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The New York Times

Nov 27 2018
Roz Chast in Full View (Body Scan Included)
The New Yorker cartoonist, the subject of a new retrospective, talks about getting started as an artist, why she loves crafting and the thing she hates drawing the most.
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The New York Times

Nov 27 2018
Five Countries Slow to Address Nazi-Looted Art, U.S. Expert Says
At a conference to mark the 20th anniversary of an international accord on restitution, Hungary, Poland, Spain, Russia and Italy were faulted.
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The New York Times

Nov 27 2018
Critic’s Pick: ‘Rams’ Review: The Man Who Made Our Machines Beautiful
Easy-to-use products with clean lines started with Dieter Rams. Meet the German designer in this elegant new documentary.
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The Guardian

Nov 27 2018
Fake views? What we can learn from the V&A’s Cast Courts

The V&A’s restoration of its masterly collection of replicas of great European works of art - from Trajan’s Column to Michelangelo’s David - is a timely reminder of the Victorians’ cultural Europhilia

The full-scale replica of Trajan’s Column that stands in two halves in the V&A’s Cast Courts has always been a gobsmacking object to come across indoors. Now its interior is about to reveal a steampunk secret. As part of the restoration of the Cast Courts, which reopen this weekend, a door has been opened at the base of this monument. What can be in there? The darkness reveals … a chimney. It turns out that with typically Victorian practicality the creators of the Cast Courts built two solid brick cylinders like industrial chimney stacks to support the two halves of this ancient – and modern – wonder.

Why did they do it? Why did the Victorians not only create this stupendous replica of one of Rome’s most sublime monuments but fill two vast rooms in South Kensington with full-size casts of everything from the ceremonial doors of Santiago de Compostela’s cathedral to Michelangelo’s David? The answer is all around you as you meditate inside Trajan’s Column. The Cast Courts are relics of a cultural Europhilia that’s clearly not shared by modern Britain. These loving educational artworks bear witness to a passion to know, to see, and most of all to understand the cultural heritage of Europe: to bring the continent’s artistic jewels to these rainy shores.

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The Guardian

Nov 27 2018
'These aren't extinct cultures' – indigenous art gets a stage at the Met

In two exhibitions in New York, Native Americans are given a spotlight both with their artwork and the inaccurate ways they’ve been portrayed by others

If you walk into the Met Fifth Avenue, there is one unlikely sign gracing the entranceway of an exhibit, which reads: “The Metropolitan Museum of Art is situated on the Lenape island of Manhahtaan (Mannahatta) in Lenapehoking, the Lenape homeland.”

It continues: “We pay respect to the Lenape peoples – past, present, and future – and their continuing presence in the homeland and throughout the Lenape diaspora.”

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The Guardian

Nov 26 2018
Politics, passion, pride: Who We Are: Photographs by Martin Jenkinson review

Weston Park Museum, Sheffield
From striking miners to Palestinian refugees, this powerful retrospective highlights Jenkinson’s talent for capturing the humanity at the heart of the action

Between 1979 and 1981, employment in the British steel industry halved from 156,600 to 88,200. Inevitably, Sheffield – the so-called steel city – suffered very badly. Almost overnight, silence replaced the beat of the drop hammers, the glow of the steel works faded to grey, and the pervasive smell of grease and machinery disappeared. As the Bessemer converters became unproductive, so did the thousands of people who lost their jobs.

But for Martin Jenkinson, who realised he had an eye for photography only after his redundancy from the steel works in 1979, it was a well-timed revelation. It was the dawn of a new era in a city that had relied on steel for the bulk of its economy. He was perfectly positioned to capture the years of struggle and triumph that followed those first mass redundancies, focusing his lens on everything from abandoned factories to redevelopment projects, the Battle of Orgreave and South Yorkshire’s first black female bus driver.

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The Guardian

Nov 26 2018
From picket lines to Palestine: Who We Are: by Martin Jenkinson - in pictures

His famous protest images put his work on front pages throughout the 80s, but every photograph of Martin Jenkinson’s was a glimpse of our shared humanity and an insight into the communities he lived and worked in

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The New York Times

Nov 26 2018
Park Avenue Armory Plans Premieres and Returns
The venue has announced its 2019 season, which will include a new play by Christopher Shinn, art by Hito Steyerl and concerts by Barbara Hannigan.
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The New York Times

Nov 26 2018
The Week in Arts: Alvin Ailey, the Internet and Florence Price
The dance company celebrates 60 years with new works and classics, and a neglected Price concerto is performed in New Jersey.
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The Guardian

Nov 26 2018
'A playground for grown up kids': inside the student housing built by its residents

Stuttgart’s Bauhäusle was built by university students in the early 1980s – and residents have been adapting and improving it ever since

When Stuttgart student Heiner Steinacker noticed the veranda of his halls of residence had rotted away, his landlord Studierendenwerk(student services), arranged for a nearby sawmill to deliver fresh timber.

