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The Guardian

Jan 13 2020
Nadav Kander: 30 years of portraiture – in pictures

Nadav Kander is one of the most influential photographers in the world, and a new book – The Meeting, published by Steidl – documents hundreds of his portraits taken over three decades. His subjects are unpredictable, from global celebrities to London market traders and South African schoolchildren

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The Guardian

Jan 13 2020
Designer destinations: architects’ favourite hotels

From a rocket tower and a pasha’s palace to a beachside bungalow and a geometric masterpiece

“Arcosanti is Paolo Soleri’s built prototype for his vision of the city of the future. Masterplanned as an eventual community of 5,000, it has housed acolytes who came to learn Soleri’s construction techniques and help make cast bells, which were sold to finance the project. It is a magical environment, ‘hippy modernism’ with domes and carvings and rooftops looking out on to the Sonoran desert just north of Phoenix.”

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The Guardian

Jan 12 2020
The construction of modern Britain – in pictures

Thousands of unseen photographs depicting the building of modern Britain are being released to the public for the first time. Historic England is publishing more than 2,000 newly digitised images online from the John Laing Photographic Collection. Laing was one of the UK’s biggest construction companies, whose projects included Coventry Cathedral, Berkeley nuclear power plant, London Central Mosque, the M1 motorway and the second Severn Bridge

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The Guardian

Jan 12 2020
From Abdul Abdullah to Vincent Namatjira: 10 artists forging a new political future

A sense of crisis is pushing through the art scene, and some of Australia’s most exciting artists are smashing apart artistic convention

A sense of urgency is pervading Australian art. Artists are seeking more than ever to spark cultural change. For some, this involves moving away from traditional art-making approaches. Others continue to mine the archives or the natural world for materials that inspire, shock, or lend themselves to 21st century recalibration.

Collaborations are becoming more common across disciplines, between artists and scientists, activists, healthcare workers, educators. Audiences and art institutions are being asked to play new roles in their relationship with art.

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The New York Times

Jan 12 2020
Pete Dye, ‘Picasso’ of Golf Course Design, Is Dead at 94
Pete Dye, ‘Picasso’ of Golf Course Design, Is Dead at 94
“His courses built for tournaments are hard,” Tiger Woods once said, “ but there’s a good reason for everything.”
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The Guardian

Jan 12 2020
'I had millions of pounds down my knickers': artist Sue Webster on her fight to buy her new house

A derelict house tunnelled beneath by its former owner was the artist’s dream come true. Could architect David Adjaye help her transform it?

Just inside the artist Sue Webster’s front door, crafted from grey cardboard, is the architect’s model of her house. On top is a pyramid roof that Webster lifts up. “This bit we haven’t done yet,” she confesses. “We’d been building for five years: I needed the project to stop.” Tucked under the roof on the top floor of the model is a set of keys that belonged to the previous owner. On the cheap plastic key fob is the name “Lyttle”.

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The Guardian

Jan 12 2020
Elegantly ethical: the best of sustainable design – in pictures

Products that reuse materials and support local communities can both do good and look good

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The Guardian

Jan 12 2020
‘Art into nature, nature into art’: César Manrique, the architect of Lanzarote

Fusing landscape, art and architecture, Manrique embraced the island’s rugged volcanic terrain as a canvas to create works that are stunning a new generation of art lovers and tourists

A sea of gnarled black lava spills in through the window of a white cubic house on the island of Lanzarote, tumbling in contorted waves on to the polished concrete floor. A pair of chubby cacti cling to the rocky windowsill, as if swept indoors by the churning torrent of molten basalt outside. It looks as if the building might have been swamped by a volcanic eruption, but this is no natural disaster. It is the work of César Manrique, the celebrated artist-architect of Lanzarote. Harnessing lava formations as other designers use concrete and steel, he conjured spectacular spaces from the caves, bubbles and tunnels left by the primal movements of molten magma.

