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The Guardian

Jul 27 2020
The Festival of Ethical Photography – single shot award entries

The Festival of Ethical Photography, now in its 11th year, was created to celebrate and promote photography dealing with content judged to be ethically significant. This year’s festival, held in Lodi in northern Italy in October, will maintain physical distancing by using the city’s streets and parks as display locations

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artforum.com

Jul 27 2020
Jess Barbagallo on Ethan Philbrick’s Disordo Virtutum
AT 8 PM ON A WARM, Thursday night, a crowd of twenty arrives in a virtual room for a Zoom performance of composer, cellist, and writer Ethan Philbrick’s Disordo Virtutum, presented by New York’s
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artforum.com

Jul 27 2020
Liesl Raff
To enter this exhibition requires crossing the physical and symbolic threshold of a steel, latex, and palm leaf structure resembling a hastily constructed cabana roof and suspended at a forty-five-degree
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artforum.com

Jul 27 2020
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The Guardian

Jul 27 2020
Protests as Norway begins tearing down building adorned with Picassos

Demolition work at building damaged in Anders Breivik attack has divided opinion

Amid protests, Norway’s government has begun tearing down a landmark building adorned with giant murals by Pablo Picasso as part of efforts to rebuild government headquarters damaged in the 2011 terrorist attack by the rightwing extremist Anders Breivik.

The Y-block office building in Oslo, with a Picasso drawing sand-blasted on to a 250-tonne section of the facade, will be replaced by a modern, safer development, the government says.

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The Guardian

Jul 27 2020
Show some solidarity! Magnum's print sale – in pictures

Magnum photographers are selling images that represent ‘solidarity’, from Muhammad Ali to Mount Fuji. Magnum photographers and Vogue will both donate 50% of sales to the NAACP. For more information click here

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The Guardian

Jul 27 2020
'Enough is enough': an urgent art campaign to help vote Trump out

Enough of Trump is a new initiative involving a collection of artists who aim to inspire US voters to make an informed decision this November

In 2008, the Los Angeles artist Shepard Fairey created a political poster for Barack Obama’s presidential campaign, depicting a graphic portrait of the candidate with the word “Hope”. It would soon become an iconic symbol, signaling a new America, and it gave renewed faith to a nation – and the world.

Ever since, there hasn’t really been a viral political poster that has had the same cultural impact. But that could change as Fairey and a group of artists are fusing forces for Enough of Trump, a new art advocacy campaign that aims to inspire voters for the November election.

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The Guardian

Jul 27 2020
Can you name this Scottish boxer? The great British art quiz

The Hepworth Wakefield set today’s quiz, in our series that explores the collections of British museums closed due to Covid-19

This quiz is brought to you in collaboration with Art UK, the online home of the UK’s public art collections, showing art from more than 3,000 venues, by 45,000 artists. Each day, a different collection on Art UK sets the questions.

Today, our questions are set by the Hepworth Wakefield, the collection established in 1923 with a collecting policy to “nurture a public understanding of contemporary art and its relations to modern life”. Works were acquired by the up-and-coming artists of the day, including local heroes Barbara Hepworth and Henry Moore. Today the collection is celebrated for its holdings of 20th-century and contemporary art.

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The Guardian

Jul 26 2020
I Can Make You Feel Good: Tyler Mitchell's debut book - in pictures

In his new book, photographer Tyler Mitchell’s distinctive vision of a black utopia portrays young men and women of colour with intimacy and optimism

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artforum.com

Jul 26 2020
Miz Cracker Visits: Judith Bernstein
Miz Cracker talks with artist Judith Bernstein about graffiti, humor, and being the “crazy lady shouting in the quiet room."
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artforum.com

Jul 26 2020
Sung Tieu
A disturbing calm emanates from Sung Tieu’s Zugzwang, 2020, an installation whose title refers to a German term used in chess when a player is forced to make a disadvantageous move. Appropriate, then,
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The Guardian

Jul 26 2020
Banksy paintings worth an estimated £1.2m to be sold at charity auction

Mediterranean Sea View 2017 donated by artist to raise money for Bethlehem hospital

A triptych of what seem to be tempestuous 19th century seascapes but are actually politically charged works by Banksy is to appear at auction to raise money for a hospital in Bethlehem.

The artist himself has donated the three paintings, which will be sold by Sotheby’s in London with an estimate of £800,000-£1.2m.

