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artforum.com

May 14 2020
MoMA Weighs in on Oslo’s Y-block, Picasso-Muraled Icon Fated for Demolition
Plans to demolish an empty government building in Oslo graced with a pair of Pablo Picasso–designed murals have caught the attention of New York’s Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), which has intervened in
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The New York Times

May 14 2020
The Daily Call That 200 Arts Groups Hope Will Help Them Survive
The Daily Call That 200 Arts Groups Hope Will Help Them Survive
In a sign of the pandemic’s toll, New York’s cultural institutions, large and small, feel compelled to share their woes and tactics in strategy sessions.
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artforum.com

May 14 2020
Eskenazi Museum of Art Appoints Lauren Richman Assistant Curator of Photography
The Sidney and Lois Eskenazi Museum of Art at Indiana University has hired art historian Lauren Richman as assistant curator of photography. The new position was created with a grant from the Henry Luce
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artforum.com

May 14 2020
Museum of the African Diaspora Benefit Auction Raises over $450,000
The Museum of the African Diaspora (MoAD) in San Francisco, which was forced to lay off staffers and make other cutbacks when it closed temporarily in March because of the Covid-19 crisis, has successfully
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artforum.com

May 14 2020
Following Paddle8 Bankruptcy Filing, Former CEO Sued for $1 Million
A group of unnamed creditors are suing online auction house Paddle8’s former chief executive Valentine Uhovski for $1 million, in addition to legal fees and interest, reports the
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The Guardian

May 14 2020
Artists struggling to work amid coronavirus, says Rachel Whiteread

Sculptor is backing UK fund giving upcoming artists £5,000 as lockdown takes its toll

Visual artists are struggling to produce work and concentrate on projects along with the rest of the population, the Turner prize-winning sculptor Dame Rachel Whiteread has said.

Even though artists often worked alone in their studios, the lockdown was taking a heavy toll financially and creatively, she said.

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The Guardian

May 14 2020
Powderfinger, Paul Kelly, Adam Liaw and more: the best live streams for Australia and beyond

The Brisbane band’s one-off reunion is just one of many big things happening on a small screen near you. Here’s what’s coming up

15 May: Join us for the first Guardian Australia book club event on Friday! Launching at 1pm, the Zoom stream will feature Phosphorescence author Julia Baird in conversation with Michael Williams. To register click here, or stay tuned for the video highlights.

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The Guardian

May 14 2020
What Comes After Farce? by Hal Foster review – oppositional art in the age of Trump

Long known for his optimism, the renowned art critic now faces the question: how to belittle a political elite that cannot be embarrassed?

During the mid-1980s, when Hal Foster established himself as one of the leading art critics in the anglophone world, many were flummoxed by his optimism. Amid the new regime of union-busting deregulation instituted by Thatcher and Reagan, the assumption in Foster’s Marxist academic milieu was that contemporary art had shed its radical convictions. Avant garde experiments that mounted a frontal attack on bourgeois culture, such as dada and surrealism, were passé. In their place, a financialised society had filled the galleries with glorified consumer products: kitschy, toothless and historically amnesiac. Against this grim appraisal, Foster insisted on the political importance of such postmodernists as Hans Haacke and Barbara Kruger, who enacted a form of subversion more subtle and effective than the “abstract and anarchistic” avant garde. He claimed that such art could do two things its utopian forerunner couldn’t: expose the contradictions of capitalism via rigorous critique, and puncture its ideological armour through playful yet penetrating mockery.

Foster’s latest collection of essays, however, spotlights the impotence of these techniques in the age of Trump. The “hermeneutics of suspicion” – a critical method that reveals the tension and instability behind seemingly stable constructs – is useless against a political establishment that flaunts its own contradictions. Mockery has become a gift to “leaders who thrive on the absurd”. And critique itself threatens to redouble the “nihilism of the neoliberal order” by engendering a state of cold detachment that reflects our alienated society. Meanwhile, formal aesthetic practices that seemed progressive during the 1990s have since been co-opted by a rapacious commercial art world. The Foster that emerges from this conjuncture is perhaps more jaded than the one we’ve come to know. “If all this sounds dire,” he writes towards the end of the preface, “it is.”

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The Guardian

May 14 2020
How do we know this family liked blancmange? The great British art quiz

Norfolk Museums Service as setting today’s quiz, which allows you to explore the collections of UK art institutions closed due to coronavirus – while answering some tricky questions along the way

This quiz is brought to you in collaboration with Art UK, the online home for the UK’s public art collections, showing art from moer than 3,000 venues and by 45,000 artists. Each day, a different collection on Art UK will set the questions.

