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The New York Times

Jan 04 2021
Plans to Raze Louis Kahn-Designed Dorms in India Are on Hold
After an outcry from preservationists and architects, the Indian Institute of Management in Ahmedabad said that it would reconvene to consider the dorms’ future.
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artforum.com

Jan 04 2021
Jean-Michel Othoniel
Kukje Gallery is pleased to announce “NEW WORKS”, a solo exhibition of the French contemporary artist Jean-Michel Othoniel, on view from December 17, 2020, through January 31, 2021. Following Othoniel’s
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artforum.com

Jan 04 2021
Skye Arundhati Thomas on Rajesh Rajamani’s The Discreet Charm of the Savarnas (2020)
“A BRAHMIN MUST BE A CULTURAL SUICIDE BOMBER,” writes Suraj Yengde, author of Caste Matters (2019). In other words, a brahmin must enter the upper-caste corridors of power to which only they have
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The Guardian

Jan 04 2021
Fashion legend Martin Margiela to make comeback as artist

Reclusive Belgian who retired as designer in 2009 will stage Paris exhibition of his artwork in April

After 12 years out of the public eye, the reclusive fashion designer Martin Margiela has announced his comeback – as an artist.

The Belgian, who retired from fashion design in 2009, is to exhibit at the Lafayette Anticipations gallery in Paris.

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The Guardian

Jan 03 2021
Skywhalepapa and his children to take flight over Canberra

Artist Patricia Piccinini’s hot air balloon sculpture is a companion to the 10-bosomed Skywhale

A Skywhale family will take to the skies over Canberra in February, with the National Gallery of Australia confirming the maiden flight of another hot air balloon sculpture.

Skywhalepapa, the companion of the bulbous and 10-bosomed Skywhale, will take off on 6 February.

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artforum.com

Jan 03 2021
Cyprien Gaillard
In his peripatetic oeuvre, Cyprien Gaillard traverses fossil remains in the marble walls of subway stations in the former Soviet Bloc; a deserted landscape in the Babylon region of Iraq with heaps of
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The New York Times

Jan 03 2021
Paige Rense, Trendsetting Editor of Architectural Digest, Dies at 91
Paige Rense, Trendsetting Editor of Architectural Digest, Dies at 91
Showcasing the lavish homes of world leaders and celebrities, she and her magazine became powerful forces in interior design.
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The Guardian

Jan 03 2021
The vagina dialogues: 33-metre artwork draws far right's ire in Brazil

Juliana Notari’s hillside sculpture sparks clash between Bolsonaro-supporting right and leftwing cultural community

A 33-metre reinforced concrete vulva has sparked a Bolsonarian backlash in Brazil, with supporters of the country’s far-right president clashing with leftwing art admirers over the installation.

The handmade sculpture, entitled Diva, was unveiled by visual artist Juliana Notari on Saturday at a rural art park on the grounds of a former sugar mill in Pernambuco, one of Brazil’s most culturally vibrant states.

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The Guardian

Jan 03 2021
David Larkin obituary

My brother David Larkin, who has died aged 84, was an art director in the book publishing industry who consistently pushed artists to go beyond their known capabilities – and often saw things in them that they did not themselves perceive.

In the late 1960s, as art director at Granada Publishing, David discovered and nurtured lots of new talent, including the ex-docker John Holmes, who illustrated Germaine Greer’s iconic Female Eunuch cover from David’s initial idea, and numerous others who went on to become art directors themselves – among them Dom Rodi, Cherry McGill, Pat Mortimore, Mike Jarvis and Steve Abis.

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The Guardian

Jan 03 2021
Destruction of brutalist architecture in north of England prompts outcry

Simon Phipps says mismanagement and lack of appreciation is leading to unnecessary demolition

Some of the finest examples of brutalist architecture in the north of England are at risk of being torn down, according to a photographer who believes a crucial part of the country’s architectural history could be lost in the process.

Simon Phipps, the photographer behind the book Brutal North, a survey of brutalist architecture in the north of England, said that a mix of mismanagement and a general undervaluing of brutalism was leading to unnecessary demolition.

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The Guardian

Jan 03 2021
New year arts: Observer critics pick the culture to get us through to spring

From laughter punches to legendary artists, rock and romance to drama and dance… our writers on cultural treats to light up the months ahead

Taking its title from a Zadie Smith line, Collapsed in Sunbeams is the much-anticipated debut album from 20-year-old Londoner Arlo Parks. Released on 29 January, it’s breezy but heavy with lived emotion, Parks’s 12 songs locating a very British meeting place between torch songs and rhythm.

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The Guardian

Jan 03 2021
Jennifer Packer review: a painter of abundant gifts

Serpentine Gallery, London
Watchful, vibrant and profound, the work of this American artist exudes empathy in her momentous first European show

Eric leans back in his chair, lost in thought, posing for the painter. He wears conspicuously odd socks and purple laced shoes. Objects seem to drift around him like figments in the ambient glow of the studio, or perhaps it’s the atmosphere of the painting itself, with its veils of gold and ochre. Everything is at once so distinct, from Eric’s sidelong gaze, to the stiff folds of his jacket, and yet so abstracted. The portrait seems to partake of its subject’s pensiveness.

