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artforum.com

Jun 07 2019
Staffers at Seattle’s Frye Art Museum Unionize and Demand Recognition
The security staff of the Frye Art Museum in Seattle, Washington, has announced the formation of the Art Workers Union (AWU). Working with a local branch of the Democratic Socialists of America (DSA),
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The Guardian

Jun 07 2019
Spanking, leather and grappling: the artist unleashing women's secret desires

Mimosa House, London
With its giggling and awkwardness, the sight of women exerting their sexuality in an increasingly repressive world makes this show, by Zoe Williams, feel radical

I entered Sunday Fantasy to the sight of a woman peeing through her fishnet tights: not an uncommon spectacle in the dark alleys off London’s Oxford Circus. However, this was neither drunken mishap nor Soho performance. Artist Zoe Williams’s new film installation is an unexpurgated exploration of female fantasy and sexual pleasure, a realm in which the erotic coexists with the disgusting, the playful and the oddly mundane. The pee, then, is deliberate and a little clumsy: an enjoyably awkward transgression.

In Sunday Fantasy, Williams invites three women to enact their fantasies for her camera: she is both voyeur and facilitator, creating an environment in which the evening’s events take place. The fantasies are not straightforwardly sexual. In one setting, two women exert themselves energetically to remove the fantasist’s clothes while she does all she can to keep them on. The result is often more pillowfight than catfight, with the women wrestling hard only to collapse periodically in exhausted giggles.

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The Guardian

Jun 07 2019
The skyscraper infinity pool – sorry, but where's the diving board?

It is meant to be a boundary-busting ‘punch for the sky’. But this design for a London rooftop pool is just another high-rise ego gimmick

In 1924, Buster Keaton approached the Life magazine film critic Robert E Sherwood, to write a script set on an under-construction New York skyscraper. In it, Keaton’s character is showing the architect’s daughter the views from the top when a strike is called, workers down tools, power is cut from the lift and the pair find themselves stranded. Like a modernist Robinson Crusoe, the plot then follows the pair trying to get attention from people in nearby buildings to no avail before building a shelter, and developing strategies to catch rainwater to drink and pigeons to eat.

It came to mind today when I saw the CGI renders of Infinity Pool, a speculative-proposal-cum-clickbait-marketing-stunt from swimming pool designer Compass Pools. The alluring images show the entire roof of an unnamed central-London tower given over to an infinity pool, with no apparent means of escape, as if the digital people are in some kind of sublime prison cell for the super rich. We are assured there is in fact a way in and out, courtesy of a “rotating spiral staircase which rises from the pool floor”, and that this is an entirely buildable proposition that includes an inbuilt anemometer to “vary the water level and access to the pool”.

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The New York Times

Jun 07 2019
Last Call: MoMA’s Closing, and Changing
With the museum shutting down June 15 for a four-month renovation, our critic assesses the challenges it faces.
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artforum.com

Jun 07 2019
Asian Cultural Council’s China and Hong Kong Fellows Announced
On Wednesday, the nonprofit Asian Cultural Council (ACC) announced the recipients of this year’s China and Hong Kong Fellowships, which provide financial support to artists, curators, and scholars in
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The Guardian

Jun 07 2019
Gender kissing, the age of Galileo and Keith Haring's 80s – the week in art

The Hayward launches a gender-fluid blockbuster, Bartolomé Bermejo’s intense Renaissance art contrasts with its science, and Keith Haring gets his first UK exhibition – all in your weekly dispatch

Kiss My Genders
A gender-fluid blockbuster to rock your socks, with artists including Catherine Opie, Planningtorock, Christina Quarles, Victoria Sin and Del LaGrace Volcano.
Hayward Gallery, London, 12 June-8 September.