Today, our questions are set by Norfolk Museums Service, which consists of 10 museums across the beautiful county of Norfolk.

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The Guardian

May 13 2020
Fragility on the frontline: life inside NHS hospitals – in pictures

Lewis Khan spent four years with unprecedented access to London’s healthcare system. His book Theatre captures the cleaners, the surgeons and the scrub nurses – and their unique bond with patients

All profits from Theatre will go to the NHS

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The Guardian

May 13 2020
Frontline hero: the Rocky Mountain GP who healed America

As doctors battle coronavirus across the globe, we recall how one tireless Colorado medic became a hero in the 1940s – thanks to the stunning work of legendary photographer W Eugene Smith

In September 1948, an American physician working in Kremmling, a remote rural community in Colorado, briefly became a national celebrity, appearing on television and radio to talk about the demanding nature of his work. The reason for his fame was a striking photo essay by the pioneering American photographer W Eugene Smith, which appeared in the 20 September issue of Life magazine.

Entitled Country Doctor, the series opened with a brooding portrait of the subject, medical bag in hand, striding purposefully across a field beneath glowering storm clouds. In another more intimate image, fraught parents hug each other as they watch an emergency procedure being carried out on their injured infant.

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The New York Times

May 13 2020
Five Artists to Follow on Instagram Now
Cultural hosts Lu Zhang and Herb Tam, “Corona Daze” poetry, printable exhibitions by Tiger Strikes Asteroid, Google street views.
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artforum.com

May 13 2020
Yerba Buena Center for the Arts Creates Hotline to Help Financially Struggling Artists
The Yerba Buena Center for the Arts (YBCA) in San Francisco has launched a new digital platform and hotline to help artists and cultural workers struggling due to the Covid-19 pandemic. Called the 
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artforum.com

May 13 2020
UK Galleries Anticipate a June Reopening as Museums Remain Shut
Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s new plan for reopening the British economy, which was broadcast on Sunday, has been met with confusion and frustration across the United Kingdom due to its vague and
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The Guardian

May 13 2020
'Hyper-resolution' image of Rembrandt painting aids restoration restart

Lockdown delays restoration of The Night Watch, but it can be viewed online in ‘minute detail’

The Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam has posted online the most detailed photograph ever taken of Rembrandt’s The Night Watch, revealing every brushstroke and random fleck of paint.

The so-called hyper-resolution image was launched as the museum announced a delay to the completion of the painting’s restoration, which was begun last year and live-streamed to a global audience.

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The New York Times

May 13 2020
When Manhattan Was Mannahatta: A Stroll Through the Centuries
From lush forest to metropolis, the evolution of Lower Manhattan. Our critic walks with Eric W. Sanderson of the Wildlife Conservation Society.
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artforum.com

May 13 2020
Nancy Stark Smith (1952–2020)
NANCY STARK SMITH: You have gone. I didn’t think it would end like this. But this isn’t about you—it’s about me. I’m all I have left of you. For forty-eight years I depended on you for my supply
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The New York Times

May 13 2020
My Weekend Binge Online at Frieze
My Weekend Binge Online at Frieze
The virtual art fair tries to condense 160 galleries onto your phone screen. Can art hold your attention amid the infinite scroll?
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The Guardian

May 13 2020
Portrait of studious woman revealed to be of Millicent Fawcett

Painting of suffragist working at her desk was misidentified as Royal Holloway ex-principal

A Victorian painting of a studious young woman working at her desk has emerged as a lost portrait of one of the most important figures in the British women’s rights movement history, the suffragist Millicent Fawcett.

The artwork in the collection of Royal Holloway, University of London, has long been identified as a depiction of another pioneer, but far less well-known figure, Dame Emily Penrose. There is even a plaque on its frame saying it is Penrose.

