News

Displaying 151 to 200 of 13085 results

The Guardian

Jun 12 2018
Naked, cheering and drinking: Juergen Teller's riotous World Cup photography

He’s been in bed with Pele. He’s been naked with a football at his dad’s grave. Now the fashion photographer is capturing all the joy, absurdity and horror of his life as a soccer fanatic

Juergen Teller dangles a cigarette from his lips as he reviews his bacchanalian celebration of Bayern Munich’s sixth straight Bundesliga title. Here he is in short shorts fleeing a shower of wheat beer, here drowning in Paulaner brew frothing like sea foam, here draped in a white towel looking like Moses or a Madonna.

The fashion photographer’s newest exhibition, Trembling on the Sofa, is his paean to football, or rather, to watching football: a personal exhibition of dreams fulfilled and dashed, of father-son bonding and family tragedy, and of the banality of sitting on one’s couch in west London and screaming at footballers – usually his German countrymen, toiling thousands of miles away.

Continue reading...
Read More
The New York Times

Jun 12 2018
Art Review: At the Berlin Biennale, the Art of Saying ‘No’
The South African curator of this year’s edition offers no shortage of outrages that artists should refuse. But is that enough for an exhibition?
Read More
The New York Times

Jun 12 2018
Trilobites: Do You Know What Lightning Really Looks Like?
Paintings by artists over centuries have consistently underestimated the number of root-like veins in a lightning strike, researchers found.
Read More
The New York Times

Jun 12 2018
Tiffany Show Reveals Helen Gould’s Role as Arts Patron
An exhibition at the Gould family’s estate, Lyndhurst, follows Louis Comfort Tiffany’s early work and Helen Gould’s commissions.
Read More
artforum.com

Jun 12 2018
500 WORDS: Aliza Shvarts
Aliza Shvarts talks about her exhibition at Artspace in New Haven, Connecticut
Read More
The Guardian

Jun 12 2018
Library explores British defence of German 'degenerate art'

Display to tell story of major UK exhibition held in 1938 to counter Nazi propaganda

They were often innocuous landscapes, conservative portraits and colourful modernist abstract paintings of nothing in particular, but to the Nazis the artworks were “sick”, “twisted” and “filth”.

The story of German “degenerate art” and the British defence of it is to be told in a display opening to the public on Wednesday at the Wiener library in London, the world’s oldest archive of material on the Holocaust and the Nazi era.

Continue reading...
Read More
The Guardian

Jun 12 2018
Vase found in French attic sells for £14.3m at auction

Imperial 18th-century Qianlong vase sets record for Chinese porcelain sold at auction in France

An 18th century vase discovered in an attic has fetched €16.2m (£14.3m) in France.

The recently discovered treasure from imperial China sparked a 25-minute bidding war at Sotheby’s.

Continue reading...
Read More
The Guardian

Jun 12 2018
No wonder we are still hooked on Dad’s Army – in Brexit Britain we are reliving it

The Royal Mail is launching a set of stamps to mark the comedy’s 50th anniversary – but the much-loved institution has become an unlikely symbol of Brexit

Stamps. We take them very seriously in Britain. They are key cultural signifiers. And it is surely culturally significant that the Royal Mail has resisted Brexiter calls to issue a set to mark “Liberation Day” – 29 March 2019, when the proud British cast off the yoke of EU servitude and strike out for ... well somewhere or other – and, later this month, is issuing a set of Dad’s Army stamps instead. Someone at Royal Mail has a very good grasp of history and a sharp satirical sense.

The Dad’s Army stamps ostensibly mark the 50th anniversary of the BBC series that once attracted 18 million viewers and still plays perennially on Saturday evenings to a band of obsessives who must be able to recite the 80 episodes backwards. The 2016 film based on the show was a dud, but the original series is a much-loved institution and has become an unlikely symbol of Brexit.

Continue reading...
Read More
The New York Times

Jun 12 2018
Show Us Your Wall: It’s Not an Art Collection. It’s Her Life.
Claudia Gould has plenty of art-laden walls to share, in her office and at home.
Read More
The New York Times

Jun 12 2018
It’s Time for African Resistance, This Artist Says
In a new exhibition in London, Yinka Shonibare has collected works that challenge the resurgence of extreme right-wing politics and xenophobia.
Read More
The Guardian

Jun 12 2018
Frida Kahlo: Making Her Self Up review – forget the paintings, here's her false leg

V&A, London
By focusing on Kahlo’s life and her suffering rather than her art, this memorabilia-stuffed exhibition stifles her blazing visionary brilliance

This feels wrong. I am looking at Frida Kahlo’s prosthetic leg. There is a glamorous red boot on it. The matching boot is also in the display case, yet the woman who wore the leg and boots is long gone. She died in 1954, when she was 47. Would she want her artificial limb to outlive her like this?

