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The Guardian

Oct 17 2020
From Warhol to Steve McQueen: a history of video art in 30 works

Starting with experimental film in the 60s, video art has revolutionised the art world. We celebrate the medium through its most groundbreaking pieces

Video art emerged in tandem with experimental film during the 1960s, as lively, open-ended alternatives away from the centre. Practitioners with contrarian agendas and backgrounds in disparate fields – music, performance, literature, visual art and the moving image – took to experimenting with audiovisual configurations. Feeling unconstrained, they explored consumer tools alone in their studios, or in the supportive environment of artist-run, nonprofit spaces.

During this early phase, contemporary art museums concentrated on concrete, commodifiable forms, namely painting and sculpture. Many considered the moving image anathema, horrified by how sound would invade adjacent sacrosanct white-cube spaces. Yet by the late 1990s, museums were finally contemplating video and media as exhibitable art forms.

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The Guardian

Oct 17 2020
Not all doom and gloom: UK cultural highlights for autumn

From books to ballet, from big to small screen, from art to theatre, there is much to enjoy despite the pandemic

Autumnal days are drawing in and Covid-19 restrictions are tightening. But it is not all doom and gloom. The world of culture is fighting back, aiming to boost the spirit of a nation. Here are just a few highlights to look forward to.

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The Guardian

Oct 16 2020
20 photographs of the week

Conflict in Nagorno-Karabakh, Hurricane Delta makes landfall in Louisiana, demonstrations in Santiago, and the enduring impact of Covid-19: the most striking images from around the world

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artforum.com

Oct 16 2020
Duan Jianyu
Though small in scale, Duan Jianyu’s new solo exhibition, “Automatic Writing - Automatic Understanding,” covers the artist’s creative output from 2014 to 2020, giving viewers a sense of how her practice
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artforum.com

Oct 16 2020
Tamina Amadyar
Alongside large-format canvases—abstractions, never in more than two shades—Tamina Amadyar is showing watercolors for the first time. Figurative, multicolored, and intimate in scale, this new group of
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artforum.com

Oct 16 2020
Brooklyn Museum Continues Deaccessioning Spree
No doubt spurred on by the tremendous success of its first deaccession sale, which saw the institution reap $5.4 million ($6.6 million with fees), an amount considerably beyond its expectations, the
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The New York Times

Oct 16 2020
Parenting While Black: Titus Kaphar’s Starkly Powerful Works
A painter’s new show ventures away from the past, toward contemporary traumas in Black lives.
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The Guardian

Oct 16 2020
Casey Jenkins v Australia Council: when controversial art loses funding, what does it mean for culture?

The artist intended to self-inseminate over a live stream, in a work that could demystify queer parenthood. But after news got out, the grant was revoked

On 1 May 2020 the Australian performance artist Casey Jenkins received a $25,000 grant from the Australia Council to present a work, titled Procreate, at festivals in the UK and Chile.

But as the pandemic spread, international borders closed, and Jenkins – who uses they/them pronouns – sought a variation to the funding, proposing a new Covid-safe project instead: Immaculate. The work would feature a live stream of Jenkins – who hopes to fall pregnant – self-inseminating with donated sperm, while discussing their past experiences with conception.

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The New York Times

Oct 16 2020
After 75 Years and 15 Claims, a Bid to Regain Lost Art Inches Forward
After 75 Years and 15 Claims, a Bid to Regain Lost Art Inches Forward
Heirs of Baron Mor Lipot Herzog, a Hungarian banker whose collection of masterpieces was seized by the Nazis, are still pursuing its return.
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artforum.com

Oct 16 2020
Gabi Dao and geetha thurairajah
The term soothsayer is derived from late Middle English for a person who speaks truth, but its contemporary use is generally synonymous with a fortune-teller. Given as an exhibition title, in its
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The Guardian

Oct 16 2020
Chris Killip obituary
Photographer of working-class life during the decline of industry in north-east England

Chris Killip, who has died aged 74 from lung cancer, was one of Britain’s greatest documentary photographers. His most compelling work was made in the north-east of England in the late 1970s and early 80s and was rooted in the relationship of people to the places that made – and often unmade – them as the traditional jobs they relied on disappeared. In 1988 he published In Flagrante, a landmark of social documentary that has influenced generations of younger photographers. His friend and fellow photographer Martin Parr described it as “the best book about Britain since the war”.

Killip later said that he had unknowingly photographed the “de-industrialisation” of the north-east. He had set out to render meaningful the lives of those who had been marginalised by the end of traditional industry in the region – miners, shipbuilders, fishermen and the like – and he did so through acute observation and empathy. “In recording their lives, I’m valuing their lives,” he said later of his mainly unemployed subjects. “These people will not appear in history books because ordinary people don’t. History is done to them. It is not acknowledged that they make history.”