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artforum.com

May 13 2020
Howard Hampton on what to stream in quarantine
IN CONFINEMENT, the captive mind cycles like a broken karaoke machine. Little Caesar’s last words bleed out over vintage Doors: “Mother of mercy, is this the End?” Is this perilous moment the inevitable
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artforum.com

May 13 2020
New York Public Library Acquires Archive of Dancer and Choreographer Martha Graham
The New York Public Library for the Performing Arts has acquired the archive of influential dance artist Martha Graham (1894–1991). During her long and illustrious career, Graham created 181 choreographic
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The New York Times

May 13 2020
2 Art Gallery Shows to Explore From Home
Galleries and museums are getting creative about presenting work online during the coronavirus crisis. Here are two shows worth viewing virtually.
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The Guardian

May 13 2020
Tokyo's state of emergency – in pictures

As Japan considers lifting state-of-emergency conditions in many regions this week and the country inches towards a gradual return of economic activity, photographer Dai Kurokawa looks at life in the capital

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The Guardian

May 13 2020
Immigrants Are Essential: a vital art project shining a light on the frontline

A new campaign aims to celebrate immigrant workers providing essential services throughout the ongoing pandemic

Whooping and clanking has become a familiar evening ritual to New Yorkers, as every night over the past two months the city has been saluting its healthcare workers with applause and saucepans at 7pm.

After it’s over, most people return to their homes, scroll their phones, watch TV and fall asleep. While it’s undeniably well-intentioned, is it enough?

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The Guardian

May 13 2020
What's this painting's hidden secret? The great British art quiz

Dundee’s McManus gallery sets today’s quiz, which enables you to explore the art collections of museums closed due to coronavirus – while answering some tricky questions along the way

This quiz is brought to you in collaboration with Art UK, the online home of the UK’s public art collections, showing art from more than 3,000 venues and by 45,000 artists. Each day, a different collection on Art UK will set the questions.

Today, our questions are set by the McManus: Dundee’s Art Gallery and Museum. The McManus is a multi-disciplinary museum with wide-ranging collections of art, social and natural history, archaeology, and world cultures. Its fine art, applied art and whaling industry collections are recognised as being of national significance by Museums Galleries Scotland. In March 2020, The McManus was named Scottish visitor attraction of the year.

You can see art from the McManus on Art UK here. Find out more on the McManus website here.

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The Guardian

May 12 2020
Warhol in black, Bowie in the nude: Victor Skrebneski shoots the stars – in pictures

The American fashion photographer, who died last month aged 90, was known for his stylised black-and white-portraits of celebrities. Here are some of his most striking shots

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The Guardian

May 12 2020
Velvet wonderlands: the plush pleasure palaces of Frank 'Matchless' Matcham

He was our ‘greatest theatrical architect’, the creator of 150 magnificent buildings that delighted crowds from Glasgow to Blackpool to London. On the centenary of his death, we celebrate a stage visionary

A pub quiz question. What do the following have in common: Blackpool Tower Ballroom, the Grand Opera House Belfast, Hackney Empire and the London Palladium? All were the creation of Frank Matcham, the centenary of whose death falls this Sunday. Alan Bennett, a devout admirer, called him “undoubtedly this country’s greatest theatrical architect”. At a time when we are resigned to many more months of virtual playgoing, it is a joy to celebrate the sensuous memories of sitting in one of Matcham’s matchless theatres.

The bare facts of his career are fascinating. He was born in Devon in 1854, was apprenticed at 14 to a Torquay architect, came to London in 1875 and joined the practice of Jethro T Robinson, who was consulting architect to the Lord Chamberlain and whose daughter he went on to marry. After Robinson’s death in 1878, Matcham took over the building of the Elephant and Castle theatre in London. But that was just the start. His explosive heyday lasted from 1891 to 1913, when he designed not just theatres and music halls but such local landmarks as the County Arcade in Leeds, Harrogate’s Royal Hall and the Blackpool Tower Circus. It is estimated that he built or rebuilt more than 150 theatres, of which 26 still thankfully survive.

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The Guardian

May 12 2020
'Time to embrace history of country': Bruce Pascoe and the first dancing grass harvest in 200 years

Writer’s farm in East Gippsland, Victoria, is producing native grains for flour and bread using traditional Aboriginal techniques

On the hill above Bruce Pascoe’s farm near Mallacoota in Victoria’s East Gippsland, there’s a sea of mandadyan nalluk. Translated from Yuin, the language of the country, it means “dancing grass”.

Pascoe and his small team of coworkers have never done a harvest like this before. There’s so much grass that both sheds are full, and Pascoe says they are “racing against the clock to refine our methods so we can extract the seed and make the flour. We have got to get this done in two or three weeks before the seed completely drops.”