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The Guardian

Jan 12 2020
Tullio Crali: A Futurist Life review – a head-on revelation

Estorick Collection, London
The lifelong Italian futurist shared his peers’ obsession with planes and fast cars. But, as this riveting first UK show reveals, his radiant, humane paintings set him apart

The Italian painter Tullio Crali ought not to be quite such a head-on revelation. After all, his astonishing vision of a solo pilot nose-diving straight into a canyon of skyscrapers, light shattering round his helmeted head, is one of the great masterpieces of futurist art. Yet this riveting survey at the Estorick Collection comes as a surprise from first to last, and not only because it is his first in Britain.

Crali (1910-2000) is a strange case, in life as in art. He grew up in Zadar, on what is now the Croatian coast, but which once belonged to Italy. His family moved to north-eastern Italy in 1922, and it was there, at the age of 15, that he created his first futurist work after reading an article about the movement.

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The Guardian

Jan 11 2020
The big picture: fresh-faced innocence in Cwmcarn

Bruce Davidson’s photograph of a child pushing a pram in a mining village captures a moment of peace amid the noise and grime

When he was serving in the US Signal Corps in 1956, the celebrated photographer Bruce Davidson was posted to Paris. He served there under a sergeant who was Welsh. Davidson was due three days’ leave and he asked the sergeant where on earth he would send his own worst enemy. The sergeant replied without hesitation “Cwmcarn”, a mining village in the Ebbw Valley. On that first visit, Davidson underestimated how long it would take to get to Cwmcarn and had to leave before he could take any pictures, to avoid being awol. But in a couple of hours, he was able to take in a sense of “the coal dust and the flesh, of the sweat and the danger” of the miners’ lives. “There was something beautiful about a life that was so horrible,” he has said.

It was another nine years before Davidson returned to Cwmcarn, by which time he had become famous for his revolutionary images of American subcultures and gangs, and for his indelible up-close images from the frontlines of the civil rights movement. He hadn’t forgotten Cwmcarn, however, and finding himself in Wales on a magazine assignment to photograph Caernarfon Castle, he made his way back there.

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The Guardian

Jan 11 2020
Brighton College’s Sports and Science Centre review – Hogwarts meets George Lucas

In a departure from the gothic image of English private schools, Brighton College’s new building, designed by OMA, is an expression of global ambition

Think of an English private school and you will probably think of somewhere gothic. Something like St Trinian’s, or Nigel Molesworth’s St Custard’s, whose ogees and oak made habitats for bats and spiders, whose shadowy recesses harboured aromas of boiled cabbage and sodden socks. Something, probably, much like Brighton College, in which flint walls are pierced by pointed arches that lead into enclosed spaces reminiscent of Oxbridge colleges, which open on to an expansive greensward dedicated to the inculcation of illogic and injustice through the games of rugby and cricket.

What you would not expect is something like the college’s new Sports and Science Centre, designed by the Rotterdam-based Office for Metropolitan Architecture (OMA), the practice founded by the celebrated not-gothic seer Rem Koolhaas. You would not expect it because no English private school has built anything quite like this before. Long, dark, angular and machined, it’s as if Hogwarts had been redesigned by George Lucas.

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The Guardian

Jan 11 2020
Hoop dreams: a vibrant Parisian basketball court - in pictures

Once known for seedy cabarets, Paris’s Pigalle district is now one of the city’s trendiest neighbourhoods. A few years ago, the fashion brand of the same name created a colourful basketball court there, with Nike and Ill-Studio, captured in this series of images by local photographer Sebastian Erras. “I was fascinated by the lines and the colours,” says Erras. “It sticks out.”

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The Guardian

Jan 11 2020
French masterpieces looted by Nazis set to fetch £20m at auction

Pointillist works by Pissarro and Signac returned to the family of a Jewish art collector are expected to raise millions at auction

Three neo-impressionist masterpieces that were looted by the Nazis from the homes of a Jewish collector during the German occupation of France are to be auctioned in London.

The works by Camille Pissarro and Paul Signac, described by experts as “exceptional”, were recently handed back to the heirs of Gaston Lévy, a successful businessman, property developer and art collector in Paris in the 1930s.