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The Guardian

Jun 07 2019
Buy a classic Guardian photograph: golden eagle on the Isle of Mull, April 2008

This week in our Guardian Print Shop series, photographer Murdo MacLeod captures the intensity of a golden eagle at a sanctuary

A young, wild golden eagle on the Isle of Mull stares down Murdo Macleod. The photographer was visiting the island – home, along with other islands along Scotland’s rugged west coast, to the largest population of these magnificent birds in the UK. This four-year-old male, which was unable to fly due to an irreparably broken wing, had been rescued by islanders, and taken to a bird of prey sanctuary in Craignure. The conservation centre, called Wings Over Mull, lets people get close to the birds. While better known for its owls, hawks, falcons, vultures and red kites, the sanctuary was caring for a second golden eagle. Both happily posed for close-ups – allowing Macleod to get the perfect shot.

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artforum.com

Jun 07 2019
Rein Wolfs to Lead Amsterdam’s Stedelijk Museum
The supervisory board of the Stedelijk Museum in Amsterdam announced today that Rein Wolfs has been named its next director. Wolfs comes to the institution from the Bundeskunsthalle, the Art and Exhibition
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The Guardian

Jun 07 2019
Francis Bacon: Couplings review – a taboo-busting opus of sizzling flesh

Gagosian Grosvenor Hill, London
Sublime paintings of sex in all its guises unlock entire worlds of beauty and terror – and reveal Bacon as the true heir to Picasso

The authority of Francis Bacon’s art is papal. I am not referring to the paintings inspired by Velázquez’s portrait of Pope Innocent X that made him famous. It’s just that walking into Gagosian’s immaculate selection of his paintings feels like exploring the art treasures of St Peter’s and the Vatican, so sublime is this display. If these pictures really were in the Vatican, though, they’d have to be veiled, perhaps even in a secret room where only cardinals could peek. For this is a sustained exploration of how Bacon saw sex.

An imaginary curtain swooshes back as you enter a chapel-like space to see Two Figures, painted in 1953 and last exhibited in Bacon’s retrospective at the Grand Palais in Paris in 1971. It has the sense of some supreme revelation. Two men make love on a bed that’s an expanse of crumpled white sheets. As they do it they look out of the canvas at us – but their faces are distorted, blurred. One might be grinning into a camera. It’s as if they are gleefully showing us their crime, their identities disguised for their protection. When Bacon painted this in the 1950s, he really was portraying a crime. That thrills him. The white bed is enclosed in a transparent box whose outline in perspective draws you towards the central act. It resembles the glass booths that enclose those renowned paintings of popes. Yet it has the opposite meaning.

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The Guardian

Jun 07 2019
Natalia Goncharova’s Peasant Woman: setting the scene

The Russian artist’s costume design for the ballet/opera Le Coq d’Or reflects the vibrant use of colour from her earlier paintings

This 1937 illustration gives a taste of the vivid colours and striking forms, inspired by traditional Russian culture, with which Natalia Goncharova made her name as a costume and set designer. Her break-out hit was the Ballets Russes’s Le Coq D’Or in 1914. Dancers in appliqued cotton or velvet were complemented by her city backdrop, a modernist fantasy of ancient Azerbaijan.

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The Guardian

Jun 06 2019
'It just sucks you in': Monet's most famous painting is now in Canberra

Monet’s Impression, Sunrise is showing in the southern hemisphere for the first time, to celebrate new discoveries made about the work

When Claude Monet was buried at the age of 86, French statesman Georges Clemenceau was horrified to see a black shroud covering his coffin. “No black for Monet!” he cried, ripping it off, before he covered his friend with a brighter cloth instead.

Monet was, of course, a master of colour: a man obsessed with the emerald green of water lilies or the blue of a pond, subjects he drew obsessively, again and again.