Related: Frida Kahlo and the birth of Fridolatry

Continue reading...
Read More
The Guardian

Jun 12 2018
The White Pube: meet the emoji-using art critics who hate art criticism

Never mind the typos – female duo the White Pube have the energy and opinions to liven up an art world full of stale, male voices

It’s no great secret that the art world is, by and large, male, pale and stale. Read through the list of any broadsheet’s arts reviewers and you’ll be faced with a parade of white, middle-class men, almost all of them based in London. No wonder, then, that art criticism is often out of touch and impenetrable to anyone who doesn’t have an MA in art history. Enter: The White Pube.

Created by Zarina Muhammad and Gabrielle de la Puente, The White Pube describe themselves as “art critic baby gods” – two 23-year-old women who want to write about contemporary art on their own terms. The name alone, a cheeky play on the White Cube gallery, embodies their fresh, tongue-in-cheek approach to art writing, which doesn’t so much aim to deconstruct the hierarchy of low and high art as shatter it completely.

Continue reading...
Read More
The Guardian

Jun 12 2018
Charles White's powerful portraits of black America – in pictures

The artist created what his gallerist, and later he, called ‘images of dignity’ while portraying African American life in the US. He was part of Chicago’s flourishing black artistic community in the 30s, believing that ‘art must be an integral part of the struggle’. His work is being celebrated in the centenary year of his birth at the Art Institute of Chicago and the Museum of Modern Art in New York

Continue reading...
Read More
The Guardian

Jun 11 2018
'Living and breathing': the slave trade legacy – in pictures

From carnival-goers in the West Indies to voodoo ceremonies in west Africa, Nicola Lo Calzo’s photography confronts us with memories of slavery

Continue reading...
Read More
The Guardian

Jun 11 2018
Ed Ruscha: 'I've done things that felt kissed by angels'

The great pop artist’s paintings immortalised urban America. Now, in the age of Trump, they’re haunted by decline. He talks about fame, his legacy – and Kanye West

Shortly after meeting Ed Ruscha, in an office space deep within the bowels of the National Gallery, we’re confronted by a terrifying vision. It’s Donald Trump. And he’s naked.

“Oh boy,” mutters the man JG Ballard once claimed had the “coolest gaze in American art”. He averts said gaze from the image in question – a book illustrated with Illma Gore’s grotesque depiction of the president, complete with fleshy rolls and tiny stubby penis – and shakes his head. “I think the art world’s still in shock by it, we’ve not had time to react yet,” he says. “We’re all sitting in an electric chair.” He grabs the sides of his seat and mimics a rush of high voltage, before laughing.

Continue reading...
Read More
The Guardian

Jun 11 2018
First surrealist art exhibition in England - archive, 12 June 1936

12 June 1936 The show included leading continental European surrealist artists along with the work of an emerging surrealist group in England

The exhibition of Surrealist art which opens at the Burlington Galleries in London to-day will no doubt create a stir even among those to whom modern painting usually means nothing. At all events it will give the public something to talk about, for no one can accuse the Surrealists of refusing to deal in definite objects, things that can be described even when they cannot be recognised, things that cast shadows, have weight, volume, and distance; whereas their elder brothers, the abstract painters, deal in nothing more tangible than shape, pattern, and colour. The one school uses paint to establish definite references: to the other paint is just paint, a mere means of altering the colour of canvas.

Related: Dalí in a diving helmet: how the Spaniard almost suffocated bringing surrealism to Britain

Continue reading...
Read More
The Guardian

Jun 11 2018
It's wonderful to see a Picasso up close. So why did I take a photo?

MoMA at NGV is a remarkable achievement featuring the A-listers of the art world, including Matisse, Van Gogh and Dalí

“OK, so you are looking at The Persistence of Memory by Salvador Dalí, arguably his most famous and recognisable work,” says Tony Ellwood, director of the National Gallery of Victoria (NGV).

