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The New York Times

Aug 07 2019
In Sydney, a Ceramic Artist Who Captures the Beauty of Decay
In Sydney, a Ceramic Artist Who Captures the Beauty of Decay
Alana Wilson’s delicate vessels belie the violent chemical processes she uses to make them.
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The New York Times

Aug 07 2019
The New York Furniture Studio That’s Become a Fashion World Favorite
The New York Furniture Studio That’s Become a Fashion World Favorite
Aaron Aujla and Ben Bloomstein of Green River Project draw on their backgrounds as artists to create conceptual handcrafted furniture.
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The New York Times

Aug 07 2019
The Studio Delivering Exotic, Color-Coded Flowers
The Studio Delivering Exotic, Color-Coded Flowers
The florists behind the new service Buunch offer a vibrant, user-friendly alternative to conventional ready-made bouquets.
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artforum.com

Aug 07 2019
Georgia Museum of Art Appoints Jeffrey Richmond-Moll Curator of American Art
The Georgia Museum of Art at the University of Georgia has tapped Jeffrey Richmond-Moll as its new curator of American art. Richmond-Moll previously worked in curatorial roles at the Princeton University
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artforum.com

Aug 07 2019
Ogden Museum of Southern Art Awards Louisiana Contemporary Prizes
The Ogden Museum of Southern Art in New Orleans has announced the artists who have received awards as part of Louisiana Contemporary, its annual juried exhibition featuring work by contemporary artists
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artforum.com

Aug 07 2019
Cincinnati’s Contemporary Arts Center Names Amara Antilla Senior Curator
The Contemporary Arts Center (CAC) in Cincinnati has appointed Amara Antilla as its new senior curator. Antilla comes to the CAC following eight years at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York,
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The New York Times

Aug 06 2019
Attempted Murder Charge Over Boy Pushed From Tate Modern Balcony
Attempted Murder Charge Over Boy Pushed From Tate Modern Balcony
A 6-year-old child suffered fractures and a brain hemorrhage after falling around 100 feet.
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The Guardian

Aug 06 2019
Summer and smoke: rock'n'roll in the warmer months – in pictures

Musicians from Debbie Harry to Joey Ramone have been captured and collated enjoying the summer in a new exhibition at 72 Gallery in New York showing until 22 August. In Summer and Smoke, the photographs on show are designed to ‘snap you out of your summer doldrums’

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artforum.com

Aug 06 2019
Aspen Institute to Launch Center Dedicated to Bauhaus Artist Herbert Bayer
The Aspen Institute in Colorado is planning to open a research center dedicated to the work of Austrian designer, painter, photographer, typographer, and architect Herbert Bayer, an influential member
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artforum.com

Aug 06 2019
Kamal Boullata (1942–2019)
Palestinian artist, historian, and writer Kamal Boullata, who drew from his interests in light and transparency, conditions of creation and exile, and Byzantine and Islamic aesthetic culture, literature,
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artforum.com

Aug 06 2019
Munich Museums Restitute Nazi-Looted Artworks
Three museums in Munich returned nine artworks to the heirs of Julius and Semaya Franziska Davidsohn, Jewish collectors who were persecuted by the Nazis during World War II, at a ceremony held at the
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artforum.com

Aug 06 2019
Christa Joo Hyun D’Angelo
American artist Christa Joo Hyun D’Angelo’s exhibition title, “GHOSTS,” may cause visitors to anticipate a house of horrors. But once inside, they’ll find that the one-room space situated on the wide
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artforum.com

Aug 06 2019
Centre Pompidou’s Yung Ma to Direct 2020 Seoul Mediacity Biennale
The Seoul Museum of Art (SeMA) announced that Yung Ma will serve as artistic director for the eleventh edition of the Seoul Mediacity Biennale, which opens in September 2020. Next year’s biennial will
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artforum.com

Aug 06 2019
Suzanne Deal Booth Gives University of Chicago $1 Million for Art Conservation
The University of Chicago’s department of art history has received a $1 million gift from activist, philanthropist, and Napa Valley vintner Suzanne Deal Booth in support of its art conservation program.
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artforum.com

Aug 06 2019
Juliana Cerqueira Leite
To make her sculptures, Juliana Cerqueira Leite often crawls inside large mounds of clay, casting the imprints of her body. By prioritizing touch and spatial orientation, her research has led her
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artforum.com

