News

Displaying 151 to 200 of 10292 results

The New York Times

Jan 08 2018
My Detox: One Artist’s ‘Life-Changing’ Morning Drink
Every day, instead of coffee, Ana Kras drinks a chai latte of adaptogenic herbs, an ancient way to fortify the body against maladies.
Read More
The New York Times

Jan 08 2018
My Detox: A Calming Elixir to Drink Before Bedtime
The creative consultant Matilda Goad includes a warm blend of turmeric and coconut milk in her nightly de-stressing routine.
Read More
The Guardian

Jan 08 2018
Damien Hirst to show new spot paintings at 18th-century mansion

Exhibition of Colour Space paintings will open in March in the gilded state rooms of Houghton Hall in Norfolk

Damien Hirst is to take over the spectacular gilded state rooms of Britain’s finest Palladian mansion to show a new series of his long-running spot paintings.

The Colour Space works, two of which can be seen here for the first time, will be shown at Houghton Hall in Norfolk, built in the 18th century for Britain’s first prime minister, Sir Robert Walpole, and which once housed one of the world’s greatest art collections.

Continue reading...
Read More
The Guardian

Jan 08 2018
'Museums should be accessible': the backlash to the Met's new pricing policy

The decision to charge out-of-state visitors a set $25 fee has enraged many who believe the New York institution’s ‘staggering wealth’ should make access easier

When the Metropolitan Museum of Art introduced their pay-what-you-wish policy in 1970, Richard Nixon was president, Elvis Presley was alive and New York City saw its very first gay pride march.

Related: Arguing over art is right but banning it is the work of fascists | Jonathan Jones

Continue reading...
Read More
artforum.com

Jan 08 2018
NEWS: Frank Lloyd Wright Building in Montana Faces Demolition
Curbed/Frank Lloyd Wright Building Conservancy
Read More
artforum.com

Jan 08 2018
SLANT: SUNRISE: January 8, 2018
SUNRISE: Ariana Reines’s January column
Read More
artforum.com

Jan 08 2018
Read More
The Guardian

Jan 07 2018
Mush! Training for the the Can-Am dog sled race – in pictures

Marla Brodsky, a professional musher, is building her Alaskan husky dogs’ distance endurance to prepare them for 100- and 250-mile races. They often train in subzero conditions near their home in Northampton, Massachusetts

Continue reading...
Read More
The Guardian

Jan 07 2018
'A pretty proud moment': the little-known arts centre that opens the Triennial

Founded as a response to social problems, the Yarrenyty Arltere art centre in Alice Springs has helped transform the lives of many Indigenous people

Each morning, soft sculpture artist Marlene Rubuntja takes a short walk with her sun-dazed dogs to the place that changed her life: Yarrenyty Arltere art centre, in the middle of the desert.

Nestled next to the Larapinta Valley town camp where she lives, a short drive from Alice Springs, the Indigenous-run centre comprises a low-slung brick complex and a collection of demountables, painted with earthy tones and murals that blend into the formidable MacDonnell Ranges behind it.

Continue reading...
Read More
artforum.com

Jan 07 2018
SLANT: SUNRISE: January 7, 2018
SUNRISE: Ariana Reines’s January column
Read More
The Guardian

Jan 07 2018
Historic Merz Barn art studio could move from Lake District to China

Stone building used by influential German artist Kurt Schwitters may be sold due to lack of funds to maintain it, owners say

A stone barn in the Lake District, which was the final studio of one of the 20th century’s most influential artists, could be moved to China if funding is not found to maintain it, its owners have said.

The Merz Barn in Langdale, Cumbria, was used by the German artist Kurt Schwitters, after he fled from the Nazis in 1940. The building became regarded as a pioneering piece of modernist art after Schwitters covered its walls in a distinctive collage of materials before his death in 1948.