We are only about one-third of the way through a guided tour of the new Winter Masterpieces exhibition, MoMA at NGV, but with promise of “the Dalí” the crowd packs in a bit tighter, gets a bit quieter and grows a bit more excited.

Continue reading...
Read More
The Guardian

Jun 11 2018
New top 10 of heritage sites maps out the history of England

Historic England announces list including Coventry Cathedral and Sutton Hoo

Coventry Cathedral, the Angel of the North, Tate Modern and Sutton Hoo, the site of strange grassy mounds that revealed some of the greatest Anglo-Saxon treasures ever found, have all been named in a new top 10 of heritage sites.

Historic England announced the list as part of a campaigning project called Irreplaceable: a History of England in 100 Places. It is broken down into various categories, with the 10 places for art, architecture and sculpture.

Continue reading...
Read More
The New York Times

Jun 11 2018
This Exhibition Has Real Bite
With letters to the tooth fairy, a set of gold grillz, and other weird and wonderful objects, an exhibition in London examines the feelings people harbor about their teeth.
Read More
The Guardian

Jun 11 2018
Surreal portrait of artist's mother wins 2018 BP portrait award

An Angel at my Table, by Miriam Escofet, successfully evokes ‘universal mother’

A tender and slightly surreal portrait of an artist’s mother appearing to drink tea has won one of the UK’s most prestigious art prizes.

Miriam Escofet, a London-based artist, was named winner of the 2018 BP portrait award for a painting praised by judges for its “constraint and intimacy” as well as its successful evocation of the idea of the “universal mother”.

Continue reading...
Read More
The Guardian

Jun 11 2018
A hot dog bus and a snowman in June: the best in US public art this summer

With skyscraper video art in California and 26ft statue of Marilyn Monroe in Connecticut, there are now even more reasons to stay outside this season

Spending time in a museum doesn’t always seem like a fitting activity for the summer months and this year, a number of public projects in the US aim to allow visitors the opportunity to appreciate art while also soaking up rays.

Related: Stone Circle: the story behind Haroon Mirza's Texas Stonehenge

Continue reading...
Read More
EosArte.eu

Jun 11 2018
Bacoli (NA). Sergio Visciano al Museo Archeologico dei Campi Flegrei
“Statuae Vivae a Baia - fotografie di Sergio Visciano” 1 luglio - 30 ottobre 2018 inaugurazione Sabato 30 Giugno 2018 ore 11.30  Il progetto fotografico Statuae Vivae, di Sergio Visciano, nasce dall’esigenza di attualizzare la bellezza classica proposta da capolavori della scultura antica esposti in vari musei italiani. L’interesse principale che muove l’autore è creare una connessione [...]
Read More
The Guardian

Jun 11 2018
Peter White obituary

My friend Peter White, who has died aged 76, fell in love with canals while studying at the Birmingham School of Architecture in the early 1960s. On qualifying he worked as an architect in the city and began campaigning to change attitudes towards the local waterways, usually regarded, if considered at all, as filthy backwaters in which to dump supermarket trollies.

He developed one area at the top of the Farmers Bridge flight of locks, restoring old buildings and adding a new pub, to create what became James Brindley Walk.

Continue reading...
Read More
The Guardian

Jun 11 2018
Serpentine Pavilion 2018 review – cement tiles, shade and a paddling pool

Kensington Gardens, London
Only the second solo woman and the youngest architect to win the annual commission, Mexico’s Frida Escobedo has made a rough, tough backdrop for summer frolics

A dark wattle fence appears to ring the lawn of the Serpentine Gallery in London’s Kensington Gardens, as if the tasteful construction hoarding of this year’s summer pavilion has yet to be removed. As you walk closer, the woven walls turn out to be made from stacks of cement roofing tiles, threaded on to steel poles, forming a series of translucent screens that envelop a concrete patio. Step inside and the space unfolds beneath a drooping mirror-polished roof, creating an intriguing cave of reflections washed with dappled light and the glistening puddles of wet footprints.

Mexican architect Frida Escobedo has pre-empted the treacherous English summer by providing a shallow pool of water inside her cool courtyard, ensuring that enthusiastic visitors will leave with soggy socks. At the press preview, a few nervously tiptoed into the water, as if trespassing on the pristine reflecting pool of a luxury block of flats. When the space is unleashed to the public this weekend, hopefully many more will go for a paddle to bring this serene, elemental space to life – and be treated to a refreshing footbath in the process.