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artforum.com

May 12 2020
Baltimore Museum of Art Gifted $3.5 Million to Endow Matisse Studies Center Directorship
The Baltimore Museum of Art (BMA) has received a gift of $3.5 million from an anonymous donor to endow the directorship for the Ruth R. Marder Center for Matisse Studies, which is scheduled to open in
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The New York Times

May 12 2020
Jaquelin Taylor Robertson, Architect and Passionate Urbanist, Dies at 87
Jaquelin Taylor Robertson, Architect and Passionate Urbanist, Dies at 87
Devoted to classical architecture, he was equally committed to design that benefits city life and helped establish a New York agency to promote it.
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artforum.com

May 12 2020
Mara Hoberman on the reopening of the Parisian art world
THE LOUVRE was the first to go. On March 1, the world’s most-attended art museum (averaging 15,000 visitors per day) went dark after some three hundred staff members walked out over concerns about
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artforum.com

May 12 2020
Chicago, Paris, and Sydney Fairs Push Dates to 2021
Three art fairs scheduled for this September have announced postponements because of the Covid-19 pandemic. Expo Chicago, the International Exposition of Contemporary and Modern Art, is now planning to
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artforum.com

May 12 2020
Artist Amadou Sanogo Plans New Arts Center for Malian Emerging Artists
Malian artist Amadou Sanogo is working toward opening a new arts space in the country’s capital city, Bamako, that will support young artists. Represented by Magnin-A gallery in Paris, the painter has
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The Guardian

May 12 2020
Lockdown with Gilbert and George: they've lost the world, but the walk goes on

For decades the suited pair have spent their days strolling around London. Now due to coronavirus they’ve stoically adapted their routine, as shown in a strangely moving video diary

Aged 76 and 78 respectively, the renowned artist couple Gilbert and George are of the age supposedly most in need of isolating against the coronavirus. Yet exploring the streets of London has been their life since they met as students in 1967 – taking photographs, picking up unusual objects, observing the people around them. There is no second home for them abroad or in the country – their only residence is the house on Fournier Street in east London where they have lived since the 1960s.

So that is where they are holed up. And this week, they are releasing a series of glimpses into their lockdown life, as they unveil their video diary on White Cube’s Instagram account.

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The New York Times

May 12 2020
Europe’s Museums Begin Reopening, Cautiously, With New Rules
Europe’s Museums Begin Reopening, Cautiously, With New Rules
Compulsory face masks, hand-sanitizer stations and one-way routes are common features as institutions reinvent themselves for the Covid-19 era.
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artforum.com

May 12 2020
Abraham Palatnik (1928–2020)
Brazilian artist, inventor, and designer Abraham Palatnik, a giant of kinetic and Op art who harnessed technology to create painterly images with light, movement, and shadow in his groundbreaking series
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artforum.com

May 12 2020
Patrisse Cullors on decarceration and the freedom of performance
Best-known as one of the three women who founded Black Lives Matter, and the powerhouse behind the grassroots movement that’s now transforming the Los Angeles County prison system, Patrisse Cullors
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The Guardian

May 12 2020
Buy a classic sport photograph: Euphoria at the 1966 World Cup

The latest of a Guardian Print Shop series featuring classic sports images. Today’s picture is of the moment England won the 1966 World Cup final, beating West Germany 4-2 at Wembley

Forget the best known photographs from the 1966 World Cup final: Geoff Hurst smashing home the fourth goal (“They think it’s all over … it is now!”); Bobby Moore riding on the shoulders of his teammates with the Jules Rimet trophy raised aloft in his right hand. Those frames don’t quite capture the raw emotion of that historic victory as well as this image by Gerry Cranham. Shot at the final whistle, it features England’s manager, Alf Ramsey, in a state of shock, being congratulated by his colleagues. But the scene is wonderfully stolen by the physiotherapist, Harold Sheperdson, whose explosive leap punctures the boundary of the frame. Ordinarily, as a picture editor, you wouldn’t want a person’s hand to be chopped off like this. Yet, somehow it just feels right, here – as if the euphoria of winning the World Cup simply couldn’t be contained within the frame.

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The Guardian

May 12 2020
'This made me smile': our readers' favourite coronavirus street art

Houses, roads and shops all over the UK have been redecorated and reinvigorated during lockdown

Seeing this makes me feel proud of what we have in the UK. Without the NHS, we would be in serious trouble in normal times, let alone during this pandemic. I have friends who are working in the NHS, in the care sector and as key workers. They are working seriously hard in difficult circumstances to make our lives the best they can be.

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The Guardian

May 12 2020
How did Devonshire wrestlers fight dirty? The great British art quiz

The Royal Albert Memorial Museum in Exeter has set today’s quiz, in the series that explores UK collections while coronavirus keeps museums closed. Test your knowledge here

This quiz is brought to you in collaboration with Art UK, the online home for the UK’s public art collections, showing art from over 3,000 venues and by 45,000 artists. Each day, a different collection on Art UK will set the questions.