Together with 11 housemates, Steinacker spent three days designing and assembling a new terrace. They then plastered a wall and built four new roofs.

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The Guardian

Nov 26 2018
The trolley boys of Manila – in pictures

Scores of commuters in the Philippine capital, whose metropolitan area is home to about 13 million, are propelled to their destinations daily by so-called ‘trolley boys’, who push metal carts along a few segments of the sprawling capital’s railroads

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The Guardian

Nov 25 2018
Orbital Reflector: the artist firing a satellite into space

Trevor Paglen’s giant artwork was designed purely to be gazed at – from anywhere on the planet

Satellites are usually designed either to look back at Earth or look out into the universe. What if, wondered the American-born, Berlin-based artist Trevor Paglen, there was a satellite whose sole purpose was to be looked at itself?

At 10.32am on Wednesday, a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket is scheduled to blast off from Vandenberg air force base, north of Santa Barbara, California, carrying Paglen’s Orbital Reflector, a kinetic sculpture in the form of a satellite that – all being well – will orbit the Earth for a couple of months before burning up as it re-enters the atmosphere.

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The Guardian

Nov 25 2018
Fringe benefits: the hair extension industry in Ukraine – a photo essay

Hair extensions are bought and sold worldwide, but Slavic hair – known as ‘white gold’ – is among the most prized. Photographer Tom Skipp went to Ukraine to find out about the industry and meet the people involved

The hair extension trade is a multi-million dollar industry – and Slavic hair is particularly prized. The blonde hair extensions have become known as white gold. Ukrainian women can supplement their incomes by selling their hair, with Slavic hair extensions costing about $1,000 (£882) and wigs about $3,000.

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The Guardian

Nov 25 2018
Rossetti drawing found in Edinburgh bookshop to go on display

Pre-Raphaelite painter’s preparatory drawing for Pia de’ Tolomei bought for £75 in 1956

A drawing by Dante Gabriel Rossetti for one of his greatest paintings and discovered in a secondhand bookshop for £75 is to go on display for the first time.

The preparatory drawing for his oil painting Pia de’ Tolomei, produced late on in his career in 1868, depicts one of the artist’s favourite models, Alexa Wilding, a dressmaker he discovered when he saw her walking on the Strand in London and was captivated by her flowing auburn hair.

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The New York Times

Nov 25 2018
Peeling Back the Paint to Discover Bruegel’s Secrets
New technology allows researchers to look beneath the layers of the Dutch master’s works, revealing some macabre details.
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The New York Times

Nov 25 2018
A Long Time Ago in Drawings Far Far Away …
See the early looks for Han Solo, Chewbacca, Darth Vader and other “Star Wars” favorites, from the Oscar-winning John Mollo’s sketchbooks.
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The Guardian

Nov 25 2018
Sixth Haworth steampunk annual weekend – in pictures

Festival features music, dancers, entertainers, burlesque performers, vintage vehicles, fashion show and masquerade ball

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The Guardian

Nov 25 2018
Fernand Léger: New Times, New Pleasures review Tate Liverpool – humanity in a machine age

Tate Liverpool
The war-scarred French artist painted the texture of the 20th century in all its kaleidoscopic confusion. But amid the jumble is also a celebration of ordinary life, work and leisure

The artist arrives, already fully formed as a painter, in Tate Liverpool’s Fernand Léger: New Times, New Pleasures, which brings together paintings, drawings, prints, textiles, film and photography. It takes us from 1914 to the artist’s death in 1955. But rather than a full-blown retrospective, this slightly strange exhibition goes into rather too much detail about some aspects of his work while sprinting through others. Many paintings here have rarely been seen in the UK before, some never. Other key works are missing, and the exhibition sometimes focuses on aspects of his art, and collaborations, that need more unpacking than they get. I would have liked a bit more scholarship and explanation. Wall labels are not enough.

