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The Guardian

Jan 15 2022
Pandemic treechange: Australia’s modern bush architecture enters new era

Rural architecture has moved far away from the knocked-up tin shed to embrace the land and sustainability

Australia is the ultimate canvas for architecture that boasts wide open spaces and rooms flooded with light. While urban centres play with streetscapes and how to maximise space in terrace-lined streets, bush architecture is embracing the land, and booming.

Two years into the pandemic, people around the world have been forced to reassess their way of life and the importance of the space they inhabit.

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The Guardian

Jan 15 2022
Embroidered visions of a peaceful Palestine – in pictures

Jordan Nassar was born and raised in New York by his Palestinian-American father and Polish-American mother. “The fight for Palestinian equality is very important in my family,” he says. “My father, a psychiatrist, spent his life helping people there.” Nassar was a crafty child, into origami and kirigami, and then he progressed to embroidery. “It’s the most recognisable element of Palestinian culture, something I had grown up around in our house and almost all of the other Arab homes I’ve been to.”

To create the works, he collaborates with embroiderers in Palestine. “I love that my artistic process brings business to Palestine,” he says, but his beautiful vistas are very much diasporic. “The land in my works manifest the imaginations of Palestinians outside Palestine... In our dreams, there is no occupation, no anguish – our Palestine is beautiful and serene.”

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The New York Times

Jan 15 2022
A Rising Designer Brings Hip-Hop to Homeware
A Rising Designer Brings Hip-Hop to Homeware
Sean Brown is the creative force behind Curves, a home décor brand inspired by African American pop culture. “I always aim to celebrate Blackness,” he said.
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The Guardian

Jan 15 2022
‘We saw this tree filled with goats’: Stephen Tayo’s best phone picture

The Nigerian photographer on an unusual encounter on the roadside in Morocco

As a professional photographer, Stephen Tayo’s usual reason to travel is for work. Since visiting Marrakech solo in 2019, however, he had been raving to friends about how much they all needed to go. Bored after a year under Covid restrictions, he eventually rallied five friends from his home town of Lagos, Nigeria, to join him on a mini road trip. The group began in Tayo’s beloved Marrakech, then decided to head to the beach to slow the pace a little.

“We hired a bus and headed for Essaouira on the coast, but stopped any time we saw something interesting. Shortly after a roadside coffee break, we saw this tree filled with goats taking shelter and resting,” Tayo says.

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The Guardian

Jan 15 2022
Dakar Rally 2022: veterans, debuts and biofuels – a photo essay

This year’s rally once again returned to Saudi Arabia where 750 competitors in 430 vehicles traversed more than 8,000km over 12 stages. The rally started and ended in Jeddah, going through canyons and cliffs in the Neom region, passing by the Red Sea coastline, into stretches of dunes surrounding the capital Riyadh.

Click here to check out images of the rally from yesteryear

From Jeddah to Riyadh and everywhere in between, this has been a visually spectacular year at the Dakar Rally in Saudi Arabia. Fourteen days of dunes, fast straight tracks, rocky sections, and cliff backdrops. Titles have been contested and first-time entrants have been broken in. All of the contestants were hoping for glory in the vast desert landscape where mistakes are rarely forgiven, but few claimed it.

The dust settles on the world’s toughest rallying event and a variety of stories emerge from the Saudi desert. Nani Roma, the seasoned veteran who has won the Dakar on both a motorbike and in a car, showed us how far biofuels have come in recent years.

Bahrain Raid Extreme driver Nani Roma and co-driver Alex Haro Bravo drive their Prodrive Hunter T1 on Stage 7 from Riyadh to Al Dawadimi. Photograph: Marian Chytka

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The Guardian

Jan 15 2022
Halls of power: how the White House inspired a homely renovation in upstate New York

Richly patterned wallpaper layered with portraits and antiques define this 1920s clapboard kit house in the Hudson Valley

The White House doesn’t often provide interior design inspiration – remember Melania Trump’s 2018 Christmas decorations? – but Tyler Lory and Michael Rauschenberg’s grey-painted clapboard home in New York state’s Hudson Valley reflects 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue in one specific way. “As a kid I was always impressed by the rooms at the White House: the blue room, the red room, the green room,” says Lory. “I wanted our rooms to each have their own identity.”

