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The Guardian

Oct 14 2020
David Byrne's lockdown despair: 'I'd wake up and ask – What am I doing today and why?'

The Talking Heads frontman has taken up drawing to get him through the pandemic – and face down his fears. He talks us through his favourites, from Nature Man to Balanced Life

‘I kept telling myself I was OK,” says David Byrne, recounting his last seven months living through various stages of lockdown in New York. “But like a lot of people, there were mornings when I’d wake up, stare at the ceiling and ask myself, ‘What am I doing today … and why?’ There have been moments where you start to wonder what it is all for.”

One of the things Byrne has been doing is ink drawings: the former Talking Heads frontman is about to put a set of humorous, hand-drawn images created during the pandemic up for sale. And it’s through these that you perhaps get a more accurate sense of his state of mind.

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The Guardian

Oct 14 2020
Damon Albarn in a facemask: Kevin Cummins' best photograph

‘He wanted to get on a train in Tokyo to see what they were like. He put on a facemask and did a shiver as a joke. Because of Covid-19, it now seems really prescient’

Blur toured Japan in 1992 and I went with them for NME. It was the first time we’d seen Japanese kids wearing facemasks. Damon was intrigued, so he bought one. Normally when you’re away with a band, you don’t get time to see anything of the cities you’re in – and a lot of bands aren’t that interested anyway. But Blur were keen to explore Tokyo. Damon wanted to get on a train and see what that was like. He looks like he’s shivering but I think it was a joke to fit with the face covering. Back then, it was really unusual to see a westerner wearing a mask. Because of Covid-19, the image seems really prescient now.

NME got a lot of letters about the shot. People didn’t understand what was going on. How dare someone show vulnerability? I thought it would make a really good cover, but NME always wanted the cover star to be instantly recognisable and make eye contact, so they ran it inside.

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The Guardian

Oct 14 2020
Sprouts, skinheads, Sundays and supermarkets: Chris Killip – in pictures

From the punk club moshpit to the well-tended allotment, the hard-hitting yet profoundly humanist photographer, who has died aged 74, captured real life in England’s post-industrial north-east

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artforum.com

Oct 14 2020
Ford, Mellon Foundations Initiate Disability Futures Fellows, Awarding $50,000 to 20 Artists
The Ford Foundation and the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation this morning announced the twenty inaugural Disability Futures Fellows, each of whom will receive a $50,000 grant toward their work. The fellowship,
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artforum.com

Oct 14 2020
Simone Leigh to Represent United States at 2022 Venice Biennale
Boston’s Institute of Contemporary Art today announced in conjunction with the US State Department Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs that sculptor Simone Leigh will represent the US at the
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The New York Times

Oct 14 2020
Ford and Mellon Foundations Unveil Initiative for Disabled Artists
Ford and Mellon Foundations Unveil Initiative for Disabled Artists
The Disability Futures fellowship awards $50,000 to 20 artists, filmmakers and journalists.
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artforum.com

Oct 14 2020
Edward Van Halen (1955–2020)
I HAVE A FOND MEMORY of sitting on our ratty red velvet couch—or rather, on the small rug that covered the gaping hole in said couch, into which one might fall ass-backwards and not be able to exit
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The New York Times

Oct 14 2020
Simone Leigh Is First Black Woman to Represent U.S. at Venice Biennale
The Brooklyn-based sculptor, whose large-scale works explore Black women’s stories and histories, will create the American pavilion’s exhibition for 2022.
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The New York Times

Oct 14 2020
The Way We Watch Now
The Way We Watch Now
TV brings us comfort. TV gives us information. TV is relentless. The coronavirus lockdown has changed the way we absorb the glow of screens. Three photographers captured viewers at home and in public, relaxed and on edge, together and alone.
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The New York Times

Oct 14 2020
Helsinki Makes Sustainability a Guiding Principle for Development
Co-housing is on the rise, as is solar power and geothermal heat. In one neighborhood, trash is collected via pneumatic tubes.
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The Guardian

Oct 14 2020
Chris Killip, hard-hitting photographer of Britain's working class, dies aged 74

Influential artist, hailed by Martin Parr as a ‘key player’ in British photography, captured human dignity amid industrial decline in England’s north-east

The British documentary photographer Chris Killip has died aged 74. He had been suffering from lung cancer. Killip was best known for his seminal series, In Flagrante, which he made in the industrial north-east of England between 1973 and 1985. He later said of the photobook of the same name, published in 1988: “History is what’s written, my pictures are what happened.”

