News

Displaying 151 to 200 of 10000 results

artforum.com

Mar 31 2021
Anthony Hawley on Lemohang Jeremiah Mosese’s This Is Not a Burial, It’s a Resurrection (2019)
“TODAY WE ARE KNOCKING at the door of the modern world,” says the politician to the villagers of Nazaretha, bloviating into a megaphone’s detachable mic. “Your voice has been heard,” he reassures
Read More
The Guardian

Mar 31 2021
'I don't want to fake the funk' – Henry Taylor, the painter of black American life

Adored by Rihanna and Jay-Z, he finds his subjects in supermarket queues – and on the streets of LA’s toughest neighbourhoods. How has the artist found lockdown in a tiny Somerset village?

“Other people look; Taylor sees.” That was Zadie Smith’s assessment of the American artist Henry Taylor. Thirty seconds into my Zoom call with him, I begin to understand what she meant, as he joyfully dissects the decor in my room. “Oh, you got a guitar back there?” he says. “What are you going to do, play me a song?” Then, noticing the slogan on my cap, he laughs and says: “I can’t be Free and Easy … peasy.” Suddenly, I’m wondering what else is in view.

You might think this was an artist trying not so subtle unsettling tactics at the beginning of an interview. But Taylor is far too spontaneous for anything like that. A question about what he’s interested in at the moment prompts an answer that turns into a rapid-fire breakdown of his artistic worldview, and a glimpse into how his mind works. “I’m receptive, you know what I mean? I’m a sensitive individual. I respond to things. I’m empathetic. I don’t try to be hardcore, I don’t want to fake the funk. I just tried to keep it real, bro. If I want to sit down and paint you, I’ll paint you.”

Continue reading...
Read More
The New York Times

Mar 31 2021
Soccer Samples Streetwear and Likes the Fit
Soccer Samples Streetwear and Likes the Fit
Juventus reimagined its look, P.S.G. partnered with Jordan Brand, and now Arsenal and Inter Milan are following suit. But soccer’s interest in design has little to do with the sport.
Read More
The Guardian

Mar 31 2021
High-flying Brooklyn boys on a magical trampoline: Jamel Shabazz's best photograph

‘I came upon them in an abandoned parking lot. Watching them was like reliving my own childhood’

This was taken in 1981, in Brownsville, my neighbourhood in Brooklyn. I was 21 and my father, who photographed weddings and took portraits in our community, had been teaching me the science of speed and light, and how to capture decisive moments. When I came upon this scene in an abandoned parking lot, I felt something was coming on. They reminded me of myself as a child. Observing them was like reliving my own childhood. I took three frames, but it wasn’t until I got the film developed that I realised I had created something magical.

This has become one of my most popular images. It’s housed in a number of renowned institutions in the US. It was used on the cover of Undun, the album by hip-hop band the Roots. It’s also the cover of one of my books, Seconds of My Life. A magical image is, for me, one that has a magnetism, that draws you in and holds your attention. You don’t need a caption. You can study it and draw your own conclusion.

Continue reading...
Read More
The Guardian

Mar 31 2021
National Gallery creates its first show designed for mobile phones

People will be able to explore a 16th-century masterpiece by the Dutch painter Jan Gossaert

The National Gallery is to offer its first exhibition designed for mobile phones, allowing people to experience in incredible detail a 16th-century Dutch masterpiece telling the story of the birth of Jesus.

Jan Gossaert’s The Adoration of the Kings was at the centre of an immersive exhibition at the London gallery that opened last December but was forced to close after a week because of the Covid lockdown.