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The Guardian

Jan 11 2020
From human composting to decluttering glassware: the latest trends in design

The freshest developments and innovations, from ethical clothing to quizzical furniture

When Philippe Malouin was asked by Finnish glass manufacturer Iittala to create vessels that could be used to declutter people’s living spaces, he began by taking a critical look at his own home.

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The Guardian

Jan 11 2020
Brave new world: the best-designed travel destinations for 2020

From treetop cycle paths to a micro hotel, we guide you through new design marvels around the globe

Under a tree outside Uganda’s National Theatre sits architect Doreen Adengo, sheltering from the sun that beats down before heavy rain at this time of year. It’s here she begins her tours of African or “tropical” modernist buildings in Kampala’s central business district, aiming to increase awareness and appreciation of their architecture. She started last year, inspired by architect Manuel Herz’s book African Modernism – The Architecture of Independence, featuring buildings in Zambia, Senegal, Ivory Coast, Kenya and Ghana. Herz’s work explores the politics behind these buildings – mainly constructed in the 50s and 60s – from colonial projects to nation-building for proud new African leaders.

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The New York Times

Jan 10 2020
Britain Moves to Regulate Its Art Trade. Bring Your ID.
Britain Moves to Regulate Its Art Trade. Bring Your ID.
New legislation to combat money laundering and terrorism financing will require dealers and auctioneers to establish the identity of buyers and sellers.
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artforum.com

Jan 10 2020
Peter Wächtler
Much has been made of Peter Wächtler’s skilled handicraft and anachronistic registers. The title of his latest exhibition, “The Datum Trail,” refers to the now-obsolete singular form of data, the premise
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The New York Times

Jan 10 2020
Broadway Playwright as High Line Curator
Broadway Playwright as High Line Curator
Jeremy O. Harris will combine disciplines in a summer festival.
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artforum.com

Jan 10 2020
Katie Bethune-Leamen
In “La douche écossaise,” Katie Bethune-Leamen's recent irregularly shaped porcelain sculptures are complemented by bronze casts of similarly lumpy forms. Embellished with imperfect pearls, these new
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artforum.com

Jan 10 2020
New Anti–Money Laundering Law Vexes UK Dealers, Beatriz Milhazes Joins Pace, and More
Art dealers in the United Kingdom must abide by a new law that targets money laundering and terrorism financing. The legislation has introduced a new set of regulations that require galleries, auction
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artforum.com

Jan 10 2020
Christopher Myers
Christopher Myers’s exhibition at Fort Gansevoort’s new satellite space opens with an image of nine human silhouettes on a banner that spans almost the entirety of the gallery’s storefront window. Cut
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artforum.com

Jan 10 2020
Gabriel Barredo (1957–2020)
Filipino artist Gabriel Barredo, whose large-scale, immersive mixed media installations and assemblages constructed vividly kinetic tableaux ambitious in their size and vision, died this week at his
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The New York Times

Jan 10 2020
Hudson Yards Promised a Park. They Didn’t Mention the Giant Wall.
Hudson Yards Promised a Park. They Didn’t Mention the Giant Wall.
For phase two, the developer imagines a 700-foot-long structure overshadowing the High Line. “The last thing New Yorkers need is a wall,” a state senator said.
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The Guardian

Jan 10 2020
Attenborough opens Turner display in artist's former London home

Sir David Attenborough says exhibition of Thames oil paintings at restored Sandycombe Lodge pays ‘proper respect’ to artist

Oil paintings by JMW Turner have gone on display in the artist’s former west London home for the first time since 1826.

The exhibition, at the meticulously restored Sandycombe Lodge in Twickenham, which was designed by Turner himself, was opened on Friday by Sir David Attenborough. The broadcaster and naturalist described Turner as “one of the great figures of western painting”.

