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artforum.com

Jun 15 2021
Marta Sala, Grzegorz Siembida
Travis Jeppesen’s 2019 essay “Queer Abstraction (Or How to Be a Pervert with No Body). Some Notes Toward a Probability” asked whether nonrepresentational art could ever be understood as queer or nonbinary.
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The New York Times

Jun 15 2021
Welcome to Barn-Quilt Country
Welcome to Barn-Quilt Country
Take a road trip in the Midwest to see a homegrown art form that creatively combines aspects of Americana.
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The Guardian

Jun 15 2021
NFT representing Tim Berners-Lee source code of the web to go on sale

Sotheby’s to auction digital artefact, This Changed Everything, more than 32 years after world wide web first proposed

Sir Tim Berners-Lee will sell an NFT representing the source code of the world wide web at Sotheby’s, the auction house has announced, more than 32 years after his first proposal for the project was dismissed by a supervisor as “vague, but exciting”.

The sale, proceeds from which will be used to benefit initiatives that Berners-Lee and his wife, Rosemary Leith, support, is the first time the auction house’s historic artefacts division has been able to sell such a “digital-native artefact”.

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The Guardian

Jun 14 2021
‘It used to run black’: images of a river reborn – in pictures

The Ogmore is an unremarkable river ... or is it? Dan Wood’s photographs capture a place of childhood mischief and intrigue

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The Guardian

Jun 14 2021
Southbank Centre to showcase art made by Britons shielding from Covid

Exclusive: more than 600 pieces created as part of Art by Post initiative to go on display in London before touring

More than 600 pieces of art created by thousands of people who were shielding and in extreme isolation during the Covid-19 pandemic will tour this year as part of a Southbank Centre exhibition that aims to showcase the importance of creativity.

More than 4,500 people have taken part in the Art by Post initiative, which was started during the first days of lockdown in March 2020. Participants as young as 18 and as old as 103 created poems, visual art and music.

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artforum.com

Jun 14 2021
(M.F.A., Painting, 2021)
In her thesis exhibition Unseen, Unloved & Unheard, Sharidyn Barnes navigates complex ideas of identity and race through a series of portraits of her SCAD contemporaries. Placing the depiction of Black
artforum.com

Jun 14 2021
Top Ten
Fashion designer and artist Bárbara Sánchez-Kane reflects on the ten things that inspire her and on working under the pseudonym: SOLRAC. Bárbara Sánchez-Kane is a fashion designer and artist based in
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artforum.com

Jun 14 2021
Savannah College of Art and Design (SCAD)
Congratulations to the Savannah College of Art and Design (SCAD) class of 2021, from B.F.A. students to M.F.A. graduates! SCAD has M.F.A. programs in over 30 disciplines ranging from sound design and
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The Guardian

Jun 14 2021
Hilma af Klint’s ‘miraculous’ art: ‘In dialogue with spirits, she found her own voice’

An expansive new exhibition at the Art Gallery of NSW pays tribute to one of the most important art pioneers you’ve never heard of

When encountering the little-known work of Hilma af Klint, you may find yourself asking some questions. “It’s out of time and out of place; it’s almost miraculous,” says Sue Cramer, who co-curated a new exhibition at the Art Gallery of New South Wales. “What is this work? Where did it come from? How did it get here?”

Born in 1862, the Swedish woman was one of the world’s first abstract artists. Yet where the other founding fathers of 20th century abstraction – the likes of Wassily Kandinsky, Piet Mondrian and Kazimir Malevich – became indelible features of art history, af Klint has remained conspicuously absent, confined to its footnotes. In all likelihood, she is one of the most important pioneers you’ve never heard of.