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The Guardian

Jul 26 2020
Nantes Cathedral fire: church volunteer confesses to starting blaze

Man, 39, charged with arson over fire that destroyed organ dating from 1621

A volunteer church assistant has confessed to starting a fire that severely damaged a gothic cathedral in Nantes, his lawyer has said.

The 39-year-old, an asylum seeker from Rwanda who has lived in France for several years, was arrested on Saturday after laboratory analysis determined that arson was the likely cause of the blaze, the local prosecutor’s office said.

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The Guardian

Jul 26 2020
How dark and violent fantasies inspired the young Francis Bacon’s art

Newly unearthed diary entries by the artist’s cousin Diana Watson shed light on his ‘flirtation’ with fascism

Unseen diary entries about the early life of the British artist Francis Bacon reveal the onset of his fleeting fixation with Nazi culture and show how random and disturbing obsessions shaped his unorthodox talent.

Taken from the journal of his cousin and close confidante, Diana Watson, these strange and candid accounts shed new light on the thoughts of one of Britain’s greatest modern painters in his early career.

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The Guardian

Jul 26 2020
Cranach: Artist and Innovator review – a grand seduction

Compton Verney, Warwickshire
The Renaissance master’s graphic brilliance is thrown into dramatic relief alongside the work of artists ranging from Picasso to Michael Landy

Venus, goddess of love, wears nothing but a lynx-eyed smile and a gleaming pearl choker. She has high breasts, slim hips and the improbable torsions of a doll, milk white against a black velvet background. Balancing on a little plinth below, Cupid points his dart straight up at her bare pudenda – just in case you hadn’t noticed what she is supposedly trying to conceal, with a veil of such transparency it is scarcely visible to the naked eye. Her blond tresses crackle with suggestive excitement.

Lucas Cranach the Elder’s Venus was so popular, so appealing, apparently so seductive (how tastes change) that he and his assistants painted – at the very least estimate – 20 more versions. In all of them, she is a flagrantly sinuous silhouette, an outright provocation to 16th-century viewers and beyond. In the 19th century, Prince Albert was buying Cranach nudes for Queen Victoria; in the 21st century they were familiar to millions of viewers from the title sequence of Desperate Housewives, where Cranach’s Eve reaches up to pluck one apple, then another, and so on until hapless Adam is buried in an avalanche.

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The Guardian

Jul 26 2020
Simone Lia: is this a cult? – cartoon

When staying on-message can be costly

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The Guardian

Jul 25 2020
A Renaissance masterpiece, Nazi looters, a double murder … and a happy ending

His grandparents had to sell their paintings for a pittance – and then were killed. Simon Goodman on why the recovery of one means so much

A masterpiece by the Italian Renaissance artist Paolo Uccello, which disappeared after the Nazis forced its owner to sell it for a pittance before sending him and his wife to their deaths, is to be sold this week after its current owners discovered its shocking past.

The painting, Battle on the Banks of a River, had belonged to Friedrich “Fritz” Gutmann, who was murdered at the Theresienstadt concentration camp in 1944, shortly before his wife, Louise, was gassed at Auschwitz.

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The Guardian

Jul 25 2020
The big picture: a pre-millennium party animal

Vinca Petersen’s shot of a fellow raver celebrates the freedom of the sound-system years

Vinca Petersen took this picture of her friend Paula as the sun came up after an all-night rave in Italy in 1997. By then Petersen had been on the road for four years with some of the “sound-system tribes” who had taken their free party culture across Europe after the 1994 Criminal Justice bill had outlawed raves in the UK. The picture comes from a reissue of Petersen’s book No System, which is her insider’s view of that hedonistic, nomadic life in the years leading up to the millennium.

Petersen gave up her life on the road in 2004, when her son was born. In some senses those photographs look like historical documents to her now, but she still feels their familiarity and excitement. “When you live that sort of life, as I did for the whole of my 20s, there is a mentality you are left with,” she says. She called that mentality, in a recent exhibition, A Life of Subversive Joy, and sees her pictures as part of the family album of that universal possibility.

Her images often celebrated these private moments of connection, with people and with nature. “The highs were much more a consistent feeling of freedom than any sort of peak moments,” she says. “Obviously it is fantastic being in a huge crowd dancing the night away, but for me it was the whole life, whether it was parking up around the lake or turning up in a new city and meeting other like-minded people.” She could still probably arrive in any city in Europe and find someone to stay with who was part of that time, she says, “but I do rather like a nice comfy bed these days”. Paula is back settled and working in the UK now too. Petersen likes the idea that in the picture the night before is still going on. “It’s sunrise,” she says, “but it’s not a new day.”

