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artforum.com

Sep 16 2021
Nicolas Rapold on the 78th Venice Film Festival
PEDRO ALMODÓVAR’S PARALLEL MOTHERS was the official opening night film of the 78th Venice International Film Festival, but through a twist of scheduling, mine was the less-trumpeted Atlantide. The
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The Guardian

Sep 15 2021
‘Peace, solitude and belonging’: Black lives in the American south – in pictures

Tyler Mitchell visited his hometown of Atlanta to create images of solace, intimacy and tenderness

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artforum.com

Sep 15 2021
Joe Tilson
Around the time British Pop artist Joe Tilson moved from London to rural Wiltshire in 1972, following time spent in Hannover, Germany, his work underwent a major shift in iconography and style, or so
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artforum.com

Sep 15 2021
Ruth Duckworth
Satellite imagery has evolved significantly in the decades since the first photographs of Earth were taken from space. Earthrise, captured in 1968 by astronaut William Anders, and The Blue Marble,
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artforum.com

Sep 15 2021
Trisha Baga
Time travel is possible. All you need, at least according to Trisha Baga’s thirty-five-minute 3D video 1620, 2020, is an old onion and lemon, a few connecting wires, and a computer running on a chirruping
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artforum.com

Sep 15 2021
Carrie Mae Weems
Explore the exhibition online at fraenkelgallery.com.
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artforum.com

Sep 15 2021
Cady Noland
Cady Noland rarely shows new work, but when she does it’s a big occasion—and in this instance doubly so because the exhibition of six new sculptures (and three prints on metal from the early 1990s) was
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artforum.com

Sep 15 2021
Carolina Caycedo
Carolina Caycedo draws one of the structuring principles of her multifarious work—flow—from the river ecologies to which she devotes investigative, affective, and political care. Organized by Carla
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artforum.com

Sep 15 2021
Mohammed Chabâa
Organized by Fatima-Zahra Lakrissa for Paris-based Zamân Books & Curating as a follow-up to the traveling retrospective of Mohamed Melehi, “Visual Consciousness” was the first retrospective of Mohammed
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artforum.com

Sep 15 2021
Deborah Roberts
Vielmetter Los Angeles is thrilled to announce “O’ Say Can’t You See,” Deborah Roberts second solo exhibition at the gallery. Roberts work is on view from September 4, 2021 until October 16, 2021.
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The Guardian

Sep 15 2021
The best of Glenn Murcutt’s Australian architecture – in pictures

The acclaimed architect has become the first Australian to win the annual Praemium Imperiale award, which recognises laureates in the fields of painting, sculpture, architecture, music and theatre/film. Here Guardian Australia takes a look back at Glenn Murcutt’s extensive work

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The Guardian

Sep 15 2021
Stirling prize shortlist: from mosque stunner to neo-neolithic flats

2021’s contenders for the Riba new architecture award range from a mesmerising Cambridge masjid to flats a London council wanted bulldozed

A mesmerising wooden mosque in Cambridge will go head to head with a Cornish footbridge and a cluster of black boatsheds in the Lake District, in this year’s battle for the UK’s best new building. Joining them in the race for the 2021 Riba Stirling prize are a new student centre for Kingston University, a key worker housing development in Cambridge, and a controversial stone apartment block in London which was almost demolished by the local council.

The mosque is the list’s photogenic stunner, and the most likely to snatch the gong. Designed by Marks Barfield, architects of the London Eye ferris wheel, it applies hi-tech rigour to the creation of a beguiling glade of worship. A grid of tall tree-like columns branch outwards, weaving into a filigree structural canopy that undulates above the prayer hall, echoing the form of gothic stone vaults, and filtering daylight from circular openings above. Featuring Cambridge Gault clay brickwork, patterned with decorative Arabic Kufic inscriptions, and ablution facilities worthy of a luxury spa, the £23m building is a compelling fusion of local and Islamic traditions, creating a powerful prototype for what a modern British mosque might be.

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artforum.com

Sep 15 2021
Gagosian Will Open Third Paris Gallery
Global megagallery Gagosian in October will open its third outpost in Paris. The gallery, at 9, rue de Castiglione in Paris’s 1st arrondissement, will be Gagosian’s eighteenth. In addition to the Paris
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The New York Times

Sep 15 2021
Seeking Art That Expands the Possibilities for a Troubled World
The shock of the pandemic is being channeled into artistic creations that offer global range and historical insight. It’s something to look forward to.
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The New York Times

Sep 15 2021
New Galleries for Dutch and Flemish Art Complicate Pictures of the Past
New galleries for Dutch and Flemish art in Boston, and the arrival of “Afro-Atlantic Histories” in Houston, will complicate serene pictures of the past.
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The New York Times

