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The New York Times

Jul 31 2020
An Artist Having Fun While Waiting for Catastrophe
An Artist Having Fun While Waiting for Catastrophe
Heather Phillipson’s works make viewers smile, but underneath their bright, over-the-top exteriors are dark, urgent messages.
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artforum.com

Jul 31 2020
Lizzie Homersham on protests at Tate Modern
“SHAME ON TATE.” This chant reverberated at a protest organized by dozens of staffers with PCS Tate United and PCS Culture Group on Monday, ensuring that no visitor to London’s Tate Modern—newly
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The Guardian

Jul 31 2020
Cao Fei’s Asia One: human behaviour

The Chinese visual artist delivers a surreal sci-fi romcom that speaks to China’s past and the global future

Cao Fei reinvents Chaplin’s Modern Times for the Amazon warehouse era in her 2018 film Asia One. In place of machine cogs and the assembly line, in her brave new world nothing is actually made.

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The Guardian

Jul 31 2020
Being Inbetween: girls of our time – in pictures

A series documenting and exploring the lives of girls aged between 10 and 12; a time of transition between girlhood and young adulthood. Winning the portrait series of the Julia Margaret Cameron Award this year, three portraits were also selected as winners in the British Journal of Photography Openwalls Arles competition.

‘This work and the way it is exhibited is my way of exploring the lives of these girls, giving them power and allowing their voices to be heard. It is celebrating the beauty that is wholly them, one that is sometimes concealed in silence, attitude, embarrassment and self-consciousness,” the photographer, Carolyn Mendelsohn, said.

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The Guardian

Jul 31 2020
Which painter are these acrobats paying homage to? The great British art quiz

Brighton Museums set today’s quiz, which enables you to explore the art collection of British museums closed due to Covid-19

This quiz is brought to you in collaboration with Art UK, the online home for the UK’s public art collections, showing art from more than 3,000 venues and by 45,000 artists. Each day, a different collection on Art UK will set the questions.

Today, our questions are set by Royal Pavilion & Museums, Brighton & Hove. The Brighton Museums collection ranges from late 15th-century European woodcuts and old master paintings to modern British paintings and 20th-century abstract expressionist works. It contains nearly 1,500 oil paintings, 4,000 watercolours and drawings, and more than 10,000 prints. It also includes topographical material on the history of Brighton and Hove, and prized Chinese export watercolours and oil paintings.

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The Guardian

Jul 30 2020
Ten years of photo reportage from Libyan traffickers to Mugabe’s Zimbabwe

On the French island of Porquerolles, 10 photojournalists backed by Fondation Carmignac exhibit their studies of hidden and intractable issues

Take the ferry from Hyères, on the French Riviera, to Porquerolles island, walk past the beach where Jean-Luc Godard shot the film Pierrot le Fou, wander through the government-protected, sculpture-dotted pine forest, remove your shoes and then descend to a subterranean gallery illuminated by sunbeams shimmering through a transparent swimming pool.

Here, in Fondation Carmignac’s newly opened private museum, you will find a portrait of Rita. Rita was 17 when the photojournalist Lizzie Sadin photographed her. A year before, she was living with her family near the foothills of the Himalayas. A friend told her of a life of opportunity lying in wait in India, just a few hundred miles away. After crossing the border from Nepal, Rita was captured, imprisoned and forced into a life of sex work for visiting tourists. Rita’s eyes blaze into the airy calm of Porquerolles island.

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The Guardian

Jul 30 2020
Homes for sale with curve appeal – in pictures

Life in the round, from a modern city centre flat to a Georgian manor house

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The Guardian

Jul 30 2020
Future shape of offices: proposals to make workplaces safe

Antimicrobial paint and rounded corners among plans to beat threat of coronavirus

Quarantine rooms, antimicrobial paint on the walls, and rounded corners in toilet cubicles are among the recommendations in a proposed building standard for reshaping offices in order to beat the threat of coronavirus.

Inspired by technologies and facilities used in hospitals, the proposals by the president of the European Property Federation are designed to allow the safe return of staff to work.