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The Guardian

Jul 25 2020
Queen views unveiling of new royal portrait via videocall

Painting commissioned by Foreign Office as a ‘lasting tribute to Her Majesty’s service’

The Queen has ticked off another first during lockdown: the virtual unveiling of a new portrait. Despite seeing the artwork of herself via videocall, it was clear she has not lost her eagle eye.

The Queen joked that a tea cup featured in the painting had no tea in it, the artist revealed, as she paid tribute to her “luminous” sitter.

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The Guardian

Jul 25 2020
Indigenous economies have been hit by coronavirus, but online art sales offer a ray of hope | Paul Daley

Artists who may not themselves use or have regular access to the internet may be producing work that is only sold online right now

Quarantining remote Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities has protected many vulnerable First Nations people from Covid-19. But it has been to the necessary detriment of local economies.

This is especially so when primary income sources are the national and international markets for Indigenous art. The floor has dropped out of sales to tourists visiting remote communities while important Indigenous art shows, such as Fremantle’s Revealed, have cancelled.

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The Guardian

Jul 25 2020
Playful origami using banknotes – in pictures

Yosuke Hasegawa has been making “money origami” for the past 14 years. The artist, who is based in Taiwan, has created hundreds of artworks out of banknotes from all over the world, each piece using an improvised technique.

“I take an image of a rigid historical person and change them into something cute and funny,” he says.

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artforum.com

Jul 25 2020
Montreal Museum of Fine Arts Fires Director Nathalie Bondil, Sparking Outcry, Gov’t Inquiry
The board of the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts’ (MMFA) explosive decision to fire longtime director Nathalie Bondil is now being investigated by the government of Quebec, the museum’s largest funder.
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The Guardian

Jul 24 2020
20 photographs of the week

Black Lives Matter protests in Portland, the impact of Covid-19 around the world and the FA Cup semi-finals at an empty Wembley: the most striking photographs from around the world

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The New York Times

Jul 24 2020
28 Ways to Learn About Disability Culture
28 Ways to Learn About Disability Culture
New York Times staff members put their heads together with disability advocates to recommend movies, books, TV shows, dance and art that capture disability experiences.
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artforum.com

Jul 24 2020
Ed Gilbert (1953–2020)
Gallerist Ed Gilbert, who championed California’s art scene during his forty years in San Francisco, has died of cancer at age sixty-seven. As owner-director of Anglim Gilbert Gallery (formerly Galerie
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artforum.com

Jul 24 2020
German Curator Kidnapped in Baghdad Is Free [UPDATED]
Curator and activist Hella Mewis, a German national, was kidnapped by a group of as-yet-unidentified armed men on Monday evening in Baghdad, Deutsche Welle reports. Berlin-born Mewis is the founder and
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The Guardian

Jul 24 2020
Erdoğan leads first prayers at Hagia Sophia museum reverted to mosque

Turkish president recites Qur’an at monument as Greece declares day of mourning

Turkey’s president, Recep Tayyip Erdoğan, has led worshippers in the first prayers in Istanbul’s iconic Hagia Sophia since his controversial declaration that the monument, which over the centuries has served as a cathedral, mosque and museum, would be turned back into a Muslim house of worship.

The Turkish leader and an entourage of senior ministers arrived for the service in the heart of Istanbul’s historic district on Friday afternoon, kneeling on new turquoise carpets while sail-like curtains covered the original Byzantine mosaics of Jesus and the Virgin Mary.

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The Guardian

Jul 24 2020
Galleries show their bottoms and a gender-friendly tube map – the week in art

Museums urged to boost visitor numbers by putting their best bums forward, plus why statues lie, and the return of Andy Warhol – all in your weekly dispatch

Andy Warhol
As Tate reopens all of its museums, there’s a second chance to visit its blockbuster survey of the 20th-century artist who predicted almost every aspect of 21st-century life – except coronavirus. Although, come to think of it, Warhol’s Velvet Underground did create The Black Angel’s Death Song...
Tate Modern, London, from 27 July until 6 September.

