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The Guardian

Mar 13 2019
Paul Ringrose obituary

Paul Ringrose, who has died aged 63 after suffering from cancer, found his vocation as a painter of the woodlands of West Cork, Ireland.

He showed widely, winning critical recognition and a following of private collectors. His paintings are visceral, immersive experiences. Tangled forms of vegetation completely fill each canvas – except when a splash of sunlight pierces the density. They are not gloomy. They are attentive markings of what he knew.

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The New York Times

Mar 13 2019
Looking Beyond the Fashion Binary
A “gender-bending” exhibition at the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston rethinks everything about what a fashion show should be.
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The New York Times

Mar 13 2019
Meeting Old Masters, Rowing With Vikings — in Augmented Reality
More museums are using A.R. to take visitors back in time, making art come “alive.”
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The Guardian

Mar 13 2019
Silicon Valley is erecting a monument to itself. Will it be a giant robo-phallus? | James Felton
How will today’s noble tech titans honour their achievements in a single statue? We run through the obvious options

Every city has a landmark that celebrates what its people love. France has the Eiffel Tower, which is both astonishingly beautiful and admittedly a bit penisy. New York has the Empire State Building, which is the same but bigger. Rome has the Colosseum, to celebrate an oiled-up Russell Crowe.

Now Silicon Valley power-brokers want to honour the thing they truly love, by building their own massive monument to themselves. The San Jose Light Tower Corporation has raised $1m to create a statue that honours Silicon Valley itself. They hope to raise up to $150m for a “great idea”, according to the New York Times.

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The Guardian

Mar 13 2019
Anish Kapoor: 'If I was a young Muslim, would I feel angry enough to join Isis? I would at least think about it'

Britain has gone through the looking glass and the artist’s new show follows it into the abyss. He talks about the upsurge in racism, fighting for Shamima Begum – and his clash with France’s president

At 7.30 on the morning after Britain voted to leave the European Union, Anish Kapoor left his London flat for an appointment with his analyst. On the street, he heard two men talking. “Bet he doesn’t even speak English,” said one. “I turned around and they were talking about me. I was so furious.”

Sir Anish Mikhail Kapoor, CBE, RA, the 65-year-old, Turner prize-winning, Mumbai-born British-Indian artist, who has lived in London since the early 1970s and (though this is hardly the point) speaks better English than most of his countrymen, had woken up in a new land. “Since then permission has been given for difference, rather than being celebrated, to be undermined.”

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The Guardian

Mar 13 2019
Views with value: how cities preserve their defining vistas

Cities have long sought to preserve historic views of landmarks or mountainous horizons. Architect Tom Brigden maps out protected ‘viewing corridors’ in cities from London to Vancouver

Value in the View is published by Riba

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The Guardian

Mar 13 2019
Top 10 books about building cities | Jonathan Carr

From Mary Beard’s Roman history to Kim Stanley Robinson’s science fiction, Jonathan Carr chooses the best writing about citizens’ eternal challenges

A big city is rather like an overcrowded cruise ship, direction unclear, belching smoke, the lives of the many controlled by a few. Except that citizens are not, of course, on vacation. We have become a predominantly urban species. More than 80% of us, in Britain and the US, live in cities. So shouldn’t we know by now what makes them work?

Despite a changing world, many of the fundamentals have indeed stayed the same. There must be a viable economy, social inclusion, technological innovation, sufficient housing, clean water and sanitation. Growing cities require visionaries, inventors, engineers and a ready supply of immigrants. Inevitably, cities will breed crime, inequality, corruption and cause environmental degradation.

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The Guardian

Mar 13 2019
‘I could be myself, not a patient’: the Norwegian hospital offering respite in a woodland cabin

Patients at Oslo University hospital can escape the gruelling reality of medical treatment at a custom-built woodland retreat

It’s a cold snowy winter’s day in Norway, but the Skogen Tangeraas family sitting around a bonfire in some woodland don’t seem to care. They’re too busy drinking hot chocolate and cooking sausages. Their dog is splashing around in the stream. The three daughters – aged 7, 10 and 12 – alternate between chopping wood, archery and popping into a nearby cabin to practise gyotaku, a traditional Japanese method of printing fish.