Aug 06 2019
Pérez Art Museum Miami Gifted Forty-Six Works from Collector Gordon W. Bailey
The Pérez Art Museum Miami (PAMM) has received a donation of forty-six artworks from Los Angeles–based collector and scholar Gordon W. Bailey. Included in the gift are drawings, paintings, and sculptures
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The Guardian

Aug 06 2019
Terry O'Neill on his best Bowie shoots: 'David never needed coaxing'

He photographed the biggest stars on Earth but Bowie was his favourite. He recalls the star’s irresistible charm, his most outlandish outfits – and his druggiest shoot

From Audrey Hepburn to the Beatles, Frank Sinatra and Elton John, there aren’t many pop cultural icons Terry O’Neill hasn’t photographed. One of his subjects, Hollywood actress Faye Dunaway – who he famously captured hungover, surrounded by newspapers the morning after winning an Oscar in 1977 – became his wife, even if the memory now frustrates him. He agrees that a photographer falling in love with one of their subjects is rarely a good idea: “That was a waste of 12 years of my life!”

Yet the legendary photographer insists none of these stars compared to David Bowie. “He was my creative muse,” O’Neill tells me authoritatively over the phone. “He was so charming and warm, and one of the few people [other than Faye] I really felt friendly towards.”

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artforum.com

Aug 06 2019
Teenager Charged with Attempted Murder for Throwing Boy from Tate Modern Balcony
A teenager who was https://www.artforum.com/news/teenager-arrested-for-pushing-six-year-old-boy-off-tate-modern-s-viewing-platform-80444 arrested for tossing a six-year-old boy off of Tate Modern’s
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The Guardian

Aug 06 2019
Can modular homes solve the UK's housing crisis?

Emerging players in the construction sector are introducing greater numbers of factory-built homes into the UK market, but experts say this needs to be accompanied by industry-wide reform

Modular housing is on the brink of a major milestone. Construction is under way of the world’s tallest towers built using modular manufacturing, a method by which houses or blocks of flats are built in sections offsite in a factory. Rather than gracing the skyline of Singapore or Beijing, the two towers, which will be 38 and 44 storeys high and contain 546 flats, are to be built in the London borough of Croydon.

Ben Derbyshire, the chair of HTA Design LLP, the architecture practice behind the Croydon towers, and president of the Royal Institute of British Architects, believes modular construction in the UK is at a turning point. “Confidence is now building and the capacity to construct homes in this way is emerging. So we will see it becoming less niche and more mainstream,” he says.

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The Guardian

Aug 05 2019
They call it acid: a graphic history of the first LSD trip – in pictures

Brian Blomerth’s graphic novel Bicycle Day tells the story of the psychedelic ride made in 1943 by Swiss chemist Albert Hofmann as he researched the drug LSD

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The Guardian

Aug 05 2019
Transamerica/n: celebrating the underrepresented history of trans art

In a unique new exhibition, works from artists such as Andy Warhol and Nan Goldin, highlight the progression of transgender models and subjects

If you’re at an art fair or biennale and spot a pair of bald women wearing matching pink dresses, you’re not seeing double. You’ve just spotted Berlin duo Eva & Adele, legendary art scenesters noted for their style and commitment to trans visibility since forming their partnership in 1989.

Related: 'It's extraordinarily powerful': first trans monument comes to New York

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The New York Times

Aug 05 2019
Aspen Institute Center Devoted to Bauhaus Artist to Open in 2022
Aspen Institute Center Devoted to Bauhaus Artist to Open in 2022
The facility, the Resnick Center for Herbert Bayer Studies, will have galleries and educational programs and study Bayer’s work.
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The New York Times

Aug 05 2019
Manet’s Last Years: A Radical Embrace of Beauty
The Art Institute of Chicago explores the great paradox of the 19th century’s greatest painter: from a scandalous youth of frank nudes to flowers, fruit bowls and fashionable women.
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artforum.com

Aug 05 2019
Frye Art Museum Acquires Four Works from Seattle Art Fair
The Frye Art Museum in Seattle has added four new works to its collection. The acquisition is part of a two-year partnership with the Seattle Art Fair, which awarded the institution a total of $50,000
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artforum.com

