no shortage of materials, with one of the largest dumping grounds in Nairobi next door. Kabiru began turning junk into spectacles. This caught people’s imagination; now he travels the world showing his art (he also makes bicycles and masks out of waste material) and giving talks on creativity. None of his “glasses” has lenses. “They’re not for seeing better; they’re for seeing different,” he says.

Cyrus Kabiru’s work was at ART X Lagos from 2 - 4 November and will be at Kochi-Muziris Biennale in India from 12 December - 29 March 2019

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The Guardian

Nov 03 2018
Thomas Heatherwick’s Coal Drops Yard – shopping in the Instagram age

Thomas Heatherwick’s ‘kissing’ roofs top a new high-end shopping mall in the old coal sheds. But why does the whole King’s Cross scheme not quite feel real?

I am reading the most pretentious and verbose label ever attached to tea towel. If it were a caption next to a work of contemporary art, you would think it excessive. The towel, to give you a condensed version, “twists the traditional expression of a kitchen textile”; with “a vibrant mélange look”, achieved by doing interesting things to yarns and twill stripes, it “adds a contemporary edge to the kitchen”. The tea towel costs £15. Fifteen pounds! Enough to say that it’s a very nice towel, if not one worth the price nor the word count on the label, and that it epitomises a certain sort of contemporary retail that is writ large in the shopping development around it, Coal Drops Yard in King’s Cross, London.

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The Guardian

Nov 03 2018
Protests prompt Phoenix cinema to drop Curzon takeover

Planned move by one of UK’s oldest independent cinemas was opposed by thousands

One of the UK’s oldest independent cinemas has ditched plans to hand over control to a commercial operator following a backlash from thousands of supporters, including film directors and musicians.

The Phoenix cinema in East Finchley, north London, had been due to have its operations and programming taken over by the Curzon cinema group, raising the possibility the venue would lose its “unique identity and much-loved atmosphere”.

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The Guardian

Nov 03 2018
Original Observer photography

The People’s Vote march, Mourinho’s meltdown, the Beastie Boys and John Cooper Clarke – all feature in this showcase of the best commissioned photography by the Observer in October 2018

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The Guardian

Nov 03 2018
'Making was more fun than designing': a modern villa with a Victorian feel

The Makers House, squeezed on to a tricky urban plot, is up for the 2018 RIBA House of the Year award

It’s called the Makers House with good reason. The architects made it. I mean, obviously they designed it – but they also got down dirty and helped to build it. “Anything we could do ourselves, we did,” says Sophie Goldhill, partner, along with her husband David Liddicoat, in the young firm Liddicoat & Goldhill. “Sweeping up, running out to the building suppliers, carrying the bricks – you name it.”

She and Liddicoat more or less moved their office and staff to the building site in east London to manage the project. I’ve watched enough episodes of Grand Designs to know this can be a disaster, resulting in rows, divorce, bankruptcy and a lot of eye-rolling from the bricklayers. “No, no,” Liddicoat corrects. “If anything, the making was more fun than the designing.”

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The New York Times

Nov 03 2018
More Is More: Saint Laurent and Bergé’s Style Flies at Auction Again
The maximalist, cross-cultural decorating style favored by the two Frenchmen has long been admired as an antidote to the minimalism of contemporary interiors.
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The Guardian

Nov 03 2018
The 20 photographs of the week

The migrant caravan in Mexico, the Pittsburgh synagogue shooting, funerals in Haiti and Simone Biles at the world gymnastics championships – the week captured by the world’s best photojournalists

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The Guardian

Nov 02 2018
'The Alf Garnett of architecture': Roger Scruton to chair buildings commission

Philosopher and writer chosen to help ensure attractiveness of new developments

A philosopher who has criticised modern architecture and some of its leading exponents has been appointed to chair a commission that champions beautiful buildings.

Roger Scruton, described by the Guardian’s former architecture and design correspondent as “the Alf Garnett of architecture”, has been charged with ensuring new developments are attractive and engage with, as well as reflect, local communities.