It sounds like a family holiday in the countryside but the cabin, woodland and stream are located in the grounds of Oslo University hospital. The middle daughter, Albertine, is in remission for childhood cancer, which has taken a toll on her and the whole family. With them is Maren Østvold Lindheim, a paediatric psychologist who works at the hospital helping children prepare for gruelling treatment for life-threatening conditions.

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The Guardian

Mar 13 2019
Peace wall people: the youth of Belfast – in pictures

Toby Binder has been documenting the daily life of teenagers in Belfast since the Brexit referendum, focusing on six neighbourhoods on both sides of Northern Ireland’s peace walls. No matter which side young people live on, their struggles remain the same

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The Guardian

Mar 12 2019
The mystery trio who have kept Australia playing 'guess who' for 36 years

Jacki Weaver and Cathy Freeman among those to guess at the identities in Martin Shaw’s perpetually touring painting

If there’s such a thing as comfort food in the visual arts world, Martin Shaw’s painting may well be it.

Created in 1982, Three Well-Known Australians is striking in its simplicity: three abstract figures – a headless blue figure, a crouching red figure and a green figure holding an umbrella – sit on a bright yellow background.

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The New York Times

Mar 12 2019
Can Art Help Save the Planet?
Museum exhibitions seek to raise public consciousness about the dangers posed to the environment by climate change.
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The New York Times

Mar 12 2019
Two by Design: A Designer Who Finds Inspiration at Her Mother’s Colorful Cottage
For the London-based Matilda Goad, a love of pastels and lushly printed wallpapers began at her family home in West Sussex.
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The Guardian

Mar 12 2019
Sir John Richardson obituary

Art historian and biographer of Picasso

The art historian John Richardson, who has died aged 95, was the author of a magisterial biography of Pablo Picasso, the first volume of which was published in 1991 and won the Whitbread book of the year award, and which is still in progress.

The first part of A Life of Picasso, The Prodigy, concluded with the climactic year of 1906, when the shock to Picasso’s system of the primitive reductions of form in Matisse’s woodcuts and his magnificent canvas Le Bonheur de Vivre induced the self-knowledge that, compared to Matisse, he had been merely cruising in his blue and rose periods. The second volume, The Cubist Rebel, published in 1996, took the story a mere 10 years further, from the breakthrough painting Les Demoiselles d’Avignon through a collaboration with Georges Braque to the brink of Picasso’s neoclassical years.

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The Guardian

Mar 12 2019
Art critic John Richardson dies aged 95

The eminent British art historian died in his Manhattan home, with the fourth volume of his definitive Picasso biography as yet unpublished

Sir John Richardson, the eminent British art historian and critic whose multivolume series on Pablo Picasso drew upon his personal and aesthetic affinity for the Spanish artist, and was widely praised as a work of art in its own right, has died aged 95.

Nicholas Latimer, a vice president at publishers Alfred A Knopf, said Richardson died on Tuesday morning in his Manhattan home.

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The New York Times

Mar 12 2019
The Missouri Museum That Churchill Built
Churchill’s “Iron Curtain” speech at Westminster College in Fulton, Mo., in 1946 led to America’s National Churchill Museum.
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The New York Times

Mar 12 2019
A Former Prison Breaks From the System That Built It
Eastern State Penitentiary shaped the modern prison system. Now it’s pushing for reform.
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The Guardian

Mar 12 2019
V&A extends Dior exhibition due to popular demand

Museum to display work celebrating life of famed designer for seven more weeks

The V&A is to extend its landmark Christian Dior exhibition by seven weeks after it sold out within 19 days of opening, the museum has announced.

Originally scheduled to finish on 14 July, Christian Dior: Designer of Dreams will now run until 1 September.

