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artforum.com

Nov 30 2019
Harry Dodge
A jolt of pleasure runs through my chest each time I look through Stephen Gill’s monograph The Pillar (Nobody Books), which consists of 120 photographs mostly of birds in various moments of liftoff
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artforum.com

Nov 30 2019
Elvia Wilk
A Ted Chiang story is easy to recognize and impossible to imitate. Seven of the nine comprising his new collection, Exhalation (Knopf), have been previously published, but taken together they are
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artforum.com

Nov 30 2019
Polly Watson
Polly Watson is a former entertainment editor for High Times. She currently performs with 1-800-BAND 1 PINOCCHIO, PINOCCHIO (Toxic State) Eno-tinged NYC art-punk weirdness characterized by janky
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artforum.com

Nov 30 2019
Byron Coley
Byron Coley is a music critic, a poet, the editor of the Bull Tongue Review, and a proprietor of Feeding Tube Records in Florence, MA. His most recent books are Defense Against Squares (L’oie De Cravan,
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artforum.com

Nov 30 2019
Sarah Hennies
Sarah Hennies is an independent composer and performer of experimental music based in Ithaca, NY, and a recipient of the 2019 foundation for contemporary arts grants to artists award. Her new album,
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artforum.com

Nov 30 2019
Ruth Estévez
Ruth Estévez is a writer and curator based in Boston and Mexico City. She is Senior Curator at Large at Brandeis University’s Rose Art Museum in Waltham, Massachusetts and Cocurator of the 34th São
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artforum.com

Nov 30 2019
Sohrab Mohebbi
Sohrab Mohebbi is a writer and curator at SculptureCenter, New York. He has recently organized, in no particular order, solo exhibitions by Fiona Connor and Banu Cennetoğlu and the group show “Searching
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artforum.com

Nov 30 2019
Stanley Love (1970–2019)
Greg and Sarah 900 :( Broken-Hearted on STANLEY   PROLOGUE Move over Nijinsky and Martha. Make space and move over Merce Cunningham. Stanley Love needs space and time and a place in our
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artforum.com

Nov 30 2019
Nayland Blake
“NO WRONG HOLES” is the apt title of Nayland Blake’s most comprehensive survey to date, on display at the Institute of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles—apt because it immediately opens onto the wit,
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artforum.com

Nov 30 2019
Pierre Soulages
In an homage to Pierre Soulages’s indomitable spirit, this mini survey at Lévy Gorvy featured twenty of the French artist’s oils made between 1954 and 2019. He is still amazingly productive and still
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artforum.com

Nov 30 2019
Nicole Eisenman
Nicole Eisenman is an artist who lives and works in Brooklyn. She is a member of Ridykeulous. 1 XYLOR JANE (CANADA, NEW YORK) Jane’s subject matter is the 96 percent of the universe that we’ve
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artforum.com

Nov 30 2019
Naima J. Keith
Naima J. Keith is the Vice President of Education and Public Programs at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. Prior to holding this position, Keith was the Deputy Director and Chief Curator at the
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artforum.com

Nov 30 2019
J. Hoberman
J. Hoberman is a recovering film critic.  1 STATE FUNERAL (Sergei Loznitsa)  The official footage documenting the pageantry around Joseph Stalin’s death—reorchestrated here by Loznitsa—is a
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artforum.com

Nov 30 2019
Jace Clayton
Jace Clayton is an artist and writer based in New York also known for his work as DJ /rupture. 1 KODAK BLACK, “ZEZE,” FEAT. TRAVIS SCOTT AND OFFSET (Atlantic) This was a terrible year to be a
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artforum.com

Nov 30 2019
Jennifer Krasinski
A PERFORMANCE must be believed to be seen. I likely hang its appearance on an act of faith because I—raised Catholic in the Midwest—received my first exposure to theater by watching men in elaborately
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artforum.com

Nov 30 2019
Pamela M. Lee
How to model kinship when Jim Crow demands otherwise? What constitutes intimacy for the legatees of race slavery and social death? The “revolution in a minor key” of Saidiya Hartman’s Wayward Lives,
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The New York Times