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artforum.com

Jun 14 2021
Arc de Triomphe to Receive Christo Wrap in September
Famed Parisian landmark the Arc de Triomphe will be swathed in silvery-blue fabric and bright red rope this fall, courtesy of the late installation artist Christo. The project, titled Arc de Triomphe,
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artforum.com

Jun 14 2021
David Altmejd
Poignant, bizarre, and frequently perverse, David Altmejd’s figurative sculptures stun on multiple levels. Be it the subtle tension of an eyelid or the considered positioning of hands, the works’
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The New York Times

Jun 14 2021
Artists on Artists to Watch, and Maybe Even Collect
We asked 16 established names to suggest a fellow talent they feel should be better known.
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artforum.com

Jun 14 2021
Robert Indiana Legacy Battle Resolved
The dispute as to who should retain control of the legacy of late artist Robert Indiana has reached a conclusion after three fraught years. The artist’s estate, known as the Star of Hope Foundation,
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The New York Times

Jun 14 2021
Reimagined Georgia O’Keeffe Museum Will Triple Its Gallery Space
Reimagined Georgia O’Keeffe Museum Will Triple Its Gallery Space
The new building, once a Safeway grocery store, is just around the corner from the museum’s current home in Santa Fe, N.M., and is about 47,000 square feet bigger.
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The Guardian

Jun 14 2021
Antony Gormley hopes Crosby statues last 1,000 years after reset

Artist personally oversaw rescue operation for his ‘industrial fossils’ after several toppled into the mud

Antony Gormley says he hopes his “iron men” on a Merseyside beach will still exist in at least 1,000 years as “industrial fossils”, after helping to excavate 10 that had been subsumed by Irish Sea mud.

One hundred cast-iron statues modelled on Gormley were installed in 2005 at Crosby beach, spread across 3km (2 miles) of the foreshore and stretching almost 1km out to sea.

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The Guardian

Jun 14 2021
Peonies envy: do I really love blowsy flowers or has Instagram destroyed my ability to think?

Millions of posts suggest that everyone loves big, bright blooms. So I guess I do too

On an enforced mid-walk pause as the elderly dog licks a lamppost in confusion, my husband’s eyes alight on the nearest garden. “Ugh,” he says. “That’s ugly.” A thrill of delicious horror runs through me: he is pointing at a peony. A bubblegum-pink one, sure, but a peony: it’s like saying you hate puppies, or your mum.

“You hate those?” I ask him, scandalised. “But … they’re peonies!”
He shrugs.

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artforum.com

Jun 14 2021
“Intimacy and Spectacle in the Age of Social Media”
Named for the capital city of Sofia, Bulgaria’s first sports car was designed by engineer Velizar Andreev in the 1980s. One of its rare prototypes now reappears in the heart of the city as The Sofia
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artforum.com

Jun 14 2021
Artists Launch Fundraiser in Support of Looted West Bank Arts Center Dar Jacir
The nonprofit Association for Modern and Contemporary Arab Art (AMCA) has launched a fundraiser in aid of the Dar Yusuf Nasri Jacir for Art and Research, which sustained heavy damage in May, when it
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The Guardian

Jun 14 2021
‘Cultural appropriation is a two-way thing’: Yinka Shonibare on Picasso, masks and the fashion for black artists

Picasso was so enthralled by African art, he used it to start a revolution. But did it give rise to a fantasy of Africa that still endures? British-Nigerian artist Shonibare tells us why he’s revisiting that seismic moment

In 1998, in a hilarious work called Diary of a Victorian Dandy, Yinka Shonibare inserted himself, impeccably attired, into the sitting rooms, drawing rooms, billiards rooms and bedrooms of high society Victorian Britain, invariably causing a sensation in each of the perfectly mocked-up photographs. The work mimics William Hogarth’s The Rake’s Progress, but instead of ending up in Bedlam, like Hogarth’s protagonist, Shonibare the Dandy triumphs over white society at everything from financial dealing to fine conversation. It all climaxes with him having a great time in a brothel with no apparent guilt or punishment. Well, it was the 1990s – and Shonibare was a bona fide Young British Artist. Also, he says with a laugh, “Hogarth was the first YBA.”

Shonibare has played plenty of games with art and history since, including refitting a model of HMS Victory – that most British of all vessels, the flagship of the Battle of Trafalgar – with sails of (supposedly) African batik fabric and sticking it in a giant bottle. But now the British-Nigerian artist is turning his attention to the birth of modern art in Picasso’s Paris. Not many artists come away from an encounter with Pablo looking good. A 2012 Tate exhibition about the Spaniard and modern British art left Henry Moore and Francis Bacon looking very small indeed. But Shonibare engages with the old Minotaur in a relaxed, funny yet profoundly insightful way.

