News

Displaying 151 to 200 of 15666 results

The Guardian

Feb 04 2019
Tracey Emin: I regret backing 'terrible' Blair and Cameron

Artist uses launch of London exhibition to hit out at former leaders over Iraq and Brexit

Tracey Emin has spoken of her anger at Tony Blair and David Cameron, two politicians she supported who “will be remembered in history for doing the most terrible things”.

The artist was a Labour supporter until switching her allegiance to the Tories about 10 years ago, attending receptions, offering her thought on arts policy to ministers and accepting an invitation to install a neon artwork in Downing Street.

Continue reading...
Read More
The Guardian

Feb 04 2019
Making It Happen review - from a jewel-like cabin to a poignant pier

RIBA, London
Community architecture doesn’t have to mean bits from a skip. It can be elegant and beautiful, as this exhibition proves

Well-meaning architecture doesn’t have to be ugly is the welcome message behind the latest exhibition at the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA). For too long, architects have split into the rival camps of the do-gooding community activists and the material-led, detail-obsessed maestros. They tend to be preoccupied with the yawning wealth gap or the crisply-executed shadow gap, but rarely both.

As the new exhibition – Making It Happen: New Community Architecture – shows, it is possible to be socially worthy, environmentally conscious, people-centred and also be interested in the beauty of things and how they are made. Community architecture doesn’t have to mean scaffolding planks, straw bales and bits from a skip nailed together ad hoc.

Continue reading...
Read More
The Guardian

Feb 04 2019
Don McCullin review – witness for the persecuted

Tate Britain, London
This retrospective of the veteran photographer’s images of war, poverty and atrocity shines light on the unconscionable. It’s almost overwhelming

Here is the camera that took a bullet instead of its owner. The military helmet and the light meter, passports and compass, all in a vitrine. Here is the American soldier, traumatised, staring back. Here are the villagers, displaced. Here are the living and here are the dead. Here are things I prefer not to describe.

Related: ‘Once photography gets a grip, you're captive’: Don McCullin and Giles Duley in conversation

Continue reading...
Read More
The Guardian

Feb 03 2019
People of the Whale – a portrait of traditional hunting in Alaska

Photojournalist Kiliii Yuyan documents the Iñupiaq and their successful conservation practices using indigenous knowledge

People of the Whale is the story of an Iñupiaq whaling crew, living where the vast plain of ice meets the waters of the Arctic Ocean. For the last 2,000 years, the Iñupiaq have stood on the edge of the sea ice, waiting for the migration of bowhead whales.

Continue reading...
Read More
The Guardian

Feb 03 2019
The Clock comes to Melbourne: what the 24-hour concept film can do to your brain

Now playing at Acmi, the world’s most popular piece of concept art, by Christian Marclay, inspires thoughts of cities, community and death

My mind is foggy and my eyes are bleary. The time is exactly 2.52am. I know this because Jack Nicholson is on the big screen in front of me, seated near an analogue clock with its hands pointed towards the camera, in a shot lifted from the 1972 drama The King of Marvin Gardens.

In the film I am watching – the visual artist Christian Marclay’s mosaical epic the Clock, which runs for a butt-flattening 24 hours and is the world’s most popular piece of concept art – the time on screen always matches the time in real life. Debuting in London in 2010, The Clock strings together some 12,000 short clips from thousands of film and TV scenes, almost all in some way referring to the time – via lines of dialogue for instance, or, more commonly, shots of clocks and watches.

Continue reading...
Read More
The Guardian

Feb 03 2019
The Parthenon marbles had a time and a rightful place for Keats | Letters
An enlightened British Museum should begin talks with the Greeks about returning the sculptures, says George Vardas, while AM Gledhill suggests casts should be taken of artefacts and the originals repatriated

I applaud the eloquent rebuttal offered by Alexi Kaye Campbell in response to Jonathan Jones’ article defending the British Museum over the Parthenon marbles (Letters, 1 February). I would also add that Jones has misunderstood the poet John Keats’ reaction to the sculptures. Keats wrote a sonnet in 1816 entitled “On Seeing the Elgin Marbles” in which the young, fragile poet’s own mortality is contrasted with “each imagined pinnacle and steep / Of godlike hardship”, the artistic achievement of “Grecian grandeur” and the “magnitude” projected by the sculptures.