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The New York Times

Jul 30 2020
American Museum of Natural History Announces September Reopening
American Museum of Natural History Announces September Reopening
The museum said it is planning to reopen on Sept. 9, pending permission from state and city officials.
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The New York Times

Jul 30 2020
Kerry James Marshall’s Black Birds Take Flight in a New Series
Kerry James Marshall’s Black Birds Take Flight in a New Series
Inspired by John James Audubon, the painter explores the societal “pecking order” in two works that dovetail with “this mystery about whether or not Audubon himself was Black.”
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artforum.com

Jul 30 2020
Picasso Mural Removed from Oslo’s Y-Block Despite International Protest
Despite objections around the world from preservationists, politicians, prominent curators, and tens of thousands of petition signers, the Norwegian government has detached the concrete mural by Pablo
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The New York Times

Jul 30 2020
How a Historian Stuffed Hagia Sophia’s Sound Into a Studio
How a Historian Stuffed Hagia Sophia’s Sound Into a Studio
Bissera Pentcheva used virtual acoustics to bring Istanbul to California and reconstruct the sonic world of Byzantine cathedral music.
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The New York Times

Jul 30 2020
Three Art Gallery Shows to See Right Now
Galleries and museums are getting creative about presenting work online during the pandemic. Some are open for in-person visits. Here are shows worth viewing either way.
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The New York Times

Jul 30 2020
Picasso Mural Torn From Building After Years of Dispute
Picasso Mural Torn From Building After Years of Dispute
To the outrage of preservationists and art-world figures, the work was removed into storage on Thursday from the side of government offices facing demolition in Oslo.
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The Guardian

Jul 30 2020
Brigid Berlin obituary
Artist known for her Polaroid photography and collaborations with Andy Warhol in 1960s and 70s New York

In Andy Warhol’s film Chelsea Girls, Brigid Berlin sits cross-legged issuing commands. “Donnie, comb it a little. Come here and give it a poke. Get the brush, the spray and all my tools,” she says as she sweeps a hand through her bouffant do. Her tone is haughty but her words slur slightly as she goes on to inject herself in the backside with amphetamines.

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The Guardian

Jul 30 2020
Licked into shape: Heather Phillipson's sundae should bring an end to the fourth plinth

The 13th temporary Trafalgar Square commission arrives when the notion of public statuary is under question like never before. It’s time to invest in a new permanence

For those who believe artists are the wizards of the world, magicking meaning from an oblivious universe, there is much to ponder in Heather Phillipson’s new fourth plinth sculpture: erected at one of humanity’s unluckier moments, it’s the 13th such commission and is titled THE END. Note those capitals. Despite its playfulness, this fat whipped-cream blob with its luscious cherry on top – unveiled under a radiant morning sun in a Trafalgar Square devoid of commuters or tourists – is not a lower-case project.

On one side squats a huge fly and on the other an outsized drone, its propellers whirring, relaying live footage of the empty square beneath to a customised website. Hard to say which of the two is the more sinister, but their perch seems perilous and temporary, because the cream is melting, bulging over the top of the column, on the point of spilling surplus calories on to the pristine flagstones beneath.

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The Guardian

Jul 30 2020
Hank Willis Thomas: 'The work will not be complete in our lifetime'

The artist talks about the Black Lives Matter movement, his latest timely sculpture and why it’s more important than ever for artists to use their voices to challenge power

In Atlanta, the BeltLine Eastside Trail recently saw a new addition to its landscape: a new public artwork by the Historic Fourth Ward Park, close to the birthplace of Dr Martin Luther King Jr.

Until 11 August, pedestrians will see a 28ft tall, 7,000lb Afro pick.

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The Guardian

Jul 30 2020
Fourth plinth whipped cream, drone and fly sculpture unveiled

Heather Phillipson’s The End monument in Trafalgar Square is plinth’s 13th commission

On one level it is an absurdly large swirl of whipped cream with a cherry, a fly and a drone on top. On another it is the end of everything as we know it.

Visitors to Trafalgar Square in central London have until spring 2022 to come to their own conclusions about the vast new artwork by Heather Phillipson, the 13th contemporary art commission to fill the fourth plinth.

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The New York Times

Jul 30 2020
A Clue to van Gogh’s Final Days Is Found in His Last Painting
A Clue to van Gogh’s Final Days Is Found in His Last Painting
A researcher says he has uncovered the precise location where the artist painted “Tree Roots,” thought to be the last piece he worked on the day he suffered a fatal gunshot wound.
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The Guardian

Jul 30 2020
What is Hercules up to? The great British art quiz

Nottingham City Museums set today’s quiz, which enables you to explore the collections of museums closed due to the coronavirus outbreak – while answering some tough questions

This quiz is brought to you in collaboration with Art UK, the online home of the UK’s public art collections, showing art from more than 3,000 venues, by 45,000 artists. Each day, a different collection on Art UK sets the questions.

Today, our questions are set by Nottingham City Museums, whose collection of more than 800 oil paintings includes many important gems. Amassed since Nottingham Castle became an art gallery in 1878, the collection reflects the tastes of curators and donors over the past two centuries, representing artistic movements from the Renaissance to the present day.