Nov 30 2019
A Sea Change in the Art World, Made by Black Creators
A Sea Change in the Art World, Made by Black Creators
For our art critic, the greatness of black visual culture, past and present, mainstream and outsider, was repeatedly asserted during the 2010s.
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The Guardian

Nov 30 2019
Through your eyes: 150 years of Stonehenge – in pictures

Last year, to celebrate 100 years since Stonehenge was given to the nation, English Heritage asked the public to share their photographs of the monument. More than 1,000 pictures, taken from 1875 onwards, were sent in and 148 are now going on show at the site. “It’s a fascinating look at the changing history of photography, posing, fashion, as well as Stonehenge,” says Susan Greaney, senior historian for English Heritage. Some of the images are very poignant. One shows a girl next to her 20-year-old brother in military uniform. “Sadly, this was the last time she saw him as he was killed in a bombing raid the following year,” says Greaney. “The images show what an enormous part Stonehenge plays in people’s memories.”

Your Stonehenge: 150 years of Personal Photos runs from 12 December to late August 2020

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The Guardian

Nov 30 2019
From iPad to glossy book: new hi-tech art by Hockney unveiled
The artist’s sketches of the changing seasons from the bedroom of his Yorkshire home feature in a new book

When David Hockney discovered he could create works of art on an iPhone, he was excited by the possibilities – and the fact that he could work from the comfort of his bed.

The device was the latest piece of technology to fire his imagination. Between 2009 and 2012, Hockney captured changing seasons and fleeting moments from a window of his former home in Yorkshire, first with an iPhone, then an iPad.

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The Guardian

Nov 30 2019
Eco-Visionaries: Confronting a Planet in a State of Emergency review – speculative and oblique

Royal Academy, London
There is little urgency and plenty of chin-stroking from the artists and architects in a show that claims to confront the climate emergency but offers few answers

There are appropriate responses to climate emergency: anger, seriousness, the determination to do something about it. Also, the recognition of the scale and complexity of the challenges it presents, of the dangers of unintended consequences, of the shortage of easy answers. You could imagine the material for powerful displays on the theme: the streets of Matera in southern Italy turned into whitewater rapids, Piazza San Marco as a lake, incinerated koalas, any amount of terrifying imagery of storm, drought, rising ocean and scorching Earth. Or a piece as impactful as the melting iceberg that Olafur Eliasson brought to the side of the Thames, in his Ice Watch London.

I’m not convinced that the responses and images offered by the Royal Academy in its Eco-Visionaries exhibition, which claims to be “confronting a planet in a state of emergency”, rise to the occasion. Here, a number of artists and architects present installations and exhibits that react somehow or other to the question of climate, which is fine, but the overall tone is speculative and oblique. In a situation that requires the rolling up of sleeves, Eco-Visionaries offers the stroking of chins, fingers placed against temples, the furrowing of brows, the escape of a slow hmmm from pursed lips. That dread term “virtue signalling”, so often used to dismiss integrity and commitment, is apposite here.

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The Guardian

Nov 30 2019
An architectural ski tour: Les Arcs, 50 years on

The modernist architecture of Les Arcs has not always found favour with skiers but as it marks its half-century, our writer warms to its egalitarian vision

‘Chocolate box” isn’t a term you’d associate with the Les Arcs ski area. Arc 1950, added in 2003, is cute and traditionally Savoyard in design but, in general, the words used to describe France’s purpose-built 1960s and 70s resorts, many constructed with little concern for their natural surroundings, are modernist, brutalist, angular. I had lumped Arc 1600, Arc 1800 and Arc 2000 into that category after my first visit some years ago.