Keats laments the temporal dislocation and uprooting of the sculptures from their ancient past. His poem underscores his realisation that these scattered fragments of a classical order, now on display as museum pieces, are not immune to the “rude wasting” of old time. He is burdened by an “undescribable feud” and a sense of tension caused by the loss of the sculptures’ identity when transplanted to an English museum.

Continue reading...
Read More
The New York Times

Feb 03 2019
Susan Hiller, 78, Maker of Dreamlike Conceptual Art, Dies
Her video, audio and photographic installations played at the precipice between reality and the subconscious and often explored the paranormal.
Read More
The Guardian

Feb 03 2019
We gotta get out of this place! The artists snared by the lure of the labyrinth

From Daedalus’s prison to Mark Wallinger’s plaques, labyrinths have always intrigued artists. Our writer makes a beeline to a new show inspired by their confounding paths

When Charlotte Schepke, director of the London gallery Large Glass, told me she wanted to organise an exhibition inspired by my book Red Thread, it felt like the ultimate compliment. Not only because it is obviously flattering but because the book, which explores the idea of the labyrinth, is partly about translations between art forms – how a poem might prompt a sculpture, which then might slip into a story, and how this chain of influence never ends, as ideas pass from hand to hand.

In the book I consider the idea of the labyrinth – the mythical, confounding prison made by Daedalus to house the Minotaur – as the original symbol of human inventiveness and imagination. I think of Daedalus as the first great artist and contriver of ingenious forms – a figure whose creations sometimes bypassed morality or overreached nature. I think of the labyrinth as a structure that, when viewed from above, with its coiled and snaking form, resembles the brain. It is fitting that one of the photographs the Irish artist Dorothy Cross is showing in the exhibition is an image of brain coral – which simultaneously resembles the interlocking passages of a maze and the grooves of a human brain. Another work by Cross contains two skulls, halved, their hollow insides gilded. The gold picks out tributaries and rivulets of bone, which make their own little confounding maze of lines.

Continue reading...
Read More
The Guardian

Feb 03 2019
‘Once photography gets a grip, you're captive’: Don McCullin and Giles Duley in conversation

On the eve of a major retrospective of Don McCullin’s work, the veteran photojournalist and the acclaimed photographer talk about growing up dyslexic, photographing suffering and the personal toll the job takes

When the photographer Giles Duley was 18 years old, he was given two presents by his godfather: a camera and a copy of Unreasonable Behaviour, Don McCullin’s autobiography about his life as a photojournalist in Vietnam, Northern Ireland, Biafra, Lebanon and London’s East End. The book was illustrated with McCullin’s acclaimed black-and-white photographs, images of war and human suffering that helped define the conflicts they described. It was a book that bowled Duley over. Today, the two men sit opposite each other in McCullin’s quiet cottage on the Somerset levels – as far removed from the horrors of war as can be imagined. The excuse for their meeting and for our conversation is a major retrospective of McCullin’s work at Tate Britain, opening next week. Not that any excuse is required because, as they reveal, they are friends already.

At 83, McCullin’s hale appearance and eloquence, after 60 years of taking pictures in war zones and elsewhere, cannot help but seem a death-defying fluke. He brushes aside any mention of the injuries he sustained falling off a roof in Cambodia (he broke several ribs and shattered his arm) and does not dwell on his hellish struggles in the city of Hue in Vietnam, which left him (as he reported in Jacqui and David Morris’s 2013 documentary McCullin) like a “tormented animal”. His restraint may partly be that he is a stoic but it is also, presumably, because of Duley’s presence. For Duley, as McCullin puts it, has “paid the price”.