Of the influential generation of British documentary photographers that came of age in the 1970s, Killip was perhaps the most hard-hitting and the most humanist. “Chris is without a doubt one of the key players in postwar British photography,” said his friend and fellow photographer, Martin Parr, who also describes In Flagrante as “the key photobook about Britain since the war.”

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The Guardian

Oct 13 2020
Death Row Exonerees: behind a powerful photo project on injustice

Martin Schoeller’s devastating new exhibition captures the faces and stories of Americans accused of crimes they didn’t commit

Martin Schoeller is a photographer known for his up-close portraits of the world’s biggest names – from Barack Obama to Taylor Swift and Brad Pitt – all photographed with a special halo light reflected in their eyes, capturing their personality, or even their soul.

The German photographer has now decided to aim his lens towards victims of the prison system in his current exhibition Death Row Exonerees, which is on view at Fotografiska in New York City until 10 January.

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The Guardian

Oct 13 2020
Head-spinning talent: winners from the AOP awards – in pictures

Using fish to make ink prints? Soaking film rolls in sea water? The best images from this year’s Association of Photographers awards were truly inventive

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The Guardian

Oct 13 2020
Picturebook legend Oliver Jeffers: 'I've got my wife's bite marks tattooed on my finger'

His beguiling, beautifully drawn children’s books have made him a bedtime colossus. Does the Belfast writer’s latest, which features one of his favourite tattoos, contain a dig at Trump?

Oliver Jeffers is talking about his many, many tattoos. He has sold millions of picture books all over the world – beautifully drawn creations about, say, friendly aliens in broken-down spaceships – but his most personal illustrations by far are the ones that are etched into his own skin. The crosses on his wrist? To mark the spot where he had surgery for a torn ligament “to remind me that my body is fragile and to be careful”.

The lines on his left index finger? Jeffers’ wife Suzanne was biting him so hard as she gave birth to their daughter Mari, he thought she would break the skin (though he was given short shrift by the doctors when he interrupted the labour to say he was in pain). “The next day,” he says, “I still had those big indentations and I thought, ‘There’s something nice about that.’ So I had her teeth marks tattooed in that place.”

These tattoos – two of too many to count, he says – are depicted in his 19th solo title, What We’ll Build. It’s the latest project in a career that has taken Jeffers from children’s books to conceptual art (portraits half-dipped in paint to become meditations on memory and loss), a collaboration with Starbucks (producing their nationwide in-store displays), as well as work for U2 (including the video and cover art for Ordinary Love). Apple+ recently turned 2017’s Here We Are into a film narrated by Meryl Streep. Dedicated to Jeffers’ first child, Harland, the book was a joyful instruction manual about how to live on planet Earth. This new work was created with his Mari in mind. It sees a father and daughter gather their tools (ranging from a drill to a miniature pig) to construct their “together future” – featuring everything from a table for drinking tea at to “a road up to the moon”.

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The Guardian

Oct 13 2020
Wildlife photographer of the year 2020 winners – in pictures

Sergey Gorshkov’s image of an Amur Tiger hugging an ancient Mancurian fir tree has won the prestigious wildlife photographer of the year 2020 award. The intimate moment, in which the tigress is marking her territory, will feature alongside other category winners in an exhibition at the Natural History Museum from Friday 16 October.

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The Guardian

Oct 13 2020
Image of tiger hugging tree wins 2020 wildlife photographer award

Sergey Gorshkov left a hidden camera in a Russian forest for 11 months to capture the big cat

An image of a clearly ecstatic tigress hugging an ancient Manchurian fir tree in a remote Siberian forest has won one of the world’s most prestigious photography prizes.

It took Russian photographer Sergey Gorshkov 11 months to capture the moment using hidden cameras. His patience led to him being named 2020 wildlife photographer of the year by the Duchess of Cambridge at a ceremony at London’s Natural History Museum.

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artforum.com

Oct 13 2020
150 Artists, Arts Workers Sign Open Letter Calling to #DismantleNOMA
More than 150 artists and art workers signed an open letter demanding the New Orleans Museum of Art (NOMA) dismiss its leaders and address and reform its institutional culture, Hyperallergic reports.
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The Guardian

Oct 13 2020
'I worked in horror films. Now I'm an undertaker': arts workers who had to find new jobs

A DJ turned shaman, a lighting designer turned railwayman, a dancer turned gayrobicist … as the government causes fury with a ballerina job ad, we meet workers forced to retrain due to Covid

Last week, Rishi Sunak’s misreported comment that people in the arts should consider retraining rightly caused widespread uproar. He has since clarified that he had meant across employment generally, though a government ad from 2019 suggesting that a ballerina should retrain in tech, caused widespread fury on Monday as arts organisations found out whether or not they had been selected for a DCMS grant.