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artforum.com

Oct 16 2020
Linda Stark
Appearing on everything from erasers to emojis, the heart symbol is ubiquitous for good reason: The blood-pumping muscle’s vital function is an ideal metaphor for life and love. Yet it can also beat as
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artforum.com

Oct 16 2020
Montreal Museum of Fine Arts Names Successor of Ousted Director Nathalie Bondil
The Montreal Museum of Fine Arts (MMFA) today announced Stéphane Aquin as its new director, Artnews reports. Aquin, who is currently chief curator of the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden in
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The Guardian

Oct 16 2020
Chris Killip: recognition for a great photographer | Letter

Mark Haworth-Booth on ‘a remarkable talent and a very special human being’

Your article (Chris Killip, hard-hitting photographer of Britain’s working class, dies aged 74, 14 October) says “Killip was not given the recognition he deserved by major British art and photography institutions.”

On the contrary, Chris Killip’s first book – on the Isle of Man – was published in 1980 with support from the Arts Council. The master set of 69 photographs from which the book was printed was bought by the Victoria and Albert Museum (home of the national collection of the art of photography) in 1980.

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The Guardian

Oct 16 2020
Shocking news from the 70s and a chilling message from the far north – the week in art

Gilbert & George’s images of a divided Britain reveal an enduring immediacy, while the British Museum takes an immersive tour of the Arctic – all in your weekly dispatch

Arctic: Culture and Climate
Human beings have interacted with the Arctic ice for millennia. This immersive journey into an extreme and endangered ecosystem reveals it is a part of ourselves, as well as our planet, that we stand to lose as the ice melts.
British Museum, London, from 22 October.

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The New York Times

Oct 16 2020
The Beirut Blast Shattered Her Masterpieces. Now, the Rebuilding Starts.
The Beirut Blast Shattered Her Masterpieces. Now, the Rebuilding Starts.
Over three decades as Lebanon’s premier stained-glass artist, Maya Husseini advanced a fragile medium in a country prone to violent shocks. Then came the big one.
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artforum.com

Oct 16 2020
Howard Hampton on Spike Lee’s American Utopia
IS AMERICAN UTOPIA A STATE OF MIND or a state of obliviousness? A bohemian house party transplanted to Mr. Rogers’ Neighborhood or a cunningly intellectualized, Dadaist-turned-soccer-dad musical of
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The Guardian

Oct 16 2020
Cluttercore: the pandemic trend for celebrating stuff, mess and comfort

Chuck out your decluttering manuals. As we’ve been forced indoors by the global crisis, clutter has emerged, dusty and triumphant

In the past few months, the pavement outside my flat has been taken over by stuff: baby baths, filing systems, books, stools. People leave them, others take them; no money exchanges hands. It’s a well-established, sustainable micro-economy – and, according to my neighbour, whose bedroom window opens on to this pavement, it’s becoming a problem. “You have to ask: where did this crap come from – and where’s it going to go?”

Clutter has emerged, dusty and triumphant, as a defining byproduct of the pandemic. Yet we are undecided on what to do with it. “Forced inside, some people have been decluttering, absolutely, but I’ve noticed others actively re-embracing their stuff,” says Jennifer Howard, author of Clutter: An Untidy History. “The pandemic has forced us to reevaluate what we have, make better use of objects and space ... and also see their value, often for the first time.”

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The Guardian

Oct 16 2020
Carla Bruni's teenage obsessions: 'Francis Bacon shows our confusion, desire, madness'

As she returns with a new album, the French chanteuse recalls the genius of the Clash and Henry James, plus encounters with Balearic naturists

As a teenager in Paris all I wanted was travel, freedom and independence. I started working [in modelling] right after my high school exam and didn’t go to university because I wanted to be an adult. I was a bit of a rebel. For me, growing up was about discovering where the boundaries were and breaking them. Like the “terrible twos”, but in adolescence.