Continue reading...
Read More
The Guardian

Feb 02 2019
Bill Viola / Michelangelo: Life Death Rebirth review – an uneasy dialogue

Royal Academy, London
This show exploring the affinities between Michelangelo and Bill Viola risks diminishing both artists

Ever since Bill Viola first pitched up in Florence as a 23-year-old film technician in 1974, there has been a certain inevitability that 45 years on he would end up here, sharing a mostly hushed and dimly lit Royal Academy with Michelangelo. Viola was in Italy back then working in a studio patronised by some of the pioneers of video art – including Nam June Paik and Bruce Nauman – but he was also encountering for the first time the work of Renaissance painters face-to-face in the city’s churches, an experience that he later described as something like “total immersion” for him.

Along the way the two experiences – fresco and video, altarpiece and flatscreen – seemed to have fused in his imagination. Viola saw the possibility of recreating those 500-year-old visions of eternal truths for a contemporary audience – not in marble or paint or charcoal, but on screen. Since then, not a man to duck a challenge, he has foregrounded an ongoing dialogue with Florentine masters. This exhibition – 12 of Viola’s video installations, 15 works by Michelangelo – arises out of the American seeing the collection of the Italian’s drawings at Windsor Castle in 2006.

Continue reading...
Read More
The Guardian

Feb 02 2019
The big picture: Anja Niemi’s The Chrysler

A 1960s suitcase inspired photographer Anja Niemi to cast herself in the imagined life of its previous owner

It was a suitcase that inspired photographer Anja Niemi’s icy, enigmatic series Darlene & Me. The case belonged originally to a beauty consultant named Darlene and contained old jars of cream, powders and brochures. But the thing that piqued Niemi’s interest after she bought it was a receipt from August 1960: Darlene had sold a jar of Liquid Beauty and one Temptress’s Hairspray, both to herself. “It left me with a feeling of a woman’s failed attempt at success,” says Niemi. “I started to picture her alone, being both beauty consultant and customer, and this led me to my fictional version of Darlene and her relationship to herself.”

The image here comes towards the end of the visual short story, after the two characters’ stay in an extravagant desert house and before the final image, in which one buries the other under the shadow of a Joshua tree.

Continue reading...
Read More
The Guardian

Feb 02 2019
Screen dreams: cinemas of the world – in pictures

For 16 years, Paris-based photographer Stephan Zaubitzer has been photographing cinemas around the world. His Cinémas project started in 2003 in Burkina Faso, where he began to shoot open-air cinemas. “With the arrival of video and television, the very existence of these cinemas is under threat,” he says. “The cinema defines the neighbourhood it is in. When a cinema closes, the whole soul of the neighbourhood is lost.” Zaubitzer has visited 15 countries, including the US, Egypt, Morocco and India: what these images have in common is his appreciation of the look and atmosphere of the cinemas. “There is a feel of mystery about these halls: architects crafted them to embody the taste of their time. The show starts on the pavement, when you’re approaching the building.”

Continue reading...
Read More
The Guardian

Feb 02 2019
‘It’s a Beatle haircut’: historian claims 15th-century portrait is from the 1960s

National Gallery’s 1450 portrait by Rogier van der Weyden was created in the 1960s by Eric Hebborn, says art historian

To the National Gallery, the man depicted in the masterpiece that hangs in its gallery of 15th-century treasures is a holy man, possibly a saint, reading a legal text. And the portrait is believed – at least by the gallery’s experts – to have been created in the workshop of the Netherlandish painter Rogier van der Weyden.

But to one leading art historian, it is nothing of the sort. Instead, it is a 20th-century fake, of an unknown man sporting a Beatles-style haircut and reading a paper containing nothing more than nonsense.