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The New York Times

Jun 14 2021
Restituer les chefs-d’oeuvre pillés? L’exemple du butin de Napoléon
Restituer les chefs-d’oeuvre pillés? L’exemple du butin de Napoléon
Le pillage d’œuvres d’art par Napoléon préfigure les excès des Français en Afrique un siècle plus tard. Le rapatriement ultérieur de certaines d’entre elles sert désormais de modèle aux musées contemporains.
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The Guardian

Jun 14 2021
‘No human survives alone’ … Misan Harriman’s portraits for Refugee Week – in pictures

Today is the start of Refugee Week, coordinated in the UK by Counterpoint Arts. The acclaimed photographer and new chair of the Southbank Centre Misan Harriman has photographed prominent supporters of refugees under the theme We Cannot Walk Alone, a line from Martin Luther King’s I Have a Dream speech. Depicting individuals from diverse backgrounds who have chosen to ‘walk with others’, the series aims to promote a fairer world where everyone is valued

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artforum.com

Jun 13 2021
Gérard Garouste
Although he first showed at Leo Castelli in New York and Rudolphe Zwirner in Cologne during the 1980s, Gérard Garouste remains best known in his native France. His dreamy, distorted, and sometimes garish
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The New York Times

Jun 13 2021
The Met Museum Sees More Clay in Its Future
The Met Museum Sees More Clay in Its Future
An abstract painter found his place as a great collector of American ceramics. His latest gift ushers the Metropolitan Museum of Art into the 21st century.
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The Guardian

Jun 13 2021
L’Arc de Triomphe, Wrapped: Christo’s dream being realised

Work begins next month to swathe monument in blue fabric a year after Bulgarian-born artist’s death

The Arc de Triomphe in Paris will be swathed in silvery blue fabric and red rope as a posthumous project planned by the artist Christo since the early 1960s finally becomes reality.

Work will begin next month on L’Arc de Triomphe, Wrapped, a €14m installation at one of the world’s most recognised monuments. The arch will be swathed in 25,000 sq metres of recyclable polypropylene fabric, fixed with 3,000 metres of red rope, also recyclable.

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The Guardian

Jun 13 2021
A Year in Art: Australia, 1992 review – dreams and nightmares

Tate Modern, London
The 200-year battle for Indigenous land rights in Australia is the focus of a devastating – and richly rewarding – exhibition

Australia was founded on a Saturday, according to Algernon Talmage’s ludicrous painting of the scene. Assorted British officers raise their beer mugs to the union jack, hoisted above the gum trees: cheers! It could be any old cup final, except that this is Sydney Cove in 1788.

The other side of the story at Tate Modern appears, very aptly, on the opposite wall. Gordon Bennett’s Possession Island (Abstraction) reprises this colonial triumphalism, complete with Captain Cook and flag, but in stippled dots reminiscent of both pointillism and Indigenous Australian painting. At the heart of the picture is a kind of suprematist abstraction – red, black and yellow (colours of the Indigenous Australian flag) – obscuring the ghost of a black man holding up the drinks tray. Black footprints appear among the undergrowth. Bennett versus Talmage: what a pictorial standoff.

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The Guardian

Jun 13 2021
Serpentine Pavilion 2021 review – a sophisticated chimera of light and depth

Kensington Gardens, London
The youngest architect ever to design the annual temporary structure has created an airy gathering place inspired by diasporic London spaces

The Serpentine Gallery’s Pavilion, an architectural essay that appears in Kensington Gardens every summer, pandemics permitting, tends to be a bit of a sketch. Intriguing ideas by imaginative architects get blurred by the exigencies of project management. Details don’t always survive their first encounter with the building regulations. The pavilions are temporary and built at speed, which can give them a dashed-off feel. The intention can be more rewarding than the execution.

Less so this year’s edition, by the Johannesburg-based practice Counterspace, directed by Sumayya Vally. It has what you might call architecture: scale, detail, the articulation of mass and volume and of shadow and light. It is high ceilinged and airy. It has presence and depth.

