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artforum.com

Oct 03 2019
Deborah Marrow (1948–2019)
Deborah Marrow, a pillar of the Getty Foundation who dedicated more than three decades of service to the organization, died on October 1. She was seventy years old. The veteran arts administrator served
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The New York Times

Oct 03 2019
Anna Sui, Fashion’s Favorite Daughter, Gets Her Day in the Sun
Anna Sui, Fashion’s Favorite Daughter, Gets Her Day in the Sun
With a museum retrospective that looks back at her four decades in fashion, the designer recalls the early influences in her storied career.
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artforum.com

Oct 03 2019
Philadelphia’s Institute of Contemporary Art Promotes Meg Onli to Associate Curator
The Institute of Contemporary Art (ICA) at the University of Pennsylvania announced today that Meg Onli has been promoted to associate curator, a position endowed by alumna Andrea Berry Laporte, effective
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The Guardian

Oct 03 2019
Banksy work depicting MPs as chimpanzees sells for record price

Devolved Parliament reaches just under £9.9m at auction at Sotheby’s in London

A Banksy artwork depicting MPs in the House of Commons as chimpanzees has been sold for close to £10m, in what organisers say is a record for the artist.

Devolved Parliament, which is four metres wide, was first unveiled as part of the Bristol artist’s exhibition Banksy vs Bristol Museum in 2009.

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artforum.com

Oct 03 2019
Expanded Seattle Asian Art Museum to Reopen in February
The Seattle Art Museum (SAM) has announced that its Asian Art Museum in Volunteer Park will reopen to the public, following the completion of a major $56 million renovation and expansion, on Saturday,
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artforum.com

Oct 03 2019
Frieze London Goes Green, Julien Creuzet Wins Prize, Tate Acquires Works, and Other Fair Highlights
The seventeenth edition of Frieze London kicked off on Thursday, October 3, with more than 160 galleries from thirty-six countries. According to a release, this year’s fair marks “the most international
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The New York Times

Oct 03 2019
This House Throws the Hamptons a Curve
Designed for maximum energy efficiency, a weekend home looks nothing like the neighbors’. But an entomologist might feel at home.
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The New York Times

Oct 03 2019
New Scrutiny of Museum Boards Takes Aim at World of Wealth and Status
New Scrutiny of Museum Boards Takes Aim at World of Wealth and Status
A recent protest at the Whitney that drummed out a vice chairman exposed the symbiotic, but potentially problematic, relationship that museums have with some trustees.
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The New York Times

Oct 03 2019
‘I Have to Get That’: How Henry Chalfant Became a Graffiti Ambassador
‘I Have to Get That’: How Henry Chalfant Became a Graffiti Ambassador
The artist’s photographs, a major act of urban historical preservation, are on view at the Bronx Museum of the Arts.
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artforum.com

Oct 03 2019
Eternal Present
PROJECTIONS, now in its sixth year, remains the most eclectic sidebar of the annual New York Film Festival, now in its fifty-seventh year. While at first the series seemed the heir of “Views from the
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The Guardian

Oct 03 2019
Gauguin Portraits review – a buttoned-up, nervous and nude-light cop-out of a show

National Gallery, London
In a gallery that is elsewhere stuffed with naked white women, this exhibition’s avoidance of Gauguin’s unclothed Tahitians feels like an act of prudery – and even censorship

Paul Gauguin was the first European artist to find brown skin more beautiful than white. He makes that plain in his 1902 painting Barbarian Tales, a highlight of the National Gallery’s ultimately frustrating exhibition. Who is the “barbarian” of the title? The gnome-like European who squats like Rumpelstiltskin, or the two serene Pacific women he is next to? It’s not quite right, however, to call the male colonial interloper who gloats over the pair’s unabashed bodies “white”. His flesh is a horrible bright pink.

Gauguin painted this self-excoriating work just a year before his death in the Marquesas Islands in 1903. The grotesque European voyeur is surely a guilty expression of his own appetite for “exotic” female flesh. In 1891, aged 43, he set sail for Tahiti with funding from the French government. He lived in and painted the Pacific world for the rest of his life, apart from a short return to France. More particularly, he portrayed Oceanian women, naked as often as not.

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The New York Times

Oct 03 2019
Feeding the Soul With Art and the Artists With Persian Delights
Feeding the Soul With Art and the Artists With Persian Delights
Fatima and Eskandar Maleki host 150 collectors and creators at a time in their London home.
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The Guardian

Oct 03 2019
Make it a double: Cabaret Fledermaus bar recreated for Barbican show

Copy of short-lived Vienna venue is star of exhibition on artistic role of cafes and clubs

For fun-loving aesthetes in early 20th-century Vienna it was the place to be, a venue for expressionist dance, absurdist puppetry and experimental theatre, perhaps enjoyed with a “cabaret smash” from the cocktail menu.

