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The Guardian

Jul 12 2019
Apollo 11 celebrated, the legacy of rave culture and a monument to Melania Trump – the week in art

The 50th anniversary of the moon landing, a history of acid house music and the US first lady immortalised in wood – all in your weekly dispatch

The Moon
To mark the 50th anniversary of Apollo 11, this exhibition surveys our fascination with the alien world closest to us.
National Maritime Museum, Greenwich, 19 July to 5 January.

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The Guardian

Jul 12 2019
Buy a classic Guardian photograph: English National Ballet at Versailles, 2007

In our series of exclusive Guardian print sales, this week we have dancers performing Swan Lake at the Palace of Versailles by photographer Graeme Robertson

Dancers from English National Ballet perform Swan Lake against the magnificent backdrop of the Palace of Versailles, outside Paris. The stage floats in the romantic Bassin de Neptune – a fitting location for Tchaikovsky’s passionate masterpiece – and the audience, just out of shot, watch the performance from an open-air amphitheatre. As the sun sets, the palace walls glow orange, and the green from the planting and the water appears iridescent.

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The New York Times

Jul 12 2019
Sculpture, Both Botanical and Bestial, Awe at the Met Breuer
Sculpture, Both Botanical and Bestial, Awe at the Met Breuer
It’s not folk art, or fiber art. It’s finger-aching ingenuity by Mrinalini Mukherjee.
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The Guardian

Jul 12 2019
David Hockney’s Two Boys Aged 23 or 24: sensuality and history

The cultural icon captures close intimacy between his friends to illustrate CP Cavafy’s poem

With its lovers’ just-touching bodies, marked out in simple, delicate lines above the soft, rumpled sheets, David Hockney’s 1966 etching conjures a luminous scene of post-coital bliss.

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The Guardian

Jul 11 2019
Aciiiiid! Rave's first 30 years – in pictures

From warehouse parties to the acid house explosion, new exhibition Sweet Harmony: Rave Today captures a dancefloor revolution. Warning: contains knitwear

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The New York Times

Jul 11 2019
New York Galleries: What to See Right Now
Work by two women who made figurative paintings in the ’50s; short films and videos about black culture; and a painter’s intermingling of contemporary and historical art.
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The New York Times

Jul 11 2019
Home Is a Sculpture Garden, but the Art Doesn’t Stop at the Door
Home Is a Sculpture Garden, but the Art Doesn’t Stop at the Door
Monumental works by Serra, Noguchi and many others occupy the grounds, and the collection of Louise and Leonard Riggio continues inside their house.
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The New York Times

Jul 11 2019
Studio Museum in Harlem Names Artists in Residence
This year’s slate, which includes two performance artists and a painter, reflects the search for what’s next in black art.
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The Guardian

Jul 11 2019
Margaret Olley's powerful legacy: 'Ben Quilty wouldn't exist without her'

A Brisbane exhibition highlights the artist’s complex relationship with power – while celebrating the irrepressible joy of her work

Staff at Brisbane’s Gallery of Modern Art pop into the Margaret Olley exhibition when they’re having a bad day; it cheers them up, they say.

Olley, the matriarch of Australia’s art scene who died aged 88 in 2011, is best known for her colourful paintings of flowers and cluttered domestic spaces, with paint applied to the canvas in thick strokes. (Her paint was made extra-chunky owing to the cigarettes she ashed on to her palettes.)