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The Guardian

Jul 24 2020
Our slum future: the planning shakeup set to blight English housing

The government has extended rules allowing former offices, shops and warehouses to be converted into housing – as research shows the policy results in dwellings unfit for human habitation

The Conservative government has a known mistrust of experts, but rarely do ministers fly in the face of their own commissioned research as starkly as the housing secretary did this week. On the very same day that Robert Jenrick triumphantly extended permitted development rights (PDR), allowing a range of building types to be converted into housing without planning permission, his own ministry published a report condemning the same rules for leading to “worse quality” homes.

After studying hundreds of new homes carved out from converted offices, shops, warehouses and industrial buildings, created between 2015 and 2018 through permitted development, a team of academics from University College London and the University of Liverpool found predictably grim results. The planning loophole had unleashed a new breed of tiny, dingy apartments, many barely fit for human habitation, with rooms accessed from long corridors, windows looking across internal atriums into other people’s rooms, and some bedrooms with no windows at all.

The research found that only 22% of dwellings created through permitted development met the nationally described space standards, compared with 73% of units created with full planning permission. They frequently came across studio apartments of as little as 16 square metres, less than half the size of the national standard of 37 sq m. Their research also found that the homes were eight times more likely to be located in the middle of a business park or industrial estate, while only 3.5% had access to outdoor space. Buildings converted to homes through permitted development, the researchers concluded, “do seem to create worse quality residential environments than planning permission conversions in relation to a number of factors widely linked to the health, wellbeing and quality of life of future occupiers”.

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The Guardian

Jul 24 2020
Tate Modern reopening: 'We've never needed these unsettling visions more'

The best modern art was made in times of crisis and terror, meaning this museum has never been a relaxing visit. But where better to discover the true meaning of a changed world?

When Tate Modern first opened its doors 20 years ago, modern life seemed comparatively benign. At the opening party, JG Ballard looked on ironically from a balcony as a brass band played acid house anthems and shiny happy people queued to climb a Louise Bourgeois tower. It is about to open again. But the world has changed utterly – and quickly. Walking through the City to get to the post-lockdown press preview, I kept passing boarded-up champagne bars and To Let signs on glass buildings. Approaching the London museum I heard drums and chanting – a celebratory live art happening as Tate prepares to receive visitors for the first time since March? No. It was a demonstration by workers in Tate’s commercial arm whose jobs are under threat.

But when the normal fails, there is always modern art. So much of the greatest art in Tate Modern was made in times of crisis and terror. Out of 20th-century war, mass unemployment and dictatorships came shocking visions. I followed one of two routes you can now take through the museum – this one leads through its collection, past the Warhol exhibition that opened shortly before lockdown, and now gets a second bite.

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artforum.com

Jul 24 2020
Taylor Renee Aldridge Named Visual Arts Curator at California African American Museum
Taylor Renee Aldridge and Susan D. Anderson have been hired by Los Angeles’s California African American Museum (CAAM) as visuals arts curator and history curator, respectively. Aldridge, a writer and
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The New York Times

Jul 24 2020
Luis Barragán’s Forgotten Works, Revisited
After moving to Mexico City in 1935, the architect set about designing a series of obscure functionalist residences that he would later disown.
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The Guardian

Jul 24 2020
Make a splash! Dive into the world's wildest pools – in pictures

As some swimming pools prepare to reopen, we dip our toes into the most dramatic ones across the globe – from remote Aussie rock pools to Cleopatra’s favourite bathing spot

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The Guardian

Jul 24 2020
Sliding home: Baseball in Colour – in pictures

As the 2020 season finally gets under way, we take a look back in time, courtesy of the work of artist Mark Truelove and his fantastic colorised vintage baseball photographs

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The Guardian

Jul 24 2020
Catherine Opie's Rusty: jock meets surfer dude

The American photographer known for capturing gender fluidity questions the age-old view of manliness

With their shoulder and thigh pads, helmets and mouthguards, American footballers can look as though they are kitted out for the battlefield. Commercial sports photography feeds into this, portraying the game’s stars like classical war heroes.

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The Guardian

Jul 24 2020
How many 17th-century breakfast dishes can you name? The great British art quiz

The Bowes Museum set today’s quiz, which lets us explore the collections of British museums closed due to Covid-19 – while answering some tricky questions

This quiz is brought to you in collaboration with Art UK, the online home for the UK’s public art collections, showing art from more than 3,000 venues and by 45,000 artists. Each day, a different collection on Art UK will set the questions.

Today our questions are set by the Bowes Museum, a collection of art, fashion and design, housed in a chateau in Barnard Castle, at the border of Yorkshire and County Durham.