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artforum.com

Jun 06 2019
Eileen Quinlan
Eileen Quinlan’s photographic work, of which this exhibition selects from roughly a ten-year period, shows the artist’s consistent return to material experimentation and clear investment in lens-based
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artforum.com

Jun 06 2019
Camille Billops (1933–2019)
Printmaker, sculptor, and documentary filmmaker Camille Billops, whose momentous films Suzanne Suzanne (1982) and Finding Christa (1991) took up some of society’s deepest-running taboos concerning
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artforum.com

Jun 06 2019
Sharjah Art Foundation Appoints Omar Kholeif Director of Collections and Senior Curator
The Sharjah Art Foundation announced today that Omar Kholeif has been named director of collections and senior curator. He will be charged with overseeing the foundation’s acquisition strategy, developing
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artforum.com

Jun 06 2019
Toronto’s Black and Caribbean Communities Help Art Gallery of Ontario Acquire 3,500 Photographs
The Art Gallery of Ontario (AGO) has acquired the Montgomery Collection of Caribbean Photographs, comprising more than 3,500 historical images from thirty-four countries, including Jamaica, Barbados,
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artforum.com

Jun 06 2019
Dede Wilsey, Board President of San Francisco Fine Arts Museums, to Step Down
Dede Wilsey, the longtime president of the board of the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, which oversees two institutions-the de Young and the Legion of Honor-is handing over the reins to Jason Moment.
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artforum.com

Jun 06 2019
Miami’s Rubell Museum to Open New 100,000-Square-Foot Home in December
The Rubell family has revealed that it will move its contemporary art collection of 7,200 works by more than one thousand artists-including Jean-Michel Basquiat, Keith Haring, Rashid Johnson, William
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artforum.com

Jun 06 2019
Phillips Names Hartley Waltman as General Counsel, Americas
Phillips has appointed Hartley Waltman as general counsel, Americas. Waltman joins Phillips following a twenty-year career at Christie’s, where he most recently served as senior vice president and senior
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The Guardian

Jun 06 2019
Summer Exhibition review – a moronic monument to British mediocrity

Royal Academy, London
Obvious ideas get third-rate treatment as this life-draining spectacle showcases the artists of a nation adrift

I wish I had a time machine so I could go back to the moment before I entered the Royal Academy’s 2019 Summer Exhibition, and then turn away. This is a memory I don’t need. Since seeing this sprawling dustbin of has-beens and never-will-be’s I have been weighed down by its depressing dullness. It was like being locked for days in a garden centre.

Last year Grayson Perry turned the RA’s 250-year-old open-submission art show into something subversive and hilarious. Any doubts that its anarchic spirit should be credited to him and him alone are removed by this year’s return to abominable form. The latest selectors, led by Jock McFadyen, have assiduously removed every trace of the wit and cleverness with which Perry brought this bloated corpse of a tradition to temporary life.

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artforum.com

Jun 06 2019
Takuya Ikezaki and Makiko Masutani
That a sense of displacement is a fundamental condition of being an artist is a cliché, but one that artists Takuya Ikezaki and Makiko Masutani customize and update in this two-person exhibition. Ikezaki,
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The Guardian

Jun 06 2019
Comrades for ever: how D-day bravery was sculpted in bronze

As a new British memorial to the Normandy landings is unveiled today on Gold beach, artist David Williams-Ellis talks about its creation

As D-day’s 75th anniversary unfolds, one man in particular has been holding his breath. The sculptor David Williams-Ellis has created the centrepiece for the new British Normandy Memorial, in Ver-sur-Mer, France: a trio of soldiers surging forward on a triangular granite plinth. With its balletic grace and lack of triumphalism, it marks the great turning point of the war and represents the changing face of war memorials in recent years.

Until April, the site on which Williams-Ellis’s sculpture stands was just a green field on a small hill overlooking a beach. It is, of course, not just any beach, but Gold beach, the middle one of five codenamed by the allies for Operation Neptune, the opening salvo in the liberation of France. North-west of the site are the hulking concrete remains of the allies’ temporary Mulberry B harbour. This is where a piper will play on Thursday at 7.26am – the exact moment the first man landed, three-quarters of a century ago.