Here, the mono effect is achieved with a different mood and richly patterned wallpaper for each room. Papers are layered with atmospheric portraits and rooms are full of antiques gathered over a lifetime.

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The Guardian

Jan 14 2022
Profusely Illustrated review: Edward Sorel and all the golden ages of New York magazines

A memoir by a man who has drawn caricatures for the greatest editors is a treasure trove of the American mid-century modern

At 92, Edward Sorel is the grand old man of New York magazines. For 60 years, his blistering caricatures have lit up the pages of Harper’s, the Atlantic, Esquire, Time, Rolling Stone and the Nation. He is especially revered for his work in Clay Felker’s New York in the late 60s and for work in the New Yorker under Tina Brown and David Remnick.

He has also worked for slightly less august titles, like Penthouse, Screw and Ramparts.

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The Guardian

Jan 14 2022
From Scream to Dr Semmelweis: a complete guide to this week’s entertainment

Whether it’s nostalgic screen terror or Mark Rylance’s stage return, our critics have your plans for the week covered

Scream
Out now
New year, new Scream. Back after a gap of 11 years (if you don’t count the so-so TV show), this sequel/reboot combines a nostalgia fix – in the form of re-appearances from surviving original Scream characters – with modern anxieties such as: what if Ghostface hacked into the smart home apps linked to your mobile?

Memoria
Out now
An arthouse essential, Memoria follows Tilda Swinton’s Jessica Holland as she attempts to trace the source of a mysterious noise in the jungles of Colombia. Fans of Apichatpong Weerasethakul will thrill to this unique director’s typically confident and singular approach, but this is also a great starting point for those new to his work.

Cow
Out now
Director Andrea Arnold is probably better known for fiction than documentary (see: American Honey, Red Road, Fish Tank …) but her fiction always has a bracing, documentary feel. It makes sense then, that her new documentary about the life of a dairy cow has lyrical, fictive qualities.
Catherine Bray

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The Guardian

Jan 14 2022
Twenty photographs of the week

The aftermath of the protests in Kazakhstan, floods in Brazil, fire in the Bronx and Novak Djokovic supporters in Melbourne: the most striking images from around the world this week

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The Guardian

Jan 14 2022
Ricardo Bofill: the outsider architect who gave 60s Spain a sci-fi makeover

The misfit Catalan, who has died aged 82, dedicated his life to wild postmodern buildings which formed the backdrop to The Hunger Games, and inspired the aesthetic of Monument Valley and Squid Game

A dazzling pink castle perches atop the coastal cliffs of Calpe, near Alicante in southern Spain, its pastel turrets standing like a coral outcrop above the shore. The high fortified walls hide a vertical maze of staircases and terraces within, painted in shades of baby blue, lilac and red, opening out on to the sparkling waters of hidden rooftop pools.

This candy-coloured citadel of holiday apartments is the work of Ricardo Bofill, the maverick Catalan architect who has died aged 82. He spent a lifetime conjuring otherworldly buildings, which now stand like monuments from some future-primitive sci-fi civilisation. Half a century after their construction, his fantastical creations have inspired a whole new generation, being used as futuristic film sets and influencing the aesthetic of everything from the Monument Valley video game to the cult TV show Squid Game.

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artforum.com

Jan 14 2022
Robert Cumming (1943–2021)
YOU MIGHT THINK it would be difficult to photocopy your own obituary from a major US newspaper and mail it off to somebody. Yet Robert Cumming did just that in 2011. He sent me his 1995 obit from
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The Guardian

Jan 14 2022
‘I’m not scared of death’: inside Taiwan’s brutal navy frogman bootcamp – in pictures

A group of 31 men started a 10-week intensive training program to become members of the Taiwan navy’s elite amphibious reconnaissance and patrol unit. It involved sleep deprivation and intense physical training, all while soaking wet. Only 15 finished

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The Guardian

Jan 14 2022
Walk into a human body, book dealers’ vandalised treasures and a 2D world – the week in art

Alison Katz gets autobiographical , the V&A recovers images cut from medieval manuscripts and Emily Speed sees life in two dimensions – all in your weekly dispatch

Wang Gongxin: In-Between
Multimedia installations that explore by modern means the ancient painterly problems of light and shadow.
White Cube Mason’s Yard, London, from 19 January to 26 February.