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The New York Times

Oct 13 2020
7 Things to Do This Weekend
7 Things to Do This Weekend
Our critics and writers have selected noteworthy cultural events to experience virtually or in person in New York City.
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The Guardian

Oct 13 2020
Virtual voguing and digital razzle-dazzle: London film festival takes the arts into a new dimension

The BFI London film festival’s exciting and enchanting new strand – LFF Expanded – mixes recorded, virtual and live experiences. It’s a pivotal moment for performance

‘Pivot” – to stay on the spot while turning to a new direction – is a word much bandied about in cultural organisations right now, as they look for ways forward while the Covid crisis has suspended normal activity. Like all live arts, dance has pivoted heavily towards the screen, and to “blended” on-site and online access. Fortuitously, screen arts are simultaneously turning towards the live: this year, the BFI London film festival launched LFF Expanded, a new strand dedicated to virtual reality, extended reality, augmented and mixed realities, immersive and 360° experiences – a ragtag set of labels all trying to capture the sense of “convergence” (as the lingo has it) between recorded, virtual and live experiences.

I went to LFF Expanded on site at London’s BFI Southbank (it’s online too, but you don’t get headsets, or help at hand) to find out how dance and VR/XR are interacting. Acqua Alta (on-site only) is a delightful pop-up book – yes, just white paper and black ink – by French company Adrien M & Claire B. The 10 spreads fold out into different scenes from the story, but the magic comes when you view them through a computer tablet: two inky silhouettes – miniature, motion-captured versions of dancers Dimitri Hatton and Satchie Noro – emerge from the paper and step and swirl around, off and up from the page. The enchantment comes not from deceiving our senses – the illusion is entirely undisguised – but from the superimposition of animated fantasy on to material reality.

Bruno Martelli and Ruth Gibson’s Dazzle Solo is titled as such not because it has a solo performer, but because it is a single-user version of an interactive, multi-user gallery installation, currently on hold. As for “dazzle” – well, imagine a cross between Oskar Schlemmer, Bridget Riley, Merce Cunningham and a liquorice allsort, and you get a sense of the vibe. Its inspiration was the legendary Chelsea Arts Club Ball of 1919, where partygoers dressed up to imitate the black-and-white dazzle camouflage (AKA razzle-dazzle) used on naval ships. In Martelli and Gibson’s environment, you can jump between different scenes, each with their own giddying perspectives, algorithmic choreography and psychedelic dancing figures – humanoid, geometric or entirely abstract – that can pass right through you like digital ectoplasm. It’s pure fantasy – and dazzling though it is, the rarefied solo experience feels a little self-isolating. I can imagine the unquarantined gallery installation being more of a ball.

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The Guardian

Oct 13 2020
Nikon Small World Photomicrography 2020 - in pictures

A selection of the winning images from Nikon’s 46th annual Small World photomicrography competition. The competition recognises excellence in the world of microscopic image-making. Daniel Castranova, assisted by Bakary Samasa in the lab of Dr Brant Weinstein at the National Institutes of Health, took the top prize for a photo of a juvenile zebrafish

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The Guardian

Oct 12 2020
Twisting your melon: Florida's freakiest attractions – in pictures

Fright nights, mermaid shows and a glimpse inside Mar-a-Lago ... Rachel Louise Brown captures the unsettling energy of the Sunshine State after dark

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The Guardian

Oct 12 2020
Trench warfare, drones and cowering civilians: on the ground in Nagorno-Karabakh

The battle over Nagorno-Karabakh, waged on and off for a century, has flared anew and civilians once again suffer the consequences

Over the road from the 8-metre-deep crater left by a medium-range missile, Sergei Hovhnnesyan and three of his neighbours are hunkering down in the basement storage space of their local grocery shop in Stepanakert, a mountain town in the heart of the Nagorno-Karabakh territory claimed by both Armenia and Azerbaijan.