Continue reading...
Read More
The Guardian

Feb 02 2019
Original Observer photography

Stage, screen, song and Sambuca - the best photography commissioned by the Observer in January 2019

Continue reading...
Read More
The Guardian

Feb 02 2019
The 20 photographs of the week

The collapse of a dam in Brazil, a tornado in Havana, Central American migrants in Mexico and a leopard attack in India – the week captured by the world’s best photojournalists

Continue reading...
Read More
The Guardian

Feb 01 2019
Buy your own Guardian classic photograph: Muslim schoolboys, Dewsbury, 1989

This week in our regular series, Muslim schoolboys in class in Dewsbury, Yorkshire in 1989 by Denis Thorpe

A sea of skullcaps greeted the Guardian photographer, Denis Thorpe, when he was dispatched to a school in Dewsbury, Yorkshire in 1989 to cover a meeting discussing grant-aided schools. “They were so beautiful and intricate, and all the designs were different,” Thorpe recalls. “They were listening intently, so I waited and waited, willing one to turn around. If you will something long enough, it will happen. He’s not even looking at me but is distracted by something else.” It was a wonderful human moment, he says, that gave the picture the focal point it needed.
Hannah Booth

Continue reading...
Read More
The Guardian

Feb 01 2019
Grace Wales Bonner: ‘I’m a fashion designer making art – it could be seen as silly’

From menswear to art, the polymath speaks about creative fluidity and ritual

“I am a fashion designer,” says 28-year-old Londoner Grace Wales Bonner, “doing an art show, which could be seen as … ” She looks away as she searches for the right word. It’s approaching midday and we’re sitting in Chucs, the cafe and restaurant housed in the Zaha Hadid-designed extension to the Serpentine Sackler Gallery in London, having walked around her new exhibition. The fine-featured artist is wearing Céline earrings and a white shirt from her Wales Bonner line, with colourful, crocheted cuffs that, she says, resemble stuff her gran would have in the house. “ … Silly,” she finally says.

Silly? For some in the fashion business, silliness is their raison d’etre. Not Wales Bonner, though. For the past four years she has created the kind of beautifully layered, finely cut, deeply referential clothing that’s so beautiful it has ended up in a few of the best shops in the world, and so brainy that it comes with its own reading list. Now, she has repurposed that aesthetic sense and sensibility into a smart, weighty, fine-art gallery exhibition. There’s no room for silliness. In fact, Wales Bonner appears to regard silliness in pretty much the same way that Superman regards kryptonite.

Continue reading...
Read More
The Guardian

Feb 01 2019
Leonardo da Vinci dragged into Salvini's spat with Macron

Louvre blockbuster marking 500 years since artist’s death may end up a casualty

He was a Renaissance master – painter, scientist, engineer and inventor – who was hailed as one of the greatest artists who ever lived.

But as Europe stages a year-long frenzy of events to mark 500 years since Leonardo da Vinci’s death, Italy and France are engaged in a diplomatic tussle over him that threatens a blockbuster exhibition at the Louvre in Paris.

Continue reading...
Read More
The New York Times

Feb 01 2019
Museums Have Grown More Diverse, New Study Says
A second nationwide survey by the Mellon Foundation found that museums’ staff members are becoming more diverse, but leaders are still largely white.
Read More
The Guardian

Feb 01 2019
Banksy fake banknote artwork joins British Museum collection

Piece depicts Princess Diana and was one of thousands of copies produced in 2004

More than a decade after he cheekily stuck a fake artwork to the wall of one of its galleries, Banksy has officially joined the collection of the British Museum for the first time.

The museum has acquired its first work by the anonymous graffiti artist, a fake £10 banknote depicting Diana, Princess of Wales, which will join its collection of coins, medals and other currency.

Continue reading...
Read More
The Guardian

Feb 01 2019
David Adjaye review – planks for the memories

Design Museum, London
From Martin Luther King to extinct species, the architect has worked on memorials of all kinds – with mixed results, as this exhibition shows

Gastric-brooding frogs, the American Hardwood Export Council and the Holocaust might not seem to have much in common. But for the ever-agile architect Sir David Adjaye, they have all proven to be subjects worthy of monuments and memorials, the stories of which are now on show at the Design Museum.