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The Guardian

Jun 13 2021
Frida Kahlo and me: how the artist shaped my life as an amputee

Writer Emily Rapp Black lost her leg aged four. In her new memoir, Frida Kahlo and My Left Leg, she explains how the work of the Mexican artist, also an amputee, helped her develop a better relationship with her body

  • Scroll down for a Q&A with Emily Rapp Black

Desnudo de Frida Kahlo by Diego Rivera hangs in a small museum in Guanajuato, Mexico. In this portrait, Frida’s torso is taut and slim; the sides of her waist curve inward, creating perfect hollows for each of your hands. Her breasts are slightly lifted, because her arms are clasped behind her head; her elbows are the pointed tips of wings. Her shoulders look solid, strong, able. This is a body that is loved, admired, desired.

This lithograph was made in 1930, after polio disfigured her right foot in 1913 when she was six years old; after the 1925 streetcar accident that broke her spinal column, her collarbone, her ribs, her pelvis, created 11 fractures in her already weakened leg, crushed her foot and left her shoulder permanently out of joint. During the 29 years between her accident and her death in 1954, Frida had 32 operations; was required to wear a corset every day from 1944 onward; and had her leg amputated because of gangrene in 1953. It was this final operation that likely led to the complications that eventually killed her. Speculation of suicide remains.

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The Guardian

Jun 12 2021
The big picture: Niall McDiarmid’s world on a plate

The Scottish photographer’s shots of his breakfast table suggest planets in alignment at a moment when everything is in its right and proper place

Niall McDiarmid, a Scottish photographer based in London, has, as a daily preface to other projects, been taking photographs of his breakfast table for the past four years. The pictures, invariably sunlit, concentrate on the shifting geometries of bowl and plate, toast and cereal, and quietly assume the meditative qualities of still lifes. Collectively, in his new book, Breakfast, they invite a sense of possibility, newness, ritual.

“For me,” he says, “breakfast is a peaceful time, a time of reflection. It is also a time to contemplate the day ahead and to believe that better times are coming. As Ian Fleming wrote, ‘Hope makes a good breakfast. Eat plenty of it.’”

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The Guardian

Jun 12 2021
How did a £120 painting become a £320m Leonardo … then vanish?

A film about the disputed Salvator Mundi blames the National Gallery for its role in giving credibility to the claim that it was the artist’s lost work

The National Gallery is facing controversy over its role in the tangled story of how the world’s most expensive painting emerged from obscurity before being sold for a staggering £320m, only to vanish again from the public eye.

The gallery exhibited the Salvator Mundi in its Leonardo da Vinci exhibition a decade ago when it was an unknown work with doubts about its attribution, restoration and ownership.

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The Guardian

Jun 12 2021
New York’s Little Island includes a message about the Thames garden bridge | Rowan Moore
London may have had a lucky escape when the grandiose project was abandoned

Little Island, a garden built over the Hudson River, designed by the British designer Thomas Heatherwick and the landscape architect Signe Nielsen, has opened to some good reviews. “It’s a bewitching, and utterly New York-y, place,” says the design website Curbed, with “wraparound views… even the bathrooms are a surprise, tucked beneath a hillock and gleaming like buried treasure in their own cave”. Given that London passed on the opportunity to have its own Heatherwickian plants-over-water project, the never-built garden bridge, Little Island poses a question: did the Thames miss a trick or dodge a bullet?

There is a dissident note, voiced by Henry Grabar on Slate. He points out that Little Island is very small and incredibly expensive: 2.4 acres and $250m, plus many millions more in running costs, or more than $100m per acre, if you like. There are less glamorous parks all over New York dying, literally, for the lack of a fraction of such funding. Pressure of numbers means that, for now at least, you have to book timed entry tickets for visits to Little Island after midday, which seems at odds with the casual, happy-go-lucky spirit you want from a park. The tab is being wholly picked up by the media mogul Barry Diller, so the island is defended by some on the basis that it’s a free gift, so everyone should be grateful. At the Garden Bridge, no Diller-like donor ever came forward and it was the project’s escalating expense that did for it in the end. It would also have experienced the same crowds v Eden conflict that is likely to persist at Little Island.