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The New York Times

Mar 12 2019
Offbeat History, Off the Beaten Path
From Poe’s tiny cottage to a museum about a historic black community, New York City’s boroughs are full of hidden treasures.
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The New York Times

Mar 12 2019
Met Gives Music Gallery a Makeover
A terra cotta trumpet shaped like a jaguar. A drum with dragons. Keyboard instruments small enough to fit in your carry-on luggage. Gallery 681 fits them all.
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The New York Times

Mar 12 2019
Van Gogh’s Perennial Appeal
At least nine exhibitions on the Dutch artist are in the works at museums around the world.
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The New York Times

Mar 12 2019
Increasing Exposure for Native Artists
Crow’s Shadow Institute of the Arts, on the Umatilla Indian Reservation, has become a hub for some of the biggest names in contemporary art.
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The New York Times

Mar 12 2019
Persian Collections at Louvre Are Worth the Journey
The museum considers the ancient remnants of the city of Susa among its most prized holdings. But the Darius palace rooms are little-visited and hard to find.
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The New York Times

Mar 12 2019
Treasures to Be Un-Hidden at New York Public Library
A new exhibition space will show some of the library’s 46 million items, including a draft of the Declaration of Independence and a 16th-century globe.
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The New York Times

Mar 12 2019
In Denver, a Sharp Focus on Westward Expansion and Its Impact
The American Museum of Western Art aims to tell the story of American pioneers and the impact of their migration as reported by artists of the era.
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The New York Times

Mar 12 2019
Taking a Spin Through American Car Culture
Through photography, painting, sculpture and more, a show opening in June at the Toledo Museum of Art will explore the car’s impact on American life.
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The New York Times

Mar 12 2019
Welcome to Mumbai Airport. Your Gate Is Past the Art Museum.
One of India’s biggest art museums is inside Terminal 2. About 50 million people pass through every year, but many do not even notice the art.
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The New York Times

Mar 12 2019
Everything Is Bigger at Open-Air Museums
The size of the exhibits can be jaw-dropping, but the museums are not simply guardians of the tangible.
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The New York Times

Mar 12 2019
Descendants Tell Stories of Free People of Color
A New Orleans museum depicts the humiliations and restrictions endured by a segment of the city’s population before the Civil War, and the resistance movements they led after.
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The New York Times

Mar 12 2019
All Dogged Up: At the American Kennel Club’s New Museum
Back in New York after a long residence in St. Louis, this institution has already attracted an enthusiastic turnout of lovers of all things canine.
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The New York Times

Mar 12 2019
Where Some See Trash, She Sees Treasure
In a part of rural Vermont known as the Northeast Kingdom, the Museum of Everyday Life makes insignificant articles seem remarkable.
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The New York Times

Mar 12 2019
A Long Island House Holds the Story of Washington’s Spy Ring
Raynham Hall in Oyster Bay is enjoying a moment in the spotlight for its role in a “honeycomb of espionage.”
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The New York Times

Mar 12 2019
Constantly on the Go, Looking for New Voices
The curator Larry Ossei-Mensah has an affinity for artists who function on the margins.
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The New York Times

Mar 12 2019
An Old Master of Painting Was a Master of Marketing
In the 16th century, Jacopo Tintoretto stormed the Western world with emotionally resonant religious scenes. His first full-scale retrospective in the United States opens this month in Washington.
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The New York Times

Mar 12 2019
Making Public Art a Contender
Raising the profile of public art at Madison Square Park, Brooke Kamin Rapaport will now bring it to the United States Pavilion at the Venice Biennale.
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The New York Times

Mar 12 2019
By Design: At Home With the Curator Championing a New Generation of Italian Artists
Caroline Corbetta has become an advocate for emerging talent — and has filled her Milan apartment accordingly.
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The Guardian

Mar 12 2019
On the fury road: the Mad Max-inspired desert festival – in pictures

Joe Pettet-Smith photographs Wasteland Weekend, where 4,000 enthusiasts recreate the world of Mad Max

Every year since 2011, thousands of fans of George Miller’s cult film Mad Max gather on the edge of the Mojave desert in southern California for the best part of a week immersed in the dusty dystopia depicted in the film. This is Wasteland Weekend, the world’s biggest post-apocalyptic festival. Fittingly, the permanent festival site sits in between the defunct Nevada nuclear test site – where from 1951 a total of 928 nuclear warheads were tested during the cold war – and Hollywood.