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The Guardian

Jul 29 2020
Sinatra swinging, Hepburn swimming: Terry O’Neill’s most celebrated images – in pictures

The first retrospective show since the death of the celebrated photographer is full of striking shots of performers at their most outrageous

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The Guardian

Jul 29 2020
Denis Thorpe's best photograph: a brave boy's vaccination

‘His stoic expression took me back to my own childhood when I had diphtheria. It made me weep’

I was five when diphtheria visited us in Mansfield. I remember lying on a sofa sweating as a doctor swabbed the back of my throat, my parents’ anxious faces looking down at me. There had been thousands of deaths from the disease – this was before a vaccination, before the NHS.

I was taken to the local isolation hospital. My parents had no phone: a friend of theirs would cycle up to the hospital gates and read the daily bulletin board, which gave the condition of patients. Eventually, my parents were allowed to come into the hospital grounds and I was taken to a window on the second-floor ward to wave to them. I was lucky and recovered, and was able to come home just before my sixth birthday. Years later, I came across the letter my parents were sent by the hospital when I was discharged: “The child should sleep in a room not occupied by other children … the towels, cups, spoons, forks used by the patient should be kept separate and distinct from those used by other members of the family for a week at least and then boiled before use by anyone else … they should not visit other houses or entertain friends for two weeks following discharge … they should not attend any school for a period of two weeks.”

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artforum.com

Jul 29 2020
Rebeccah Blum, Curator Who Expanded Berlin’s Art Community, Found Dead
Rebeccah Blum, an independent curator based in Berlin who was known there as an ambitious and compassionate supporter of artists, has died at age fifty-three. Her death was confirmed by her daughter,
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The New York Times

Jul 29 2020
National Endowment for the Humanities Announces New Grants
National Endowment for the Humanities Announces New Grants
This round of funding, the final for the fiscal year, totals $30 million and will support 238 projects.
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artforum.com

Jul 29 2020
MOCAD Drops Director Elysia Borowy-Reeder Over Toxic Workplace Allegations
The board of the Museum of Contemporary Art Detroit has terminated director Elysia Borowy-Reeder over allegations of racism, sexism, and “exploitative labor practices” leveled by former employees.
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The New York Times

Jul 29 2020
Five Art Accounts to Follow on Instagram Now
Our critic shares accounts that make her feel, think and see in new ways — something that feels especially vital right now.
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The New York Times

Jul 29 2020
Senate Report: Opaque Art Market Helped Oligarchs Evade Sanctions
Senate Report: Opaque Art Market Helped Oligarchs Evade Sanctions
Congressional investigators said companies tied to two Russians under sanctions were able to buy art using shell companies and an intermediary.
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artforum.com

Jul 29 2020
Marcuse Pfeifer (1936–2020)
Marcuse “Cusie” Pfeifer, who championed contemporary photography at the eponymous New York gallery she founded in 1976—and in doing so, helped launch the careers of Peter Hujar and Sally Mann—has died
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The New York Times

Jul 29 2020
Adding a New Name to the Canon in Clay: Doyle Lane
The underrecognized Black ceramist made tiny “weed pots” in the 1960s and ’70s that are seen today on a fresh pedestal.
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The New York Times

Jul 29 2020
Hirshhorn Suspends Jon Rafman Show After Allegations of Sexual Misconduct
Hirshhorn Suspends Jon Rafman Show After Allegations of Sexual Misconduct
The move follows the suspension of an exhibition of the artist’s works at a Montreal museum earlier this month after several women accused him of sexual misconduct on Instagram.
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The Guardian

Jul 29 2020
'It's like we don't exist': Jaune Quick-to-See Smith on Native American artists

The 80-year-old has become the first ever Native American artist to see her painting purchased by the National Gallery of Art in Washington

Earlier this month, the National Gallery of Art in Washington announced it had made history – it bought a painting by a Native American artist for the very first time.

The gallery purchased I See Red: Target, a 1992 piece by Jaune Quick-to-See Smith, a response to the colonization of America by Christopher Columbus.

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The Guardian

Jul 29 2020
Spuds you like: Potato Photographer of the Year – in pictures

The inaugural Potato Photographer of the Year prize has gone to a potato getting a lockdown haircut. Judged by a panel including organiser Benedict Brain and Martin Parr, the competition raised funds for the food bank charity, The Trussell Trust

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The Guardian

Jul 29 2020
Who is this dog-loving future monarch? The great British art quiz

The National Portrait Gallery set today’s quiz, which enables you to explore the art collection of British museums closed due to Covid-19 – while answering some brainteasers

This quiz is brought to you in collaboration with Art UK, the online home for the UK’s public art collections, showing art from over 3,000 venues and by 45,000 artists. Each day, a different collection on Art UK will set the questions.