Sep 15 2021
A Harmonic Convergence of Signature Art Surveys
Greater New York, the New Museum triennial and the Performa biennial, which all open in October, should allow us to take stock of what the year has wrought.
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The New York Times

Sep 15 2021
Met Costume Institute and Brooklyn Museum Bring Back Fashion
Met Costume Institute and Brooklyn Museum Bring Back Fashion
With “In America” at the Met and “Christian Dior” at the Brooklyn Museum, our critics debate the nuances of showing fashion in art institutions, and find a depth of influence among young American designers.
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The New York Times

Sep 15 2021
First Look: Jasper Johns 'Slice'
The newest painting by Jasper Johns was inspired by a fan letter from an astrophysicist. Here’s a first look.
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The New York Times

Sep 15 2021
Behind Jasper Johns's New Exhibition 'Mind/Mirror'
Behind Jasper Johns's New Exhibition 'Mind/Mirror'
Two major museums teamed up for “Mind/Mirror,” only to realize they disagreed. Alike yet different, the two shows offer a revelatory look at America’s most famous living artist.
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artforum.com

Sep 15 2021
Max Lakin at the Armory Art Fair and Independent
INDEPENDENT’S ABILITY TO CHOOSE locations that have private members clubs is unmatched. This year it had left Spring Studios, where someone told me it was outbid by Fashion Week, for the Battery
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The Guardian

Sep 15 2021
Subversive sexuality amid the smell of cow dung – Duncan Grant: 1920 review

Charleston, East Sussex
This exhibition at the Bloomsbury group artist’s mural-filled former home joyously recreates his intensely sexual first solo show

The tale of Venus and Adonis has been used in various sexually ambiguous ways for centuries. Shakespeare adopts the voice of the goddess in his long poem Venus and Adonis: she pleads with her lover – or is it the Bard’s? – not to leave, not to go on the boar hunt in which he’s doomed to die. Its lyricism is echoed in Cy Twombly’s paintings, in which Adonis was his former lover Robert Rauschenberg. For the pioneering British modernist Duncan Grant, in a joyous exhibition at his mural-covered, biography-stained home in the East Sussex hills, the metamorphosing body of Venus allows a shift of identity. This is not a woman but a constructed abstract form with which the artist can merge, to express his own longing for Adonis.

In Grant’s 1919 painting Venus and Adonis, the goddess leans her head on her hand as she sadly watches her lover run to his death. Except her huge hand floats in front of her ear, on top of a bulbous arm that’s only vaguely attached to a torso that itself looks like a separate creature, with nipples for eyes. Her big hips and orotund legs form a third independent being, kicking in space. The only thing holding her together is her bright pinkness.

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The Guardian

Sep 15 2021
A flying great white shark: Chris Fallows’ best photograph

‘Adolescent great whites lurk in the depths waiting for seals. Then they launch themselves at the surface – and their sheer power takes them clear of the water’

There is no more iconic species on the planet than the great white shark. Everybody knows what they are, even in the most landlocked countries on Earth, and people are fascinated by them. The great white sharks at Seal Island, a few miles across the water from False Bay near Cape Town, use a surface hunting technique called breaching. They lurk in the depths waiting for seals porpoising along the waves, then launch themselves with incredible speed towards the surface. Their sheer power takes them clear of the water and results in these dramatic breaches that have become famous on documentary channels all across the world.

Sharks tend to hunt differently depending on their environment. In the Farallon Islands near San Francisco, they’ll bite off the flippers of seals and let them bleed out. But at Seal Island, certain environmental factors encourage this sort of aerial hunting. First, it’s the ideal topography: the shallows turn to depths quickly, meaning the sharks patrolling the deeper waters can surprise their prey. Stealth is key.

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The Guardian

Sep 15 2021
Photographic print sale to raise funds for Afghan’s female journalists

The Taliban takeover of Afghanistan has severely affected women’s rights, and especially the lives of female journalists. The NWMI (Network of Women in Media, India) has launched a print sale, with all images donated by the Associated Press, to raise funds to help those journalists with evacuations and resettlement, to rebuild their lives, and to tell their stories

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The Guardian

Sep 14 2021
Join our clube! Brazil’s secret photography auteurs – in pictures

Between 1946 and 1964, a group of amateur photographers changed the face of Brazilian photography – yet are almost forgotten outside their homeland

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The Guardian

Sep 14 2021
On holiday in southern France chez Le Corbusier

The wild coast between Monaco and Italy is home to Le Corbusier’s holiday cabin – and his favourite beach bar-next-door

I wish I had a beach hut like Le Corbusier’s. A perfect place to self-isolate on the French Riviera’s wildest stretch of coastline.