More than a century later there are no drinks on sale but the wildly colourful bar of the short-lived Cabaret Fledermaus has been recreated for an exhibition exploring the artistic role of cafes, cabarets and clubs around the world.

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The Guardian

Oct 03 2019
Prize-winning photos of peace – in pictures

From climate activists to orangutan babies, these images capture peace efforts around the world

These international awards for the best images of peace celebrate professional photographers who visualise what inspires hope. In short, the Alfred Fried Photography Award honours the ability of people to be caring and supportive.

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The New York Times

Oct 03 2019
Landscape Prize Honors Cornelia Hahn Oberlander
Landscape Prize Honors Cornelia Hahn Oberlander
The first recipient of the $100,000 prize will be announced in 2021, the centennial of Ms. Oberlander’s birth.
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The New York Times

Oct 03 2019
A Roof of One’s Own, With or Without the Gingerbread
A Roof of One’s Own, With or Without the Gingerbread
More than escapist fantasies or backyard baubles, tiny houses are increasingly sheltering people in need.
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artforum.com

Oct 03 2019
Valerio Adami
Valerio Adami will forever remain affiliated with the French intelligentsia of the ’70s. Jean-François Lyotard and Jacques Derrida wrote essays about him, and in turn, Adami provided them with a fertile
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The Guardian

Oct 03 2019
Frieze London 2019 review – gags, tapestry and hardcore ceramic panda sex

Regent’s Park, London
Dazzling colour radiates throughout the art fair this year, along with the scent of ayahuasca ceremonies and satirical pokes at the pretensions – and aggressive fringes – of the art world

‘Artists who think you are not good looking.” “Performance for people in jogging clothes with serious expressions.” “Tapered trouser reading group.” No, these are not my notes from Frieze: these are captions to drawings by Bedwyr Williams, skewering art world pretension and insincerity. From curators with aggressively short fringes and witty spectacles to patronising artists on rural residencies, he sees them all.

Williams is no ingénue – he represented Wales at the Venice Biennale – but the satirical drawings he drip-fed through Instagram over the last year have a fanbase all their own. The Welshman has made it impossible to see art-world gatherings as much other than an assemblage of his painfully accurate caricatures. But now the serpent has eaten its own tail: Williams’s drawings are at Frieze, the art fair at Regent’s Park in London, shown by Southard Reid. Make a beeline for its booth and you’ll see the fair through different eyes.

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The Guardian

Oct 03 2019
Sneaker fans clamour for designer’s lace-up tribute to home town

Limited-edition shoe launching at Adidas exhibition in Blackburn, part of British Textile Biennial

It was more than 48 hours before the Adidas exhibition was due to open at the Blackburn Corn Exchange and already a gaggle of sneaker superfans had gathered outside.

Inside, Gary Aspden, the locally born designer of the brand’s cult Spezial range, was busy arranging 1,200 pairs of trainers plucked from his own 2,000-strong archive and borrowed from collectors around the world, including Stan Smiths worn and signed by Kate Moss, one-offs made for the Beastie Boys, as well as pristine originals from the 1950s.

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The Guardian

Oct 02 2019
End of the Caliphate – in pictures

As the military campaign against Islamic State intensified, Ivor Prickett documented the terror group’s last days in Mosul – its final stronghold in Iraq – and the people trapped there

  • Ivor Prickett is one of the shortlisted photographers for Prix Pictet prize. The exhibition will open at the V&A, London on 14 November
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The New York Times

Oct 02 2019
A New Leader for the Minneapolis Institute of Art
A New Leader for the Minneapolis Institute of Art
Katherine Crawford Luber of the San Antonio Museum of Art succeeds Kaywin Feldman as director.
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The New York Times

Oct 02 2019
Archtober: A Month of Lectures, Tours and Films About Architecture
More than 80 New York City organizations are participating in Archtober, a monthlong event series put on by the Center for Architecture.
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The New York Times

Oct 02 2019
The Newish Charleston
The Newish Charleston
The writer of a new book on architecture in South Carolina’s oldest city praises past glories and rues recent developments.
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The New York Times

Oct 02 2019
Brutalism Springs Eternal in Morocco
A modernist thermal bath complex on an ancient site near Fez may return to its original concrete splendor.
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The New York Times

Oct 02 2019
Charlotte Perriand’s Work Transformed Rooms. Now It Fills a Museum
In Paris, tribute is paid — encore — to the French architect and designer.
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The Guardian

Oct 02 2019
Adrian Bradshaw’s best photograph: the future arrives in 1980s China

‘These guys came out of a Shanghai factory on their lunch break. One had a radio with headphones. I love their expressions – the fascination with something new’

When westerners think about China back in the 1980s, they tend to think about one thing: Tiananmen Square. But as one of the few westerners who spent a significant proportion of that decade in China, I think it erases a much more complicated history – a time of hope and optimism that has since been forgotten.