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The Guardian

Jun 05 2019
Inside the surreal mind of Brian Griffin – in pictures

Griffin is known for his striking shots of everyone from Kate Bush and Elvis Costello to Iggy Pop. These early black and white images show why the smartest pop stars sought him out

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The Guardian

Jun 05 2019
Kirk Weddle's best photograph: Nirvana's Nevermind swimming baby

‘Spencer is 27 now. I’d love to shoot him again – he’s got some really good tats these days’

It’s such a great concept: a baby underwater, naked, defenceless, can’t breathe, but still going after the dollar on a fishhook. Nirvana’s record label, Geffen, came to me with the idea. I was marketing myself as the underwater photography guy at the time. But when they asked me to shoot the sleeve [for Nevermind] I had no idea whether I could do it. Shooting a baby was new for me. I really didn’t want to drown the little guy!

I was lucky that my friends had just had a baby, Spencer, and they trusted me with him. The band weren’t on anyone’s radar at that point, so the shoot was really small-scale – there was no art director, no manager or account executive looking over your shoulder.

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artforum.com

Jun 05 2019
Claudette Schreuders
In this gallery’s back room, several smaller-than-life-size figurative sculptures by South African artist Claudette Schreuders stand or lie in various states of intimate repose. The show’s title, “In
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artforum.com

Jun 05 2019
Joe Overstreet (1933–2019)
The American painter Joe Overstreet, who often hung his exuberant and deeply personal canvases in provocative ways, has died at the age of eighty-five. His passing was confirmed by Eric Firestone Gallery.
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artforum.com

Jun 05 2019
Final Section of Manhattan’s High Line Opens Today
The last stretch of Manhattan’s elevated green space, the High Line, has officially opened today, ten years after the park welcomed its first visitor. Called the Spur, the section boasts the largest
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artforum.com

Jun 05 2019
Virginia Zabriskie (1927–2019)
Dealer Virginia Zabriskie, the founder of modern and contemporary art galleries in Paris and Manhattan that became known for promoting the work of underrecognized artists, died on May 7 at her home in
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The Guardian

Jun 05 2019
Faith Ringgold review – critique of racist America as relevant as ever

Serpentine Galleries, London
A retrospective spanning a 50-year career provides an unflinching perspective on America’s turbulent history

Whether on canvas, panelled quilts or in children’s books, Faith Ringgold is a storyteller. This concise retrospective at Serpentine sprints through almost 50 years of strong and precisely considered works. All contribute to Ringgold’s grander enterprise, in which narrative is deployed as a powerful force, taking back histories and suggesting alternatives to the status quo.

Related: The quilts that made America quake: how Faith Ringgold fought the power with fabric

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The Guardian

Jun 05 2019
Saype's grassy graffiti: meet the street-art sensation who sprays mountains

The French artist’s giant biodegradable artworks adorn fields, are best seen by drones and last only days. Now, Guardian readers can get their hands on them

On a vast stretch of lawn beneath the Eiffel tower, a paint-splattered figure in a baseball cap is kneeling down, carefully planting small wooden stakes into the grass, checking each is aligned with a tape-measure.

It’s an odd sight in the park beneath Paris’s main tourist attraction, but in the morning rush, few people pause to wonder what he is doing. They simply continue trampling over the grass, or let their dogs bound over it. “I’m used to all kinds of hazards to my work,” shrugs the artist Saype. “If it’s not the weather, it’s cows walking over it, or moles popping up, and here it’s dogs. I take it as a lesson in humility.”

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The Guardian

Jun 05 2019
What lies behind? The facades of London – in pictures

Photographer and trained architect Francisco Ibáñez Hantke sees cities as a spectacle of constant conflict, negotiation and flux. Some of these facades will be retained, others have been demolished, and some will be integrated into new developments

  • The following images are from his Unsustainable Structures series, part of his Non-Structures show at the London Festival of Architecture
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The Guardian

Jun 05 2019
The Trump Baby Blimp review – triumph of protest art or big bag of wind?

Skies over London
It’s reaching national treasure status and the Museum of London is after it. But is the joke on us?