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The Guardian

Mar 11 2019
Weirs and aerial walkways: the Bristol that might have been

From otherworldly bridges to filled-in docks, here are some of the best and worst unrealised urban proposals for Bristol

Unpopular plans for a new ring road and thousands more houses on the south side of Bristol have recently led to a surge in local civic activity. Posters have been popping up across the city, and several hundred people recently descended on a church hall meeting with the mayor to make their feelings known.

This is not the first time Bristolians have clashed with would-be tarmac. In fact, if past campaigners hadn’t been so successful, much of the city centre and the beloved harbourside could have been turned into a plain of concrete and cars.

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The Guardian

Mar 11 2019
Peter Kidson obituary

Peter Kidson, who has died aged 93, was an outstanding historian of medieval architecture whose work and teaching inspired successive generations of scholars.

His special interest, the subject of his PhD thesis, Systems of Measurement and Proportion in Early Medieval Architecture (1956), lay in the transmission of ancient traditions of designing and setting out buildings that passed unbroken into the usages of medieval masons.

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The Guardian

Mar 11 2019
Kara Walker chosen for Tate Modern's Turbine Hall showcase

Work of African American artist has explored race, gender, sexuality and violence

An African American artist known for her racially charged art addressing slavery and its legacy, is to be Tate Modern’s next commission for its Turbine Hall.

Kara Walker is probably best known for her use of black cut-paper silhouetted figures to depict scenes of horror. She shot to fame in 1994, when using them to create a room-size mural featuring rape and dismemberment of African American women and children by cheerful white men, and lynched black men dangling from tree branches.

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The Guardian

Mar 11 2019
Harrowing and haunting: Deutsche Börse Photography Foundation prize review

Photographers’ Gallery, London
Laia Abril’s history of abortion and Arwed Messmer’s project about the Baader-Meinhof group are this year’s standouts

Pick up a phone and listen to voicemail threats from an American anti-abortionist. Delve into state archives and look at crime scenes and suicide shots. See ruined shacks at dusk, bomb-test craters in the US desert and flattened Kurdish towns in Iraq. All this and much more is in the 2019 Deutsche Börse Photography Foundation prize exhibition.

This year’s prize is less about the best photographs, whatever that might mean, so much as research and documentation. Mark Ruwedel’s work continues an American landscape tradition. Landscapes scoured by time, weather and atomic weapons tests, dynamited canyons where the railroads once pushed west, houses in the middle of nowhere and an abandoned A-bomb casing forgotten on a desert floor all have their place in these white-skied black-and-white images, shot with a large-format camera.

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The Guardian

Mar 11 2019
Inside the bascule chamber: secrets of Tower Bridge – in pictures

Harry Cory Wright’s photographs of Tower Bridge, one of the most famous bridges in the world and a defining symbol of London, provide insight into the workings of the largest and most advanced bascule bridge of its time

• Tower Bridge by Harry Cory Wright is published by Thames & Hudson

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The Guardian

Mar 11 2019
Critical canvas: behind the year's most political art show

At this year’s Spring/Break in New York, artists are addressing political unease in a carefully chosen space next to the Trump World Tower

The Trump World Tower in midtown Manhattan is rather quiet these days. It does not typically see as many protests as the Trump International Hotel, where the president holds residence in its gilded penthouse.

That changed over the weekend as an influx of protest art took hold in a neighboring building, 866 United Nations Plaza, housing the Spring/Break Art Show. From portraits of the president to mock paparazzi shots, artwork by more than 400 artists and 100 curators was assembled for an exhibition themed around “fact and fiction”.

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The New York Times

Mar 10 2019
The Ultimate Video Art Retreat
It took 18 years for a collector couple to build a state-of-the-art home for their one-of-a-kind collection, with the architects Herzog & de Meuron. Now they can slow down and watch.
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The Guardian

Mar 10 2019
Robert Maguire obituary

Architect whose St Paul’s, Bow Common, represented a modern aesthetic founded on a sophisticated reading of classicism

Particularly influential among the buildings produced by the architect Robert Maguire, who has died aged 87, was a church in the East End of London, which was rebuilt after being destroyed during the second world war.