I had been fascinated by China since reading translations of ancient Chinese literature when I was at school, but my interest was in the classical philosophy and language – I had practically no interest in modern China. I studied Chinese at the School of Oriental and African Studies in London, and we had to spend our second year at a language institute in Beijing. I landed there in 1982. I had no huge enthusiasm for going to a repressive communist state which seemed to be only just recovering from a violent hatred of its own culture during the Cultural Revolution, but it was an adventure.

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The New York Times

Oct 02 2019
Hiroshi Sugimoto Has Hard Thoughts and a Soft Focus
Hiroshi Sugimoto Has Hard Thoughts and a Soft Focus
In his new book, the photographer reveals the essence of important buildings. In conversation, he has a few unvarnished things to say about some of them.
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The New York Times

Oct 02 2019
In the Desert With Jackrabbits and Clint Eastwood
In the Desert With Jackrabbits and Clint Eastwood
A developer resurrected a neglected concrete cabin in the Southern California high desert.
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The New York Times

Oct 02 2019
Architectural Feats in Inhospitable Spots
New books describe the architecture of (near) impossibility, both real and imagined.
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artforum.com

Oct 02 2019
Eike Schmidt Turns Down Top Vienna Museum Post to Lead Uffizi for Second Term
Eike Schmidt, the German art historian who heads the Uffizi Gallery in Florence, has backpedaled on https://www.artforum.com/news/uffizi-director-eike-schmidt-will-head-to-vienna-s-kunsthistorisches-museum-in-2019-70903
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The New York Times

Oct 02 2019
The Unstable Artist Who Helped Invent Expressionism
The Neue Galerie’s mesmerizing survey of Ernst Ludwig Kirchner reveals the genius behind the shocking surface. (Don’t blame absinthe.)
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artforum.com

Oct 02 2019
Yun Hyong-keun
The singular practice of Yun Hyong-keun can be best analyzed through the “quantity-quality equation,” proposed by Yve-Alain Bois. This concept purports that the physical size of flat colors covering a
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artforum.com

Oct 02 2019
Inaugural Recipients of BRIC’s $100,000 Colene Brown Art Prize Announced
Last month, Brooklyn’s BRIC announced that it had established a new prize that aims to support underrecognized New York–based visual artists. On Wednesday, it announced the inaugural winners of the
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artforum.com

Oct 02 2019
From Victoria Miro: Doug Aitken
A look inside “Return to the Real,” an exhibition of new works by Doug Aitken now on view at Victoria Miro London. Conceived as a unified composition of sound, light, form and movement, the show explores
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artforum.com

Oct 02 2019
Minneapolis Institute of Art Names Katherine Crawford Luber Director
Katherine Crawford Luber, the director of the San Antonio Museum of Art, has been hired to lead the Minneapolis Institute of Art (MIA). She succeeds Kaywin Feldman, who departed MIA in March 2019 to
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The Guardian

Oct 02 2019
Art Beyond Limits review: MND show pushes at the event horizon of existence

Gallery@Oxo, London
From the photographer paralysed from the neck down to the roboticist aiming to be the world’s first cyborg, this show for the Motor Neurone Disease Association is full of courage and passion

The power of photographer Simon Adams is to make you see the crystalline beauty of any given moment. A City crowd is moving in all directions, under two old-fashioned clocks in a panoramic black and white print that is radically focused so that while the background is all a blur, faces in the foreground are picked out in super-lucid detail. It’s a freeze-frame of the quotidian wonder that we take for granted – but Adams doesn’t. His pictures hold life with intense appreciation.

In 2012, Adams was diagnosed with motor neurone disease. He is paralysed from the neck down, dependent on carers who, in addition to their medical responsibilities, help set up his digital camera to shoot his big, wide-eyed images of the city and nature. An owl stares at you with hypnotic predatory intent; a purple sky broils over an aquamarine sea … these are photographs full of awe and passion, celebratory works of art that make you see afresh.