Continue reading...
Read More
The Guardian

Mar 30 2021
'A parallel universe': the rickety pleasures of America's backroads - in pictures

From rundown churches to shuttered stores, this road trip across America offered up countless visual gems – as long as you opened your eyes to them

Continue reading...
Read More
The Guardian

Mar 30 2021
Jessica Hung Han Yun: a designer tripping the light fantastic

The bright mind who lit up Blindness at the Donmar and the National Theatre’s panto approaches each job like a mystery

After Jessica Hung Han Yun’s first professional gig as a lighting designer, she seriously considered leaving the industry. It was Tosca at the King’s Head theatre in London in 2017. “I remember feeling like I hadn’t done this show justice but I couldn’t figure out why. At that point I wasn’t confident in myself so I wasn’t confident in my ideas. I wanted to try things but was too scared to try them so I went for a safer option.”

That taught her an important lesson: “to be brave in the way you design and the way you approach work.” If you fail, she adds, there is always another way of approaching lighting. “People always think of failure as negative. It’s not, it’s also positive because you learn from it.” Since that moment, Hung Han Yun has gone out of her way to take risks. At 27, she has already won huge acclaim for the imagination and beauty of her designs.

Continue reading...
Read More
The Guardian

Mar 30 2021
The Great British Art Tour: an overlooked talent who broke gender norms

With public art collections closed we are bringing the art to you, exploring highlights from across the country in partnership with Art UK. Today’s pick: The Martinique by Sally Ryan

At first glance this work is easily mistaken in our collection’s spaces for one of renowned 20th-century British sculptor Jacob Epstein’s busts. Its creator is in fact the little known American sculptor Sally Ryan.

This sculpture was gifted as part of a selection of 15 of Ryan’s works, presented to the town of Walsall in 1973 by Kathleen Garman (Epstein’s widow) who had grown up locally. We are, as far as we are aware, the only UK public museum collection that features Ryan’s work.

Continue reading...
Read More
artforum.com

Mar 30 2021
Aaron Gilbert and Martin Wong
P·P·O·W is pleased to present “1981–2021”, a two-person exhibition featuring the paintings of Brooklyn-based artist Aaron Gilbert and the late Chinese-American painter Martin Wong. Sparking an
Read More
artforum.com

Mar 30 2021
Carrie Moyer
DC Moore Gallery is pleased to present Carrie Moyer: Analog Time on view from April 1 – May 1. Moyer’s use of abstraction continues to be a medium for sensations and this new body of work is a recollection
Read More
artforum.com

Mar 30 2021
Mitchell Johnson
“About halfway into Mitchell Johnson’s 2014 monograph, Color as Content, there’s a portfolio of Josef Albers and Giorgio Morandi paintings juxtaposed one to a page – looking at each other, so to speak.
Read More
artforum.com

Mar 30 2021
Rob Reynolds
Anthony Meier Fine Arts is pleased to present “OVERVIEW”, an exhibition of paintings by Los Angeles-based artist, Rob Reynolds. On view April 29 – 4 June 4, 2021.  Reynolds seeks to make the unseen
Read More
The New York Times

Mar 30 2021
As NFTs Soar, Experts Warn of an Unsustainable Bubble
As the prices of blockchain-secured works skyrocket and speculators swoop, experts are warning of an unsustainable bubble.
Read More
The Guardian

Mar 30 2021
Moscow lends Fabergé Imperial Easter eggs for V&A exhibition

Display to include eggs commissioned by Russian tsars and Fabergé pieces owned by the Queen

Three Imperial Easter eggs created by Carl Fabergé are being lent by Moscow to the UK for the first time as part of an exhibition exploring the often overlooked success in London of the tsars’ favourite jeweller.

The V&A on Wednesday announced details of an exhibition, opening in November, that will display some of the most jaw-dropping ornaments ever produced. More than 200 objects will go on display, with the show-stopper being three eggs lent by Moscow Kremlin Museums. They include the largest Imperial egg, the Moscow Kremlin egg, which was inspired by the architecture of the Dormition cathedral in the Russian capital.