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The Guardian

Jan 14 2022
The princess and the Caravaggio: bitter dispute rages over Roman villa

‘It’s like a museum,’ says princess caught in inheritance feud over one of the world’s most expensive homes

As legend goes, tossing a coin into the Trevi fountain guarantees a return visit to Rome. When, as a 16-year-old American tourist, Rita Carpenter participated in the ritual and made a wish to one day marry a Roman and live in the Italian capital, little did she know that almost five decades on she would return to marry a prince and home would be a 16th-century villa stuffed with history, including the only ceiling mural ever painted by Caravaggio.

But now Princess Rita Boncompagni Ludovisi is facing the prospect of having to move out of the sprawling Villa Aurora, and the vast treasures it contains are at risk of being closed off to the public.

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The Guardian

Jan 14 2022
Max Fordham obituary
Leading building services engineer of his era, who changed the way architects thought about heating, light and power

Max Fordham, who has died aged 88, changed the way that buildings in Britain are heated, lit, powered and ventilated more than any other engineer of his generation. Trained in the sciences, he brought a new creative and intellectual rigour to the problems of plumbing and wiring, bringing the disparate building services trades together in a single holistic approach. Tackling problems from first principles, he founded his practice on the idea of engineers embedding scientific knowledge in the art of building design, in a way that has since become ubiquitous.

He always instructed colleagues to “start with the edge of the universe as a boundary and quickly narrow down to the specific problem”. While other engineers might reach for the ventilation grille catalogue, Fordham began by asking how air should enter a room, and why. At a time when heating and lighting was usually an afterthought, he worked with architects from the very beginning of the design process, developing practical, elegant, low-energy solutions, pioneering sustainable design long before the term was coined.

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The Guardian

Jan 13 2022
Behind the scenes of Munich: The Edge of War – in pictures

Guardian photographer Sarah Lee describes her experience as a stills photographer on the set of the joint British-German Netflix production starring Jeremy Irons

Munich, based on the Robert Harris novel, is a German-British TV production that was filmed in Germany and subsequently in England in late 2020. I was invited to join the crew as an on-set stills photographer for the UK leg of shooting.

We started in Liverpool, which was doubling for 1930s London. The historic Liver Building, which stood in for Gotham city in the forthcoming Batman movie, made a very convincing Whitehall. The production later moved south to Amersham in Buckinghamshire where we shot in historic houses used as sets for Chequers and Downing Street.

Liverpool doubled for 1930s London – with the historic Liver Building making an impressive substitute for Whitehall

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The New York Times

Jan 13 2022
5 Things to Do This Weekend
Our critics and writers have selected noteworthy cultural events to experience virtually and in person in New York City.
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artforum.com

Jan 13 2022
Dieter von Graffenried (1953–2021)
Dieter von Graffenried, publisher of the acclaimed international art journal Parkett, of which he was also a cofounder, died December 19 at the age of sixty-eight. According to the journal, he experienced
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The New York Times

Jan 13 2022
Artists Respond to Jan. 6 With Brushes and Ballots
On Jan. 6, many artists shared the belief that they should respond to a national trauma. But how?
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The New York Times

Jan 13 2022
The Met Will Pay Museum Guards More Amid Covid-Related Shortages
The Met Will Pay Museum Guards More Amid Covid-Related Shortages
Beyond recent absences caused by a surge in cases, the museum has faced some difficulties hiring guards to replace those laid off earlier in the pandemic.
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The New York Times

Jan 13 2022
Soot, Spit and Paper: James Castle’s Transfixing Worlds
An energizing presentation of the artist’s landscapes, interiors and sculptural objects at David Zwirner Gallery lets visitors enter his secret universe.
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artforum.com

Jan 13 2022
David Graeber and David Wengrow’s new history of humanity
THE DAWN OF EVERYTHING, BY DAVID GRAEBER AND DAVID WENGROW. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2021. 704 pages. ONE OF THE MAIN PROPOSITIONS that David Graeber and David Wengrow put forth in The
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artforum.com