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artforum.com

Oct 12 2020
Nancy Holt
Parafin is delighted to present an exhibition exploring Nancy Holt’s use of language in her ground-breaking work of the late 1960s and early 1970s. It presents for the first time in the UK the major
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artforum.com

Oct 12 2020
Joseph Kosuth
For his eighth solo exhibition with Sean Kelly Gallery, “Existential Time”, Joseph Kosuth has developed a series of installations that address the problem of time and existence, emphasizing the lack,
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artforum.com

Oct 12 2020
David Hockney
Spread over the gallery's three spaces, the forthcoming exhibition “Ma Normandie” at Galerie Lelong & Co. in Paris will present a dozen of new and recent paintings as well as a series of inkjet prints
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The New York Times

Oct 12 2020
Cuomo Unveils Statue of Mother Cabrini
Cuomo Unveils Statue of Mother Cabrini
A year after a dispute between New York City and the state, a memorial to the patron saint of immigrants is dedicated in Manhattan.
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artforum.com

Oct 12 2020
Julie Tolentino Wins 2020 Queer|Art|Prize for Sustained Achievement
Performance artist, dancer, activist, and radical caregiver Julie Tolentino—founder of the storied Clit Club, a queer, pro-sex nightclub that floated throughout various Manhattan locations from 1990 to
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artforum.com

Oct 12 2020
Tom Gores Departs LACMA Board Over Prison Telecom Connection
Billionaire private equity mogul and Detroit Pistons owner Tom Gores has resigned from the Los Angeles County Museum of Art’s board of directors after the activist groups Color of Change and Worth Rises
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The New York Times

Oct 12 2020
Spirit Halloween Rises from the Dead. Again. And Again.
Spirit Halloween Rises from the Dead. Again. And Again.
The retailer inspires songs and memes with its near-guaranteed seasonal reappearance each fall. But can it survive this year?
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The Guardian

Oct 12 2020
Revamped nuclear bunker wins museum of the year award

Gairloch in Scotland becomes one of five UK museums to share prestigious prize

With 2ft-thick concrete walls and bombproof doors, the ugly nuclear bunker in north-west Scotland was meant to be a place for tracking Soviet aircraft at the height of the cold war.

Fortunately, the planes never turned up and the bunker has instead become the unlikely home for a museum telling the story of Gairloch, a coastal village 75 miles from the nearest town.

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artforum.com

Oct 12 2020
Ho Rui An
Ho Rui An’s first solo exhibition in Southeast Asia delves into the compromises that the East made to achieve capitalist modernity—and the repercussions thereof. The performance-turned-installation Asia
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The Guardian

Oct 12 2020
Indigenous Peoples’ Day: the latest US billboard project to send a message

Across the US, artist-designed billboards are set to send an important message to coincide with an important day of remembrance

Many might know today as Columbus Day, which celebrates the Italian explorer’s arrival to America in 1492. But to many others, today is Indigenous Peoples’ Day, a counter-event that honors Native Americans whose lives were destroyed by colonial rule.

Indigenous Peoples’ Day has been celebrated since it was first introduced in 1977 at an indigenous conference but took over a decade to be officially acknowledged and remains overlooked.

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The Guardian

Oct 12 2020
Furlough fraud, snooping and firings: architects speak out over lockdown exploitation

Endless hours, home-surveillance, fear of reprisals – complaints in this already stressful industry have soared during Covid-19. We speak to distraught workers

For Maria Gomez, the nightmare began when she couldn’t get her boss out of her bedroom. “It felt like he was in there 24/7,” she says, “always watching my every move.” She was used to architecture’s punishing lifestyle, working late nights and weekends, and she had adjusted to the additional stresses of working from home during lockdown. But she hadn’t expected to be monitored via her computer webcam all day every day, with her meetings with clients secretly recorded by her bosses.

“I only realised I was being monitored when something I said was later quoted back to me in a team meeting,” she says. “And another recording of me was used in a presentation. It was completely insane. It felt like being back at school, with added hyper-surveillance.”

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The Guardian

Oct 12 2020
Margaret Nolan - actor, artist and Goldfinger title sequence star - dies aged 76

Actor who began as a glamour model went on to appear in the James Bond film before taking numerous roles in 1960s and 70s TV

Margaret Nolan, the actor best known for appearing in the title sequence for Goldfinger and for a string of appearances in TV shows in the 1960s and 70s, has died aged 76. Film-maker Edgar Wright, who directed Nolan in her final film role, in the forthcoming Last Night in Soho, reported the news on social media.