The Swiss-born architect chose Roquebrune-Cap-Martin, halfway between Monaco and the Italian border, to build his retreat in a medieval village that overlooks a rugged, tortoise-shaped cape beyond the pebble beaches of du Buse and Golfe Bleu.

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The New York Times

Sep 14 2021
Los Angeles Museum Pivots Back to One Director, Johanna Burton
Los Angeles Museum Pivots Back to One Director, Johanna Burton
The contemporary art museum had split its directorial duties into two jobs but has made a quick about-face with Klaus Biesenbach’s departure.
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The New York Times

Sep 14 2021
A Climate Opera Arrives in New York, With 21 Tons of Sand
A Climate Opera Arrives in New York, With 21 Tons of Sand
“Sun & Sea,” an operatic installation that won the top prize at the Venice Biennale, is being staged at the Brooklyn Academy of Music.
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artforum.com

Sep 14 2021
Palais de Tokyo President Emma Lavigne to Helm Pinault Collection
Emma Lavigne, president of the Palais de Tokyo, Paris, has been named chief executive officer of the Pinault Collection, which is headquartered in the same city. Lavigne is just two years into her job
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The Guardian

Sep 14 2021
Martina Hall obituary
Maker of arts and history films for TV with an eye for detail and a flair for celebrating the creative gifts of women

The film-maker Martina Hall, who has died aged 56 of oesophageal cancer, had a passion for the arts, history and music, and over her 30-year career made highly regarded documentaries for the BBC, Channel 4, Sky and international broadcasters. She relished the opportunities film-making gave her to explore a wide range of arts subjects – from women in punk to Alfred Hitchcock, from Leonard Cohen to Joseph Beuys.

The historian Simon Schama worked with her on his BBC series A History of Britain. The episode Victoria and Her Sisters (2002) examined high Victorian culture through the eyes of women, and he recalled being struck by her “brilliant creative gifts, worn modestly and lightly.

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artforum.com

Sep 14 2021
Nairy Baghramian Awarded 2022 Nasher Prize for Sculpture
Iranian-German artist Nairy Baghramian has won the 2022 iteration of the Nasher Prize. The prize, considered to be the world’s most prestigious sculpture honor, is awarded annually by the Nasher Sculpture
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artforum.com

Sep 14 2021
GaHee Park
There is a bouquet of flowers in many of the eleven oil paintings in GaHee Park’s first solo show in France. The eleven colored-pencil drawings tantalize with glimpses of an affair, just as lush, between
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artforum.com

Sep 14 2021
“Elovoy and the Surroundings”
Curated by art historian Irina Kudriavtseva, this exhibition aims to restore some forgotten pages in the chronicles of the Ural contemporary-art community by revisiting one of its key figures: Oleg
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The New York Times

Sep 14 2021
Nairy Baghramian Wins 2022 Nasher Prize for Sculpture
The artist’s work “stood out for its deep commitment to the object-based traditions of sculpture.” The award comes with $100,000.
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The Guardian

Sep 14 2021
Sickert: A Life in Art review – master of malevolence goes for the jugular

Walker Art Gallery, Liverpool
In this excellent, unsettling exhibition, monstrous men leer at women with violent intent in settings from Venetian bedrooms to sleazy London music halls

Walter Sickert was not Jack the Ripper. Let’s get that clear right from the start. Apart from anything else, points out the Walker Art Gallery in its absorbing journey into this menacing artist’s world, he was abroad for much of 1888 when a series of working-class women were murdered in and near Whitechapel, east London.

Except, right next to the wall text saying this hangs a painting to which Sickert gave the title Jack the Ripper’s Bedroom – and it portrays the artist’s own flat. Venetian blinds let in a weak ghost of daylight that animates a pink bedcover, as if the bed is haunted by a memory of flesh. Creamy pigment suggests flayed skin.

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The Guardian

Sep 14 2021
Design Museum to host major Amy Winehouse retrospective

Amy: Beyond the Stage will be first such UK exhibition on singer’s life, coming 10 years after her death

A major retrospective of Amy Winehouse’s life and career will cast her as a “music intellectual” and feature personal items displayed for the first time, including her first electric guitar and handwritten notebooks, and an immersive tour.

Amy: Beyond the Stage, which opens at the Design Museum in London on 26 November, is the first such exhibition of the singer’s life in the UK, coming 10 years after her death aged 27.