Sometime film-maker, polemicist, teacher (he numbered Louise Bourgeois, Brazilian artist Lygia Clark and the wayward and wonderful Serge Gainsbourg among his students) and most of all painter, Léger really needs a bigger exhibition than this to detail his thinking, his collaborations and his politics.

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The New York Times

Nov 25 2018
Leda and the Swan: A Fresco Comes to Life in Pompeii Excavation
An expensive excavation campaign to shore up an at-risk area of the city is a constant font of archaeological discoveries.
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The Guardian

Nov 25 2018
Gainsborough’s Family Album review – what Mary and Margaret did next

National Portrait Gallery, London
Designed to advertise his talents as a portraitist, Thomas Gainsborough’s many paintings of his wife, siblings – above all, his beloved daughters – are swift, impressionistic and captivating

Margaret and Mary Gainsborough are holding hands in their father’s most famous portrait of his children. Margaret, aged five, darts forward to catch a cabbage white as Mary, a year older, gently tries to restrain her. Their treasured faces are as radiant as the shaft of sunlight through the glade that turns their dresses silver and gold. But the butterfly is almost disappearing from the scene and time’s shadow is beginning to fall. The day is brief and childhood will soon be over.

The truth of Thomas Gainsborough’s great double portrait grows more apparent with every room of this small but powerfully affecting show. The artist (1727-88) painted his daughters together at least half a dozen times, and with each image they lose a little more innocent joy. Inseparable girls, arms draped around each other, teasing a cat, their thin young bodies twisting exuberantly inside stiff 18th-century dresses, they turn into uncertain young women immobilised by the latest fashions.

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The Guardian

Nov 25 2018
A glimpse into Jamaica’s soul: the lost photographs of William Melvin Kelley

First, his classic novel was rediscovered. Now comes a trove of the American writer’s images of Kingston’s ghettoes

“My father began taking pictures when he was 13 years old,” says Jesi Kelley, “and, when we went to Jamaica in 1968, he went everywhere with his camera documenting the lives of the ordinary people we lived among.”

The father she speaks of is William Melvin Kelley, who is enjoying posthumous literary recognition as a lost genius of American fiction. His debut novel from 1962, A Different Drummer, has just been reissued by Quercus books after a bidding war, and two further novels are also due to be published.

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The Guardian

Nov 24 2018
Would you trust Roger Scruton to design your new home?

The conservative philosopher who shares Prince Charles’s views on architecture is surely the worst person to head the government’s new commission to improve UK housing

You know the bit in horror movies when everyone relaxes. They think that the zombie/vampire/psychopath/alien is at last dead. But it isn’t. With one more hideous gasp the monster rises up and takes a few more victims down before it is finally, definitely, conclusively polished off. Such is the effect of the news that the philosopher Roger Scruton is to chair the government’s new Building Better, Building Beautiful commission. The stated purpose of the commission is to “tackle the challenge of poor quality design and build of homes and places, across the country and help ensure as we build for the future, we do so with popular consent.” Its chair will in theory wield considerable influence over the built form of the country.

Scruton’s appointment has been met with alarm on two fronts. The first is his record of past remarks on subjects other than architecture – that there is “no such crime” as date rape, that homosexuality is “not normal”, that Islamophobia is “invented” – which have caused MPs to demand his resignation. Luciana Berger, parliamentary chair of the Jewish Labour Movement also said he should go, on the basis of remarks that she said reinforced antisemitic conspiracy theories about the philanthropist George Soros.

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The Guardian

Nov 24 2018
The art of the travel diary – in pictures

For the past 13 years, Spanish artist José Naranja has been combining sketches, calligraphy and collage to create personal notebooks inspired by his travels. “I collect ideas, dreams and experiences,” he says. Naranja quit his job as an aeronautical engineer to dedicate himself to his art, through which he says he creates “a little space of freedom” for himself. He has completed 15 notebooks, their pages filled with musings, illustrations, and stamps and tickets from his travels. After using Moleskine notebooks for many years, he now binds his own by hand, selling facsimiles under the title The Orange Manuscript. Based in Madrid, Naranja hopes his work can speak to a global audience: “Even if they don’t understand the language, they can feel something.”