Today, our questions are set by the National Portrait Gallery in London, which holds the most extensive collection of portraits in the world. Search more than 215,000 works in the collection online, 150,000 of which, from the 16th century to the present day, are illustrated.

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The Guardian

Jul 28 2020
Entirely unseen colour photographs by an unknown Italian photographer, discovered by his granddaughter.

Amateur photographer Alberto di Lenardo’s work was, for many years, hidden away in a secret room. Now the unguarded moments he captured are being published in An Attic Full of Trains

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The Guardian

Jul 28 2020
From Sgt Pepper to family moments: Linda McCartney retrospective - in pictures

More than 250 photographs taken by Linda McCartney go on display from August at Walker Art Gallery in Liverpool. The exhibition will display her contact sheets featuring images of the Rolling Stones on the Hudson River, as well as photographs of the album launch of the Beatles’ Sgt Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band and the recording of the White Album at Abbey Road Studios. Photographs taken in Liverpool by McCartney feature some of the city’s most famous streets and landmarks. Images of her family spending time together near the waterfront at Hoylake, Wirral, also feature.

Linda McCartney retrospective: 8 August to 1 November at Walker Art Gallery, Liverpool

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The Guardian

Jul 28 2020
Sex, lies and text messages: the photographer snapping New Yorkers' private thoughts

Drug deals, hook-ups, break-ups and secret code – Jeff Mermelstein’s snatched photographs of New Yorkers’ texts reveal that the city still has its wild side

In 2017, the street photographer Jeff Mermelstein took a shot in midtown Manhattan. “I saw a woman sitting outside a cafe on her phone; I was just curious and I made a picture of her screen, of her hand on it.”

After Mermelstein had captured the image on his iPhone – which he now favours over Leicas and Canon SLRs – he zoomed in on her phone screen. She had been searching for information about wills. “I remember a line about her father having left $6,000 in in attic,” he says. “It was this little short story. That brought my attention into a new territory.”

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The New York Times

Jul 28 2020
Banksy and Rembrandt Boost Sotheby’s Sale to $192.7 Million
Banksy and Rembrandt Boost Sotheby’s Sale to $192.7 Million
The auction house held a livestream sale of 65 artworks from seven centuries titled “Rembrandt to Richter.”
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The Guardian

Jul 28 2020
Ai Weiwei: History of Bombs review – high-impact reminder of our insatiable desire for destruction

Imperial War Museum, London
This site-specific work across the floor of the museum shows in chilling detail the horrible ingenuity of the weapons we innovate to kill each other. It’s nightmare-inducing

The bomb reproduced in a life-sized 3D image on the floor of the Imperial War Museum seems almost comical – so big and clumsy, like something out of an old film of a Jules Verne story. Surely this monster was never used. But the Soviet Union’s Tsar Bomba, the most powerful nuclear weapon ever created, was once detonated. Suspended beneath a bomber because it was too big to fit inside, it was dropped over the Barents Sea and exploded with a force of 57 megatonnes, more than 1,500 times the combined strength of the two atomic bombs America dropped on Japan.

Ai Weiwei’s History of Bombs is an artwork about incalculable destruction in the form of an encyclopaedic collection of bombs and missiles, depicted with clinical precision across the floor of the Imperial War Museum’s central hall and flowing up a staircase. At a time when the world is quaking from a natural pandemic, he reminds us of our mind-boggling capacity to obliterate ourselves. It’s a mesmerising piece of popular history that shows in detail how the human race has accumulated a murderous arsenal since the early 20th century, when the invention of flight unleashed explosive new possibilities in warfare. There was barely more than a decade’s leap between the Wright Brothers taking off at Kitty Hawk and aerial bombing. The earliest weapons here are small enough to be chucked from a biplane.