Eric Mack is a painter too, and a friend of the black American artist Jennifer Packer. Even if you didn’t know it, you would immediately perceive the intimacy between Packer and the circle of people she paints in this show. The poet April Freely turns away from her typewriter to sit as still as she can for Packer: restless, waiting, fingertips twitching in a shining yellow aura. The New York artist Tschabalala Self appears twice in a single painting, like successive images in a flick-book, shifting about like one of the energetic female figures in her own art.

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The Guardian

Jan 02 2021
The big picture: the right kind of snow, London 2009

A rare white-out in London, captured by Peter Marlow in 2009, found sledgers running for the hills as the city ground to a halt

In the 30-odd years that I’ve lived in London, I can think of only half a dozen proper sledging days. The capital’s comical lack of preparedness for white-outs is, of course, a source of amusement for other, snowier parts of the country. But then, why prepare for something that never happens? (Until it does.)

Peter Marlow’s picture of Greenwich Park from February 2009 recalls a day on which schools were closed for all the right reasons and public transport slithered to a predictable halt. The headline in the London Evening Standard read: “It’s -5 and we’re going snowhere!” But that wasn’t quite true. Everyone with a tea tray in the cupboard or an underused toboggan in the attic fetched it out and trudged to the nearest hill.

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The New York Times

Jan 02 2021
Design Works Prints From Tillett Textiles are Back
Design Works Prints From Tillett Textiles are Back
In the late 1960s, Tillett Textiles teamed up with designers in Bedford-Stuyvesant, Brooklyn, for a historically significant collaboration. Now the prints are being reissued.
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The Guardian

Jan 02 2021
Hospitals without walls: the future of healthcare

In the wake of Covid, doctors and designers are radically adapting their thinking about what a hospital can be and what it should deliver

St Mary’s hospital was slated for a £1bn redevelopment before the pandemic struck, with work due to start in 2027. The main emergency and specialist hospital serving north-west London will still get its upgrade, but it might look quite different now. “Covid-19 has dramatically changed things,” says James Kinross, a surgeon who works at St Mary’s and sits on its redevelopment planning committee.

Before the pandemic, Kinross says, the committee’s goal was to improve the efficiency of existing care pathways; now it’s to rethink those pathways entirely. St Mary’s is a test case, but the shape of healthcare is being reconsidered everywhere and that has major implications for the way hospitals will look in future.

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The Guardian

Jan 02 2021
Plastic fantastic: vintage carrier bags - in pictures

Hull-based artist Aaron Thompson’s Instagram project Carry a Bag Man is a trip down memory lane. He first began collecting vintage carrier bags a few years ago, along with other packaging such as chocolate wrappers and crisp packets. It all started when he found an old Kwik Save bag in a shed. “I work in garden maintenance, so every time I had to take sheds or outhouses down, I’d come across bags.” So far, he’s photographed more than 250 for Instagram, from shops such as WH Smith, Topshop and HMV. Many of them are likely to bring back fond memories of the shopping sprees in January sales from years gone by. “The effort put into advertising back then was so much more creative and out-there,” he says. “It’s great to look at a bag and get that burst of nostalgia as soon as you see a design you’ve totally forgotten about.”

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The Guardian

Jan 02 2021
Original Observer photography

Weruche Opia, Gemma Arterton, Stefflon Don and Joe Wicks - the best photography commissioned by the Observer in December 2020

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The Guardian

Jan 02 2021
Events horizon: the films, music, art and more to get excited about in 2021

From the return of live comedy to a cornucopia of video game releases, it’s going to be a big year for ... pretty much everything

Massive albums by massive artists
... From Drake (due late December) to Foo Fighters (5 February). We may also hear from Adele, Rihanna, Frank Ocean, Cardi B and Kanye West. Plus Beyoncé, that shock album-drop pioneer might join the party, too.

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artforum.com

Jan 01 2021
USC Roski School of Art and Design
Class of 2020 MFA Art: Josh Beliso, Dulce Soledad Ibarra, Casey Kauffmann, Paulson Lee, Alexis C. McDonald, Johnny Forever Nawracaj  MA Curatorial Practices: Loujain Bager, Eve Moeykens-Arballo, Bianca
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artforum.com

Jan 01 2021
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The New York Times

Jan 01 2021
Congress Poised to Apply Banking Regulations to Antiquities Market
Congress Poised to Apply Banking Regulations to Antiquities Market
Regulators have long worried that the secrecy of the antiquities trade, where buyers and sellers are seldom identified, made it an easy way to launder money.
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The Guardian

Jan 01 2021
20 photographs of the week

Pro-choice activists celebrate in Buenos Aires, police break up New Year’s Eve celebrations, the enduring impact of Covid-19 and the earthquake in Croatia: the most striking images from around the world

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The Guardian

Jan 01 2021
John Midgley obituary

My husband, John Midgley, who has died aged 85, was an artist who specialised in creating posters and banners for trade unions.