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The Guardian

Nov 24 2018
The 20 photographs of the week

The migrant caravan in Mexico, wildfires in California, the Copa Libertadores final and Rohingya refugees in Bangladesh – the week captured by the world’s best photojournalists

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The Guardian

Nov 23 2018
The Guardian big picture: № 1 Damse Vaart canal, 2018

The first in our weekly series of exclusive Guardian print sales. This week is the Damse Vaart canal in Bruges by our photographer Murdo MacLeod

The Damse Vaart is a canal in West Flanders that connects Bruges to the Dutch border town of Sluis, and this tree-lined avenue – perfect for cycling – runs alongside. The photograph was taken this year, the end-of-the-afternoon, late-October sun filtering through the trees, giving the scene a “misty, golden glow”, says Murdo MacLeod. “It was as empty and as beautiful as it looks.” MacLeod was riding back to Bruges, “and then these two ladies cycled past in their yellow tops, so I stopped to take a picture. They were so perfect, they could have been dialled in.” Hannah Booth

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The New York Times

Nov 23 2018
Show Us Your Wall: Filling Their Lives With Art, and Not Just One Piece at a Time
A couple who began collecting the work of black artists as newlyweds in the 1960s are making large gifts to museums to raise the artists’ profiles.
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The New York Times

Nov 23 2018
Overlooked No More: Lilian Rice, Architect Who Lifted a Style in California
In the 1920s, Rice brought her design aesthetic to a small village north of San Diego. Those who live there continue to respect her vision.
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The Guardian

Nov 23 2018
Banksy works worth £12m impounded in Belgium after legal row

Brussels exhibition was closed by bailiffs after a dispute over ownership of the street art

It had been advertised as “Banksy unauthorised”, a retrospective of 58 of the street artist’s most famous works, put on display in an empty supermarket in a swanky part of Brussels.

On Thursday night, a Belgian court proved just how unauthorised the exhibition may have been by ordering bailiffs to seize the art, valued at over £12m.

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The Guardian

Nov 23 2018
Surreal meditations on Scottishness and Dickens saved from hard times – the week in art

Edinburgh has a new contemporary art space, Charles II’s enthusiasm for sex is surveyed and Cornelia Parker crushes brass – all in our weekly dispatch

Rachel Maclean
Surreal meditations on modern Scottish identity from this audacious creator of grotesque video masquerades.
National Gallery, London, from 29 November to 3 February.

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The Guardian

Nov 23 2018
Snapping point: how the world’s leading architects fell under the Instagram spell

Instagram culture is changing architecture around the world, but is quality being compromised in pursuit of a striking selfie?

For a couple of recent summers, gaggles of young Chinese tourists would regularly find themselves lost in an industrial estate on the edge of the A11 dual carriageway in east London, smartphones in hand, in search of the perfect selfie. The faded warehouses of Newham have their own special charm, but the millennials weren’t here to sample the post-industrial wastes of the 2012 Olympic site’s hinterland. They were here to find a wall.

Not just any old wall, but one that had been photographed and shared online thousands of times, that had found its way into the background of music videos and adverts, a patterned backdrop that had become so popular on social media that it had spawned a wave of unofficial merchandise.

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The Guardian

Nov 23 2018
Gold chandeliers and satin galore: the London home causing a social media stir

The late photographer and designer Henry Wilson’s house – a riot of vivid colour and India-inspired decor – is up for sale

The 10 best velvet pieces for your home

It is a world away from the modernist lines and sparse concrete floors and walls of many interior design magazines. Perhaps that’s why a uniquely decorated terraced house in Chelsea, southwest London, has caused a stir on social media since going on the market for £1.85m last month.

Most people don’t greet yet another £2m property in London with enthusiasm. But the four-bedroom end-of-terrace house, which the estate agent is advertising as “extraordinary”, is quite different. It has a mix of vivid colour, baroque stylings, paisley, Indian decor, Persian rugs, gold tiling and book-lined walls. There are striped floors and a bright, burnt orange kitchen; Moroccan lamps hanging from the ceilings; art deco clocks; what looks to be an original Edwardian bed, a fuchsia boudoir; gold chandeliers; glossy black ceilings; satin ottomans; wall-mounted china.

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The Guardian

Nov 23 2018
Ashurnasirpal II shoots a wounded lion – a dangerous predator or human enemy?

The symbolic display of power is captured in this well-preserved carving, circa 865BC

Bare-chested Putin toting a rifle in the great outdoors has got nothing on the kings of ancient Assyria. Back then, if a despot wanted to promote his physical might, the lion hunt – or, more accurately, lion killing – was the truly regal way to go.