Donald Trump is a gift to caricaturists – and not just because of his unreal yellow quiff and angry orange face. He is a satirist’s dream because he reacts. The poor man has not got it in him to ignore a jibe. When protesters floated a big baby Trump blimp for his British visit last summer, he said it made him “feel unwelcome”. So like foxhounds scenting blood, his tormentors have relaunched the inflatable for his state visit. The Museum of London wants to put it on display. It is well on its way to becoming a national treasure.

So we will probably see this mildly funny balloon many more times. I could hear someone on video, as the nappy-wearing blimp was launched from a glum grey Parliament Square, lecturing reporters on its place in the history of British satire. So is this really a masterpiece of protest art – or does it pop when you take a sharper look?

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The Guardian

Jun 04 2019
Punks, beatniks, vagabonds: Ed van der Elsken's world – in pictures

The Dutch photographer’s joyful and intimate images of young bohemians captured the lives, loves and struggles of those immersed a global counterculture

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The Guardian

Jun 04 2019
Nancy Fouts obituary

Artist widely acclaimed for her distinctive sculptural works

The artist Nancy Fouts, who has died aged 74, was best known for her distinctive sculptural works, which reconfigure commonplace objects and materials with a characteristically playful and provocative humour.

A “modern-day surrealist”, with a wild imagination and subversive humour, she produced work that brings together seemingly disconnected objects and ideas to revel in the inherent strangeness of the everyday.

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The Guardian

Jun 04 2019
'It's a celebration': tracing the roots of hip-hop through photography

In a new exhibition, photos from rappers from Jay-Z to Cardi B are on show to trace the rise of a genre from the streets to the White House

On Monday, Forbes revealed Jay-Z to be the first billionaire rapper, a far cry from his early days selling CDs out of his car in the Brooklyn neighborhood of Bed-Stuy.

For his first promotional photoshoot in 1995, Jay-Z, born Shawn Carter, wanted to be shot in front of symbols of wealth – expensive cars, buildings and yachts. When the photographer joked that he’d one day have a yacht, Jay-Z responded: “There’s no doubt I will.”

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The Guardian

Jun 04 2019
Michael Rakowitz review – horribly entertaining tour of ruined utopias

Whitechapel Gallery, London
The Beatles play a presidential funeral while Nimrud’s Palace is rebuilt with sardine cans in this angry, thought-provoking journey though time

Michael Rakowitz’s fascinating Whitechapel show is filled with surprises. It is also an exhausting experience. An inflatable grey building greets you, corralled behind a timber ramp and elevated walkway. A simplified, pneumatic vinyl housing block, it puffs itself up, then flags wheezily and slumps like a drunk to one side. Then up it comes again, undefeated. Designed as a modernist estate in 1954, the Pruitt-Igoe development in St Louis was initially a segregated area, and although that didn’t last, the estate was predominantly occupied by African Americans and left to decay. So bad did it get that the whole thing was dynamited in 1972 and the rubble used as landfill for luxury homes in the suburbs. Up it comes, down it goes.

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The Guardian

Jun 04 2019
The quilts that made America quake: how Faith Ringgold fought the power with fabric

The artist’s work has told stories ranging from memories of the Harlem renaissance to disputes with racist neighbours – and at 88, she’s still got plenty to say

When Faith Ringgold graduated from high school in 1948 she headed to the City College of New York to sign up for an art degree. Ringgold lived around the corner from the campus in Harlem, and used to “see the boys coming out of the subway and going up the hill to the college”. It had never occurred to her that they were all white, and that it was a men-only college. When the bemused college administrators informed her she wouldn’t be able to attend, Ringgold refused to budge. She wasn’t taking a stand, she just didn’t understand why they were telling her she couldn’t do art.

“Art is what I wanted to do,” she says matter-of-factly. “As a child you think you have the freedom to do what you want. You learn later in life that maybe you’re not supposed to do this or that. Then, hopefully, you realise that you can try.” Eventually, a college official helped her sort out a compromise. Women were allowed to teach – that was acceptable; she could get an art degree as long as she minored in education at the college’s teaching institute. She was in, but it wasn’t exactly a breeze from there: she experienced racism and several teachers tried to discourage her. But she never doubted her ability: “Sorry, but I’m here. And I’m going to be here. And you better know it.”