He got into designing for trade unions following a period of his own workplace activism in the early 1960s, when he was sacked as a tutor at the Camden Arts Institute in London for supporting staff and students in a labour dispute.

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The Guardian

Jan 01 2021
The KLF reissue music for first time since 1992

Singles compilation Solid State Logik 1 appears on streaming services and YouTube years after being deleted, with further reissues anticipated soon

Rave-pop iconoclasts the KLF have released their greatest hits on to streaming services and YouTube for the first time, and have hinted at further music to follow later this year.

An eight-track collection entitled Solid State Logik 1 has been released today, including 1988 No 1 novelty single Doctorin’ the Tardis, 1991 UK No 1 dance anthem 3am Eternal, and the Top 5 hits Last Train to Trancentral and America: What Time is Love? also released that year.

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The Guardian

Jan 01 2021
Italy begins year of Dante anniversary events with virtual Uffizi exhibition

Gallery puts seldom-seen Divine Comedy sketches on display online to mark 700 years since poet’s death

Eighty-eight rarely seen drawings of Dante’s The Divine Comedy have been put on virtual display as Italy begins a year-long calendar of events to mark the 700th anniversary of the poet’s death.

The drawings, by the 16th-century Renaissance artist Federico Zuccari, are being exhibited online, for free, by the Uffizi Gallery in Florence.

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artforum.com

Dec 31 2020
Karla Kaplun
I had a lot of curiosity coming into this exhibition. It had been three years since Gaga had shown a local artist; Karla Kaplun is young, and “La Compañia” (The Company) was her first solo show in an
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artforum.com

Dec 31 2020
Eulàlia Rovira
In his famous 1967 lecture “Des espaces autres” (Of Other Spaces), Michel Foucault stated, “Heterotopia is capable of juxtaposing in a single real place several spaces, several sites that are in themselves
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artforum.com

Dec 31 2020
Sarah K. Rich on Philip Guston’s Untitled, 1964
“THE ARTIST SHOULD NOT WANT TO BE RIGHT,” Philip Guston said in 1960, when pressed to comment on Ad Reinhardt’s rules for pure art. With paintings such as Untitled, 1964, Guston put that ethos to
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artforum.com

Dec 31 2020
Openings: Hayley Barker
I FEEL LIKE I’M SEEING EVERYTHING from a distance these days. It’s disconcerting, but the seeing is no less precious for that—maybe the opposite. Something of that sensation is captured for me in
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artforum.com

Dec 31 2020
ART CLUB2000
Curated by Jay Sanders, Jamie Stevens, and Stella Cilman THE YEAR: 1993. The Roaring Nineties had kicked off, Royal Trux and Mystery Science Theater 3000 ruled the airwaves, the taps ran clear with
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artforum.com

Dec 31 2020
Archie Rand
Although Archie Rand’s long career as a painter has shown many—and sometimes seemingly incompatible—aspects, he has become best known (or perhaps, best underknown) for presenting Jewish themes on a
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artforum.com

Dec 31 2020
Justin Sterling
The multivalent figure of the broken window—emblem of both thoughtless neglect and mindful disobedience, of a certain species of policing and righteous resistance to it—presided over “Orange Chapel,”
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artforum.com

Dec 31 2020
Made in L.A. 2020
At the time of this writing, the fifth iteration of this city’s biennial, Made in L.A., a version, was closed to the public. Due to the pandemic, its official unveiling had been pushed off into an
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artforum.com

Dec 31 2020
Raymond Pettibon
Certain recurring iconography is quintessential Raymond Pettibon: breaking waves and other emblems of SoCal surf culture, along with superheroes, dogs, racehorses, Hollywood, and the endlessly malleable
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artforum.com

Dec 31 2020
Isabelle Albuquerque
The press release for Isabelle Albuquerque’s solo exhibition “Sextet” at Nicodim Gallery opens with a quote from David Wojnarowicz: “Inside my head I wished for years that I could separate into ten
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artforum.com

Dec 31 2020
Bruno Dunley
There was something arrestingly fraught about the latest works of Brazilian artist Bruno Dunley. Although the show’s title, “Virá” (It Will Come), taken from one of the works on view, had an upbeat
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artforum.com

Dec 31 2020
Nancy Holt
STAR EARTH SKY WATER MOON SUN, reads Nancy Holt’s The World Through a Circle, ca. 1970, a sheet of white paper on which these typewritten words—read in either direction and starting in any location—form
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artforum.com

Dec 31 2020
Robert Slifkin on Philip Guston and white privilege
WHAT DOES THE WORK OF PHILIP GUSTON have to tell us about racism in the United States? And, for that matter, who is the us the work is speaking to? These questions are, of course, inspired by the
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artforum.com

Dec 31 2020
Carmen Winant
Touch is our first teacher. Long before language takes hold, we absorb lessons in pleasure, pain, comfort, love, and fear through our skin. Despite its primacy in our early lives, however, touch remains
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artforum.com

Dec 31 2020
Patricia Treib
Kindred but differentiated glyphs, flat and of varying sizes, repeat over time and across space in Patricia Treib’s recent paintings. Her quasi-alphabetic forms are abstract even as they resemble sundry
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