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The Guardian

Apr 03 2019
Alys Tomlinson's best photograph: a volunteer on pilgrimage to Lourdes

‘We ended up at a raucous party, drinking with the Order of Malta. That’s where we met Markus, who was caring for an Austrian man in a wheelchair’

I’m not religious, but I am very curious about people who are and their motivations. Five years ago, after seeing Jessica Hausner’s 2009 film Lourdes, I booked myself on a pilgrim package tour to the south of France.

Lourdes is overwhelming when you first arrive. It’s a bit like a Disneyland of faith, crass and commercial, with thousands and thousands of pilgrims and tourists and trinket shops. It’s a spectacle. I had timed my visit to coincide with the Order of Malta’s annual international pilgrimage, and it was like stepping on to a film set: women sweeping through the streets in long, black cloaks emblazoned with the order’s insignia; the men in military-looking boilersuits, pushing sick people around in chariots. It all felt as if it were from a different time.

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The Guardian

Apr 03 2019
Son and hail: Tottenham's new stadium opens in style

Competitive football finally arrives at the club’s long-awaited 62,000-seater home as the new stadium plays host to Crystal Palace as they take on Spurs in the Premier League

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The New York Times

Apr 03 2019
Lyle Tuttle, Who Recast Tattooing’s Image Pore by Pore, Dies at 87
Tattooed almost head to foot himself, he helped move the art form “out of the back alley” and into the mainstream, finding fame with a celebrity clientele.
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The Guardian

Apr 03 2019
Duchamp’s Fountain and the feminist avant garde in New York | Letters
Prof Dawn Ades pours cold water on the suggestion that Baroness Elsa von Freytag-Loringhoven was the artist’s accomplice

The subheading on Siri Hustvedt’s article (A woman in the men’s room, Review, 30 March) says: “Evidence suggests the famous urinal Fountain, attributed to Marcel Duchamp, was actually found and signed by a forgotten female poet and artist? Why won’t the art world accept it?”

The art world doesn’t accept it because the argument is based on a number of false premises. Hustvedt is free in her novel to create a fictional account of the Baroness Elsa von Freytag-Loringhoven’s activities, but in the welcome aim of restoring agency to women artists and poets it is a pity that she chooses the baroness rather than the other women in the New York avant garde who were involved in the 1917 Fountain incident and who are no less forgotten by history: Louise Norton and Beatrice Wood.

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The Guardian

Apr 03 2019
Sir William Whitfield obituary
Architect who worked across boundaries to synthesise different styles

The architectural career of William Whitfield, who has died aged 98, ranged from the concrete assertiveness of new brutalism to a new Palladian mansion that won plaudits from traditionalists. The office he founded in 1952 and led as principal for more than six decades developed a design approach that brought together different ideas and styles, not as compromise, but synthesis.

His extension to the Institute of Chartered Accountants in the City of London (1970) squeezed a tall concrete tower into a tight site and managed the joins to the baroque of John Belcher’s 1892 original building with great finesse and wit. The hammered concrete and elegant modernist facades alongside older work won round many to the gutsy beauty of brutalism.

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The Guardian

Apr 03 2019
Queer today, gone tomorrow: the fight to save LGBT nightlife

They survived homophobia and Thatcher. But is gentrification now sounding the death knell for gay clubs and pubs? We meet the artists battling to save them

On a summer’s day in 2017, in gardens near the Royal Vauxhall Tavern in London, an unusual drag show took place. A lot of work had gone into the costumes, but these were not of the kind you’d expect: there were no rhinestones or wigs. Each performer was wearing an architectural model on their head, and instead of lip-syncing, they were reading out snippets of planning and licensing documents. The models didn’t represent buildings of any great distinction, but to members of the audience they were a familiar lineup: the Black Cap, the Joiners Arms, the Glass Bar, the Lesbian and Gay Centre. They were London’s queer spaces, past and present.

The event had been organised by the architecture academics Ben Campkin and Lo Marshall as a riff on the famous 1931 Beaux Arts Ball in New York, at which attendees dressed as the Chrysler building and the Waldorf Astoria hotel. They have been analysing the changing landscape of the queer community in London since 2016, and dragged up once again in front of the press at the Whitechapel Gallery to mark the opening of Queer Spaces: London, 1980s–Today.