The diversity of the topics in David Adjaye: Making Memory reflects the eclectic nature of his practice. Over the years, the British-Ghanaian architect has been willing to turn his knack for imbuing structures with deep symbolic meaning to everything from a trade show pavilion to a fractured landscape memorialising the mass slaughter of six million Jews.

Continue reading...
Read More
The Guardian

Feb 01 2019
Velvet Buzzsaw is a fiendish portrait of art-world avarice – but is it realistic?

In Netflix’s new showpiece, Jake Gyllenhaal sells his soul to an LA art scene full of grime, crime and flesh-eating sculptures. ‘It’s 100% accurate,’ says its director

Want to make a funny but worrying film about the way we live now? The art world has everything you need. With its po-faced claims that mediocrity is genius, its jaw-dropping celebration of naked wealth and its cast of pretentious curators, rapacious dealers and power-mad critics, it’s an industry that’s begging to be ridiculed.

And sure enough, art-world satire is becoming a mini-genre of cinema. In Paolo Sorrentino’s 2013 film The Great Beauty, one image of emptiness inscrutably observed by Toni Servillo’s character Jep is a performance in which an artist rams her head against a Roman aqueduct. Four years later, in Ruben Östlund’s Palme d’Or winning The Square, museum cleaners mistake installations for garbage, while a PR company’s attempt to popularise “relational aesthetics” results in a viral video of an exploding child. They’re terrific fun, but how accurate are they about contemporary art?

Continue reading...
Read More
The Guardian

Feb 01 2019
Koons apes the old masters and robots invade Edinburgh – the week in art

Jeff Koons heads to Oxford, Tracey Emin shows new work in London and the V&A debuts a sumptuous survey of Christian Dior – all in our weekly dispatch

Jeff Koons
The master of pop art takes on the old masters.
Ashmolean Museum, Oxford, 7 February until 9 June.

Continue reading...
Read More
The Guardian

Feb 01 2019
Susan Hiller obituary
Conceptual artist who explored alternative belief systems and cosmologies

In 1965 Susan Hiller was in New Orleans, sitting through a lecture on African art, during the final year of her doctorate in anthropology, when it dawned on her that she could pursue all the things that had originally interested her about anthropology through art. “My previous inchoate thoughts and feelings about anthropology as a practice and about art as a practice seemed to fall into place, in one complex moment of admiration, empathy, longing and self-awareness.”

Although this revelation came quickly, Hiller’s celebrated career as a conceptual artist, which included investigations into auras, alien sightings and mystic rituals, and incorporated installation, film, painting, writing, sculpture and photography, did not start until she settled in London later that decade. There, initially flirting with the tail end of minimalism, and with nods to a burgeoning feminist art scene, Hiller began to channel the knowledge of alternative belief systems and cosmologies she had gained from her studies, and a restless passion for travel, into her art.

Continue reading...
Read More
The New York Times

Feb 01 2019
The Week in Arts: Soderbergh’s Latest, Sharon Van Etten, Kronos Quartet
The director’s new film, “High Flying Bird,” stars André Holland as a fast-talking basketball agent who proposes a bold business move to his rookie client.
Read More
The Guardian

Feb 01 2019
Tal R’s House Red: the American dream as an urban ghost

The Danish painter evokes a sense of loss with a colourful palette and sharp geometric lines

A staple of the American dream, the house with the picket fence, gets a toothsome reworking in this typically dreamlike 2018 painting by the Copenhagen-based painter Tal R.