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The Guardian

Nov 30 2019
Original Observer photography

Naomie Harris, elections in Hong Kong and the UK, Lizzo and some gorgeous roquefort pastries – the best photography commissioned by the Observer in November 2019

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The Guardian

Nov 30 2019
20 photographs of the week

Wildfires in California, protests in Iraq and Chile, flooding in Venice and Flamengo’s triumph at the Copa Libertadores – the best photography in news, culture and sport from around the world this week

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The New York Times

Nov 29 2019
Black Is Still the Only Color for Pierre Soulages
Black Is Still the Only Color for Pierre Soulages
An exhibition at the Louvre will celebrate the French painter’s 100th birthday. The only other artists given shows there during their lifetimes were Picasso and Chagall.
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The New York Times

Nov 29 2019
They Keep Times Square in Order, and a Statue Front and Center
They Keep Times Square in Order, and a Statue Front and Center
Several Times Square security officers have been doing double duty as “public art ambassadors” for a Kehinde Wiley monument, which ends its New York visit this weekend.
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The Guardian

Nov 29 2019
Basquiat and Haring: unprecedented art show revives the 'manic draughtsmen' of 80s New York

Crossing Lines at Melbourne’s NGV celebrates Keith Haring and Jean-Michel Basquiat, close friends and twin giants of the late 20th century art world

When Gil Vasquez was a young DJ in New York, two things happened that changed his life: his closest friend, Keith Haring, died of Aids, and – with a small group of friends and peers – he inherited one of the most important artistic legacies of the 20th century.

“It felt quite overwhelming,” Vasquez says when we meet at the Keith Haring Foundation headquarters in Manhattan. He was only 19 at the time. “None of us had any idea how to run a foundation.”

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artforum.com

Nov 29 2019
ICA Miami Adds More Than One Hundred Works to Its Collection
The Institute of Contemporary Art, Miami, has acquired more than one hundred works of art by emerging and established contemporary artists including Allora & Calzadilla, John Baldessari, Tony Conrad,
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The Guardian

Nov 29 2019
John Holloway obituary

My father, John Holloway, who has died aged 90, was a photographic artist, teacher and nature conservationist. Based on the Sussex Downs, he made significant work about and of their landscape, exemplified in Downlandscapes, a series of aerial black-and-white photographs exhibited at Brighton Museum and Art Gallery in 2004, and collected in an accompanying publication. These images demonstrate John’s consummate ability to render the marks on the landscape – fields, tracks and hedges – into graphic images that transcend their rural origins.

John’s passion and engagement in the visual landscape and wildlife conservation were not independent strands but fully integrated. He and his wife, Denée (nee Rayner), created a species-rich chalk grassland habitat in their garden, in the village of Kingston, near Lewes, which in 1993 was designated a Site of Nature Conservation Interest, in particular because of its abundance of butterflies, with, to date, 38 species recorded, and moths (500 species).

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artforum.com

Nov 29 2019
Roger Cardinal (1940–2019)
The British scholar Roger Cardinal, who translated and broadened Jean Dubuffet’s conception of art brut-a label applied to artists who work outside of official cultural institutions-died on November 1
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The Guardian

Nov 29 2019
Austria's feminist agitator and Renaissance bling – the week in art

The British Museum wrestles with empire, the Turner prize nears its finale and Spider-Man defends Bolton – all in your weekly dispatch

Valie Export
The incendiary feminist art of an Austrian revolutionary who named herself in defiance of patriarchy and nationalism.
Galerie Thaddaeus Ropac, London, from 28 November.

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The Guardian

Nov 29 2019
Party time! The photographer who captured the other swinging sixties

James Barnor shot Ghana’s independence on a cheap camera, then moved to London to document its emergent black counterculture. Now, at the age of 90, he is finally being recognised

James Barnor is in Paris looking through negatives and old photographs, some of which he hasn’t seen since he took them more than 50 years ago. There’s one of a young Ghanaian couple on their wedding day, others of a boxer preparing for his fight, a girl proudly holding her birthday cake. “I have lost a lot with all my toing and froing, so when I come across some that I haven’t lost, and it is iconic and I have a story about it … Oooh,” he exhales. “I want to take the one who found it and squeeze her!”