Jan 13 2022
More US Museum Staffers Unionize as Pandemic Drags On; Institutions Increase Incentives
As the Covid-19 crisis looks set to enter its third year, US museum workers, many of whose jobs were precarious or attached to low wages even prior to the pandemic, continue to push for unionization in
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The Guardian

Jan 13 2022
Three women are dancing on an iceberg in the sky. They don’t know how fast it will melt

For the next three days, artists will perform on a 2.5 tonne block of ice suspended above Sydney harbour – an ever-shrinking stage, and a huge logistical feat

A feeling of pessimism and despair following the black summer bushfires that swept through Australia in 2019/2020 became the catalyst for one of the most unconventional and ambitious productions likely to be seen during this year’s Sydney festival.

Like most arts organisations, Sydney-based physical theatre company Legs on the Wall has spent the better part of two years in hiatus.

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The Guardian

Jan 12 2022
Back in the USSR: 1920s Soviet film posters – in pictures

During the brief period of artistic freedom before Stalinism, these avant garde film posters were as bold and innovative as the movies they advertised

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The Guardian

Jan 12 2022
Tented love: how Senegal created a spectacular new African architecture

After independence in 1960, the country cast off western influences and forged a new African style full of triangular forms, rocket-shaped obelisks and rammed earth. Is this spirit now being suffocated? Our writer takes a tour of the capital

Visiting the International Fair of Dakar is like taking a stroll through the ruins of some ancient Toblerone-worshipping civilisation. A cluster of triangular pavilions rises from a podium, each clad in a rich pattern of seashells and pebbles. These are reached by triangular steps that lead past triangular plant pots to momentous triangular entranceways. All around, great hangar-like sheds extend into the distance, ventilated by triangular windows and topped with serrated triangular roofs. All that’s missing is triangular honey from triangular bees.

Built on the outskirts of the Senegalese capital as a showcase for global trade in 1974, this astonishing city-sized hymn to the three-sided shape was designed by young French architects Jean Francois Lamoureux, Jean-Louis Marin and Fernand Bonamy. Their obsessive geometrical composition was an attempt to answer the call of Senegal’s first president, the poet Léopold Sédar Senghor, for a national style that he curiously termed “asymmetrical parallelism”.

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The Guardian

Jan 12 2022
Norman Foster’s architecture firm almost doubles profits

Foster + Partners buoyed by Middle East expansion in year ending April 2021 despite global lockdowns

The architecture practice run by Sir Norman Foster almost doubled its profits as it expanded in the Middle East and gained new business despite pandemic lockdowns.

Total revenues fell by £33m to £200m in the year ending 30 April 2021, accounts for Foster + Partners, the practice’s main trading company, show. But profits before tax almost doubled to £36.2m during the year, compared with £19.8m in the previous year.

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The New York Times

Jan 12 2022
7 Ways to Remember Martin Luther King in New York
From in-person and virtual performances to exhibitions and tours, the city offers plenty of options for honoring the civil rights leader this year.
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The New York Times

Jan 12 2022
Netscape Founder Gives Up $35 Million in Art Said to Be Stolen
Netscape Founder Gives Up $35 Million in Art Said to Be Stolen
“Why would you want to own something that was stolen?” said James H. Clark, who investigators said had been persuaded to buy dozens of looted items by a rogue dealer.
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The Guardian

Jan 12 2022
Man uses hammer to attack statue on front of BBC Broadcasting House

Artwork by Eric Gill installed in 1933 at London HQ is controversial because artist was a paedophile

A man has climbed on to the front of the BBC’s Broadcasting House headquarters and used a hammer to damage a prominent statue by Eric Gill, as another man shouted about the artist’s history of paedophilia.

Gill was one of the most prominent early 20th-century British artists and designers until his death in 1940. But his diaries, published many decades later, reveal his sexual abuse of his daughters and family dog.

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artforum.com

Jan 12 2022
“Spinning East Asia Series I: A Compass in Hand”
Showcasing fifteen individuals and collectives working within an expanded notion of textiles, “Spinning East Asia Series I: A Compass in Hand” explores the titular region as a sociopolitical, geographic,
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The Guardian

Jan 12 2022
Joy and nakedness at San Francisco’s Dyke March: Phyllis Christopher’s best photograph

‘The march is like our Christmas – the biggest night of the year, where women celebrate half naked and anything goes’

In San Francisco, the night before the annual Pride parade is reserved for the Dyke March, a celebration of lesbian life throughout the city. It was like our Christmas – the biggest night of the year – and half of us would be so hungover we wouldn’t make it to Pride the next day.