Continue reading...
Read More
The New York Times

Mar 30 2021
Hired by the Empress of Art at Tehran’s Hidden Museum
Hired by the Empress of Art at Tehran’s Hidden Museum
Donna Stein, in her score-settling memoir, reveals how she helped Farah Diba Pahlavi create a museum whose collection is valued at $3 billion today.
Read More
The New York Times

Mar 30 2021
Bags, Bootlegs and Art: A Quirky Communion on Canal Street
Bags, Bootlegs and Art: A Quirky Communion on Canal Street
The creators of Canal Street Research Association have lost their lease but they can still show the way for a new arts community.
Read More
artforum.com

Mar 30 2021
Detroit Institute of Arts Board Members Quit in Protest of Leadership
Six Detroit Institute of Arts (DIA) elected board members—Anne Fredericks, Mary Ann Gorlin, Julie Rothstein, Suzanne Shank, Carol Walters, and Celeste Watkins-Hayes—have resigned after a board committee
Read More
artforum.com

Mar 30 2021
Carolyn Case
For the past six or so years, Carolyn Case’s maximalist paintings, while ostensibly nonmimetic, have been inhabited by an assortment of quotidian objects such as leaves, vases, and ruled notebook paper.
Read More
artforum.com

Mar 30 2021
Suzanne Weaver to Leave San Antonio Museum of Art
The San Antonio Museum of Art (SAMA) has announced that Suzanne Weaver is departing as interim chief curator and Brown Foundation Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art. Weaver, who came to the institution
Read More
The Guardian

Mar 30 2021
Hypnotic loops and self-soothing sounds: the rise of #OddlySatisfying and visual ASMR

As a subreddit devoted to strangely satisfying video clips grows into a behemoth, a new wave of digital artists are manufacturing their own

The subreddit r/oddlysatisfying has always had a wholesome mission: it collects small moments of magic in the world – “those little things that are inexplicably satisfying”.

It began in 2013, when people started sharing gifs of high-pressure hoses and industrial pasta cutters on Reddit. Eight years later, it has grown into an entire subsection of the internet: r/oddlysatisfying has 5.6 million members, and there’s a multi-platform “media network” of the same name. It curates content for a combined 3.44 million followers across YouTube and TikTok. Videos with the hashtag #oddlysatisfying have clocked up 25.9bn views on TikTok alone.

Continue reading...
Read More
artforum.com

Mar 30 2021
Cory Arcangel
Stand in front of Cory Arcangel’s giant video wall long enough and you’ll get spammed with an array of offers: “Seven day free VIP trial,” the opportunity to “turn up your jam,” invitations to connect
Read More
The New York Times

Mar 30 2021
The Boom and Bust of TikTok Artists
The Boom and Bust of TikTok Artists
When a 60-second video can make you famous, is it any surprise that young creators would bypass art school? But what’s left of their careers when fans move on and copycats encroach?
Read More
The Guardian

Mar 30 2021
Wasteland wanderer: how Tish Murtha captured the beating heart of Tyneside

Kids at rubbish tips, adolescents on the dole, sex workers in the street … the photographer made marginalised lives matter. But recognition came too late. Now her daughter’s making a film about her extraordinary life

One of Tish Murtha’s first photography assignments, after she enrolled at Newport College of Art in 1976, was to shoot people at work. Befriending a man called Wilf who, like her father, was a scrap man, she went on to take magical photographs at the rubbish dump, where he was often to be found. Some of her images show a fantastical figure in a mouse mask. Another captures a girl with her head in a skip, scavenging for lost treasure.

“It was very much what she knew,” says Ella Murtha, Tish’s daughter. “My granda and uncles would go down to the dump and find gems. That’s how they were brought up – to be creative and never waste anything. She took that mentality into her photography. There were treasures to be found everywhere, and what other people might not have found important, everyday moments of life, was important to her.”

Continue reading...
Read More
The Guardian

Mar 29 2021
Calm skies: the healing power of birdsong – in pictures

Photographer Gary Calton’s pandemic wanderings around the North York Moors taught him how to be alone – and in harmony with the soothing music of nature

Continue reading...
Read More
The Guardian

Mar 29 2021
Visits to world's top 100 museums and galleries fall 77% due to Covid

Institutions across globe could take years to recover from disastrous 2020, suggests survey

Visitor numbers at the world’s top 100 museums and art galleries plunged by 77% last year, down from 230 million in 2019 to just 54 million as the pandemic forced closure on an unprecedented scale.