Continue reading...
Read More
The Guardian

Jan 07 2018
Gavin Stamp obituary
Architectural historian who campaigned to save notable buildings from destruction

Gavin Stamp, who has died aged 69 after suffering from cancer, was an architectural historian and campaigner whose scholarship and enthusiasm promoted the understanding and reputation of several great but neglected architects, and helped save many fine 19th and 20th century buildings (he would say not nearly enough) from the wrecker’s ball. As a writer and conservationist he followed a tradition set by John Betjeman and Ian Nairn, both of whom he admired, and for nearly 40 years his pseudonymous column in Private Eye waged war on the property developers and planning authorities who disfigured British towns with their greed and ineptitude. Stamp concluded that their disregard for history, especially in the shape of Victorian buildings, was a form of national self-hatred.

His passion for buildings first appeared when, as a boarder at Dulwich college, he filled his weekends by exploring the streets of south London and southern suburbs such as Bromley, where he was born. Like most pupils in the days of the so-called Dulwich Experiment, he had a free place at the school (funded by a local authority grant) – a fact that he was keen to stress later in life whenever he was mistaken for a typical product of a paid education.

Continue reading...
Read More
The Guardian

Jan 07 2018
Bushey Jewish Cemetery review – a place of dignity and ease
Bushey, Hertfordshire
Elegant pavilions, a broad portico and thick walls of ‘rammed earth’ create a calm, unobtrusive £6m extension and 17,000 more burial spaces for the Jewish community of north-west London

In a Wahaca restaurant in London’s Covent Garden there stands, improbably, a wall in rammed earth, an ancient but now uncommon construction technique. It was here that Andrew Waugh, of the architects Waugh Thistleton, took representatives of the United Synagogue, to persuade them to use it on the extension he was designing for their cemetery in Bushey, Hertfordshire.

They liked it. “It’s like the Wailing Wall,” said one, also improbably. They stuck with the earth, even though it required importing a specialist from Western Australia to do the job, together with a shipping container full of formwork and other aids. They persisted even after a trial wall collapsed.

Continue reading...
Read More
The Guardian

Jan 07 2018
From Ear to Ear to Eye review – voices of battle and the bazaar
Nottingham Contemporary
From phone films to ballistics reports, testimony is central to this powerful survey of contemporary Arab art

In the spring of 2014, in one of the most controversial crimes of recent times, Israeli border guards shot dead two Palestinian teenagers in the West Bank town of Beitunia. CNN reporters captured the deaths on camera, disproving the soldiers’ claim that they were quelling a riot; but still the Israeli government defended its own. In the chaotic investigation that followed, audio-ballistic spectrograms of the event produced by the Amman-born artist and “audio investigator” Lawrence Abu Hamdan proved crucial. He was asked – as we are now, in his immensely powerful installation at Nottingham Contemporary – to listen rather than look.

The spectrograms hang before you like targets in a shooting gallery. Each represents a different kind of gunshot, plucked from the soundtrack of carnage; and each approaches or recedes according to the trial unfolding in transcript on a screen below. Were the soldiers firing live ammunition or rubber bullets, as they insisted? Or were they in fact trying to disguise the fatal shots to make them sound like rubber bullets, with murderous intent? Hamdan gave the clinching evidence; but what strikes is the eerie silence of his installation. The case appears more horrifying as the lies and distortions are laid bare on screen, uninflected by the mollifying tones of human voices. The bodies of evidence hang in the air, ghosts of the speechless victims.