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artforum.com

Jun 12 2021
Gilda Willliams at the first London Gallery Weekend
THE HARDEST PART of the first-ever London Gallery Weekend wasn’t attempting to visit the 130 official galleries, plus dozens of unlisted events, in a city about twice the area of Berlin or New York.
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The New York Times

Jun 12 2021
In the ’80s, Post-Punk Filled New York Clubs. Their Videos Captured It.
An exhibition at the Museum of the City of New York documents a brief moment when rogue videographers shot an influential sliver of the music scene.
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The Guardian

Jun 12 2021
The beauty of native wildflowers – in pictures

Photographer Kathryn Martin started working with wildflowers when she lived in London. Inspired by the copperplate engravings in 18th-century botanist William Curtis’s eight-volume Flora Londinensis, she digitally photographs native wildflowers against graph paper. The idea developed when she moved to the South Downs and collected flowers on her daily walks as a way to connect with the landscape. The resultant exhibition – called Come, See Real Flowers of this Painful World, after a haiku by Japanese poet Matsuo Bashō – is on show at London design shop Egg. “Wildflower habitats are in sharp decline, but are a vital source of food and shelter for countless species,” Martin says. “I want my photographs to show how beautiful these plants are, to encourage people to notice them, and perhaps even sow their own patch.”

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The New York Times

Jun 11 2021
Parties Settle in Legal Fight Over Robert Indiana’s Legacy
Parties Settle in Legal Fight Over Robert Indiana’s Legacy
The artist’s estate, a company that licensed the sale of some of his works and a former caretaker had been fighting in court since the time of the artist’s death in 2018.
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artforum.com

Jun 11 2021
Gwangju Biennale Foundation Faces Audit in Wake of President’s Ouster
Following the forced departure, announced May 27, of Gwangju Biennale Foundation president Sunjung Kim, the foundation is facing questions from both city and state. The Gwangju Ministry of Culture,
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The Guardian

Jun 11 2021
20 photographs of the week

The aftermath of the conflict in Gaza and Israel; the crisis in Ethiopia’s Tigray region; the 77th anniversary of D-day and the election in Peru: the most striking images from around the world this week

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artforum.com

Jun 11 2021
Catherine Taft on David Hammons's Global Fax Festival performance
“THIS IS IMPROVISATION,” Butch Morris says emphatically to an ensemble during a heated rehearsal. He continues, “This is collective improvisation. This is Conduction. This is conducted improvisation.
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The New York Times

Jun 11 2021
Racist Mural Puts Tate Galleries in a Bind
Racist Mural Puts Tate Galleries in a Bind
Problematic sections of a work painted on Tate Britain’s walls have caught museum officials between the demands of activists and the policies of the British government.
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The Guardian

Jun 11 2021
Varying measures of success for letter writers | Letters

Readers respond to suggestions that prolific letter contributors should be commemorated with statues

There are other metrics for measuring letter writing success. I may not have had as many letters published as the Big Four (Letters, 8 June), but I bet none of them have had a letter published in the Review and illustrated by cartoonist Tom Gauld. No statue required.
Maggie Johnston
St Albans, Hertfordshire

• Jeanette Hamilton asks: “Do women make no epistolary contributions to the Guardian?” I do try, but I don’t need a statue: featuring on the fourth plinth in Antony Gormley’s One and Other was quite enough.
Margaret Squires
St Andrews, Fife

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artforum.com

Jun 11 2021
Dale Harding
Dale Harding’s solo exhibition “Through a Lens of Visitation” attempts to piece together his matrilineal heritage by juxtaposing intricate quilted pieces by his mother, Kate Harding, with a selection
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The Guardian

Jun 11 2021
Glasgow International: screens lure eyeballs but it’s the sculptures that thrill – review

A feverish appraisal of our fast-food culture takes in grotesque sitcoms, erotic body-horror – and a bubblegum-chewing witch getting spanked

New York, 1986: artists Gretchen Bender and Cindy Sherman record a conversation. Bender had just edited the video for Megadeth’s Peace Sells and Sherman asks about videos she’s making with manipulated television footage – does she want to change TV itself? “I think of the media as a cannibalistic river,” Bender replies, describing a rapid flow that picks up, appropriates and repackages everything in its path. “There is no consciousness or mind. It’s about absorbing and converting.”