The survey carried out annually by the Art Newspaper for more than 20 years is normally an upbeat one, highlighting which museums had good years and what the most popular exhibitions were, whether in London, New York or São Paulo.

Continue reading...
Read More
The Guardian

Mar 29 2021
The Great British Art Tour: a masked thug flexes his muscles

With public art collections closed we bring the art to you, exploring hidden gems from across the country in partnership with Art UK. Today’s pick: the Ingram Collection’s Riace III by Elisabeth Frink

In 1972, a swimmer found two lifesize Greek bronzes in the sea off the Italian coast near Riace. Dated to around 500BC, these beautifully modelled figures became known as the Riace Warriors and their public display in 1981 was a major cultural event.

They also captured the imagination of British sculptor Dame Elisabeth Frink. Frink had always been drawn to the male figure, finding it a suitable vehicle to express one of her central preoccupations – what it means to be human.

Continue reading...
Read More
artforum.com

Mar 29 2021
ARTISTS ON WRITERS | WRITERS ON ARTISTS
In the third episode of “Artists On Writers | Writers On Artists,” novelist Rachel Kushner and artist Ed Ruscha talk about their love of vintage cars, share memories of Kathy Acker and Walter Hopps,
Read More
artforum.com

Mar 29 2021
Richard Taittinger Gallery
“NARRATIVE FIGURATION 60s – 70s”, curated by Richard Frerejean Taittinger in collaboration with Yoyo Maeght, is the new historical exhibition at RICHARD TAITTINGER GALLERY. In order to celebrate RTG’s
Read More
artforum.com

Mar 29 2021
Elias Sime
James Cohan is pleased to present TIGHTROPE: ECHO!?, an exhibition of new work by Elias Sime, on view at 48 Walker Street from March 19 through April 24. This is Sime’s fourth solo exhibition at James
Read More
artforum.com

Mar 29 2021
Mel Kendrick, David Hartt and Wardell Milan
David Nolan Gallery is pleased to present a selection of new and recent works by Mel Kendrick, David Hartt and Wardell Milan. In the main gallery are new sculptures and wall-mounted wood reliefs by Mel
Read More
artforum.com

Mar 29 2021
Richard Mosse
Jack Shainman Gallery is pleased to present “Tristes Tropiques”, Richard Mosse’s expansive new body of work on view across the gallery’s 20th and 24th Street locations. “Tristes Tropiques” showcases a
Read More
artforum.com

Mar 29 2021
Julie Mehretu
Through her exploration of abstraction, scale, and, most recently, figuration, Julie Mehretu’s monumental works and her idiosyncratic vocabulary of forms have brought to the fore themes of borders,
Read More
artforum.com

Mar 29 2021
Tony Martin (1937–2021)
Tony Martin, a painter and new-media artist whose groundbreaking work with light was embraced by performers as disparate as Pauline Oliveros and the Grateful Dead, died in upstate New York on March 24
Read More
The New York Times

Mar 29 2021
16 Global Design Concepts for an Unpredictable Future
The challenges of the past year gave designers every reason to recede into the shadows, but creativity won’t be denied.
Read More
The Guardian

Mar 29 2021
How to slow down in a fast-moving world | Brief letters

Olga Tokarczuk | Flags | Music festivals | Alan Turing | Art

As a big fan of Olga Tokarczuk (Editorial, 28 March) I was also pleased to see the publication of The Lost Soul and am now a proud owner. But, surely, what’s just as important as the use of pictures is her “commentary” on modern life in a fast-moving world. Slow down, relax and chill out. I’m now looking forward to the English translation of The Books of Jacob.
Dr Mark Wilcox
Holmfirth, West Yorkshire