Continue reading...
Read More
EosArte.eu

Jan 06 2018
Il Processo. A 80 anni dalle leggi “per la difesa della razza”
  Organizzata da Memoria in Scena un’emozionante rappresentazione teatrale ricorda una delle pagine più deplorevoli della nostra storia recente. Un processo, con imputato Re Vittorio Emanuele III, avvia la riflessione sulle responsabilità collettive del regime fascista, delle Istituzioni e di una parte di società civile che, silenziosamente, accettò l’infamia di queste leggi. Il processo vede la partecipazione di: Marco [...]
Read More
EosArte.eu

Jan 06 2018
Brera,, James Bradburne :”Occorre una vera autonomia per mettere a frutto le migliori competenze”
Dopo due anni di intenso lavoro e anche di polemiche, James Bradburne, Direttore di Brera, tratteggia un bilancio e indica prospettive intervista a Pietro diloreto –Direttore, sono passati due anni dal suo insediamento; più soddisfazioni o più problemi qui a Brera per lei? R: Il mio approccio con le cose consiste nell’avere una visione strategica, nel sistemarla [...]
Read More
EosArte.eu

Jan 06 2018
A Recanati Lorenzo Lotto dialoga con Giacomo Leopardi
  Recanati, Villa Colloredo Mels, Fino all’ 8 aprile 2018, A cura di Vittorio Sgarbi   Con la mostra “Lorenzo Lotto dialoga con Giacomo Leopardi” Vittorio Sgarbi mette in rapporto due anime inquiete e di grande sensibilità. Entrambi a Recanati hanno lasciato il loro segreto. Ad arricchire l’evento un ciclo di conferenze con personalità della cultura e l’esposizione [...]
Read More
EosArte.eu

Jan 06 2018
La pittura secondo Jack Kerouac. 100 opere a Gallarate
  Peter Greenway ha lavorato ad un omaggio al grande scrittore americano, le cui fasi  sono proposte in apertura della mostra dedicata alla produzione grafica e pittorica del padre della beat generation. Circa cento opere costituiscono un itinerario, tra  Scuola di New York e l’Espressionismo astratto, rivelando anche determinati legami con l’Europa e con la sua pittura. [...]
Read More
The Guardian

Jan 06 2018
Behind the veil: Iranian women cast off their hijabs – in pictures

For her project My Stealthy Freedom, Amsterdam-based photographer Marinka Masséus travelled to Iran, where it is mandatory for women to wear the hijab. The series, in which women defiantly throw their veils in the air, was created in a Tehran apartment with the windows covered in tinfoil to conceal the flash. “I applaud the right for any woman to wear the hijab as she chooses,” says Masséus. “But many Iranian women hate compulsory hijab – they see it as a symbol of oppression.” She was struck by the contrast between the oppressive regime and the independent, modern women she met there. “They all told me the same thing: we have two faces, one for the outside world to stay safe and one for inside.”

  • Masih Alinejad, an activist for My Stealthy Freedom against forced hijab, calls upon all foreign female visitors to Iran to not wear the headscarf in support of the fight for freedom for women in Iran.
Continue reading...
Read More
artforum.com

Jan 06 2018
SLANT: SUNRISE: January 6, 2018
SUNRISE: Ariana Reines’s January column
Read More
The Guardian

Jan 06 2018
The 20 photographs of the week

New Year’s celebrations, Rohingya refugees in Bangladesh and winter storms in the US - the week’s biggest news stories captured by the world’s best photojournalists

Continue reading...
Read More
The New York Times

Jan 05 2018
Show Us Your Wall: See the Art That Tavi Gevinson Collects
The blogger-turned-actress lives in Brooklyn and is drawn to artwork about young women.
Read More
artforum.com

Jan 05 2018
FILM: Point of No Return
Sarah Nicole Prickett on the finale of Twin Peaks: The Return
Read More
The Guardian

Jan 05 2018
'Institutional' male bias in government's art collection, says Labour

Shadow arts minister says only a quarter of works acquired by the government in recent years are by female artists

The government’s art collection reveals “institutional bias” against female artists, according to Labour. Research by the party showed that about three-quarters of works acquired in recent years were created by men.

Figures from the shadow culture team suggest that around 265 works by men and just 80 by women were collected over the last five years for which data is available, between 2011-2012 and 2015-2016.