Nolan, who was born in 1943 in Somerset, first appeared on film under the name Vicky Kennedy in “glamour” shorts by the then notorious Harrison Marks, appearing in his naturist film It’s a Bare, Bare World. She soon graduated to more mainstream films, with a noticeable role in the Beatles film A Hard Day’s Night (as the girl accompanying Wilfrid Brambell in a casino), and the James Bond film Goldfinger, as the masseuse Dink. Nolan also appeared in Goldfinger’s celebrated title sequence, wearing a gold bikini and with images projected on her skin – though in the film itself it was Shirley Eaton who played Jill Masterson, the girl smothered to death by gold paint.

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The Guardian

Oct 11 2020
Flickers and Fukushima: Japanese and Korean talent at Photo London – in pictures

Depopulated cherry blossom landscapes and embroidered fingers feature as Japan’s Kana Kawanishi Gallery goes under the spotlight at Photo London

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The Guardian

Oct 11 2020
Weird, wacky and utterly wonderful: the world's greatest unsung museums

A bullring full of blood, a house full of sweet wrappers, a power station full of sculpture, a roundabout full of plants … Hilton Als, Mary Beard, Russell Tovey and more pick their alternative favourite museums

Jessie Burton, novelist
A tourist might more prosaically call this the world-famous bullring of Seville. I lived in Andalucía in my 20s and the culture of bullfighting was unavoidable. I had a kid in my class who, at 16, was a trainee fighter. Whatever your thoughts on the ethics, I defy you not to be captivated by this building and the exhibits within its corridors. It’s a living museum, as bullfights still take place. Standing in the middle of the empty 12,000-seater ring is a hair-raising experience, especially when you notice the wooden panels scarred by horns. The toreador costumes – all camp and skintight glory, butterfly colours and braiding – belie the fully equipped emergency room, a place of blood loss and death since 1749. The matador prayer chapel, the equipment, the bulls’ heads and the black and white photographs seem like relics of a faded world – until you leave and see posters advertising the next fight.

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artforum.com

Oct 11 2020
Cecily Brown
Opening at Paula Cooper Gallery on Thursday, October 15, 2020, is a one-person exhibition of new work by Cecily Brown—the artist’s second with the gallery. Painting with a diverse palette, from warm
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artforum.com

Oct 11 2020
Barry Le Va
Emblematic of Le Va’s installations of the late 1960s, the meat cleaver works were iconoclastic for their aggressive materiality and enigmatic elegance. They followed Barry Le Va’s now mythic felt floor
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artforum.com

Oct 11 2020
Miz Cracker interviews Laurie Simmons on her art
Miz Cracker talks with artist Laurie Simmons about her early black and white photography and how questions of gender inform her process.
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artforum.com

Oct 11 2020
Daphne Wright
Daphne Wright’s work maneuvers things into well-wrought but delicate doubt. Shifting between tautness and mess, it sets imagery, materials and language in constant metaphorical motion. “A quiet mutiny
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artforum.com

Oct 11 2020
Ariana Papademetropoulos
Vito Schnabel Projects presents “Ariana Papademetropoulos: Unweave a Rainbow,” the first New York City solo exhibition for the Los Angeles-based artist. “Unweave a Rainbow” will debut a new series of
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artforum.com

Oct 11 2020
Avni Sethi Wins Vera List Center’s Jane Lombard Prize for Art and Social Justice
The Vera List Center for Art and Politics at New York’s New School has named Avni Sethi as the recipient of the 2020–2022 Jane Lombard Prize for Art and Social Justice. Sethi was awarded the $25,000
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The Guardian

Oct 11 2020
The gangster vanishes: twist in hunt for world’s largest haul of stolen art

Irish criminal disappears after leading BBC film crew to gang behind infamous Boston heist

Some of the most precious paintings in the world, a billion-dollar haul including work by Vermeer, Rembrandt, Degas and Manet, were stolen from a gallery in Boston, Massachusetts, in an audacious heist 30 years ago. But now, just as a British detective closes in on what he believes are the best clues so far to the masterpieces’ hiding place, his key contact, an Irish gangster, has disappeared.

Martin “the Viper” Foley, a well-known convicted criminal who has operated on the fringes of gangland political violence in Ireland for half a century, has suddenly dropped out of negotiations, according to Charles Hill, a leading art sleuth. And Foley’s promise to reunite the public with these great works, including Vermeer’s The Concert, the most valuable missing artwork in the world, has vanished with him.