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The Guardian

Apr 03 2019
Port Talbot's Banksy to be moved to new street art museum

Artwork painted on corner of garage to stay in south Wales town for at least three years

A Banksy artwork that appeared on the corner of a steelworker’s garage in Port Talbot, south Wales, is to be moved to a new museum of street art in the town.

The corner of the garage featuring the work will be moved in one chunk and given pride of place in a new complex redeveloped from an disused police station, an ironic location given that many street artists often find themselves on the other side of the law.

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The Guardian

Apr 03 2019
Damien Hirst homecoming announced for Yorkshire sculpture festival

Artist grew up in Leeds and says he followed in the footsteps of Hepworth and Moore

Damien Hirst is returning to the area where he grew up and went to art college with seven sculptures installed across Leeds and the Yorkshire countryside.

The inaugural Yorkshire Sculpture International festival on Wednesday announced plans to display in Leeds and Wakefield provocative works such as The Virgin Mother, a 10-metre high surgically flayed pregnant woman, and Black Sheep with Golden Horns, part of Hirst’s animals in formaldehyde series.

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The New York Times

Apr 03 2019
Christo’s Next Project: Wrapping the Arc de Triomphe
The monument will be wrapped in 2020 to accompany a Christo and Jeanne-Claude exhibition at the Pompidou Center in Paris.
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The Guardian

Apr 02 2019
Big hair day: the best of NY's Photography Show

Basquiat, Bob and Bourdin all star in the vast collection of fine art photography about to open at Pier 24 in Manhattan. We select the highlights

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The Guardian

Apr 02 2019
Anish Kapoor's Brexit artwork: Britain on the edge of the abyss

Frightening rift tearing the UK apart – or gateway to a new land? Our critic explores the artist’s response to Brexit, created for Guardian readers

Anish Kapoor has exposed a bottomless void at the heart of Britain. You could topple in there and never stop falling. In fact, that is exactly what we have done – and solid ground still seems to be nowhere in sight.

This artwork, which Kapoor has created for the Guardian, is his response to our current predicament and the new Britain that appeared after the leave vote. Although the Mumbai-born artist has given it a title – A Brexit, A Broxit, We All Fall Down – he does not wish to make any further comment about the piece, preferring to let it speak for itself.

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The Guardian

Apr 02 2019
Discovery of Aboriginal handprint art in Blue Mountains halts trains

The culturally significant art was found after a boulder threatened to fall onto tracks

A section of track on Sydney’s outskirts may not run trains all week after Aboriginal handprint art was uncovered during work to break up a boulder teetering on a cliff.

Sydney Trains has confirmed buses will run between Penrith and Springwood in the Blue Mountains until potentially next week.

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The New York Times

Apr 02 2019
The Week in Arts: Martha Graham, ‘Ink’ and More
A dance company celebrates the 19th amendment and a play about Rupert Murdoch hits Broadway.
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The Guardian

Apr 02 2019
London's Tulip skyscraper given planning permission

Plans for the 305-metre tower approved 18-7 by City of London Corporation

A controversial new London skyscraper dubbed “the Tulip” has been given planning approval, paving the way for the construction of the second tallest building in Western Europe after the Shard.

Designed by Foster + Partners, the 305-metre tower in the City of London will feature a viewing platform with rotating pods, a restaurant and a sky bar, and is expected to attract 1.2 million visitors a year.

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The Guardian

Apr 02 2019
Paradise painted with a porcupine quill – the wild visions of Raqib Shaw

He has survived fire, cancer and civil war, turning his love for his lost homeland of Kashmir into mind-blowing fantastical works. Our writer takes tea among his beehives and bonsai trees

On a grubby stretch of Peckham Road, just down from a replica of Del Boy’s van from Only Fools and Horses, stands an old sausage factory. Inside are gardens, beehives , bonsai trees, tables covered in fresh rose petals and a room full of Japanese flower arrangements. Here, assistants labour painstakingly over some of the most eye-popping paintings being produced today. This is the home and studio of Raqib Shaw, a 45-year-old Indian artist, whose hyperreal and crazily detailed visions of gods, fairytales, impossible architecture and paradises lost and found, emerge in paintings and sculptures that can take up to three years to produce – even with the help of an eight-strong team (more if there’s an exhibition in the offing).