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artforum.com

Jul 11 2019
Oskar Schmidt
The five portraits in Oskar Schmidt’s exhibition “Centro” face one another in uneasy reciprocation, severing the gallery space with a taciturn exchange of gazes. Each sitter, unmoored against a digitally
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The New York Times

Jul 11 2019
27 Art Exhibitions to View in N.Y.C. This Weekend
Our guide to new art shows and some that will be closing soon.
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artforum.com

Jul 11 2019
Not My Man
NICK BROOMFIELD SAYS that his latest documentary, Marianne & Leonard: Words of Love, is his most personal. I don’t agree, but then again, the “personal” is always complicated. In 1968, twenty-year-old
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artforum.com

Jul 11 2019
Beijing Arts Districts Targeted for Demolition
Hundreds of artists have been forcibly evicted from two Beijing arts districts that will be razed as part of China’s alleged crackdown on organized crime, the |https://www.theartnewspaper.com/news/beijing-arts-districts-evicted|Art
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artforum.com

Jul 11 2019
Forbidden Love
ON THE SECOND FLOOR of the LGBT Center on West Thirteenth Street, at the Bureau of General Services—Queer Division, Sebastián Castro Niculescu stands in teacherly repose next to a large screen. An
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The New York Times

Jul 11 2019
Investigators Say a Ring Smuggled $145 Million in Ancient Artifacts
Investigators Say a Ring Smuggled $145 Million in Ancient Artifacts
It focused on treasures from six separate countries, and was led by Subhash Kapoor, one of the world’s largest antiquities smugglers, a criminal complaint says.
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The New York Times

Jul 11 2019
Philip Freelon, African-American Museum Architect, Dies at 66
He worked on numerous museums, libraries and other cultural projects, many of them devoted to the black experience.
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artforum.com

Jul 11 2019
Studio Museum in Harlem Names 2019–20 Artists-in-Residence
The Studio Museum in Harlem announced today that E. Jane, Naudline Pierre, and Elliot Reed have been invited to participate in its artist-in-residence program, which has advanced the careers of over
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artforum.com

Jul 11 2019
Arts Patron Leon Black’s Foundation Disputes Reports of Jeffrey Epstein’s Ties to Charity After 2008 Plea Deal
Leon Black, an American investor and art collector who serves as chair of the board of trustees of the Museum of Modern Art in New York, came under scrutiny for his connections to Jeffrey Epstein, a
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artforum.com

Jul 11 2019
Hito Steyerl on “Drill”
Filmmaker and writer Hito Steyerl talks about her most recent installation, “|http://www.armoryonpark.org/programs_events/detail/drill|Drill|,” comprised of pre-existing works as well as new projects
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The New York Times

Jul 11 2019
A Trans-Atlantic Artist, Recognized at Home, at Last
A Trans-Atlantic Artist, Recognized at Home, at Last
An exhibition at Tate Britain suggests the breadth of the painter Frank Bowling’s career, which has spanned half a century, and an ocean.
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The Guardian

Jul 11 2019
Yesterday’s tomorrow today: what we can learn from past urban visions

From modernist machine-built perfection to a nuclear-proof metropolis buried far underground, our predictions for future cities tell us much about the past

Future Cities: Architecture and the Imagination by Paul Dobraszczyk is published by Reaktion Books

Ever since the world’s first recognised skyscrapers were built in Chicago and New York in the 1880s, cities have been in thrall to visions of extraordinary height. Early intimations of the ways in which skyscrapers would transform cities came in the 1910s, with images such as Richard Rummell’s below suggesting a future not only of immensely tall buildings but also of multilayered streets, railways and flying machines.

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The Guardian

Jul 10 2019
Award-winning Latin American photography – in pictures

In the second annual Latin American Foto festival, on view at the Bronx Documentary Center in New York, a range of photographers from throughout the Caribbean and Latin America will exhibit their varied and vibrant work until 21 July

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The Guardian

Jul 10 2019
Lusail: sleek new city offers glimpse of Qatar's post-oil future

During the 2022 World Cup, all eyes will be on the coastal metropolis located 16km from Doha

Text and photography by Stéphanie Buret

From the sands of the Qatari coast rise the towering glass, steel and concrete forms of Lusail, a city being built almost entirely from scratch. Pharaonic in its scale and ambition, the under-construction metropolis is the vision of the country’s former emir Sheikh Hamad bin Khalifa al Thani, born in part from the desire to diversify the Qatari economy and distance it from oil dependence.