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The Guardian

Jun 04 2019
Robin Rae obituary

My friend Robin Rae, who has died aged 90, was a figurative artist who – with oil on canvas – was able to transform the ordinary world into a dramatic vision.

His solitary figures, buildings and huddled groups of people were all depicted in landscapes, some of which were identifiable but all of which possessed a haunting, Edward Hopper-like quality, many verging on the surreal.

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The Guardian

Jun 04 2019
Natalia Goncharova review – revolutionary visions from a lost Russia

Tate Modern, London
Goncharova’s vibrant, diverse, folkloric images transform our understanding of the Russian avant garde, and a peasant culture swept away by the Soviets

The Russia painted by Natalia Goncharova died long before she did. Goncharova passed away in Paris in 1962, at the age of 81, by which time the gaudy, vibrant popular culture of the peasant society that fascinated her was long gone, deliberately destroyed decades earlier by the forced “collectivisation” of agriculture by the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics.

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The Guardian

Jun 03 2019
Brittany, France's 'Little Britain'– in pictures

Mark Neville’s Breton project began in June 2016, the day the UK voted to leave Europe. The images in his book Parade explore the region of north-west France where pigs outnumber people two to one

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The Guardian

Jun 03 2019
Nano-robots and VR for refugees: EPSRC 2019 winners – in pictures

An image of a Syrian refugee using virtual reality to help researchers design a shelter has been chosen as the winner of the 2019 national science photography competition organised by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council. The competition attracted 169 entries from EPSRC-funded researchers

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The Guardian

Jun 03 2019
Protests and a tomato fight: Monday's best photos

The Guardian’s picture editors select photo highlights from around the world

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The Guardian

Jun 03 2019
Werner Bischof: 1950s America in colour – in pictures

The acclaimed Magnum photographer Werner Bischof’s images of 1950s America are shown for the first time in an exhibition devoted to his USA series. His early use of colour shaped the development of photojournalism, and they can be seen at the David Hill Gallery in London from 7 June

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The Guardian

Jun 03 2019
The best US exhibitions celebrating Stonewall at 50

Museums and galleries across America are honoring the impact of the Stonewall riots of 1969 with a varied selection of exhibitions

One summer night in 1969, police raided the Stonewall Inn, a gay dive bar in New York’s Greenwich Village (John Waters said the “uppity gays would never go there”). While the police raided Stonewall for not having a liquor license, many saw it as an excuse to target sex workers and criminalize the gay community. Then something happened – the LGBTQ community fought back in a way that had never been seen before. For six consecutive days, the gay community held a series of protests to fight for their rights, some held signs that read: “Stonewall means fight back!” and “Smash gay oppression!”

Related: 'It's extraordinarily powerful': first trans monument comes to New York

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The Guardian

Jun 02 2019
Melbourne's Capitol theatre reopens after $18m restoration

A 1920s design triumph of Walter Burley and Marion Mahony Griffin, the cinema was mothballed in 2014 after falling into disrepair

Hidden from public gaze for five years, one of the jewels in Melbourne’s architectural crown, The Capitol – a 1920s design triumph of Walter Burley Griffin and Marion Mahony Griffin – has reopened its doors.

The RMIT University-owned theatre underwent a three-year $20m+ restoration after it was mothballed in 2014 after falling into disrepair.

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The Guardian

Jun 02 2019
Colourful runners and Champions League: the weekend's best photos

The Guardian’s picture editors select photo highlights from around the world

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The Guardian

Jun 02 2019
Leonardo da Vinci expert declines to back Salvator Mundi as his painting

Dr Carmen Bambach believes the polymath likely only did small retouchings to the work

One of the world’s leading experts on Leonardo da Vinci has criticised Christie’s auction house for wrongly suggesting in its cataloguing of the Salvator Mundi that she was among scholars who had attributed the picture to the Renaissance master.