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The New York Times

Oct 02 2019
Mary Abbott, Abstract Expressionist, Is Dead at 98
Mary Abbott, Abstract Expressionist, Is Dead at 98
She traveled in the same circles as Pollock and de Kooning, but recognition in a male-dominated genre often eluded her.
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artforum.com

Oct 02 2019
Robert Frank (1924–2019)
THE WEEK ROBERT FRANK DIED, the West Berlin building formerly known as Amerika Haus, now the gallery C/O Berlin, opened the exhibition “Robert Frank: Unseen.” As it happened, I was in town, staying
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artforum.com

Oct 02 2019
New Museum Reaches Contract Agreement with Union
The New Museum in New York and members of UAW Local 2110 announced that they have agreed on a five-year contract. (On Thursday, September 26, the union 
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The Guardian

Oct 02 2019
Wim Crouwel obituary

Leading Dutch typographer and graphic designer who created the Gridnik and New Alphabet typefaces

Wim Crouwel, who has died aged 90, defined the look of the modern Netherlands. He became an influential graphic designer, establishing one of the first professional Dutch design offices, Total Design, with Benno Wissing, a fellow graphic designer, and the furniture designer Friso Kramer, in 1963. “We designed all of Holland, more or less, or at least that is what our competitors said,” Crouwel told one interviewer.

And indeed, he is responsible for its stamps; the signage system for Schiphol, its main airport; the identity of its biggest bank; two decades’ worth of posters for the Stedeljik Museum, Amsterdam; and even the Dutch team football strip for the 2014 World Cup. He was also an influential teacher at the Technical University in Delft and, from 1985 to 1993, the director of the Boijmans Van Beuningen art muiseum in Rotterdam. In 2011, the Design Museum in London staged a Crouwel retrospective under the title A Graphic Odyssey.

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The Guardian

Oct 02 2019
Grafton Architects wins 2020 RIBA gold medal, UK's highest honour

The Dublin cooperative, known for brutalist buildings that create generous open spaces, is only the second women-led practice to win the prize

Grafton Architects, the Dublin practice led by Yvonne Farrell and Shelley McNamara, has been named as the recipient of the 2020 RIBA gold medal, the UK’s highest honour for architecture. It marks just the second time in the award’s 172-year history that the prize has been given to a women-led firm, following Zaha Hadid’s win in 2016.

It says a lot about the duo that their practice is named not after themselves, but the street in which they set up their office. For Grafton, place is more important than personality, and making good buildings a higher priority than theory, rhetoric or appearing in magazines.

Related: Architecture biennale 2018: all hail the new queens of Venice

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artforum.com

Oct 02 2019
German City Rescinds Support for Art Prize After Artist Refused to Denounce BDS Movement
After a jury unanimously chose the Lebanese artist Walid Raad as the winner of the 2018 Aachen Art Prize, the German city of Aachen withdrew from the $10,900 biennial award when it learned that Raad
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artforum.com

Oct 02 2019
Robert Frank (1924–2019)
I REMEMBER SITTING IN MY STUDIO on Broadway and Bleecker, watching a new crop of footage I had received from Robert Frank. On the grainy black-and-white Super-8 reel of a dead horse in the sea, the
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The Guardian

Oct 01 2019
Vorsprung durch techno: the glory days of Berlin clubbing – in pictures

When the Berlin Wall fell in 1989, empty industrial spaces were soon filled with the sounds of banging techno, from illicit parties that went on for days. Now, a new exhibition and book commemorates the legendary scene. Geh hart oder geh nach hause!

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The New York Times

Oct 01 2019
Marina Abramovic Comes Home, and Comes Clean
Marina Abramovic Comes Home, and Comes Clean
The artist received a lavish welcome when she returned to Belgrade, Serbia, the city of her birth, for her first exhibition there in nearly 50 years.
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The New York Times

Oct 01 2019
Vern Yip on Interior Design: Your Home ‘Should Nurture You’
Among his 18 key points: If you don’t love it or need it, get rid of it. And leave each room the way you want to come back to it.
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artforum.com

Oct 01 2019
Artist Files Lawsuit Against Anonymous Instagram Account over #MeToo Posts
The Indian artist Subodh Gupta is suing Instagram over the anonymous account https://www.instagram.com/herdsceneand/?hl=en @herdsceneand , which has accused several prominent members of India’s arts
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artforum.com

Oct 01 2019
Leslie Hewitt
Leslie Hewitt builds deftly upon her conceptual photographic practice in “Reading Room,” an exhibition featuring both a solo presentation in the main gallery and the artist’s reimagining of Perrotin’s
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The New York Times

Oct 01 2019
Need to Get From Point A to Point B? This Guy Creates the Signs to Help.
Herbert Seevinck is the chief executive and owner of Mijksenaar, a wayfinding design firm that creates signs, maps and other visual information systems for the world’s transit hubs.
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artforum.com

Oct 01 2019
Juliana Ochs Dweck Appointed Chief Curator at Princeton University Art Museum
The Princeton University Art Museum, in Princeton, New Jersey, has named Juliana Ochs Dweck its chief curator, a newly created position effective immediately in which she will lead a team of eleven
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