Financed by the government via the Qatari Diar real estate company, the city was initially conceived in 2005 but development truly took off when Qatar was announced as the host of the 2022 World Cup.

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The Guardian

Jul 10 2019
Adrian Steirn's best photograph: the last portrait of Nelson Mandela

‘We waited 10 days for him to feel well enough to sit for the shoot. He was 95 and so weak, the mirror had to be supported’

I shot this in 2011, as part of a series of portraits of extraordinary South Africans, from Desmond Tutu to FW de Klerk. The project – 21 Icons – was inspired by Mandela, but he didn’t agree to take part until after it was under way. I remember the day I got the phone call. I was driving home from Table Mountain in Cape Town, having just taken the dogs for a run. Mandela had seen the portraits of De Klerk and Tutu and decided he would like to be photographed too. Winnie Mandela, his former wife, got in touch on his behalf. At first, I thought it was a friend playing a joke. It was pretty surreal.

Mandela had not been photographed for many years. I started documenting what would turn out to be his last years, shooting family life and birthdays. I had incredible access. For the final portrait, to be included in 21 Icons, I knew exactly how to shoot him. I had wanted to use a mirror in this way since I’d first dreamed up the project in my kitchen in 2009. He was in his 90s, though, and was fragile. We waited for 10 days, in his house in the Eastern Cape, until he was well enough to sit for the shoot. He wasn’t ill so much as frail. He was so weak the mirror had to be supported.

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The New York Times

Jul 10 2019
Christie’s to Auction Items From the Collection of Lee Radziwill
Christie’s to Auction Items From the Collection of Lee Radziwill
The auction will include fine and decorative art, books, costume jewelry, photography and memorabilia.
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The New York Times

Jul 10 2019
Institute of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles Chooses Its New Director
Institute of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles Chooses Its New Director
Anne Ellegood, senior curator of the Hammer Museum, will fill the position being vacated by Elsa Longhauser, who is retiring.
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The New York Times

Jul 10 2019
Court Says Heirs of Holocaust Victim Can Keep Nazi-Looted Works
Court Says Heirs of Holocaust Victim Can Keep Nazi-Looted Works
An appeals court in New York upheld a ruling that returned two drawings by Egon Schiele to the heirs of a Viennese cabaret performer.
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The Guardian

Jul 10 2019
Sculpture by the Sea threatens to leave Bondi after dispute over new path

Organisers want NSW premier to intervene in row sparked by council’s decision to boost disabled access to Marks Park

Organisers of Sydney’s famous Sculpture by the Sea exhibition at Bondi are calling on the New South Wales premier to step in and help save the event as it battles with the local council over a new path to boost disabled access.

Founding director David Handley said the 279m long and 1.8m wide concrete track around Marks Park would interfere with the Spring exhibition, which attracts nearly half a million visitors each year.

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artforum.com

Jul 10 2019
Himali Singh Soin Wins 2019 Frieze Artist Award
The London- and Delhi-based poet, artist, and filmmaker Himali Singh Soin is the recipient of the 2019 Frieze Artist Award. Soin will be commissioned to create a new work for Frieze London, which will
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artforum.com

Jul 10 2019
Court Rules Nazi-Looted Schiele Works Belong to Heirs of Holocaust Victim
The heirs of Fritz Grünbaum-an Austrian cabaret singer and collector whose trove of more than four hundred works was seized by the Nazis before he was sent to the Dachau concentration camp, where he
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artforum.com

Jul 10 2019
Rachel Libeskind and Carmen Winant
The announcement for Rachel Libeskind and Carmen Winant’s show tells us that the artists “practice feminism and motherhood,” as if these were optional items on a menu of exercise regimens. Yet both of
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The New York Times