Continue reading...
Read More
The New York Times

Jan 31 2019
World Monuments Fund Enlists Selldorf Architects for Forbidden City Project
Annabelle Selldorf will design an interpretation center at the Qianlong Garden in the Forbidden City in Beijing.
Read More
The New York Times

Jan 31 2019
Critic’s Notebook: James Baldwin: Pessimist, Optimist, Hero
The literary figure is the glowing subject of a group exhibition, curated by the New Yorker critic Hilton Als, that is part personal narrative, part study of his influence on contemporary artists.
Read More
The New York Times

Jan 31 2019
Art review: A French Painter, Fallen From Fame, Gains Historical Weight
The art of Pierre Puvis de Chavannes, one of the least celebrated influential painters of 19th-century France, is illuminated by a large show of small works.
Read More
The New York Times

Jan 31 2019
Critic’s Pick: An 1840s Road Trip, Captured on Lustrous Silver
An exquisite show at the Metropolitan Museum of Art recalls travel before digital maps, when photography was the hottest of new media.
Read More
The New York Times

Jan 31 2019
20 Art Exhibitions to View in N.Y.C. This Weekend
Our guide to new art shows and some that will be closing soon.
Read More
The New York Times

Jan 31 2019
Art Review: John Dunkley, an Outsider Artist Deep in the Heart of Jamaica
Long cherished in his homeland, the self-taught artist gets his first large museum survey. And the show is a revelation.
Read More
The Guardian

Jan 31 2019
Reuniting the Parthenon marbles is nothing to do with nationalism | Letters
Alexi Kaye Campbell responds to Jonathan Jones’s article on the British Museum director’s claim that the marbles’ removal from Greece in the 19th century could be seen as ‘a creative act’. Plus letters from Pierre Makhlouf and John AK Huntley

As a member of the British Committee for the Reunification of the Parthenon Marbles who recently argued (and happily won) against Jonathan Jones at the UCL debate which he mentions in his recent article (Let’s not lose our marbles over the British Museum boss’s remarks, 29 January), I presumptuously assume I am included in his description of “the passionate proponents of Greece’s claim”. He goes on to say that people such as myself “need to explain how their argument differs from any other variety of nationalist populism”. I thought I had done just that at UCL, but I shall do so again in case he missed my point.

On that evening, I had made the distinction between patriotism and nationalism, and had alluded to how I believe nationalism is what happens when patriotism is thwarted or humiliated. I had said that as a relatively new modern state, albeit with an extraordinary ancient heritage, Greece’s need to forge its contemporary identity after hundreds of years of occupation, cultural evisceration and adversity, often has to look to its glorious ancient history and achievements for confidence and pride. So there is some symbolism in its wish to see the marbles reunited with the monument from which they had been taken when Greece was under Ottoman occupation, there is little doubt of that.

Continue reading...
Read More
The Guardian

Jan 31 2019
Leonardo da Vinci: A Life in Drawing review – the superhuman hits you like a thunderbolt

Museums across the UK
These drawings from the Royal Collection – dispersed around Britain – are like pure, clear windows on to the extraordinary mind of this enigmatic and visionary genius

It was in Cardiff that I finally cracked the Da Vinci Code. For years I’ve been searching for the clues that would explain this weird and wonderful genius. I’ve visited the Tuscan hill town Vinci, where an illegitimate boy called Leonardo was born in 1452, and Amboise in the Loire Valley, where he died on 2 May 1519, looking for traces of his secret self. Yet it was on an icy afternoon in the Welsh capital that I finally found the killer clue to a real Leonardo da Vinci mystery: his sex life.

Leonardo’s inky fingerprint has been found – it’s just barely visible with the naked eye – on his drawing The Cardiovascular System and Principal Organs of a Woman, done c.1509-10, yet this is not the revelation. This big, bold graphic dissection of a female body is a window on Leonardo’s emotions. He has drawn a female nude then transposed against her rounded breasts a complex machinery of tubes and pumps, bags and balloons. Her uterus looks like an alien creature. As an image of the female form it isn’t exactly intimate, let alone lustful. At the National Museum Wales, you can look straight from this to a far more sensual portrayal of the human body that he drew in about 1504: a scintillating study of a naked man from behind. Leonardo’s muscular model stands at attention, showing us his curly locks and rippling back. His hands seem to visibly shake with contained energy. His stance is potent. Leonardo uses red chalk to give this nude a carnal warmth: its softness lets him delicately model every bulge and recess of taut skin. The man’s buttocks are ripe ovals of perfection.