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artforum.com

Nov 29 2019
Perrotin to Move Its Hong Kong Outpost to Kowloon, Victoria Miro Now Represents María Berrío, and More
Perrotin, the Paris-based gallery with locations in New York, Hong Kong, Seoul, Shanghai, and Tokyo, is planning to close its satellite in Hong Kong and open a new space in Kowloon in March. Dealer
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The Guardian

Nov 29 2019
Buy a Guardian classic photograph: Yates’s in Blackpool, by Don McPhee

This week in our series of exclusive Guardian print sales we have a scene from Yates’s Wine Lodge in Blackpool in the mid-1970s, shot by Don McPhee


Yates’s is Britain’s oldest pub chain, founded as Yates’s Wine Lodge in 1884 in Oldham, Lancashire. Historically, it was a popular destination for elderly and working-class people and it had a particularly strong presence in the north of England, where the Guardian photographer Don McPhee worked. Yates’s was known for its Australian wine and draught beer. From the beer kegs and the cigarette butts scattered on the floor, to the headscarves, flat caps and wide lapels, the photograph is a snapshot of a time that is long gone.

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The Guardian

Nov 29 2019
Tate Britain unveils post-apocalyptic Christmas decorations

Anne Hardy transforms front of London gallery with ice, mud, tangled lights and torn banners

Loud sounds of crashing thunder, cawing tropical birds, swarming mosquitoes and the smash of collapsing ice will greet visitors to what could be life after the Apocalypse, but is in fact Tate Britain this festive season.

The gallery on Friday unveiled its annual winter commission, when it invites artists to transform the front of its grand building on the Thames.

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artforum.com

Nov 29 2019
Russia and Syria to Restore Ancient Syrian City Desecrated by ISIS
Russia and Syria have signed an agreement declaring their intention to work together to restore the ancient city of Palmyra, which was gravely damaged by ISIS during the militant group’s occupation of
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The Guardian

Nov 29 2019
Pierre Huyghe’s Human Mask: grace and mystery in a post-apocalyptic world

The exquisitely unsettling short film follows an enigmatic, fur-covered creature as it performs in a ruined restaurant

In Pierre Huyghe’s exquisitely unsettling 19-minute film Human Mask from 2014, drone footage of Fukushima, decimated after the tsunami that led three nuclear plant reactors to meltdown in 2011, becomes an unspecified, post-apocalyptic, no man’s land.

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The New York Times

Nov 28 2019
Art Basel Miami, Where Big Money Meets Bigger Money
Art Basel Miami, Where Big Money Meets Bigger Money
The art world’s tribes converge in Miami Beach for the country’s most important art fair. Here’s your guide to the cultural fray.
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The New York Times

Nov 28 2019
Holiday Museum Guide: Where to See Art This Season
Holiday Museum Guide: Where to See Art This Season
We’ll not only help you figure out what exhibitions to see, but also offer some tips before you head out.
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The New York Times

Nov 28 2019
Where to Eat and Drink at 14 N.Y.C. Museums Right Now
Where to Eat and Drink at 14 N.Y.C. Museums Right Now
Dine while overlooking Central Park, sip mezcal in East Harlem or get a taste of Pierre Cardin’s Parisian bistro in Brooklyn.
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The New York Times

Nov 28 2019
20 Art Exhibitions to View in N.Y.C. This Weekend
Our guide to new art shows and some that will be closing soon.
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The Guardian

Nov 28 2019
Other Spaces / Transformer review – a mind-blowing rumble in the jungle

180 The Strand, London
With its hi-tech recordings of African wildlife, a chamber of mirrors and a yellow bikini, this trip through hypnotically weird worlds is strangely soothing – but wrap up warm

I’m sitting on a beanbag in a dark room, staring at a split-screen scored with apple-green blips and streaks of light that – much like a heart monitor – record signs of life. The date: 8 September 1994. The setting: Dzanga-Sangha national park, a marshy patch in the Central African Republic. The opening notes come courtesy of a chorus of insects, whose murmurs are soon joined by the territorial shrieks of a southern tree hyrax and the grunts of a western lowland gorilla. The cacophony builds to a climax, and – the moment we’ve all been waiting for – a solo rumble of African forest elephants, sloshing through water (it’s the wet season). Next, the ribbits of frogs and the chirps of a red-chested cuckoo, then the alarm calls of the greater spot-nosed monkey. The performance continues in much the same vein, animal species sounding both uncomfortably close and disappointingly far away, until – at last – it fades and the apple-green blips and streaks vanish from the screen.