Aug 05 2019
Aichi Triennale Exhibition Closes Following Threats over “Comfort Woman” Statue
Three days after the 2019 Aichi Triennale kicked off in Japan, an exhibition at a museum in Nagoya was shut down after organizers received dozens of threats by phone, email, and fax over the inclusion
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The Guardian

Aug 05 2019
Dóra Maurer review – the dissident who rebelled in colour

Tate Modern, London
From black and white films made in her kitchen to glorious geometric designs, the Hungarian artist’s career has blossomed since the end of communist rule

Dóra Maurer’s impressive creativity since the end of Soviet control and communist one-party rule in Hungary in 1989 is an exception to a dispiriting rule. Many creative artists whose imaginations rebelled against the communist states of eastern Europe faded after their countries became democratic. Was the challenge of dissidence a spur to creativity? Or is capitalist democracy destructive in its own banal, populist way? The novels of Milan Kundera and films of Jan Švankmajer are examples of that lost urgency, and – in Švankmajer’s case – funding, after the fall of communism. So it’s heartening that Maurer, who spent much of her life making dissident art in a totalitarian state, has done her best work since that state collapsed.

It’s worth looking at her artistic life backwards. Go right to the end of Tate Modern’s enlightening, and free, survey of her subversive career to be delighted by the paintings she does today. Maurer’s flights of colour include interleaving waves of blue, green and yellow, curves of red rushing towards blue and orange rectangles, and interlapping grids of too many colours to count. The most recent of these joyous paintings that spin off across walls and around corners as they defy the idea of a closed picture surface is dated 2016. Maurer, born in 1937 in Budapest, is in the swim of creativity today and producing paintings that are simultaneously installations, with hard, bright geometries knocked sideways by some crazy libertarian impulse.

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The Guardian

Aug 05 2019
Fights, festivals, fear: Sohrab Hura's angst-ridden India

With his photographs of out-of-control hedonism, punch-ups and blood-letting rituals, Hura captures a nation in the grip of an angry new nationalism

Sohrab Hura’s photobook, The Coast, begins with a fantastical short story written by him. It features Madhu, a woman whose head has been stolen by her obsessive lover. She is awaiting the arrival of “an idiot of a photographer” who wants to capture her and “all the wonderful and vicious things that happened along the Indian coastline”.

The images that follow are indeed wonderful and vicious, almost hallucinatory in their intensity: lovers embrace, angry men come to blows, revellers are caught in closeup, eyes bloodshot, faces daubed with powdered paint, lips smeared with lipstick. Moments of violence are caught in the flashbulb’s glare: a machete drips blood on a bare foot, a man holds a brick above another man he has pinned to the pavement, a woman stares in terror at something – or someone – just out of the frame.

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artforum.com

Aug 05 2019
Katharine Mulherin (1964–2019)
KM WAS ALL OF THE THINGS. She was perceptive and talented. Committed and enthusiastic. Essential and legendary. And funny. She had a very unique way of bringing people toward art that they wouldn’t
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artforum.com

Aug 05 2019
Teenager Arrested for Pushing Six-Year-Old Boy Off Tate Modern’s Viewing Platform
A six-year-old boy who was thrown from a tenth-story viewing platform at Tate Modern in London on Sunday, August 4, is in critical but stable condition, the 
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The Guardian

Aug 05 2019
Black 3.0: Anish Kapoor and the art world’s pettiest, funniest dispute

Stuart Semple was incensed when Kapoor bought the exclusive rights to the world’s blackest paint – so he made what he says is a blacker one and banned him from using it

Name: Black 3.0.

Age: Six months old.

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artforum.com

Aug 05 2019
Mary Boone’s Former Galleries Find New Tenants, Sam Gilliam Now Represented by Pace, and More
Yares Art, Dennis Yares’s gallery, which specializes in Color Field painting, is moving into Mary Boone’s former space at 745 Fifth Avenue in Midtown Manhattan. According to
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The Guardian

Aug 05 2019
Rare Bonington landscape on display at National Gallery

View on River Seine – Morning by 19th-century British artist acquired for nation

Richard Parkes Bonington was a contemporary of Constable and Turner, but his death at the age of 25 from tuberculosis excluded him from the casual art lovers’ radar.