Continue reading...
Read More
The Guardian

Jun 11 2018
Frida Kahlo and the birth of Fridolatry

Bitch. Sauvage. Icon. Barbie doll: the grotesque exploitation of Frida Kahlo... and the artist behind the myths

Frida, the unapologetic bitch. Frida, the disabled artist. Frida, symbol of radical feminism. Frida, the victim of Diego. Frida, the chic, gender-fluid, beautiful and monstrous icon. Frida tote bags, Frida keychains, Frida T-shirts, And also, this year’s new Frida Barbie doll (no unibrow). Frida Kahlo has been subject to global scrutiny and commercial exploitation. She has been appropriated by curators, historians, artists, actors, activists, Mexican consulates, museums and Madonna.

Related: Frida Kahlo: Making Her Self Up review – forget the paintings, here's her false leg

Continue reading...
Read More
The New York Times

Jun 10 2018
Art Is Becoming a Financial Product, and Blockchain Is Making It Happen
Investors have shied away as an asset class. But new technology could make it a better bet.
Read More
The Guardian

Jun 10 2018
Cecil Beaton: Icons of the 20th century - in pictures

The work of Cecil Beaton is having its first exhibition in Spain at the international photography and visual arts festival Photo España with a major retrospective of more than 100 images of leading figures in the British aristocracy and the worlds of fashion, culture and politics

Continue reading...
Read More
The Guardian

Jun 10 2018
Women take part in the Processions living artwork in the UK

Thousands of women and girls from across the UK come together to create a vast participatory artwork taking place simultaneously in Belfast, Cardiff, Edinburgh and London. The event marks 100 years since the Representation of the People Act, which gave British women the right to vote and stand for public office

Continue reading...
Read More
The Guardian

Jun 10 2018
On the tiles: Liverpool's treasures allowed to shine in 2018 Biennial

Public will be able to see spectacular floor of St George’s Hall as part of city’s art festival

The 30,000 Minton tiles of St George’s Hall in Liverpool, one of the most spectacular surviving Victorian floors, are usually far too good for everyday use. But the covers will come off for nine days in August, as the city gets some of its greatest treasures out of storage to celebrate the Biennial arts festival.

Other eclectic treasures being celebrated include “Waterloo teeth” harvested from the battlefield for sale as dentures; the Allerton oak, believed to be about 1,000 years old; centuries of art treasures from the Walker Gallery, from Giovanni Bellini to David Hockney; the civic silver collection including a mace once part of the regalia of Charles II; and the Central Library’s precious copy of Audubon’s Birds of America, one of only 120 elephant folio copies in the world.

Continue reading...
Read More
The New York Times

Jun 10 2018
What to See in New York Art Galleries This Week
Jitish Kallat’s galactic terrain; Max Beckmann’s rarely exhibited works; Delia Brown’s Instagram ladies; Caleb Considine’s dizzyingly precise portraits; and Natalie Frank’s O-inspired drawings.
Read More
The Guardian

Jun 10 2018
Observer archive - Society wedding: 15 June 1968

Jane Bown captured the arrival of Elizabeth Taylor and the somewhat rumpled pair of Richard Burton and Noël Coward, for page one.

Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother and Princess Margaret arrived at the village church here today in crackling sunlight for the marriage of Miss Sheran Cazalet, daughter of the Queen Mother’s racehorse trainer, Mr Peter Cazalet, to Mr Simon Hornby.

At the entrance to the church they climbed from a great maroon Rolls-Royce to the applause of assembled villagers, mainly women, whose summer dresses lined the gravel drive like confetti.

Continue reading...
Read More
The Guardian

Jun 10 2018
Inside North Korea: a pastel fairyland built to forget
The candy-coloured, fantastical architecture of Pyongyang is revealed in a forthcoming book

When Donald Trump and Kim Jong-un finally meet face-to-face at their momentous summit in Singapore on Tuesday, it will be more than a coming together of two powerful men with a penchant for missiles and curious haircuts. Beyond the jocular Twitter exchanges over nuclear war, the president and the supreme leader share a dearly held passion for outre architecture and flamboyant interiors.