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The Guardian

Oct 11 2020
A piece of Fleet Street history: Katharine Whitehorn's desk for sale

Pioneering columnist’s 60s design classic to be auctioned to aid Alzheimer’s charity

They were inspiring and entertaining words that helped set the tone for more than just one era of social change. Katharine Whitehorn’s 60 years of provocative, useful and funny journalism and books were all typed up at a large wooden desk in a busy family living room.

Now that desk, a piece of classic Danish design as well as vintage Fleet Street history, is to go under Bonhams the auctioneer’s hammer to raise money for a charity that cares for people with Alzheimer’s disease.

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The Guardian

Oct 11 2020
'It's pretty messed up': Americans’ deadly love for tigers

Steve Winter, commended for his photographs of US private ‘zoos’, reveals the dark side of Netflix’s Tiger King

More tigers are now held in captivity in the United States than survive in the wild in Asia. That is the grim statistic that underpins Americans’ growing appetites for posing for pictures with big cats and their offspring, a desire that is today being met by thousands of tigers that are caged and displayed in private roadside zoos across the US.

Young tigers are taken from their mothers just after their birth and bottle fed and handled by humans. Then they are used as props until they are about 12 weeks old when they become too dangerous to hold. Many develop bone and joint problems because they were removed so early from the adult female and not given proper nutrition. At the same time, mother tigers are returned to cages to provide future supplies of cubs. “This is done repeatedly,” says wildlife photographer Steve Winter. “It’s inhumane.”

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The Guardian

Oct 11 2020
Young minds, wise visions: art helps children to make sense of coronavirus lockdown

The Way I See It, depicting the impact of the coronavirus, is to feature on the Google Arts & Culture platform

A is for Annoyed, B is for Bored and C is for Confused: an alphabet of lockdown feelings created by Rivers, a 14-year-old from Gateshead, is just one of a dazzling range of 200 responses from young people to the Covid-19 crisis to be launched online on 16 October on a leading international art site.

The lockdown alphabet is to appear alongside 15-year-old Louis’ painting of a spotty teenage face, bathed in ghoulish green light, and a short film made by Maisie, a 15-year-old from Northumberland, as she nervously awaits yet another Zoom call.

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The Guardian

Oct 11 2020
Bruce Nauman review – prophetic visions

Tate Modern, London
The US artist’s video and neon installations have lost none of their power to confound and dazzle, as this almost unbearably tense retrospective shows

Midway through the gruelling vaudeville at Tate Modern, among the clamour of shrieking clowns, gagging mouths and tortured violins, you suddenly come upon yourself. Or rather, the ghost of yourself. A video monitor appears to be recording your approaching footsteps. But up close, the screen is only showing the view around the next corner, where another monitor irresistibly beckons. Turn that corner and you glimpse your own departing back, spectral and black on the screen. For a moment, you hardly know whether you’re coming or going.

Nor should you know. There is no comfort in the art of Bruce Nauman, no resting place for the confounded brain – not even when his methods are openly declared. What could be clearer, for instance, than a bright neon sign? One Hundred Live and Die is the baldly descriptive title of an epochal work from 1984, a wall of neon instructions that flash on and off: Laugh and Die, Play and Live, Speak and Live, Play and Die. They confront you with all the inanity of the Walk/Don’t Walk signs on US streets.

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The Guardian

Oct 10 2020
The big picture: a hands-on Martin Luther King

Leonard Freed’s image of the civil rights leader is a rare optimistic moment in a series on racial injustice in 60s America

There are many things to focus on in this picture of Dr Martin Luther King Jr’s joyous homecoming, having received the Nobel peace prize, but your eye can’t help but be drawn to the hands that grasp his. King’s was the voice of the US civil rights movement but human touch was seminal to his message; solidarity was about linked arms, shoulder-to-shoulder physicality. The determination of the women who crowd the car to clutch at his outstretched fingers speaks not of star-struck celebrity but of a desire to share strength and to receive it.

This photograph, taken in Baltimore in 1964, was the centrepiece of Leonard Freed’s book Black in White America, itself a fundamental document of those years, now republished to mark another pivotal juncture in the struggle for racial justice. Freed travelled his segregated country for two years between 1963 and 1965, looking hard at the division that defined it. Some of those pictures – of a corridor of black hands reaching through prison bars, of mass rallies demanding an end to police brutality – could have been taken this summer.

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