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The Guardian

Oct 16 2020
Behind the scenes with Ridley Scott – in pictures

Ridley Scott is one of Britain’s most prolific directors, with more than 70 films to his credit. A new book examines his career, from Alien and Blade Runner to Gladiator, including this selection of pictures of him at work on set. Ridley Scott: A Retrospective by Ian Nathan is published by Thames & Hudson

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The Guardian

Oct 15 2020
Photo Oxford: a celebration of women and photography – in pictures

The third Photo Oxford Festival celebrates the feminine, with the theme Women and Photography – Ways of Seeing and Being Seen. Exhibits and events across the city will explore the achievements of and challenges for women, both behind and in front of the lens, including problems of representation, women as photographers, collectors and curators, and photographic techniques

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The Guardian

Oct 15 2020
'Not married but willing to be!': men in love from the 1850s – in pictures

A new book collects photographs of male romance over the course of a century – with many images taken secretively so the lovers didn’t get caught

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The New York Times

Oct 15 2020
2 Art Gallery Shows to See Right Now
Justine Hill makes more with less in her multipart abstract paintings; Kevin Beasley mixes the political with the personal in “Reunion.”
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artforum.com

Oct 15 2020
Kayode Ojo at Martos Gallery
Kayode Ojo gives us a glimpse into his show, “The Aviator,” at Martos Gallery in New York. The exhibition is on view through October 25, 2020.
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The New York Times

Oct 15 2020
Honoring Latinx Art, Personal and Political
El Museo del Barrio celebrates its own electric history, and present, in a show about the Puerto Rican workshop Taller Boricua.
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artforum.com

Oct 15 2020
San Francisco Institutes Universal Basic Income Pilot Program for Artists
The San Francisco mayor London Breed last week announced the implementation of a pilot universal basic income program for artists, with $6 million earmarked for $1,000 monthly stipends for up to 130
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The New York Times

Oct 15 2020
8 Things to Do This Weekend
8 Things to Do This Weekend
Our critics and writers have selected noteworthy cultural events to experience virtually or in person in New York City.
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The New York Times

Oct 15 2020
Ablaze With Art: Thriving Galleries in Lower Manhattan
Will Heinrich heads to TriBeCa, where new galleries keep popping up and strong shows abound.
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The New York Times

Oct 15 2020
Black Trustees Join Forces to Make Art Museums More Diverse
Black Trustees Join Forces to Make Art Museums More Diverse
Weary of tokenism, Black board members are now seeking institutional transformation.
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artforum.com

Oct 15 2020
Art in General, Long a New York Stalwart, to Close after Forty Years
The long-running nonprofit exhibition space Art in General will permanently shut down operations as of October 31 owing to the continuing Covid-19 pandemic. Founded in 1981 by artists Martin Weinstein
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artforum.com

Oct 15 2020
Rosemary Mayer
Between 1972 and 1973, Rosemary Mayer constructed a series of innovative cloth sculptures dedicated to both forgotten and celebrated women of history. Hung, draped, and suspended from the wall, the
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artforum.com

Oct 15 2020
“The total scab-free solidarity...”
During lockdown, curator Tiago de Abreu Pinto picked up the notoriously difficult 1996 novel Infinite Jest by David Foster Wallace. The result is “The total scab-free solidarity and performative silence
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The Guardian

Oct 15 2020
Polly Morgan: a gloriously nasty nest of vipers – review

The Bomb Factory, London
Taking in squirming snakes, raw flesh and dripping gunk, the artist’s stomach-churning sculptures delight as much as they disturb

What’s the opposite of ASMR? The antidote to lulling, whispering comfort? There may not be an elegant term for the jangling, queasy, uncanny chills induced by certain combinations of materials and textures, but by God does Polly Morgan understand the territory. Her exhibition How to Behave at Home is gloriously discomfiting: a multi-hazard zone of phobias and sensitivities.

Nests of snakes, acrylic nails, polystyrene, damp concrete, raw flesh, tiny prickles, dripping gunk: this is the sculptor and taxidermist’s goosebump-inducing arsenal. It’s a small show, but each work is precisely crafted for unheimlich impact.

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The Guardian

Oct 15 2020
Quino obituary

Argentinian creator of Mafalda, Latin America’s most famous strip cartoon character

She is a stumpy six-year old girl with a mop of black hair, innocent-looking saucer eyes and a broad smile. Like little girls everywhere, she asks awkward questions. Of her mother, busy doing the washing: “What would you be if you had a life?” Of her father: “How come in the family of man everyone wants to be the father?” The little girl is Mafalda, the creation of the Argentinian cartoonist Joaquín Salvador Lavado Tejón, universally known by his pen name of Quino, who has died aged 88.

Mafalda began life as a strip cartoon character in the early 1960s as part of an advertising campaign for domestic appliances. The campaign came to nothing but Mafalda was soon taken up by magazines and newspapers across the country. By the time Quino drew his last Mafalda strip in 1973, she had become a household name across Latin America.