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The Guardian

Jul 23 2020
Wellcome photography prize 2020 shortlist: focus on mental health

The 2020 prize has five categories: social perspectives, hidden worlds, medicine in focus, and two categories on mental health, which is the special theme for this year. With the 2020 prize, the Wellcome Trust hopes to transform public perceptions of mental health

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The New York Times

Jul 23 2020
A ‘Smart District’ Takes Shape in the Netherlands
The goal is a sustainable community that uses technology to improve the quality of life for 4,500 residents.
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The New York Times

Jul 23 2020
Welcome to the Great Indoors: Museums Beckon in the Berkshires
Welcome to the Great Indoors: Museums Beckon in the Berkshires
At Mass MoCA and the Clark, there are timely new exhibitions, but our critic finds as much relevance in a still life by Manet, or an Ingres drawing.
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artforum.com

Jul 23 2020
Turkish Arts Philanthropist Osman Kavala Approaches Thousandth Day in Prison
Turkish cultural workers are renewing their demands for the release of Osman Kavala, a businessman and major arts supporter who was imprisoned for alleged conspiracy in a violent plot to overthrow
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The New York Times

Jul 23 2020
At the Hirshhorn, a Battle Over Plans for Its Sculpture Garden
The museum is going ahead with meetings on a design by the artist Hiroshi Sugimoto that preservationists say would undo key features of postwar landscape design by Lester Collins.
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artforum.com

Jul 23 2020
New York’s Tenement Museum, Indefinitely Closed, Lays Off 76 Employees
Reeling from the economic situation created by the coronavirus pandemic, the Lower East Side Tenement Museum in Manhattan announced on Wednesday that it has laid off all seventy-one part-time members
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The New York Times

Jul 23 2020
8 Things to Do This Weekend
8 Things to Do This Weekend
How can you get your cultural fix when many arts institutions remain closed? Our writers offer suggestions for what to listen to, read and watch.
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The New York Times

Jul 23 2020
Virtual Encounters With Purring Cheetahs and Curious Penguins
Virtual Encounters With Purring Cheetahs and Curious Penguins
Zoos are beginning to open, but digital experiences allow visitors to see ecosystems from a different perspective.
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artforum.com

Jul 23 2020
Annie Flanagan Wins Robert Giard Grant for Emerging LGBTQ+ Photographers
Annie Flanagan, a photographer based between New Orleans and Vermont, has won the Robert Giard Grant for Emerging LGBTQ+ Photographers, an annual award that was relaunched last year by Queer|Art and
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The New York Times

Jul 23 2020
Works by Sir John Richardson’s Many Friends in Sotheby’s Sale
The art historian John Richardson collected art by his pals Pablo Picasso, Lucian Freud and Andy Warhol. The works will be sold in New York and London in the fall.
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The New York Times

Jul 23 2020
‘Helmut Newton: The Bad and the Beautiful’ Review: Man With a Camera
‘Helmut Newton: The Bad and the Beautiful’ Review: Man With a Camera
This cheery, chatty overview of the life and work of the photographer Helmut Newton prioritizes gossip over critique.
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The Guardian

Jul 23 2020
'It took genius to chisel these buttocks' – the top 10 bottoms in art, chosen by our critic

They are ‘the founding curves of the Renaissance’. As Yorkshire Museum calls on collections worldwide to display their best behinds to boost attendance after coronavirus, we name our favourites

Raphael died 500 years ago, it is said, after a night with his mistress left him in a weakened state. He had said that to paint perfect beauty he needed to see lots of different women. This geometrical arrangement of interlocking nudes revolving around a bottom reveals his addiction to the female body, from all angles.
• Château de Chantilly, France

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The Guardian

Jul 23 2020
Why does this show the audience rather than the play? The great British art quiz

The Ben Uri Collection set today’s quiz, part of our series enabling you to explore the art collection of British museums closed due to Covid-19 – while answering some fiendish questions along the way

This quiz is brought to you in collaboration with Art UK, the online home for the UK’s public art collections, showing art from more than 3,000 venues and by 45,000 artists. Each day, a different collection on Art UK will set the questions.

Today our questions are set by the Ben Uri Collection, the most comprehensive collection of works by late 19th-, 20th- and 21st-century Jewish artists – and widened, since 2001, to include immigrant artists to the UK from all national, ethnic, and religious origins. The Ben Uri Research Unit, based in north London, is recording this contribution to British visual culture since 1900 in a new digital database.

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