Continue reading...
Read More
The New York Times

Jan 05 2018
Fire-Breathing Robots Bring Anarchy to a Chelsea Art Gallery
Mark Pauline, a.k.a. Survival Research Laboratories, has resisted the commercial side of the art world for years. Now he has work for sale in Chelsea.
Read More
The New York Times

Jan 05 2018
Thomas Roma, Photographer and Professor, Accused of Sexual Misconduct
Five women who studied with Mr. Roma at Columbia University and at the School of Visual Arts said he behaved inappropriately.
Read More
The Guardian

Jan 05 2018
Arts minister places UK export bar on £26.2m Francesco Guardi painting

Huge painting of Rialto Bridge was sold at auction last summer to an overseas buyer but committee says it would be ‘regrettable loss’ for the UK

A huge painting of Venice’s Grand Canal by Francesco Guardi has had a temporary export bar placed on it by ministers in an attempt to prevent it leaving the UK.

‘Rialto Bridge with the Palazzo dei Camerlenghi’ was owned by successive generations of the Guinness family before it was sold last summer to an overseas buyer at a Christie’s auction for £26.2m.

Continue reading...
Read More
The Guardian

Jan 05 2018
Yorkshire revolts and Doig paints a cracking Caribbean dreamworld – the week in art

Tracey Emin’s My Bed is down to its last weeks in Margate, Peter Doig is on great form and Yorkshire Sculpture Park mans the barricades – all in your weekly dispatch

Revolt and Revolution
Protest art from the Arts Council collection brings a radical start to the year on the rolling dales of Britain’s grandest sculpture park.
Yorkshire Sculpture Park from 6 January until 15 April.

Continue reading...
Read More
artforum.com

Jan 05 2018
Read More
artforum.com

Jan 05 2018
Read More
artforum.com

Jan 05 2018
FILM: Journey to the East
Nick Pinkerton on Michelangelo Antonioni’s Chung Kuo—Cina (China)
Read More
artforum.com

Jan 05 2018
SLANT: SUNRISE: January 5, 2018
SUNRISE: Ariana Reines’s January column
Read More
The New York Times

Jan 05 2018
Met Changes 50-Year Admissions Policy: Non-New Yorkers Must Pay
With a decline in visitors paying the “suggested” full admission price, the museum is looking for ways to regain revenue.
Read More
The New York Times

Jan 05 2018
Your Week in Culture: Jaamil Olawale Kosoko, the Killers, a ‘Lavender Scare’ Opera
Also the week of Jan. 7: Female playwrights take over Washington, D.C.; and Andrey Zvyagintsev gets a retrospective at MoMA.
Read More
The Guardian

Jan 05 2018
Michael Armitage’s Conjestina: a trippy evocation of Kenyan exoticism

This tragic depiction of a female boxing champion recalls Gauguin’s compact nudes and Watteau’s Pierrot

The young Kenya-born, London-based painter Michael Armitage often makes beautiful images inspired by terrible things. Rendered on traditional bark cloth, his layers of paint fade trippily from one lush colour to another, from tangerine to purple, with the occasional jolt of green. The fluid figures gently shape-shift within his birth country’s twisting trees and melting hills.

Continue reading...
Read More
The Guardian

Jan 04 2018
Unbuilt cities: the outrageous highway schemes left as roads to nowhere

The postwar passion for highway construction saw cities around the world carved up in the name of progress. But as communities fought back many schemes were abandoned – their half-built traces showing what might have been

Of all the mistakes made by city planners in the postwar era, the passion for highway construction has to be one of the most foolhardy. After the early success of systems like the autobahn and freeways, cities everywhere were carved up to make way for giant roads, crashing through neighbourhoods and creating opportunities for “comprehensive redevelopment”.

Continue reading...
Read More
The New York Times

Jan 04 2018
Torbjorn Rodland’s Puzzling Photos Are Unsettling and Arousing
The Norwegian photographer is having a moment, with major European shows. His pictures capture changes in photography in the internet era.
Read More