• On the issue of flag-waving (Letters, 26 March), I have had the privilege of living in eight countries in my adult life. In my experience, the bigger the flags and the more they are waved is in inverse proportion to the country’s national self-confidence and political stability.
David Smith
Accra, Ghana

Continue reading...
Read More
artforum.com

Mar 29 2021
Gary Panter talks about his life and art
It’s hard to overstate the importance of Gary Panter to the art world and to popular culture; he has consistently forged art based on their imbrication and crossover. Oklahoma-born and Texas-raised,
Read More
artforum.com

Mar 29 2021
San Francisco to Provide Six Months’ Basic Income to Select Local Artists
The city of San Francisco in conjunction with the Yerba Buena Center for the Arts (YBCA) has announced that it will award 130 local artists $1,000 per month for six months as the arts community there,
Read More
The New York Times

Mar 29 2021
An Online Museum Shows Life During Wartime
An Online Museum Shows Life During Wartime
The new Museum of American War Letters is making a range of communications from battle zones available.
Read More
The Guardian

Mar 28 2021
The Great British Art Tour: split flesh and a feasting lizard

With public art collections closed we are bringing the art to you, exploring highlights from across the country in partnership with Art UK. Today’s pick: Dudmaston’s Still Life With Fruit, Bird’s Nest and Insects by Rachel Ruysch

A luscious arrangement of late-season fruit is amassed at the base of a young oak tree. Clusters of grapes nestle between plump peaches, unhusked corn and a single, rotund gourd. Encroaching on this display is a rich woodland understorey: fungi, thistle, white dead-nettle, forget-me-not and thorny sprays of bramble. Brilliant flashes of red and orange in the form of physalis seed heads, rowan berries and corn kernels enliven this shaded spot. A chipped stone plinth is a singular vestige of what may have once been a formal garden. The scene teems with snails and insects – creatures whose short lifespans embody transience and impermanence, the hallmarks of a vanitas. So too do the ripening fruits, some on the cusp of over-maturing and rotting. White mould blooms on a grape; the dewy flesh of a peach has split. In the lower right corner, a miniature drama unfolds: a lizard feasts on a speckled egg in a bird’s nest.

Still Life With Fruit, Bird’s Nest and Insects is a masterful study of earthly abundance and forces of decay, the promise of life and the certainty of death. It is the work of Rachel Ruysch (1664-1740), one of the most admired flower painters of the Dutch golden age and perhaps the most successful Dutch female artist in history. In a period where few women painted professionally, Ruysch led a lucrative career that spanned almost seven decades, saw her become the first female member of the Confrerie Pictura in The Hague and named court painter to the Elector Palatine in Düsseldorf – all while raising 10 children.

Continue reading...
Read More
The Guardian

Mar 28 2021
The National review – major showcase of new Australian art gets third and final instalment

Held across Sydney’s three major galleries since 2017, it would be a shame for an exhibition series with so much potential to end here

There’s a great deal of uncertainty when it comes to contemplating what a post-Covid Australia might look like. Do we want to return to some comforting idea of normality? Or would we prefer to take the opportunity to try and build a better and more just world?

These big picture questions might seem worlds away from a discussion about contemporary art in Australia, but in many ways the art world embodies all that is both conservative and progressive in wider culture.

Continue reading...
Read More
The Guardian

Mar 28 2021
'Don’t bring your best clothes': Melbourne's Rising festival promises you will get your hands dirty

The city’s new 12-night arts festival will finally launch in May, taking over Melbourne’s rivers, parks and even Flinders St Station’s hidden ballroom

On 26 May, the same night a super full moon will be totally eclipsed, Melbourne will finally premiere the first season of Rising. The city’s new 12-night cultural festival was cancelled last August during a dark year for the arts when Covid-19 forced performances and exhibitions to shutter.

The festival will feature more than 800 artists, including more than 750 from Victoria. A takeover of the hidden former ballroom upstairs of Flinders Street Station by surrealist sculptures, a two-month-long musical performance on Melbourne’s rivers and the transformation of the Myer Music Bowl into a supernatural forest are just some of the 133 art, music and ceremony events that will take place.