Jul 10 2019
What and Whom Are Jewish Museums For?
What and Whom Are Jewish Museums For?
The director of the Jewish Museum Berlin stood down after a string of controversies, and the institution is tackling tough questions as it looks for a new leader.
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The Guardian

Jul 10 2019
London's answer to New York's High Line? You must be joking

A tree-scattered, elevated walkway through air vents, The Tide is a textbook piece of artwash and greenwash – more pointless whimsy amid the tortured cityscape of Greenwich Peninsula

Almost 20 years since the unveiling of the Millennium Dome, which promised to transform the post-industrial wastes of the Greenwich Peninsula, the area has become a junkyard of half-baked ideas and botched plans. Emerging from the tube station, you are confronted with a cacophony of competing structures: the tilting concrete struts supporting a glass canopy swerve drunkenly towards a wall of fat towers clad in a chequerboard of bronze, champagne and metallic dog-turd brown.

To the right looms a bulbous sales-suite-cum-gallery, to the left the jazzy shed of Ravensbourne University, while all around lie assorted oddments of public art and curated happenings, from a huge, twisted steel spire to a surreal dinner party in the sky – a table suspended from a crane where you can eat dinner, strapped to a seat, for £200. Completing the panorama of pointless whimsy, the pylons of Boris Johnson’s costly cable car stretch across the Thames in the distance.

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The Guardian

Jul 10 2019
V&A boss proud of funding from US family linked to opioid crisis

Tristram Hunt says museum is grateful for support of Sacklers, owners of Purdue Pharma

The director of the Victoria and Albert Museum, Tristram Hunt, has mounted a strong defence of the museum’s relationship with the Sacklers, the family accused of making a profit from the US opioid crisis.

Hunt said the London museum was proud to have received support from the family over a number of years. “We are not going to be taking names down or denying the past,” he said.

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artforum.com

Jul 10 2019
Anne Ellegood to Become Director of Institute of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles
The Institute of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles (ICA LA), announced today that Anne Ellegood will succeed museum director Elsa Longhauser, who is stepping down after nineteen years of leadership. Ellegood
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The Guardian

Jul 10 2019
Tony Prime obituary

My husband, Tony Prime, who has died aged 80, was a former Observer and Fleet Street photographer.

He was a newspaperman from the day when he crossed Blackfriars bridge from his home in Camberwell, south London, at the age of 15, and knocked on the door of Sport and General – a photographic agency – to ask if they took on school-leavers. He began work the next morning.

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The Guardian

Jul 10 2019
New cities in the sand: inside Egypt’s dream to conquer the desert

Four decades ago Egypt embarked on the most ambitious new cities building programme in the world. Their boom shows no sign of stopping

Seen from space, Egypt is a vast dusty land with a green Y opening into the Mediterranean Sea – a fertile valley that makes up 5% of the country yet is home to 95% of the population.

This pattern of human occupation had characterised the country for thousands of years, but in the 1970s, as ever more precious green land was eaten up by urban growth, an idea that had been taking shape in the national consciousness for decades was finally put into policy. Egypt would “conquer the desert” and redistribute its burgeoning population across the white sands of the Sahara – an Egyptian version of the 19th-century US “manifest destiny” to move west, no matter how punishing the consequences.

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The Guardian

Jul 10 2019
'Beauty available to all': groundbreaking US buildings added to Unesco list

A group of eight projects by the architect Frank Lloyd Wright are now included on the list of 1,000 heritage sites around the world

A villa in Los Angeles and a church near Chicago have been granted the same level of cultural recognition as the pyramids of Giza and the Great Barrier Reef, and have been declared Unesco World Heritage sites.

They are part of a group of eight projects by the architect Frank Lloyd Wright to be added to the list of 1,000 heritage sites around the world. The Wright structures are the only US modern architecture on the prestigious list.