Maguire came up with the designs for St Paul’s, Bow Common, at the age of 25, based on a student project that his tutors had nearly failed because its brutalist, concrete nature challenged long-held perceptions of what a church should look like. St Paul’s is square, and its altar is placed under a clear-glazed central cupola, from which the walls step down in two stages. The lower part, separated by columns, forms a processional route beginning by the door, where the font is a stoneware vat produced by Royal Doulton for the brewing industry.

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The New York Times

Mar 10 2019
Building a Blockbuster: Behind the Scenes With T. Rex
Fiberglass, resin, glue, feathers and new technology bring the dinosaur to life at the Museum of Natural History.
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The Guardian

Mar 10 2019
Peter Chappell on Anni Albers at the Tate Modern
Peter Chappell’s essay on the German-American textile artist was highly commended in this year’s Observer/Anthony Burgess prize

• The winning review: Jason Watkins on Daisy Campbell’s Pigspurt’s Daughter

Peter Chappell, 23, is a writer and journalist from south London. He is currently studying data at City, University of London

I once bought a rug in the grand bazaar in Istanbul; many people do. I didn’t set out that day to buy anything, but as soon as I wandered into their little shop, and the glass door shut, I knew how this would end. I let my hand touch the fabrics, and a man in a cap came lumbering from the alcove, smiling. He whisked the rug from under my fingertips, and threw it to the floor: “Like it?” I’m not sure I said anything as he found another rug, bellyflopping it on to the previous. “Or this?”

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The Guardian

Mar 10 2019
Michael Perrett on Waqas Khan at Manchester Art Gallery
Michael Perrett’s exploration of the Pakistani artist’s exceptionally detailed ink drawings won highly commended in this year’s Observer/Anthony Burgess prize

• The winning review: Jason Watkins on Daisy Campbell’s Pigspurt’s Daughter

Michael Perrett is a musician. He trained at the Royal Northern College of Music in Manchester, where he is still based

Waqas Khan, who made his debut solo show in the UK at Manchester Art Gallery, produces pen and ink drawings of exceptional, obsessive detail in which patterns repeat and accumulate into shifting monochrome fields of gossamer beauty. The artist, in a meditative state, works in the cool stillness of night in his studio in Lahore. But there is tension here, too, a number of paradoxes that make this work particularly stimulating and potentially transformative.

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The Guardian

Mar 10 2019
George Grylls on Towards a Concrete Utopia at MoMA, New York

George Grylls’s critique of a survey of Soviet social building was highly commended in this year’s Observer/Anthony Burgess prize

• The winning review: Jason Watkins on Daisy Campbell’s Pigspurt’s Daughter

George Grylls, 24, is an MA student and freelance journalist who writes about architecture for the RIBA Journal, Prospect and CityMetric. He lives in London

Communism was grim. It involved hard work, heavy industry and not much McDonald’s. So to put us into a sufficiently browbeaten frame of mind, we are greeted at the entrance of Towards a Concrete Utopia with a film. We watch peasants clad in headscarves. We watch luxurious shots of iron girders. We obey the background march of some ominous foot-stepping. Welcome, New Yorkers, to eastern Europe.

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The Guardian

Mar 10 2019
All under one roof: the rise and rise of multigenerational life
With the young unable to afford to leave home and the old at risk of isolation, more families are opting to live together

The doorway to serenity, for Nick Bright at least, leads straight to his mother-in-law: she lives on the ground floor, while he lives upstairs with his wife and their two daughters.

Four years ago they all moved into a three-storey Victorian house in Bristol – one of a growing number of multigenerational families in the UK living together under the same roof. They share a front door and a washing machine, but Rita Whitehead has her own kitchen, bathroom, bedroom and living room on the ground floor.

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The Guardian

Mar 10 2019
The Renaissance Nude review – the naked truth?

Royal Academy, London
From monumental goddesses to athletic Adams and Eves, beauty and meaning fight it out in the Renaissance’s nude awakening

Saint Sebastian – golden-haired, flawless – poses in nothing but a wisp of white loincloth. We look up at him, balletic feet in third position, arms casually folded behind his back to show off his perfect physique. There he stands in all his pale beauty, oblivious to the arrow that leaves not a drop of blood in his shapely thigh. He could be modelling for a catwalk.

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