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The Guardian

Oct 14 2020
Historic England: heritage sites at risk – in pictures

Historic England’s register lists the heritage sites most at risk of being lost for ever as a result of neglect, decay or inappropriate development

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The Guardian

Oct 14 2020
Best of Photo London Digital 2020 – in pictures

A selection of some of the best images from the Photo London Digital international photography fair, which runs free online this year due to the pandemic until 18 October, 2020. The online exhibition brings together over 100 exhibitors

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artforum.com

Oct 14 2020
Gedi Sibony
For his sixth solo exhibition at the gallery, Gedi Sibony has combined salvaged materials fashioned into objects, staged within and among the remnants of temporary walls from the previous exhibition,
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artforum.com

Oct 14 2020
Runo Lagomarsino
There is an endless list of invisible things that it would be consoling to contain, to keep and revisit. Some moments. The processed smoke from a cigarette, after it travels around someone’s lungs
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artforum.com

Oct 14 2020
Gregory Crewdson
Gagosian is pleased to present “An Eclipse of Moths”, an exhibition of new work by Gregory Crewdson. For three decades, Crewdson’s photographs of houses, landscapes, and people have become canonical
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artforum.com

Oct 14 2020
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artforum.com

Oct 14 2020
Mario Merz
Curated by Matilde Guidelli-Guidi A new long-term installation at Dia:Beacon of work by Mario Merz brings the Italian into conversation with his many international peers in the foundation’s collection,
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artforum.com

Oct 14 2020
Andreas Gursky
Monika Sprüth and Philomene Magers invite you to tour the current exhibition by Andreas Gursky at the Berlin gallery through these selected images and video walkthroughs. The exhibition presents a
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The Guardian

Oct 14 2020
The bridge that fell: Melbourne's West Gate Bridge collapse 50 years on – in pictures

On 15 October 1970, the under-construction West Gate Bridge, connecting Melbourne’s affluent eastern suburbs with its working-class west, collapsed. Thirty-five people died. It was Australia’s worst construction disaster. Over the past three years, academics Sarah Gregson from the University of New South Wales and Elizabeth Humphrys from University of Technology Sydney have been researching the disaster. For its 50th anniversary, they shared their research with Walkley-nominated cartoonist Sam Wallman to create a visual retelling of the story of the collapse

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The Guardian

Oct 14 2020
Historic England takes London 'birthplace of feminism' off at-risk list

Church that was hotbed of 18th century radicals is one of 181 sites no longer endangered

A once damp and leaky meeting house known as the “birthplace of feminism” is one of 181 historic sites facing a brighter future after being taken off England’s 2020 Heritage at Risk Register.

The building in Newington Green, London, has been a remarkable hotbed of dissent for more than 300 years and counted Mary Wollstonecraft, who wrote A Vindication of the Rights of Woman (1792), as a member of its congregation.

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The New York Times

Oct 14 2020
Museum Inquiry Into Whistle-blower Complaint Finds No Misconduct
Museum Inquiry Into Whistle-blower Complaint Finds No Misconduct
The Detroit Institute of Arts said an outside law firm found there had been no skirting of conflict of interest rules in the loan of a painting by the museum director’s father-in-law.
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The Guardian

Oct 14 2020
Portrait Artist of the Year review – Bake Off for painters is an hour-long cuddle

Stephen Mangan hosts as a mix of amateur and professional artists compete to produce the best portrait within four hours. It is gripping from start to finish

The always lovely Portrait Artist of the Year is back for a seventh series, and it continues to be such a welcome addition to the schedules that I hope it returns for many more years to come. Stephen Mangan hosts what is in essence the Great British Paint Off, and while I believe there is some kind of saying about the levels of excitement involved in watching paint dry, this is gripping from initial sketch to finished product.

Each week, a mix of amateur and professional artists produce, within four hours, portraits of three famous or well-known sitters, using a pleasing variety of techniques and approaches. Some are flamboyant, some are precise. Some do the squinty perspective thing with their fingers. Some use both hands at once. It is essentially that Bake Off showstopper challenge where they had to commemorate their heroes with cake busts, only with paint, talent and more dignity. In this opening episode, the sitters are Ncuti Gatwa (Eric in Sex Education), Cold Feet’s Fay Ripley and Lady Glenconner, a former lady-in-waiting to Princess Margaret. Each gets to choose their favourite portrait at the end, then the judges choose their favourite three portraits, and then an overall winner emerges from those favourites and is put through to the next round.

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The New York Times

Oct 14 2020
How a Medusa Sculpture From a Decade Ago Became #MeToo Art
How a Medusa Sculpture From a Decade Ago Became #MeToo Art
Some criticized the fact that the artist behind the work, which was unveiled on Tuesday, was a man. One backer says men need to be in the conversation.
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The New York Times

Oct 14 2020
Torlonia Collection Finally Goes on Show in Rome
Torlonia Collection Finally Goes on Show in Rome
After decades of false starts and setbacks, the public can finally take a look at the Torlonia Collection.
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