The Great Animal Orchestra is the highlight of Other Spaces, three audiovisual installations by multidisciplinary collective United Visual Artists. Its conductor is ecologist Bernie Krause, who since the 1970s has been making sound recordings of various ecosystems and their residents. As well as works of art, these soundscapes are a vital means of observing shifts in the world’s remaining wild habitats. Krause archives them, we’re told, in case any of the animal ensembles fall silent – which, because of human activities, has so far happened in 50% of those in his collection.

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artforum.com

Nov 28 2019
Eliel Jones on Alexa Karolinski and Ingo Niermann’s Army of Love
ALEXA KAROLINSKI AND INGO NIERMANN make war movies about love. Their two moving image works to date, both currently on view at Auto Italia in London, are premised on the existence of an Army of Love,
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The New York Times

Nov 28 2019
A Detroit Doctor Who Loves Art and Loathes Labels
A Detroit Doctor Who Loves Art and Loathes Labels
Lorna Thomas has filled her home with African-American pieces; she believes their beauty transcends categorization.
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The Guardian

Nov 28 2019
National Gallery lends Van Eyck portrait for 'once-in-a-lifetime' show

Exclusive: Portrait of a Man (Léal Souvenir) will be among star items in Ghent exhibition

The National Gallery in London is to make an exceptional loan of a painting by Jan van Eyck to a one-off exhibition celebrating the 15th-century Flemish master.

Portrait of a Man (Léal Souvenir), one of the earliest dated works by the painter, will be among the star exhibits in Van Eyck – an Optical Revolution, which will open at the Museum of Fine Arts (MSK) in Ghent, Belgium, in February. It will be the largest ever showing of Van Eyck’s works and probably the last major exhibition of its kind, curators said.

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The Guardian

Nov 27 2019
How does childhood shape a life? Margaret Mitchell's moving photo essays

In 1994, the award-winning Scottish photographer Margaret Mitchell made Family – a set of striking images of her sister’s children at home in Stirling. Two decades later, after her sister’s death, Mitchell returned to photograph their own children to make a sequel, In This Place

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The Guardian

Nov 27 2019
David Lynch smoking: Chris Saunders' best photograph

‘He came out on to the balcony, picked a half-smoked cigarette out of a plant pot, lit it, and then it was click, click, click’

I was a student working part-time in a video shop and I took Twin Peaks home to watch. It was a revelation. I became completely hooked, and watched as much of David Lynch’s work as I could.

I was studying photography and fell into portrait work almost by accident. I saw the comedian Bill Hicks on TV and he blew me away like Twin Peaks had. I spotted he was performing in Manchester and I knew I had to go – I was like an autograph hunter but using my camera instead of a pen. I stood backstage and introduced myself and asked if I could photograph him. He said yes, and I spent 45 minutes with him in his dressing room. Coming away with something I’d created gave me a massive buzz.

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The New York Times

Nov 27 2019
New York Galleries: What to See Right Now
“Lineup” spotlights the role of the stripe; Ann Greene Kelly’s recent drawings; Sérgio Sister’s prison art; Vanessa German’s power-figure sculptures.
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The New York Times

Nov 27 2019
Antiquities Expert Charged With Trafficking in Cambodian Artifacts
Antiquities Expert Charged With Trafficking in Cambodian Artifacts
Prosecutors say Douglas A. J. Latchford, 88, a dealer in and collector of Southeast Asian antiquities, falsified documents to make looted treasures easier to sell on the art market.
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artforum.com

Nov 27 2019
Jenn Smith
Wobbly and geometric all at once, Jenn Smith’s fervently painted canvases are the epitome of “organized chaos.” The artist seems to say the same of her primary subjects: conservative Christianity and
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artforum.com

Nov 27 2019
Italian Culture Ministry Tries to Evict Right-Wing Group from Monastery
The Italian government approved the long-term lease of a thirteenth-century monastery to a right-wing religious organization connected to Steve Bannon, the ex–chief strategist of President Donald Trump
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