Continue reading...
Read More
The Guardian

Jan 31 2019
Olafur Eliasson to bring his tunnel of fog work to Tate Modern

Danish-Icelandic artist’s Your blind passenger installation to be on display from July

A 45-metre tunnel of blinding fog through which less than a handful of people will be able to walk at any given time is to be installed at the Tate Modern, part of an enormous summer exhibition by the artist Olafur Eliasson.

The Danish-Icelandic artist is best known for his Weather Project installation in the gallery’s Turbine Hall in 2003. It was one of the most popular installations in the Tate Modern’s history, with people lying down and basking in the dazzling fake sunlight.

Continue reading...
Read More
The Guardian

Jan 30 2019
Female artists are finally in our galleries – let's keep them there

Galleries are finally choosing to exhibit works by women – but will they stay on the walls once the trend for representation has passed? It’s all of our jobs to ensure they do

On the face of it, 2018 was a good year for female artists. Museums and galleries across the UK staged exhibitions on historic and contemporary female artists, with events that celebrated 100 years since British women won the right to vote. But now that the bunting has been taken down and the suffragette sashes stowed away, will women still get wall space in our public museums? Are they here to stay or will they have to make way for the next fad?

It’s certainly true that over the past few years, public museums have begun redressing the gender imbalance in their collections. When Tate Modern opened its major extension in 2016, director Frances Morris made a point of dedicating half of the new gallery space to women artists, increasing the percentage on display across the museum from 17% to 36%. And in 2020, the National Gallery will stage its first solo exhibition on a historic female artist – the 17th-century Italian baroque painter Artemisia Gentileschi.

Continue reading...
Read More
The Guardian

Jan 30 2019
Gauri Gill's best photograph: a rat nursing an elderly woman

At the Bahoda mask festival in India, people dress up as characters from myth. But I wanted to have real people in real situations – as well as a rat

In 2014, I was working in rural Maharashtra, in western India, when I heard about the Bahoda festival, in which papier-mache artists create masks of characters from Hindu and tribal myth. People are chosen to wear them and are consecrated by a priest, after which they “become” their characters and parade through their village over several nights.

The masks are spectacular. But I began to wonder why what is represented in rituals is often so idealised. Why are there no people with grey hair or big noses? Why is no one wearing spectacles? Why can’t routine gestures, such as sweeping the floor, be enacted too, as opposed to the drama of slaying a demon?

Continue reading...
Read More
The New York Times

Jan 30 2019
Large Asian Art Collection Donated to University of Texas at Dallas
The family of Trammell and Margaret Crow has donated the Crow Museum’s entire collection to the school, plus $23 million to help build a campus arts complex.
Read More
The New York Times

Jan 30 2019
Critic’s Notebook: The Battle to Make the Strand a Landmark Is About More Than a Building
An attempt to preserve the home of a beloved independent bookstore points to a new way to think about saving the city’s cultural heritage.
Read More
The New York Times

Jan 30 2019
Jodorowsky’s Wife Defends Him After Museo del Barrio Cancellation
“Words are not acts,” Pascale Montandon-Jodorowsky said in a statement, adding that her husband “never raped anyone.”
Read More
The Guardian

Jan 30 2019
Australia's 2018 Photographer of the Year awards – in pictures

Australian Photography magazine has named Brisbane ecologist Jasmine Vink as the overall winner in its 2018 Photographer of the Year awards the largest amateur photography competition in the southern hemisphere

Continue reading...
Read More
The Guardian

Jan 30 2019
Rare Lucian Freud portrait of Guinness heir goes up for auction

Artist’s 1956 painting hung in legendary house in Wicklow mountains for half a century

A tender and rarely seen portrait of a boy by Lucian Freud that hung in a legendary Irish house tucked away in the Wicklow mountains for more than 50 years is to appear at auction for the first time.

The 1956 painting, Head of a Boy, is of Garech Browne, the wealthy Guinness heir who became a patron of Irish arts and music and hosted wild, dazzling, parties at the fairytale-esque Guinness home and estate.