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The Guardian

Jan 10 2020
20 photographs of the week

The Iran plane crash, bushfires in Australia and the continuing unrest in Hong Kong and Santiago – the best photography in news, culture and sport from around the world this week

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The New York Times

Jan 10 2020
Budget Blowouts and Delays Blight Germany’s Major Arts Projects
Budget Blowouts and Delays Blight Germany’s Major Arts Projects
A renovation of Cologne’s opera house is running eight years late, and cost estimates have doubled. It’s just one in a long list of public works gone wrong in the country.
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artforum.com

Jan 10 2020
Longtime Minneapolis Institute of Art Curator Patrick Noon to Retire
The Minneapolis Institute of Art (Mia) has announced that senior curator Patrick Noon, the chair of its department of paintings, will retire on January 31 after more than two decades with the institution.
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The New York Times

Jan 10 2020
He Left a Museum After Women Complained; His Next Job Was Bigger
He Left a Museum After Women Complained; His Next Job Was Bigger
A Philadelphia Museum of Art boss who quietly resigned now directs the Erie Art Museum, where a woman also objected to his conduct.
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artforum.com

Jan 10 2020
The Wooster Group
Negotiating posterity is a weird task for theater artists. Live performance may be impermanent by nature, but there’s limited virtue in being completely lost to time. Which is why this compact yet potent
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artforum.com

Jan 10 2020
The Met Adds Works by Pakistani Artist Lala Rukh to Its Collection
The Metropolitan Museum of Art has acquired two major works by the late Pakistani artist and activist Lala Rukh (1948–2017). Rukh’s estate also gifted the institution a group of six posters that were
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The New York Times

Jan 10 2020
Cecilia Alemani Named Curator of Next Venice Biennale
Cecilia Alemani Named Curator of Next Venice Biennale
The curator of the High Line will be the first Italian woman to organize the show.
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artforum.com

Jan 10 2020
Cecilia Alemani Appointed Artistic Director of Fifty-Ninth Venice Biennale
Cecilia Alemani-the director and chief curator of High Line Art, the public art program of New York’s elevated High Line park-has been named artistic director of the Fifty-Ninth Venice Biennale, taking
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artforum.com

Jan 10 2020
Bob Wade (1943–2019)
Texan public artist Bob “Daddy-O” Wade, known for his gargantuan sculptural renderings of objects and critters as varied as saxophones, frogs, and his beloved hot rods, died of cardiac arrest on December
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The Guardian

Jan 10 2020
Trump's threat to Iranian treasures and flashbacks to fascist Italy – the week in art

The president’s bomb targets, the future of speed and flight, the power of maternality, and the creations of a political refugee potter – all in your weekly dispatch

The Four Ages of Woman
Madge Gill, Anna Kavan and political refugee potter Bibi Herrera are among the visionary artists in this exhibition about mind, creativity and gender.
Bethlem Museum of the Mind, London, until 25 April.

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artforum.com

Jan 10 2020
Philbrook Names Sara O’Keeffe Associate Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art
The Philbrook Museum of Art in Tulsa has appointed Sara O’Keeffe as its new associate curator of modern and contemporary art. She comes to the institution from the New Museum in New York, where she
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artforum.com

Jan 10 2020
Akbar Padamsee (1928–2020)
Akbar Padamsee, whose six-decade output of paintings, prints, photographs, sculpture, and film made an inestimable contribution to the development of modernism in postcolonial India, died this week at
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artforum.com

Jan 10 2020
Ariana Reines’s full moon report
Sometimes I think this entire culture five thousand years was just a rehearsal for the wrong apocalypse Our original owners siphoned up an energy from colonized doomsday preachers Whose own religion,
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The Guardian

Jan 10 2020
Buy a classic Guardian photograph: A horse kisses a woman at Belle Vue Christmas Circus, 1981

This week in our ongoing series of exclusive Guardian photography we have an unusual festive image from a circus in Manchester, shot by Don McPhee

In 1981, the last Belle Vue Christmas Circus rolled up at Manchester’s Kings Hall. It had been a regular Christmas date since the 1920s: a traditional family circus with a ringmaster, band, tigers, bears and performing ponies, along with acrobats, strongmen and clowns. The Guardian photographer Don McPhee was there to take this picture of a woman being “kissed” by one of the circus’s horses as part of an act. McPhee, who was based in Manchester, began his career working for local newspapers before joining the Guardian in 1970. He died in 2007.