I remember getting a call from an editor at On Our Backs, a lesbian magazine run by women that billed itself as offering “entertainment for the adventurous lesbian”. It was a bedrock of the lesbian community – one of the few ways to communicate with one another, and to celebrate sex and educate each other about it at a time when Aids had brought so much devastation to queer communities. The editor wanted me to shoot a kiss-in, but the tone of her voice sounded almost guilty – like she couldn’t quite bring herself to ask me to work on the biggest party night of the year. But to me, it was the most fun I could imagine.

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The Guardian

Jan 12 2022
National Gallery to reconnect Britain with giant of US art Winslow Homer

Exhibition to tell story of painter’s move to seaside village in north-east England in 1881

He is a superstar artist in the US, revered for powerful civil war scenes and dramatic coastal storms, but Winslow Homer is barely known in the UK. Even less well known is the importance of an English seaside village in making him the truly great painter he became.

The National Gallery will this year aim to correct that with the first in-depth exhibition of Homer’s art staged in the UK.

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artforum.com

Jan 12 2022
Warhol Foundation Announces Fall 2021 Grantees
The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts has revealed the forty-nine recipients of its fall 2021 grants, which total $4.1 million and are issued to museums and arts organizations in support of
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The Guardian

Jan 12 2022
Go on, I dare you: Philippa Perry’s advice for a fulfilling new year

The therapist tackles the Observer readers’ personal problems every week as our agony aunt. Her tip for an amazing 2022? Get out there and find a new passion

At the beginning of lockdown, so I wouldn’t be alone all day, I went to hang out with my husband at his art studio. I started playing with clay again, something I hadn’t done much since leaving art school decades before. I was in the studio when Grayson started his Art Club with Channel 4 and thought I’d make things and chip in. Many people contacted the show to share their artwork. Often, like me, they’d not picked up a brush for a long time, or this was the first time they’d attempted art. We heard so many stories about how people benefited from making things and the confidence they gained by getting better at it, I couldn’t help but be inspired to keep pushing myself as well.

I’m pleased to report that I haven’t stopped making art since the cameras turned off and, even after lockdown eased, I’ve carried on. This summer a friend needed some abstract modern art to make her therapy centre seem a bit less clinical. How hard can it be, I thought, to get a canvas and chuck a load of paint at it? Turns out it is very hard indeed. Arranging shapes and colours so they somehow look right took me several months before I had six canvasses I thought might not be too terrible. Now the therapy centre has its canvasses, but I can’t stop. How to arrange paint and form so it looks right has become something of an obsession. You could call it a hobby if you like, but that word isn’t quite serious enough for me.

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The Guardian

Jan 12 2022
Magritte masterpiece expected to sell for record £45m at auction

L’empire des lumières depicts street in Brussels thought to be near where the Belgian surrealist lived

A masterpiece by the Belgian surrealist René Magritte, described as one of the most desirable works in private hands, is expected to sell for a record-breaking £45m when it goes to auction for the first time this year.

Helena Newman, the chair of Sotheby’s Europe, said the “show-stopping” painting, L’empire des lumières, depicting a street at night underneath a bright blue sky, would be the star of an auction on London on 2 March.

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The Guardian

Jan 11 2022
Freeze frames: the epic wilderness of Greenland – in pictures

From Inuit hunters to the vast expanses of snow and ice, Danish photographer Carsten Egevang’s images spring from a three-decade fascination with the planet’s least-populated country

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The New York Times

Jan 11 2022
National Endowment for the Humanities Announces $24.7 Million in New Grants
National Endowment for the Humanities Announces $24.7 Million in New Grants
The awards will support projects including Cherokee language translation, a digital map of jazz and hip-hop in Queens, and a study of the secret language of French butchers.
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The New York Times

Jan 11 2022
He Lost Fingers in an Accident. Now It’s Inspiring His Art.
He Lost Fingers in an Accident. Now It’s Inspiring His Art.
After a life-changing injury with a table saw blade, John Powers asked friends to help sculpt a solution. His project to regain his craft is the most important art he’s done yet.
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artforum.com