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The New York Times

Nov 02 2018
Last Chance: A Discreet Jubilee for a Groundbreaking Chelsea Gallery
Paula Cooper, a model of integrity in a market gone crackers, celebrates 50 years of art and activism with an exhibition featuring artists from its very first show.
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The New York Times

Nov 02 2018
Children’s Books: The 2018 New York Times/New York Public Library Best Illustrated Children’s Books
We invite you to take a look at this year’s winners ...
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The New York Times

Nov 02 2018
20 Art Exhibitions to View in N.Y.C. This Weekend
Our guide to new art shows and some that will be closing soon.
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The Guardian

Nov 02 2018
Flat owners take Tate Modern to court over 'invasion of privacy'

Neo Bankside residents seek measures to prevent art gallery visitors looking into their homes

Residents of London flats overlooked by the Tate Modern have gone to the high court in an effort to stop “hundreds of thousands of visitors” looking into their homes from the art gallery’s viewing platform.

The owners of four flats in the Neo Bankside development on London’s Southbank say the use of the platform “unreasonably interferes with their use of their flats” and that the Tate is “committing a nuisance”.

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The Guardian

Nov 02 2018
David Bailey's Peru – in pictures

Machu Picchu, Lima, Cusco and Lake Titicaca … David Bailey’s Peru is a collection of images shot by the photographer while on location for Vogue in 1971 and Tatler in 1984. Struck by the natural beauty he saw on these assignments, Bailey set out to document people in their natural habitats in addition to his fashion work

  • The exhibition runs from 19 October to 21 December at Heni Gallery in central London
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The Guardian

Nov 02 2018
Viennese sexuality from Klimt/Schiele and art from Coca-Cola – the week in art

The Assyrian empire in all its glory, human psychology from Lorenzo Lotto and Patrick Heron by the seaside – all in our weekly dispatch

Klimt/Schiele Drawings
This is a beguiling and engrossing show of sensuality and reverie from Sigmund Freud’s sexually supercharged Vienna.
Royal Academy, London, from 4 November until 3 February.

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The Guardian

Nov 02 2018
Edward Burne-Jones’s Love Among the Ruins: the plight of illicit lovers

Rossetti’s pupil proves his worth with this vivid masterpiece, inspired by his mistress

Created by the young gun who hung around Dante Gabriel Rossetti’s studio absorbing everything he could, this painting, produced between 1870 and 1873, marks a last great flowering of the pre-Raphaelite style: the plight of illicit lovers; the vivid colours; the hallucinogenic detail. It would soon evolve into the flouncy, morally ungrounded aesthetic movement.

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The Guardian

Nov 02 2018
Picfair’s Women Behind the Lens 2018 – in pictures

Open photography platform Picfair’s second annual Women Behind the Lens competition features work by female photographers in four categories: portrait, architecture, nature and street level. Open to all levels of photographer from Picfair’s global community, the shortlist includes an Ayrshire-based scotch egg maker, a Swedish psychologist, a Czech finance analyst based in Oxfordshire and a Malaysian interior designer

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The Guardian

Nov 02 2018
Mark Wallinger wants football teams in the UK to kick his artworks

Turner Prize winner’s artwork One World features a satellite photo of the world on a football

Up to 2,000 artworks by the Turner prize-winning artist Mark Wallinger are to be distributed to grassroots football teams across the UK with the message – please do kick it.

Wallinger was commissioned to create a new work of art by the Liverpool Biennial and 14-18 NOW, the UK arts programme marking the first world war centenary.

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The New York Times

Nov 01 2018
Show Us Your Wall: For the Singer Ingrid Michaelson, Home Is Where the Art Is
Her chosen field is music, but she finds comfort in objects and images from the home where she grew up, and works by her mother and grandmother.
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The New York Times

Nov 01 2018
Exhibitions: How Black Citizenship Was Won, and Lost
“Black Citizenship in the Age of Jim Crow,” an exhibition at the New-York Historical Society, traces the gains, and reversals, of the post-Civil War struggle over racial equality.
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The New York Times

Nov 01 2018
Art review: How Conspiracy Theories Shape Art
At the Met Breuer, the crackpot exhibition “Everything Is Connected” reveals how artists have tracked, critiqued and sometimes embraced conspiracy theories.
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