Now, visitors to the National Gallery in London can see a rare landscape by the influential 19th-century artist after it acquired a second work for its collection.

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artforum.com

Aug 04 2019
Davide Stucchi
To speak of a perfume’s sillage is to evoke the trail of scent that follows its wearer, to contemplate how a fragrance diffuses around a body, or, more metaphysically, to consider what lingers in the
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The Guardian

Aug 04 2019
Vote Neave and build a better Britain

The inaugural Neave Brown award is a welcome initiative honouring Britain’s best affordable housing. But will it persuade Boris Johnson to invest in the public sector?

Inscribed on the tomb of Christopher Wren in St Paul’s Cathedral is the following injunction: “Reader, if you seek his monument, look around you.” Were you to seek Boris Johnson’s monument, your gaze might stray in the direction of Nincompoopolis by Douglas Murphy. Published in 2017, it’s a forensic evisceration of Johnson’s architectural and design follies during his eight years as London mayor. The book’s cover depicts the comedically grotesque tableau of a peroxide Struwwelpeter toupee plonked on the ArcelorMittal Orbit, the hellish helter-skelter that squats like a gutted toad on the edge of London’s Olympic Park. “An ugly man’s ugly legacy of chaos concentrated into a single ugly object”, as the critic Jonathan Meades wrote in his review of Nincompoopolis for the Morning Star.

Murphy’s grimly entertaining book should be required rereading for anyone who cares about the built environment and is now casting the runes to see what Johnson’s elevation to prime minister might portend. The auguries are not good. Running riot in London, the nation’s largest playpen, he was insatiably and gullibly drawn to big-ticket vanity projects of stunning vacuity. Like stations of the cross, the Boris bridge, the Boris bus, the Boris cable car and the Boris Orbit (the Borbit?) came to define the modern Via Dolorosa of London’s anguished “iconic” calvary.

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The Guardian

Aug 04 2019
Artists’ Film International review – the mesmerising view from elsewhere

Whitechapel Gallery, London
Bringing together images that are both familiar and otherworldly, the latest collection of AFI works is a hidden treasure

The French ambassador’s wife sings bleak arias behind the shutters of her fortified residence in Ouagadougou. Somalian refugees perform the epic verse of their homeland on the streets of Turin. Rock drilling turns up great chunks of the earth’s mantle in the Mojave desert, alien in winter, while dancers in their 90s turn the boulevards of Argentina into sweltering outdoor ballrooms – global visions appearing on screen.

Art can take you anywhere, and nowhere more immediately or more variously than in the ceaseless cycle of films that makes up the Artists’ Film International programme at the Whitechapel Gallery. The AFI, as it is unenticingly known, is one of the hidden treasures of the contemporary art scene in Britain. It is always there, always free and perpetually changing, with tranches of new films rolling out through the year from all over the world. They aren’t bulletins, although each brings news of elsewhere; nor are they movies in any conventional sense, although some artists work with actors, film stock and plot.

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The Guardian

Aug 04 2019
Emma Watson and Claire Foy star as Juliet in Pirelli’s 2020 calendar

Annual art project features shoots in Verona and Paris imagining tragic heroine as she might have been in later life

All calendars mark the passing of time, but those produced by the Italian tyremaker Pirelli, once noted for their soft-porn shots of nude women, have chronicled our changing tastes more than most.

Behind-the-scenes images from the 2020 calendar show photographer Paolo Roversi putting Shakespeare and his heroine Juliet centre stage, featuring acclaimed actresses Emma Watson, Claire Foy and Kristen Stewart.

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The Guardian

Aug 03 2019
The big picture: the highs of Woodstock
Elliott Landy’s photograph of fans scaling the sound towers at the legendary music festival captures the freedom of the 60s

Throughout the Woodstock music festival, which celebrates its 50th anniversary later this month, concert-goers scaled 70ft sound towers to get a better look at what was happening on stage. Depending on your view, this was either “insanely dangerous”, as production coordinator John Morris described it in Woodstock: An Oral History – the towers weren’t set up to hold all that extra weight and one fallen structure could have killed “hundreds of people” – or an expression of the joyful sense of freedom that pervaded the four-day event in August 1969.

For photographer Elliott Landy, who captured the climbers during his in-depth coverage of Woodstock, the ascent of the sound towers, though dangerous, has a broader meaning. “It really symbolises the nature of the 60s,” he says, “which was that people were trying to get higher, spiritually, so they can experience life in a better way, in a clearer way.”