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The Guardian

Nov 22 2018
From llamas to lefties: the intrepid Inge Morath – in pictures

Born in Austria, she escaped the Nazis and became part of Magnum’s community of photographers – relishing the way her camera could admit her into worlds then closed to women

• Sarah Crompton on the quiet brilliance of Inge Morath

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The Guardian

Nov 22 2018
The quiet brilliance of Magnum photographer Inge Morath

From escaping Nazi Germany to marrying playwright Arthur Miller, as Linda Gordon’s new biography shows, Morath’s life was almost as extraordinary as her images

• Click here to see a gallery of Inge Morath photographs

Inge Morath arrived at the newly formed Magnum photographic co-operative in Paris on July 14, 1949, with her friend and fellow photographer Ernst Haas (known as Haasi), looking for Robert Capa. The door was opened by a man with a hangover, with an ice bag on his head. The renowned war photographer was nowhere to be seen. Morath, who had expected to be greeted by “big shots” was disappointed. “I had bought a hat and felt a touch betrayed,” she wrote later.

It was not the last time she would feel that way as she forged a path through the aggressively masculine boys’ club that the agency was at the time. When she arrived from Vienna, aged 26, she was an experienced editor and reporter, who had worked with Haasi as a photo-story team for Life and other magazines. She trained with Simon Guttmann, a picture editor with Picture Post, and later with her on-off lover Henri Cartier Bresson before becoming a full photographic member of Magnum in 1955. But she knew she would have to prove herself.

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The New York Times

Nov 22 2018
New York Art Guide: How to Navigate Museums This Holiday
We’ll not only help you figure out what exhibitions to see, but also offer some tips before you head out.
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The New York Times

Nov 22 2018
28 Art Exhibitions to View in N.Y.C. This Weekend
Our guide to new art shows and some that will be closing soon.
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The New York Times

Nov 22 2018
Critics’ Picks: 10 Under-the-Radar Art Shows to See Now
Our critics select museum and gallery exhibitions that provide a respite from carols and crowds.
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The New York Times

Nov 22 2018
Leaning Tower of Pisa Now Tilts a Little Less. 1.5 Inches Less.
Nearly two decades after engineers completed consolidation work to keep the tower from toppling over, officials said its famed tilt had been reduced by 1.5 inches.
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The New York Times

Nov 22 2018
Indelible Impressions From 3 Shows in Washington
There is plenty of art to see now in the nation’s capital, but three exhibitions stand out: Bill Traylor’s iconic drawings, Dawoud Bey’s haunting portraits and the savoir faire of Senegalese women.
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The Guardian

Nov 22 2018
Leaning Tower of Pisa is leaning less than before, say experts

It is half a degree straighter after restorative work and its stability is better than feared

Stabilisation work means the Leaning Tower of Pisa is leaning slightly less than it used to, experts have said.

The tower, which has leaned to one side ever since it began to take shape in 1173, has lost 4cm of its tilt over the past two decades, according to a report from the surveillance group that meets every three months to give updates on the monument’s condition.

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The Guardian

Nov 21 2018
Dorothy Bohm's best photograph: two poor children in 50s Paris

‘They told me they were shopping for their mum. The little girl is carrying a box of Omo washing powder, the boy a bottle of wine’

In the mid-1950s, my husband and I were living in Paris and my brother came to visit. I showed him around the city, took him to all my favourite places. We were up in Montmartre when I saw these kids, who were about nine and five. My French was good enough to chat with them. They told me they were going shopping for their mum. The little girl is carrying a box of Omo washing powder, the boy a bottle of wine, I think. I took a few shots but this was the most interesting one. You can see they were perfectly at ease, looking up at my brother, who was talking to them.

I love their expressions, but what makes this image so poignant is that it is also a piece of history: the fact that the streets weren’t properly paved; the sign on the wall; the way the children are dressed. I look at it and wonder about the life they led, the boy looking after his little sister. Life did not seem to be luxurious.