Continue reading...
Read More
The Guardian

Jan 30 2019
Susan Hiller: an artist who chased ghosts – and took no prisoners

Her multimedia artworks dwelt on the persistence of the past and the phantoms of cultural anxiety, entertaining, challenging and terrifying viewers

You never knew what Susan Hiller was going to do next, and I sometimes think neither did she. Experiments in automatic writing, burning all her paintings, creating a museum collection of detritus, communicating with the dead. Her art was not programmatic, but driven by curiosity and an alertness to her surroundings.

She recognised that what an artist does happens in the context of place, and society, and the culture in which she finds herself. Hiller’s training as an anthropologist sharpened her view and provided something of her methodology, such as it was. She mistrusted objectivity. In her art, in her curating and in her teaching, she was full of curiosity, insight, integrity, humour and irony.

Continue reading...
Read More
The Guardian

Jan 30 2019
Goya's Black Paintings: ‘Some people can hardly even look at them’

Goya’s bleak visions were originally painted onto the walls of his house – and remain some of the most disturbing artworks ever made

A boggle-eyed pagan god feasts on the headless carcass of his own son. A humanoid billy goat in a monkish cassock bleats a satanic sermon to a gasping congregation of witches. A desperately expressive little dog appears to plead for rescue, submerged up to its neck in a mud-coloured mire beneath a gloomy, void-like firmament of negative space.

“Well, these are quite a pick-me-up,” remarks one visitor to Madrid’s Prado museum, as his group moves quickly past the Black Paintings of Francisco de Goya. I have overheard that kind of thing many times in this room: a jokey, defensive sort of irony in response to the spectacular weirdness and bleakness of these 14 images.

Continue reading...
Read More
The New York Times

Jan 30 2019
What to See in New York Art Galleries This Week
Erica Baum’s photographs of sewing patterns; Leah Guadagnoli’s sculptural paintings; Anna Plesset and Fred and Daniel Terna reckon with loss; ‘Make Believe’ takes on the movies.
Read More
The Guardian

Jan 29 2019
Fake leaves: Alma Haser's fantasy plants – in pictures

The series Pseudo plays with reality, layering and manipulating images of plants and flowers in a comment about the roots of fake news

Continue reading...
Read More
The Guardian

Jan 29 2019
Delays singer Greg Gilbert: 'I was taking peppermint pills but I had bowel cancer'

When the psych-poppers’ frontman was told he was dying, it sparked an explosion of poetry and painting. As his work goes on show beside Leonardo da Vinci’s, he relives an artistic salvation

Greg Gilbert should have been having the time of his life. It was 2014 and his band, Delays, were touring the country to celebrate the 10th anniversary of their debut album, Faded Seaside Glamour, which had made indie stars of them in the noughties. He had also just become a father and was engaged to his partner, Stacey.

But Gilbert was not having the time of his life. He was in almost constant pain – “pain I can’t even describe”. His weight had dropped to 8st and he was beset by anxiety so extreme that he could not contemplate taking medicine, let alone getting himself checked out properly. “The only thing I would take is peppermint capsules,” he says. “I realise now that I was taking peppermint capsules to try to treat bowel cancer.”

Continue reading...
Read More
The New York Times

Jan 29 2019
Show Us Your Wall: It’s No Secret That Espionage Is This Collector’s Passion
When governments are crumbling, H. Keith Melton is knocking on the doors of intelligence agencies with cash in hand to buy devices and memorabilia.
Read More
The New York Times

Jan 29 2019
Critic’s Pick: Review: An Aching Ode to Jerome Robbins’s Lost New York
For this essential New York choreographer’s centenary, a Public Library exhibition full of the joy and anxiety of postwar Manhattan.
Read More
The New York Times

Jan 29 2019
James Turrell Asks MoMA PS1 to Close Installation
The work, “Meeting,” which intends to offer an uninterrupted view of sky, was closed after media reports of construction marring the view.
Read More