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The Guardian

Aug 03 2019
Drawn to nature: insect art of the 16th century – in pictures

In the late 16th century, Flemish artist, scholar, poet and miniaturist Joris Hoefnagel (1542-1600) created the first illustrated book devoted to the study of insects. Documenting his observations with the naked eye, he meticulously painted hundreds of insects with watercolour and gouache. Marisa Anne Bass, associate professor of art history at Yale University, has produced a book on his work, Insect Artifice (Princeton University Press, £50). “Hoefnagel’s art is a reminder that nature and culture go hand in hand,” says Bass. “The natural world is not just the space that we inhabit. It is also a space that allows us to think through the very question of what it means to be human.”

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The Guardian

Aug 03 2019
Original Observer photography

Podcasters and poets, punks and politicians – the best photography commissioned by the Observer in July 2019

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The Guardian

Aug 02 2019
The 20 photographs of the week

The final stage of the Tour de France, violent demonstrations in Hong Kong, plastic rubbish on an uninhabited island and illegal migrants in El Paso – the last seven days, as captured by the world’s best photojournalists

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The New York Times

Aug 02 2019
MoMA PS1 Reopens James Turrell Installation
MoMA PS1 Reopens James Turrell Installation
“Meeting” had been closed indefinitely in January, after nearby construction became visible from the installation.
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The New York Times

Aug 02 2019
In Chicago, Overlooked Achievements by L.G.B.T.Q. Artists
An ambitious survey of underrecognized gay artists of the last half century.
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The New York Times

Aug 02 2019
Silence Speaking Volumes: Artists Confront the Culture of Incarceration
Art meets social action in “Mirror/Echo/Tilt,” which uses gestures to combat stigma — through film and real-life interventions.
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artforum.com

Aug 02 2019
Don Suggs (1945–2019)
American artist and teacher Don Suggs, a longtime instructor at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), has died. He was seventy-four years old. Suggs was born in Fort Worth, Texas, in
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artforum.com

Aug 02 2019
Baltimore Museum of Art to Devote 2020 to Celebrating Women Artists
The Baltimore Museum of Art (BMA) is launching a yearlong program of exhibitions dedicated to the presentation of female-identifying artists. The initiative is part of the BMA’s efforts to address race
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The Guardian

Aug 02 2019
June Fraser obituary

My mother, June Fraser, who has died aged 88, was a pioneering graphic designer. She began her career in the 1950s at Design Research Unit, a multidisciplinary London practice, where her prolific output included visual identities for Bata shoes and British Sugar, a logotype and packaging for Wedgwood, a logo for Sadler’s Wells theatre, and packaging for the Royal Mint.

Later, in 1980, she became head of graphics at John Lewis Partnership. Though she stayed there for only four years it was an incredibly prolific period, during which she was responsible for the packaging of a huge range of the partnership’s own-brand goods under the Jonelle name. A challenge she particularly enjoyed was the redesign of wine labels for Waitrose.

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artforum.com

Aug 02 2019
New York City Announces Record $212 Million Cultural Budget for 2020
New York City’s Department of Cultural Affairs (DCLA) announced that $212 million have been allotted for the 2020 fiscal year budget for the arts. The sum, which is the highest amount ever awarded to
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artforum.com

Aug 02 2019
Wisconsin’s Kohler Arts Center Acquires Thousands of Works by Eugene von Bruenchenhein
The John Michael Kohler Arts Center in Sheboygan, Wisconsin, has acquired more than 8,300 artworks by the self-taught American artist Eugene von Bruenchenhein (1910–1983). The collection, which comprises
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artforum.com

Aug 02 2019
Karsten Schubert (1961–2019)
Karsten Schubert, the dealer, publisher, and pillar of the London arts scene in the 1980s, has died at the age of fifty-seven. According to https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2019/aug/01/karsten-schubert-obituary
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The New York Times

Aug 02 2019
After Investigation, Neil deGrasse Tyson Will Keep His Job
After Investigation, Neil deGrasse Tyson Will Keep His Job
Dr. Tyson was accused of sexual misconduct. The American Museum of Natural History said he would remain director of the Hayden Planetarium.
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