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The Guardian

Jan 10 2020
Sam Taylor-Johnson’s David: sleeping beauty

The English film-maker echoes the work of Michelangelo and Warhol in her intimate video portrait of David Beckham

Over an hour in length and filmed in a single take, Sam Taylor-Johnson’s video portrait of footballer David Beckham was created during a scheduled post-training siesta in a Madrid hotel room in 2004.

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The Guardian

Jan 10 2020
‘The Michelangelo of kitsch’: the restoration of outsider architect Bruce Goff

The Oklahoman was marginalised in his lifetime as much for his sexuality as his unusual designs, no two of which were the same

Bruce Goff was the ultimate outsider architect. Despite being one of the most innovative, imaginative and downright interesting architects in history, with admirers including Frank Gehry, Mies van der Rohe, Philip Johnson and Frank Lloyd Wright, Goff, who died in 1982, remains a marginal figure. His exile was partly self-imposed, but there are signs that Goff was also pushed out – as a result of his sexuality as much as his unorthodox design philosophy.

We’ve come to associate US midcentury modernism with minimalism – everything clean and straight and simple. Goff’s buildings were the exact opposite: curvaceous or unconventionally geometric, busy, flamboyant, mysterious. Critics of the era could not get a handle on him. Charles Jencks described him as “the Michelangelo of kitsch”. Others described his work as organic, futuristic, or sci-fi. He was pop and postmodern before the terms existed. What’s more, not one of Goff’s works resembles another, making him even harder to classify.

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The New York Times

Jan 09 2020
What Makes Pope.L’s Art Endure? (It’s Not the Famous Crawls)
The maverick artist, the subject of two exhibitions, is known for his grueling street performances, but his real enchantment lies in something weirder.
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The New York Times

Jan 09 2020
When He Was Good, He Was Breathtaking
The mesmerizing, frustrating world of Félix Vallotton, now at the Metropolitan Museum.
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artforum.com

Jan 09 2020
RECORDARE
our sense of the verb “to remember” comes from the latin recordari, literally to pass through the heart.
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artforum.com

Jan 09 2020
Employees at the Shed in New York Move to Unionize
Front-of-house staffers at the Shed, the contemporary arts center that  https://www.artforum.com/news/new-york-s-the-shed-to-open-in-april-78291 opened in New York in April of last year, filed a petition
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The New York Times

Jan 09 2020
16 Art Exhibitions to View in N.Y.C. This Weekend
Our guide to new art shows and some that will be closing soon.
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artforum.com

Jan 09 2020
“New Skin”
“New Skin,” curated by Jason Stopa, is a five-part ensemble featuring a dozen paintings by Clare Grill, Juan Logan, Michael Berryhill, Shirley Kaneda, and Stopa himself—most of whom have been showing
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artforum.com

Jan 09 2020
Odessa Straub
Is that a figure? An organism? An ecosystem? An organ? Odessa Straub’s latest show holds back answers, with gratifying results. The materials of the thirteen pieces on view—wall works and freestanding
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artforum.com

Jan 09 2020
New Director of Warsaw Art Center to Promote Artists “Marginalized” by the Left
The Ujazdowski Castle Center for Contemporary Art (CCA) in Warsaw, known for exhibiting some of Poland’s most prominent experimental artists, has a new director, Piotr Bernatowicz. The curator, former
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artforum.com

Jan 09 2020
Mary Savig Appointed Smithsonian American Art Museum’s Curator of Craft
The Smithsonian American Art Museum has named Mary Savig its new curator of craft. Savig will be responsible for conducting research into collection objects; collection displays at the museum’s Renwick
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The New York Times

Jan 09 2020
What to See Right Now in New York Art Galleries
Suzanne Jackson’s non-canvas compositions; Mike Kelley’s ode to painting.
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