Continue reading...
Read More
The Guardian

Mar 28 2021
Row erupts over bid to revive London's historic Caribbean cultural hub

Haringey council admits neglecting the West Indian centre in north London but is locked in a dispute over who should improve it

A row has broken out over the future of an important Caribbean community centre in north London which has fallen into serious disrepair after years of neglect by its landlord, the local council.

Stewart Wellington, whose parents arrived in the UK from Jamaica in the 1950s as part of the Windrush generation, has drawn up multimillion-pound plans to demolish it and start again, giving it a bigger home within an ambitious scheme that will not cost the taxpayer a penny, while instilling pride in local people.

Continue reading...
Read More
The Guardian

Mar 28 2021
Saved: portrait of the queen of dance who changed the course of ballet

Donors contribute to buy painting of Tamara Karsavina, co-founder of the London ballet school

A rare and valuable portrait of the Russian ballerina Tamara Karsavina, Anna Pavlova’s great rival and one of the key dancers behind a revolution in ballet, has been bought for the Royal Academy of Dance (RAD). Karsavina presided over the London teaching school, which she co-founded, for many years, instilling a modern emphasis on expressive movement over stiff tradition.

“This is such a ravishing and iconic picture, I thought the RAD should have it when I heard it was up for auction at Christie’s at the end of last year,” said Lady Sainsbury of Preston Candover, the former dancer Anya Linden. “The great English choreographer Frederick Ashton once wrote that working with Karsavina was like being visited by ‘a queen from a bigger and more glamorous world’, and he said that her generosity, humanity and discipline had inspired the whole company of Royal Ballet dancers.”

Continue reading...
Read More
The Guardian

Mar 28 2021
Stalin statue site reveals chilling remains of Prague labour camp

Archaeologists have discovered foundations of the previously unknown structure in the city’s Letná park

The colossal monument to Joseph Stalin that towered over Prague at the height of the cold war stood as a frightening reminder of the Soviet dictator’s tyranny and communism’s seemingly unshakeable grip on the former Czechoslovakia.

Nearly 60 years after its demolition, the brooding 15.5-metre (51ft) shrine retains a hold on the popular imagination, with locals referring to the now popular meeting point where it once stood as “Stalin’s”.

Continue reading...
Read More
The Guardian

Mar 28 2021
Yinka Shonibare: ‘You don’t want the next generation to be full of hate'

The artist on fostering hope, why he doesn’t want a retrospective, and making work inspired by Picasso’s African art collection

The British-Nigerian artist Yinka Shonibare makes work – often in sculpture, painting and tapestry – that looks unflinchingly at race, class and colonialism. The 58-year-old, who is partly paralysed after contracting a virus of the spine in his late teens, was one of the original YBAs and was shortlisted for the Turner prize in 2004. His 2010 sculpture Nelson’s Ship in a Bottle, a scaled-down replica of HMS Victory with sails made from his signature batik fabric, was one of the most memorable artworks on Trafalgar Square’s fourth plinth and now has a permanent home outside the Maritime Museum in Greenwich. Shonibare was recently given the 2021 Art Icon award by the Whitechapel Gallery.

Congratulations on becoming the Whitechapel’s eighth Art Icon. You join a storied list of artists, including Howard Hodgkin and Rachel Whiteread
I’ve been a fan of that gallery for a long time, so I feel particularly honoured. I didn’t even know that anyone noticed what I did!

Continue reading...
Read More
The Guardian

Mar 28 2021
Liverpool Biennial review – bleeps, bones and a machine that curates

Adding AI and more to its traditional art offerings, the festival’s theme of artistic experience shared through technology could not be more timely

There’s a sugary quality to Chiptune — the synthesized electronic music popularised by video game consoles and arcade machines in the 1980s. Hearing it live at the online “listening party” for Larry Achiampong’s series, Videogame Mixtape, is perhaps comparable to eating, as an adult, the confectionery you once binged on as a kid – time is reversed, instantly evoking full-coloured memories of your youth.