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The Guardian

Sep 14 2021
Sebastião Salgado receives Praemium Imperiale 2021 award – in pictures

The Brazilian photographer Sebastião Salgado has been named as one of four winners of a £400,000 award given by the Japan Art Association. Amazonia, an exhibition by Salgado, opens at the Science Museum in London from 13 October. An exhibition of collectors prints, organised by the Photographers’ Gallery, is on show at Cromwell Place Art Centre from 20 October

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The Guardian

Sep 13 2021
‘It brought people back together’: the summer after 9/11 – in pictures

Nine months after the towers fell, Lucas Foglia visited the diverse boroughs of New York with his camera to ‘show the city healing … but with scars’

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artforum.com

Sep 13 2021
David Velasco in conversation with Lauren Halsey
In this episode of “Under the Cover,” Artforum editor in chief David Velasco talks with artist Lauren Halsey about Summaeverthang, a food program and community space supporting South Central Los Angeles.
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artforum.com

Sep 13 2021
Leonardo Drew
Anthony Meier Fine Arts is pleased to present an exhibition of new works on paper, the gallery’s fourth solo exhibition with Brooklyn-based artist Leonardo Drew. Known for his abstract sculptural
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The Guardian

Sep 13 2021
Met Gala 2021: stars explore ‘American independence’ theme – in pictures

Co-chair Billie Eilish (the youngest in the event’s history) is one of many stars to channel Grace Kelly at the pandemic-delayed Met Gala on Monday night. She is joined by a guest list of fashion designers, models, celebrities and – to some controversy – TikTok stars, on the steps at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. This year’s theme of the Costume Institute fundraiser is ‘American independence’, leaving plenty of room for interpretation. Just ask Lil Nas X, who did a Lady Gaga-esque three-look strip on the carpet in gold Versace, from opera cape to armour to a crystal-studded catsuit

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artforum.com

Sep 13 2021
Baltimore Museum of Art Receives $150K Grant to Research Museum Structures
The Baltimore Museum of Art (BMA) has received $150,000 from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation in support of a multi-year project aimed at reimagining the museum through the lens of equity and diversity.
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artforum.com

Sep 13 2021
Anna Perach
“Gasp” is the title Anna Perach's inaugural exhibition at the ADA gallery. The convulsive intake of exhaustion and shock, the onomatopoeic wheeze of those who flee, the attempt to recover one’s breath,
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The New York Times

Sep 13 2021
Renaissance Shield With an Afterlife in World Wars Is Returning to Europe
The Philadelphia Museum will return a 16th-century shield that scholars say was once owned by Archduke Franz Ferdinand and later taken by the Nazis.
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artforum.com

Sep 13 2021
Silas Martí on the 34th São Paulo Bienal
“THOUGH IT’S DARK, STILL I SING” is the name of the show. Though it’s a pandemic and the country is on the verge of collapse, still we find ways to celebrate. Nothing spells dystopia more than a
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The Guardian

Sep 13 2021
Contents of Karl Lagerfeld’s eight houses up for grabs at Sotheby’s

Bowls used by world’s most spoilt cat among the more than 1,000 lots that belonged to late fashion designer

Dishes used to feed one of the world’s most pampered cats and hundreds of pairs of fingerless gloves will be among more than 1,000 lots at eight auctions selling the collection of Karl Lagerfeld, Sotheby’s has announced.

The auction house announced earlier this year that it would sell the vast and varied number of objects that the late fashion designer accumulated to fill his eight residences in Monaco and France.

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The New York Times

Sep 13 2021
The Paintings Within Matisse's 'The Red Studio'
In a coming exhibition, MoMA will feature the artworks within this famed painting. Two of them will be on public view for the first time in 50 years.
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The New York Times

Sep 13 2021
After the Storm, Philip Guston for Real
Compensating for a postponed museum retrospective, an exciting gallery show revisits the painter’s late figurative style.
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artforum.com

Sep 13 2021
Kerstin Brätsch and Eduardo Paolozzi
An exhibition combining contemporary German painter Kerstin Brätsch and the late Scottish Pop pioneer Eduardo Paolozzi sounds odd. Offhand, I couldn’t think of any significant connection between the
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The Guardian

Sep 13 2021
Scientists identify key conditions to set up a creative ‘hot streak’

Researchers use AI to reveal runs of artistic success are commonly preceded by an experimental phase

Whether it is the director Márta Mészáros or the artist Jackson Pollock, those in creative careers often experience a particular burst of success.

Now researchers have used artificial intelligence to reveal such “hot streaks” are commonly preceded by an experimental phase followed by a focus on one particular approach once the winning period has begun.

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The Guardian

Sep 13 2021
Migrants cross Darién Gap between Colombia and Panama – in pictures

Migrants from Haiti and other countries arrive in Panamanian territory after walking for five days in the Darién Gap

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