Today, our questions are set by the Royal Albert Memorial Museum in Exeter – or RAMM as it is affectionately known – which has been collecting art, artefacts and natural history since the 1860s. The collections tell the story of Exeter and Devon since prehistory, and the region’s connections with people and places around the globe.

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The Guardian

May 11 2020
'An army of teenage runaways': American girls in the wild – in pictures

Justine Kurland’s iconic five-year journey across the US captured young girls roaming fearless and free

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The Guardian

May 11 2020
'We could be deluged': V&A to collect signs made during lockdown

Museum asks for rainbow signs and shop notices to create a snapshot of Covid-19 Britain

They are familiar to everyone: cheerful children’s rainbow drawings in countless windows, and notices explaining closure or new entry rules in shop doorways everywhere. Soon some of them will be in the national collection after the V&A made a public callout for homemade signs created during the lockdown.

Brendan Cormier, a design curator at the V&A, acknowledged that the signs were ubiquitous. “We could be deluged,” he said. “There is also the risk with a public callout that you don’t get anything. I don’t think you ever get quite the number you’re hoping for. We’re asking for patience from people … it might take us some time to sort through them and decide which are the most useful and relevant for us to take.”

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The Guardian

May 11 2020
Forget Titian, here's a talking dog! Is this digital art's big moment?

A film noir about a cluttered flat, an animated canine, Yesterday whistled in a corridor … artists in coronavirus lockdown are making the leap to digital. Can they stop people switching over to Netflix?

The last art I saw in the flesh was the Titian exhibition at the National Gallery in London. It was a remarkable, treasurable experience: his group of “poesie” paintings, based on stories from Ovid, had last hung together 400 years ago. Two days later, the museum closed its doors. By then, most commercial galleries in the UK, and many public institutions, had shut. The drift to digital began soon afterwards. Visual arts organisations launched so many podcasts and IGTV broadcasts and film streams and viewing rooms and talks from the archive that it has sometimes been overwhelming.

This week, the most social, crowded, people-watching-oriented event of the global visual art calendar – Frieze art fair, in its New York iteration – is happening on devices everywhere. It has transformed itself into an online shop with art as the scrollable produce. The Asos effect is amplified by the fact that prices, for once, are displayed for all to see. A Martin Creed neon spelling out the words DON’T WORRY could be yours for $150,000 (£118,000).

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The Guardian

May 11 2020
'Ken! Do something!': Coronation Street double acts reunited on Royal Mail stamps

Special-issue set celebrates 60th anniversary of world’s longest-running soap opera

Famous double acts over six decades of ITV’s Coronation Street are being reunited on a special-issue set of Royal Mail stamps to celebrate the programme’s diamond anniversary.

Eight stamps highlight the most memorable couples and adversaries to walk Weatherfield’s cobbles since December 1960 on the world’s longest-running soap.

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The New York Times

May 11 2020
Victim or Executioner? Let the Computer Decide
Victim or Executioner? Let the Computer Decide
An interactive plan for a Holocaust museum envisioned sorting visitors into victims, executioners and collaborators. Backlash ensued.
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The New York Times

May 11 2020
A Drive-By Art Show Turns Lawns and Garages Into Galleries
A Drive-By Art Show Turns Lawns and Garages Into Galleries
The outdoor exhibition on Long Island featured works installed at properties from Hampton Bays to Montauk, with social isolation as just one theme.
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artforum.com

May 11 2020
Valeria Graziano, Marcell Mars, and Tomislav Medak on the care crisis
IN LATE 2019, we organized a writing retreat at the Croatian cultural center Drugo More, in Rijeka, to create an online syllabus with activists who practice what we call “pirate care.” These practices
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artforum.com

May 11 2020
Gallery Weekend Beijing to Launch Fourth Edition on May 22
The fourth edition of Gallery Weekend Beijing (GWBJ), which was postponed because of the Covid-19 crisis, will now take place from May 22 through May 31. The weeklong event will feature twenty-two
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The Guardian

May 11 2020
'So bored of this': life under quarantine in London - in pictures

Photographer Jill Mead has been documenting the quirky, unusual and downright strange occurrences in her local neighbourhoods and other parts of the capital

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artforum.com

May 11 2020
“Anonymous Society for Magick”
The “natures miracles” of Cinquecento humanist Giambattista della Porta’s 1558 book Magia Naturalis (Natural Magick) suffuse curator Ying Kwok’s exhibition, where multimedia works by five Chinese artists
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