Jan 11 2022
Guillaume Désanges to Lead Palais de Tokyo
Independent curator and critic Guillaume Désanges has been named the next president of the Palais de Tokyo, Paris. Known for his innovative and atypical programming, Désanges replaces Emma Lavigne.
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artforum.com

Jan 11 2022
Jimmy Raskin
Jimmy Raskin is an aberrant poet who reveals himself on rare and vital occasions, like “a kind of ten-year cicada,” as critic John Reed once wrote. His work is often a whirlwind of chaotic, exciting,
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artforum.com

Jan 11 2022
J. M. W. Turner in Texas
TO VIEW A J. M. W. TURNER sunset in Texas, as I did recently in Fort Worth at the Kimbell Art Museum’s “Turner’s Modern World”—an exhibition making its stateside debut after premiering at Tate Britain
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artforum.com

Jan 11 2022
Richard Klein Steps Down as Exhibitions Director at the Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum
Richard Klein, who has served as exhibitions director at the Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum for more than thirty years, is departing the Ridgefield, Connecticut, institution to pursue independent
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The New York Times

Jan 11 2022
Rubin Museum to Return Nepalese Relics Thought to Have Been Stolen
Rubin Museum to Return Nepalese Relics Thought to Have Been Stolen
The two relics from the museum’s collection that are being returned to Nepal are believed to have been taken from religious sites by smugglers.
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The Guardian

Jan 10 2022
Chasing waterfalls: Alec Soth’s US road trip – in pictures

The celebrated chronicler of American life started his latest photographic journey by following the route of Lincoln’s funeral train … and completed it by following darts thrown at a map

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The Guardian

Jan 10 2022
‘He was a handful’ – Hunter S Thompson’s PA and photographer relives her wild job

She cooked his weird dinners, dealt with his volcanic rants, and read his prose back to him from dark till dawn. As Chloe Sells’ photographs of the gonzo writer’s chaotic Colorado cabin are published, she remembers an invigorating, inspirational figure

One evening towards the end of 2003, Chloe Sells was entering the J-Bar in Aspen, Colorado, in search of a late night drink, when an older woman approached her. As Sells recalls in her new photobook, Hot Damn!: “She looked me up and down and said, ‘We’re looking for some help for Hunter. Are you a night owl? Would you be interested?’”

Hunter, as every local knew, was Hunter S Thompson, the celebrated creator of “gonzo” journalism, and the town’s most infamous resident. The woman was his wife, Anita. “It took me only a moment,” Sells says, “to answer ‘Yes’ to everything.”

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The Guardian

Jan 10 2022
Sinking feeling: San Francisco’s Millennium Tower is still leaning 3in every year

The 58-story luxury condominium building continues sinking despite a $100m plan to reinforce its foundation to prevent tilting

San Francisco’s infamous Millennium Tower – a luxury condominium where star athletes and retired Google employees bought multimillion-dollar apartments before they realized it was sinking – is continuing to sink and tilt to the side by about 3in (7.5 cm) a year, according to the engineer responsible for fixing the troubled building.

In a few years, if the tilting continues at the current rate, the 58-story luxury building could reach the point where the elevators and plumbing may no longer operate, said Ron Hamburger, the engineer.

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artforum.com

Jan 10 2022
Uruguay’s First Contemporary Art Museum Opens
Uruguay on January 8 inaugurated its first major contemporary art museum. The hotly anticipated Museo de Arte Contemporaneo Atchugarry (MACA), located in the coastal resort town of Punta del Este, opened
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artforum.com

Jan 10 2022
Ireland to Launch Universal Basic Income Program for Artists
Catherine Martin, Ireland’s minister of tourism, culture, arts, Gaeltacht, sport and media, on January 6 initiated an online consultation aimed at soliciting opinions regarding the creation of a basic
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The New York Times

Jan 10 2022
How European Royals Once Shared Their Most Important Secrets
How European Royals Once Shared Their Most Important Secrets
Recent research highlights the use of letterlocking techniques by Queen Elizabeth, Catherine de’ Medici and Mary Queen of Scots.
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