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artforum.com

Jul 28 2020
Jacques Coursil (1938–2020)
“YOU CANNOT BE AN ARTIST,” said the trumpeter, scholar, and world-traveler Jacques Coursil, “if you don’t have one foot on the ground and the other outside the planet.” Pursuing a career across three
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artforum.com

Jul 28 2020
“Matisse, comme un roman”
Curated by Aurélie Verdier In honor of the 150th anniversary of Matisse’s birth, the Centre Pompidou will examine the breadth of the artist’s work from a novel perspective: the written word. Such an
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The New York Times

Jul 28 2020
House Votes to Create a National Museum of the American Latino
House Votes to Create a National Museum of the American Latino
Plans for a museum devoted to the history and contributions of Latinos in the United States began forming in the 2000s, but legislation had not gained traction in Congress until now.
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artforum.com

Jul 28 2020
Museum Staffers Protest Proposed Job Cuts at Tate Modern Reopening
Dozens of Tate employees gathered on July 27 to protest at London’s Tate Modern during its long-awaited reopening, steering visitors’ attention to cuts at the museum and across a wider cultural sector
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The New York Times

Jul 28 2020
Met Museum Acquires Two Sculptures by Wangechi Mutu
The new additions are from the series that is on display on the museum’s Fifth Avenue facade.
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The New York Times

Jul 28 2020
Tyler Mitchell: ‘Black Beauty Is an Act of Justice’
Tyler Mitchell: ‘Black Beauty Is an Act of Justice’
His debut photography monograph, “I Can Make You Feel Good,” suggests an Edenic timeline for Black American life, but also shows its inherited traumas.
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The Guardian

Jul 28 2020
Electronic at the Design Museum review – a sweaty rave paradise lost

Design Museum, London
From squat synthesisers to a gyrating cube, a new exhibition dedicated to dance music culture poignantly brings the spirit of communal celebration to a museum

One of the first items you see upon entering the Design Museum’s ambitious new history of electronic music is a vast Andreas Gursky photograph of ravers in Dusseldorf in 1995. Electronic debuted at the Philharmonie de Paris last year and this expanded, anglicised version was meant to open in April, but subsequent events have rendered the curators’ efforts to represent electronic music’s fans as well as its practitioners unexpectedly poignant. A scenario that was commonplace for 30 years is suddenly unattainable: a sweaty paradise lost. Social distancing hasn’t just changed the layout of the exhibition but its emotional resonance. It’s just a shame that there’s no mention of masked rave duo Altern-8 now that every museum-goer resembles them.

Related: 'Keep the dist-dance' - Design Museum reopens with electronic music exhibition

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artforum.com

Jul 28 2020
US House Votes to Create National Museum of the American Latino
The US House of Representatives voted yesterday to establish a national museum of the American Latino dedicated to the history and culture of America’s Latinx communities, which comprise nearly 60
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The Guardian

Jul 28 2020
'Keep the dist-dance': Design Museum reopens with electronic music exhibition

Musicians from Daphne Oram to Chemical Brothers feature in a show organised under coronavirus restrictions

With the sour tang of dry ice, pounding dance music and more strobe lights in one room than are normally on the main stage of Glastonbury it may finally be an opportunity for some hedonism. With strict social distancing and hand sanitisation, of course.

“It’s not for the faint-hearted,” the designer Adam Smith said of the sensory Chemical Brothers experience he has created with his studio partner Marcus Lyall. “We were trying to bring some of the visceral feeling you get from a live show into a different setting.”

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The Guardian

Jul 28 2020
Place depicted in Van Gogh's final painting found with help of postcard

French hillside scene in Tree Roots may have been painted hours before artist’s death

The exact location from where Vincent van Gogh is likely to have painted his final masterpiece, perhaps just hours before his death, has been pinpointed with the help of a postcard.

The scene in Tree Roots, a painting of trunks and roots growing on a hillside near the French village of Auvers-sur-Oise near Paris, was first spotted on a card dating from 1900 to 1910 by Wouter van der Veen, the scientific director of the Institut Van Gogh.

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The New York Times

Jul 28 2020
A Clue to Van Gogh’s Final Days Is Found in His Last Painting
A Clue to Van Gogh’s Final Days Is Found in His Last Painting
A researcher says he has uncovered the precise location where the artist painted “Tree Roots,” thought to be the last piece he worked on the day he suffered a fatal gunshot wound.
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The Guardian

Jul 28 2020
Who did this man make enemies with? The great British art quiz

UCL Art Museum set today’s quiz, which enables you to explore the art collection of British museums closed during the coronavirus outbreak – all while answering some fiendish questions

This quiz is brought to you in collaboration with Art UK, the online home for the UK’s public art collections, showing art from more than 3,000 venues and by 45,000 artists. Each day, a different collection on Art UK will set the questions.

Today, our questions are set by University College London. UCL Art Museum’s collection of about 12,000 artworks has its origins as a teaching and research resource tied to the history of the university’s Slade School of Art. Work by prize-winning artists emerging from the Slade over 150 years sits alongside art spanning five centuries that informed their studies. Forty five per cent of the Slade Collections is work by women artists.

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