The Trump style is the better known of the two. The builder-president has adorned the world with puffed-up towers swathed in golden mirror glass, his own New York penthouse is a gilded Louis XIV fantasy, while his Florida getaway heaves with marble mouldings, leaping from gothic to Moorish like an encyclopaedia of dictator chic.

Continue reading...
Read More
The Guardian

Jun 10 2018
Frida Kahlo: Making Her Self Up – an extraordinary testimony to suffering and spirit

Victoria & Albert Museum, London
From plaster corsets to prosthetic legs, Frida Kahlo’s possessions reveal the astonishing courage of an artist whose life and work were painfully intertwined

There is a self-portrait by Frida Kahlo that shows the artist’s bare torso split in two to expose a shattered spine, the result of a horrific bus accident at the age of 18. Her body is held together by straps. Tears stream down her cheeks and her poor flesh is everywhere pierced with sharp little nails. It is one of Kahlo’s most famous martyrdoms.

The painting is called The Broken Column, which throws the focus so completely on the spine – depicted as a ruined Ionic column – as to make the straps seem incidental, or perhaps as metaphorical as the architecture. But Kahlo (1907-54) really did live inside such a harness. The object appears in a show of her possessions opening at the Victoria and Albert Museum this week, and it is a horrific contraption of metal spars, cloth restraints and nail-like buckles. Its representation turns out to be the documentary truth.

Continue reading...
Read More
The Guardian

Jun 09 2018
The big picture: Alex Prager’s preflight pawns
The American photographer’s choreographed airport scene captures the passive nature of travel

Technically a photograph, this is actually a still from a nonexistent film. Alex Prager – who has a show later this month at the Photographers’ Gallery in London, plus a lavish retrospective book, Silver Lake Drive – does not snatch momentary excerpts from life. Instead the American photographer assembles a cast of characters, directorially positions them, and instructs them to enact private dramas derived from a script she writes in advance.

These supposed travellers occupy separate squares on a floor that is patterned like a chessboard. Some wear clothes with wittily chequered patterns to underline the angular regularity of the game, and those who look wonderingly skywards watch for the hand that will reach down and shift them sideways or diagonally. Transfixed, as if running on the spot, they have no volition of their own. One man has settled down on his suitcase to read, others are absorbed in arguments with members of their own small group. The woman with the stroller pushes a pair of inert adult dolls, shrunken replicas of the immobilised figures all around. Everyone lugs luggage: don’t they know that bags now have wheels? Gestures semaphore exhaustion, or perhaps bewilderment. Worryingly, the uniformed pilot has no idea where to go or what to do.

Continue reading...
Read More
The Guardian

Jun 09 2018
Preston bus station review – a glorious reprieve

Earmarked for demolition just six years ago, the brutalist gem that is Ove Arup’s Preston bus station has been sympathetically renovated, right down to the route numbers

How could there have been any doubt? Why was it even considered that the majestic concrete battleship that is Preston bus station might be demolished? Yet it was, a few years back, to make way for a proposed shopping centre of uncertain viability. Central government, in the face of prolonged and well-made arguments for its listing, hedged and prevaricated until deciding in 2013 that, yes, it was worthy of protection.

Now, as its renovation is completed, it’s plain that the bus station deserves to stand alongside the other robust civic masonry that Preston, like many industrial cities, boasts: the neo-Greek Harris Museum and Art Gallery; the Edwardian baroque Sessions House. It’s also again clear (see, too, the Southbank Centre in London) that the listing of postwar architecture is the last, best defence of public space that the tattered planning system can provide.

Continue reading...
Read More
The Guardian

Jun 09 2018
Weird World Cup beermats – in pictures

When discussing their favourite World Cup moments – Rob Green’s blunders in goal for England, John Barnes rapping – London-based graphic designers Gordon Reid and Callum Stephenson had an idea. They invited 20 of their favourite designers to celebrate the tournament’s stranger sides: the result is Weird World Cup, a collection of beermats depicting bizarre moments. “I love the World Cup because almost everyone remembers something from it. Even my mum, who hates football, remembers the Zidane headbutt,” says Stephenson. The money raised will go to the charity Football Beyond Borders, which supports young people from disadvantaged backgrounds. The designers, however, need to be ready to have their work obscured. “A good beermat is something you don’t really want to ruin by putting your beer on,” says Reid. “Although that ruins its one purpose.”

The beer mats are available to buy at weirdworldcup.com (20 for £5)

Continue reading...
Read More