Dr Carmen Bambach, who is a curator at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, told the Guardian: “That is not representative of my opinion.”

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The Guardian

Jun 02 2019
Get Up, Stand Up Now: Black British art's response to the Windrush scandal

A new exhibition celebrates black British creativity from the 1970s to the present day. Its curator discusses the show and talks us through eight key pieces

“As a child, my superheroes were artists,” says Zak Ové. Perhaps it was inevitable growing up in a bohemian west London household with his father, Horace, a Trinidad-born artist who arrived in the UK in 1960 and became a key figure in British film, TV and photography. Horace was the first black British film-maker to direct a feature-length film (Pressure, 1976). It was through his films and photographic work chronicling black British life that he forged bonds with influential cultural figures such as the US writer and activist James Baldwin, photographer Armet Francis and textile designer Althea McNish, who were like an extended family for the young Ové. They were, he says, guiding lights to an “artistic life and black consciousness”.

But he’s quick to point out that “within Horace’s group, it wasn’t just a black thing”. Social consciousness more widely drove their activism. Ové’s white Irish mother was a diehard socialist, and at dinner with their fists raised high his parents would proclaim: “Power to the people.” Political beliefs were woven into the fabric of the Ové home, which was adorned with African art and artefacts, and Ové and his sister, Indra, were regularly exposed to their father’s working practice, at his “scene” – “be it at a shebeen in Ladbroke Grove, Sunday afternoon jazz or accompanying him to an edit suite”.

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The Guardian

Jun 02 2019
Rennie Mackintosh’s Hill House – when two roofs are better than one

Helensburgh, Scotland
The architect broke new ground in 1904 with his gorgeous design for a family home. Now, a very modern solution has been adopted to save this expressive masterpiece

Fate has not been kind to the buildings of Charles Rennie Mackintosh, Scotland’s most iconoclastic modern architect. His masterpiece, the Glasgow School of Art, lies in ruins, doubly destroyed by two catastrophic fires, first in 2014 and latterly last year. “One may be regarded a misfortune; two looks like carelessness”, to paraphrase Oscar Wilde, an equally iconoclastic and equally doomed fin-de-siecle contemporary.

Like Wilde, Mackintosh endured extreme reversals of fortune. In 1900, during a trip to Vienna, “Toshie” and his wife, the gifted artist Margaret Macdonald, were feted as Caledonian heroes by the secessionist movement and cheered through the streets in a flower-decked cart. From these intoxicating heights there ensued a slow descent into poverty and obscurity, exacerbated by the first world war, which severed connections with Europe and robbed Mackintosh of the sustaining influence and acclaim of his co-conspirators.

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The Guardian

Jun 01 2019
‘The public has a right to art’: the radical joy of Keith Haring

Colourful and cartoonish, accessible and political, Keith Haring’s work has never gone out of fashion. But what drove him?

• ‘He has changed things’: Keith Haring remembered by those who knew him

Though he died in 1990, in many ways Keith Haring is still alive. His art is everywhere. There are Haring T-shirts, Haring shoes, Haring chairs. You can buy Haring baseball hats and badges and baby-carriers and playing cards and stickers and keyrings.

Keith Haring’s work pops up all over the place – his radiant baby, the barking dog, the dancer, the three-eyed smiling face. Simple, cheerful, upbeat, instantly recognisable. They make you smile and they work like graffiti tags, small signifiers that say “Keith woz here”. But Haring did much more than provide cute cartoons. He was publicly minded. His art faced outwards. He wanted to inform, to start a conversation, to question authority and convention, to represent the oppressed. Those cute figures are political.

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The Guardian

Jun 01 2019
‘It's the fun and joy I remember’: Keith Haring by his friends

On the eve of a major UK exhibition, friends and fellow artists remember the beloved pop art maverick

• ‘The public has a right to art’: the radical joy of Keith Haring

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