The following year Bender showed Total Recall – 24 stacked TVs and three projection screens, broadcasting choreographed video edited at a pulse-raising pace. The mash-up of ads, war footage, idents, movie clips and abstract animation is set to an intense electronic score. Total Recall broadcasts the acceleration of contemporary life, an attention-deficit TV culture of rolling news and channel surfing.

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artforum.com

Jun 11 2021
“Mollino/Insides”
Ever since the enigmatic Italian architect and designer Carlo Mollino died in 1973, leaving behind a secret residence in Turin, wildly improbable speculations concerning the apartment’s “true” purpose
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The Guardian

Jun 11 2021
‘The thirst trap of London’: UK welcomes Every Woman Biennial

This summer the world’s largest showcase of female and non-binary art comes to Britain. Its curator describes her mission to reclaim the art world from tech bros

In 2019, the most recent iteration of the Every Woman Biennial drew 3,000 attendees to two galleries in New York and Los Angeles. Among the 600 artists represented were a 12-year-old trans photographer of moths and butterflies and a 91-year-old multimedia artist who makes paper assemblages.

“That was ultimately the show of my dreams,” says C Finley, who founded the world’s largest biennial of women and non-binary artists. She is confident about the forthcoming inaugural London leg: “This show is the thirst trap of London – it will scratch an itch people didn’t even know they had.”

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The Guardian

Jun 11 2021
Damien Hirst’s death obsession and intimate visions of Amazon life – the week in art

Hirst’s macabre dead-fly art, Claudia Andujar’s Yanomami photographs and Jimmy Robert’s history of the Caribbean – all in your weekly dispatch

Damien Hirst: Relics and Fly Paintings
The latest exhibition in Hirst’s year-long occupation of this space sees him at his most macabre and death-obsessed, from black paintings made with dead flies to a flayed statue of Saint Bartholomew.
Gagosian Britannia Street, London, until end of 2021.

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The Guardian

Jun 11 2021
‘He was aware of racist pigeonholes’: how Basquiat took inspiration from jazz, hip-hop and no wave

Time Decorated: The Musical Influences of Jean-Michel Basquiat explores the artist’s relationship to music in three short films

Before Jean-Michel Basquiat became one of the leading art stars of the 1980s, he was a kid from Brooklyn thriving in the music and art scenes of downtown New York in the late 1970s.

“Everyone was coexisting together, musicians and artists,” says Ed Patuto, the producer of Time Decorated: The Musical Influences of Jean-Michel Basquiat, three short films that explore the artist’s relationship to bebop, no wave, and hip-hop. “You would go to a gallery, see a show, end up at [legendary East Village club] the Pyramid. Moving between platforms and genres was what people did.”

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artforum.com

Jun 11 2021
Anthony Korner remembers Judith Godwin
WHEN THE ARTIST Judith Godwin died on May 29 in her ninety-second year, the art world lost the last living member of a generation of women Abstract Expressionists, a group of artists largely overlooked
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The New York Times

Jun 11 2021
How a Family Transformed the Look of European Theater
The Bibienas, the focus of an exhibition at the Morgan Library & Museum, dominated Baroque theatrical design.
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The New York Times

Jun 10 2021
Submerged in van Gogh: Would Absinthe Make the Art Grow Fonder?
Submerged in van Gogh: Would Absinthe Make the Art Grow Fonder?
Individual absorption is the order of the day at two touring spectacles devoted to the painter’s greatest hits.
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The New York Times

Jun 10 2021
Officials Remove Tile Viewed as Offensive from Detroit Museum-Sponsored Mural
Officials Remove Tile Viewed as Offensive from Detroit Museum-Sponsored Mural
The tile, installed beneath a mural sponsored by the Detroit Institute of Arts and intended to honor police officers, contained imagery that some associate with a rebuke of racial justice.
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