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The Guardian

Nov 21 2018
Own a limited edition print from photographer Jane Bown

Jane Bown joined the Observer in 1949 and over the next six decades created a remarkably singular body of work that straddled all areas of photojournalism. It is, however, for her insightful, intimate and deeply respectful portraits that she is best remembered. Her working method was legendary – speed and simplicity. She used Olympus OM1s from the early 1970s, liked to expose no more than two films, never used a light meter, never had an assistant, used natural light only, and worked, almost exclusively, in black and white. Famously reluctant to talk about her working method, Jane once admitted that for the brief moment when she looked at somebody through a lens, what she felt could best be described in terms of an intense love

Order your limited edition Jane Bown print here

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The New York Times

Nov 21 2018
Critic’s Notebook: From the Beach to the Boudoir
Exhibitions of the work of Berthe Morisot and her teacher, Camille Corot, explore the changing images of women in late-19th-century France.
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The Guardian

Nov 21 2018
How life drawing helped me rediscover my capacity for empathy | Nathan Dunne

What does sketching thigh hair and folds of skin have to do with understanding other people? Quite a lot, it turns out

Daily life is increasingly a relationship with the screen, a digital reality of reproduction, manipulation and surveillance. As Win Butler of Arcade Fire sang on Reflektor in 2013, “We’re so connected, but are we even friends?” Increasingly, I feel that the most persistent symptom of the internet age is a lack of empathy. In 2006 the then-senator Barack Obama referred to the US’s “empathy deficit”, while commentators have used the notion of an “empathy gap” as a talking point, often with regard to climate change or racial tensions.

Related: Damien Hirst's gigantic uteruses are a bold correction to shocking ignorance | Hannah Clugston

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The Guardian

Nov 21 2018
We have liftoff: Edinburgh Observatory embarks on a new mission

The City Observatory on Calton Hill was a decrepit ruin until arts group Collective decided to make it their spectacular new gallery, giving new life to a monument to the Scottish Enlightenment

Edinburgh’s old and elegant skyline has a thrilling new attraction, a hilltop haven for art lovers and astronomers, dog walkers and coffee drinkers. The City Observatory on Calton Hill spent most of the past century descending into dereliction. In recent years, it has been hidden behind hoardings, letting the pillars, towers and spires elsewhere in the city take all the glory. But now this pretty little neoclassical building can be seen again, its dome glossy, its portico proud, its telescopes lovingly reconditioned.

The restoration of this scientific monument – designed in 1818 by William Henry Playfair – has been led, somewhat improbably, by Collective gallery, a small, not-for-profit visual arts organisation. The last eight years have transformed its director Kate Gray into a seasoned negotiator. Besides raising the £4.5m required, Gray and her team have managed to balance the conflicting demands of an enormous number of bodies: the city council, world heritage groups, architects, construction firms, astronomers, restaurateurs, tourists, revellers and even local dog walkers, not to mention all the artists the gallery supports. “The expectation was that people would see the site and expect the National Galleries,” says Gray. “And that’s really not who we are.”

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The Guardian

Nov 21 2018
Rembrandt painting featuring artist's 'fingerprints' to go on sale in London

Nearly 400-year-old oil sketch of Christ in prayer expected to fetch £6m at Sotheby’s auction

Two fingerprints almost certainly belonging to Rembrandt have been discovered on a small painting portraying Jesus, which is to be auctioned in London next month.

The artwork, called Study of the Head and Clasped Hands of a Young Man as Christ in Prayer, a rapidly painted oil sketch on an oak panel, is coming to the market for the first time in 60 years and is estimated to fetch about £6m.

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The New York Times

Nov 21 2018
Museums in France Should Return African Treasures, Report Says
Two academics, in a study commissioned by President Emmanuel Macron, recommended a process for repatriating artifacts if countries asked for them.
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The Guardian

Nov 21 2018
Female wrestling's teen star Gia Scott – in pictures

Kierra Scott – better known by her stage name Gia – is a rising star in the US pro wrestling scene. This month, the 19-year-old became the youngest ever female champion of the MCW wrestling league in Maryland.

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The Guardian

Nov 21 2018
Souls Grown Deep: the foundation helping to preserve black artists

The Atlanta-based group boasts work by roughly 160 artists of colour and a string of deals with major US museums hints at a vital shift in the art world

Through the 1960s and 1970s, Purvis Young, a self-taught artist from Miami, roamed the inner city streets of Overtown, scouring for cardboard, wooden crates and secondhand doors to use as canvas for his expressive paintings.

He learned the chops of art history – from Rembrandt to Van Gogh – through library books. He was often called an outsider artist and would paint trains, trucks and railroads to suggest an escape from inner city life, while his pieces told visual tales of racism, poverty and hypocrisy.

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The Guardian

Nov 20 2018
Doughnuts, drag and an extraterrestrial: 48 hours in Blackpool – in pictures

Benita Suchodrev spent two days in the Lancashire seaside resort, pointing her camera at its tourists and townsfolk, at the tattoo parlours, amusement arcades and the iconic Tower

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