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The Guardian

Jul 09 2019
From #MeToo to missing baboons: the World illustration awards – in pictures

Illustrators showcase their designs for books, magazines and advertising – featuring futuristic cities, plasticine circuit boards and the life story of a doomed dancer

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The Guardian

Jul 09 2019
Early Turner landscape Walton Bridges saved for the nation

East Anglia museums fill gap in their collections with help from lottery fund

An early landscape by JMW Turner, thought to be the first painted by the artist in the open air, has been saved for the nation with the help of £2.1m of lottery money.

Turner’s Walton Bridges was the subject of a temporary export bar preventing it from leaving the UK after it was sold at auction for £3.4m.

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artforum.com

Jul 09 2019
Cultural Figures Oppose Destruction of San Francisco School Murals of George Washington
Hal Foster, David Harvey, Fredric Jameson, Joyce Kozloff, Rachel Kushner, Fred Lonidier, and Barry Schwabsky are among the four hundred academics, writers, and artists that have signed an |
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artforum.com

Jul 09 2019
Memento Morra
“MUSEUMS ARE DEAD,” Andrea Viliani, artistic director of the Museo d’Arte Contemporanea Donnaregina, said over dinner my first night in Naples. “White cubes are devouring white cubes.” It was a daring
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The New York Times

Jul 09 2019
Sarah Parcak Thinks We Need to Learn From the Fall of Egypt’s Old Kingdom
Sarah Parcak Thinks We Need to Learn From the Fall of Egypt’s Old Kingdom
In a new book, the archaeologist makes the case that ancient history illuminates solutions to modern problems.
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artforum.com

Jul 09 2019
Frank Lloyd Wright Buildings Added to UNESCO World Heritage List
Eight buildings designed by architect Frank Lloyd Wright-including the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York, the Holly Hock House in Los Angeles, and Fallingwater in Pennsylvania-have been designated
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artforum.com

Jul 09 2019
Pace Closes Its Beijing Outpost, Thor Shannon Joins David Zwirner, and More
Pace has closed its Beijing gallery. The decision was made as tensions mount between the United States and China over the breakdown of trade talks between the two countries. Located in the city’s 798
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artforum.com

Jul 09 2019
Pace Closes Beijing Outpost, Thor Shannon Joins David Zwirner, and More
Pace has closed its Beijing gallery. The decision was made as tensions mount between the United States and China over the breakdown of trade talks between the two countries. Located in the city’s 798
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artforum.com

Jul 09 2019
Manolis D. Lemos
Made in collaboration with theoretical computer scientist and MIT professor Constantinos Daskalakis, Manolis D. Lemos’s digitally enhanced abstractions oscillate between various affective states,
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artforum.com

Jul 09 2019
Di Rosa Center for Contemporary Art to Deaccession Artworks to Stay Afloat
The Rene and Veronica di Rosa Foundation in Napa, California, has revealed plans to sell most of its 1,600-work collection in order to raise funds for its endowment. The foundation runs the Di Rosa
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The Guardian

Jul 09 2019
Olafur Eliasson review – art's weatherman fogs up Tate Modern

Tate Modern, London
Pea-soupers in corridors, moss on the walls – the artist wants to change the way we see our place in the world at a time of climate emergency. Does he go far enough?

Here is rain at the window running down the pane on a sunny July afternoon. In the early morning light, another window frame appears, a projected apparition cast on a blank wall. Ripples of amber-tinted water slop back and forth in low trays on the floor, the sound slightly muffled by a huge wall entirely covered in reindeer lichen, the frizzy, greyish-green branches giving off a slight acidic tang. We are in the world of Danish-Icelandic artist Olafur Eliasson.

Related: Olafur Eliasson returns to Tate Modern with tonne of white Lego

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artforum.com

Jul 09 2019
Guy Oliver and Reman Sadani Win 2020 Jerwood/FVU Awards
The Jerwood/FVU Awards announced last week that Guy Oliver and Reman Sadani have been named the winners of the 2020 edition of the moving-image prize. The artists will receive $31,100 each in support
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