Achiampong’s listening party was one of a raft of online events to launch the postponed 11th edition of Liverpool’s biennial art festival: The Stomach and the Port. The British-Ghanaian artist has long been interested in video game storytelling, and his Videogame Mixtape is a meditation on the heritage and evolution of gaming music. The sonic limitations of Chiptune – its 8-bit or 16-bit processors could produce only a small number of sounds – are what gave games like Super Mario Bros their famous blocky and bleepy texture The sounds crossed over into other genres, inspiring grime musicians who sampled and adopted video game soundtracks in their tracks (1994’s Wolverine: Adamantium Rage is said to accidently be the first ever grime instrumental). The piece is also, quite simply, a playlist of “grooves”. Achiampong mixes together glitchy melodies from games such as Sonic The Hedgehog 2 and Street Fighter with accompanying chromatic graphics to be enjoyed as a cinematic compilation album of greatest hits.

2021’s Liverpool Biennial opens in two phases. The first, last week, included the unveiling of seven outdoor commissions, including a photomontage mural of layered flowers, small animals and red lips by Linder in College Lane, a bronze sculpture of two cast heads by Rashid Johnson at Canning Dock, and, at Exchange Flags, Teresa Solar’s Osteoclast, large sculptures resembling human bones that are made of kayaks. The first phase also features a range of digital commissions, including a podcast series, tutorial videos by body percussion ensemble KeKeÇa, and an AI project – The Next Biennial Should Be Curated by a Machineby Ubermorgen, Leonardo Impett and Joasia Krysa.

Continue reading...
Read More
The Guardian

Mar 28 2021
All hail our overlooked bandstands – beautiful, essential meeting places in a pandemic age | Susannah Clapp

Let’s reclaim these spaces, gifts from the past, and bring our parks alive again with public performances

In Covid walks through central London, I have found myself collecting pavilions and bandstands. And longing for them to be put to good use. They are structures unlike any others: halfway between the outside world we crave and the domestic interior to which we have been urged to retreat. They are often beautiful – flashing their finials – and often neglected, with mossy roofs and scuzzy floors.

Occasionally, they are commandeered. The bandstand on Clapham Common was the natural place for people to gather after Sarah Everard’s death. Pavilions in Sheffield and Bath are apparently in demand for weddings. I have seen boxers springing around on the bandstand in Regent’s Park, which, in 1982, was bombed by the IRA while the Royal Green Jackets played extracts from Oliver!. The marvellous stand in Arnold Circus in east London is an essential meeting place.

Continue reading...
Read More
The Guardian

Mar 28 2021
Soy of the Rovers: the vegan football club kickstarting a green revolution

Led by eco-entrepreneur Dale Vince, Forest Green Rovers have become the world’s first carbon-neutral football club. Now there are plans for a Zaha Hadid Architects all-timber stadium…

A player miskicks the ball – skies it – and its clatter on the metal roof is the loudest sound in the Covid-emptied stand. There’s not much by way of a corresponding stand on the other side of the pitch, mostly just advertising boards and a momentarily malfunctioning scoreboard. Behind them a hillock, behind that a sunset. There’s an ill-timed tackle, a melee of angry players, a red card for the home team. But the visitors, Colchester United, look rudderless – it’s the first game for their interim manager – and 10-man Forest Green Rovers run out 3-0 winners.

If much of this is a typical scene of lower-league football, as played out all over the country every week of the season, in some crucial details it is not. It’s partly the setting that’s different, on a hill outside Stroud in Gloucestershire, in a landscape more redolent of point-to-points than professional football. “Jilly Cooper loves Forest Green Rovers!” says one of the billboards – a tribute from a local author to the local team. “Red sky at night,” says one of the few people permitted to be there, as he contemplates the sunset, “shepherds’ delight.” I’m pretty sure I haven’t heard that line of commentary at a football match before.

Continue reading...
Read More