It’s my second visit to Shaw’s decadent London domain. Five years ago I spent a Sunday afternoon having enormous glasses of pink champagne thrust into my hand while Shaw declared that he spent £20,000 a month on flowers, and said that it was a point of honour for him to be heavily in debt at all times (“in the red, darling – red is the colour of fashion”). He showed me works he was making: visions of exploding buildings and fantastical beasts disporting themselves in temples and gardens.

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The Guardian

Apr 01 2019
Rise and shrine: Japan's 1,300-year-old ritual – in pictures

Every 60 years, one of Japan’s most sacred Shinto shrines, Izumo Oyashiro, is reconstructed in an ancient ritual that dates back 1,300 years. Photographer Yukihito Masuura documented the 12-year process

The Japanese Aesthetic of Kehai in the Photography of Yukihito Masuura is at Foto Care, New York, 3-6 April

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The Guardian

Apr 01 2019
From farm to track: reindeer racing in Finland - a photo essay

Finland’s annual reindeer races culminate in the championship event held in Inari, more than 200 miles north of the Arctic Circle, on the last weekend of March. Photojournalist Shoja Lak visited a reindeer farm in Lapland before heading to the event

It is 6am and the temperature is -15C. A new blanket of snow covered the area overnight and the frozen fresh air tingles my nose. The reindeers are running around impatiently in their fenced area. “Reindeers are a very suspicious semi-wild animal,” says Antti Pätsi, a young herder and reindeer jockey from Posio in Finland.

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The New York Times

Apr 01 2019
Lincoln Kirstein: A Modern Tastemaker With Some Iffy Taste
An art critic and dance critic talk about two Kirstein shows — and how his protean diversity left its mark on the arts, most productively on ballet.
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The New York Times

Apr 01 2019
Rediscovering the Confederate Flag of Truce
Sonya Clark, a social practice artist, unfurls a handmade version of a Confederate truce flag and asks, ‘What if …”
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The Guardian

Mar 31 2019
'Like the Eye of Sauron': western Europe’s tallest building planned for tiny Danish town

Fast-fashion giant Bestseller set to build skyscraper headquarters in Brande, a 7,000-person rural town

Until a local company announced plans to send a 320-metre skyscraper soaring over the surrounding countryside, most people in Denmark had only the haziest idea where Brande, a town of 7,000 people in rural Jutland, even was.

The Bestseller Tower, designed by star architectural studio Dorte Mandrup, will not only be the tallest building in Denmark, but the tallest in western Europe, besting the Shard in London by a crucial 10.4 metres.

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The Guardian

Mar 31 2019
Annie Leibovitz on the shots that made her

She captured America’s most tumultuous moments and its biggest stars. The great photographer relives her Rolling Stone years – and the time she set fire to Patti Smith

Annie Leibovitz is standing by a photograph she took of Pont Neuf in Paris. It’s a swirling panoramic shot of the famous bridge, taken when she was a student and would roam the city’s streets camera in hand. One day, with a thrill, she realised she was standing where her idol, Henri Cartier-Bresson, once stood to take his own ghostly grey picture of the Seine crossing.

Leibovitz’s homage to the great French photographer did not stop there. Her latest exhibition – Annie Leibovitz: The Early Years, 1970-1983 – also features a remarkable shot of Cartier-Bresson himself. The notoriously camera-shy Frenchman glares into her lens. “He wouldn’t let me photograph him,” says Leibovitz. “So I studied his route to work every day and planted myself on a bridge and waited. ‘You!’ he said, when he saw me. Then, ‘All right – take the picture.’”

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The Guardian

Mar 31 2019
Cottingley Fairies fake photos to go under the hammer

Images of one of 20th century’s great hoaxes are expected to fetch nearly £70,000

Photographs of what is considered to be one of the great hoaxes of the 20th century are expected to fetch nearly £70,000 when they are sold at auction.

Pictures of the Cottingley Fairies were taken in July and September 1917 by the 16-year-old Elsie Wright and her nine-year-old cousin Frances Griffiths, in the village of Cottingley, near Bingley in West Yorkshire.

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The Guardian

Mar 31 2019
Van Gogh and Britain review – on the town with Vincent

Tate Britain, London
The artist’s heady London years are the backdrop to a show that struggles to locate a British influence on this singularly self-propelled genius

Van Gogh loved Dickens. He wore a top hat on his daily walk to work from Brixton to Covent Garden. He rowed on the Thames, studied Turner and Constable in the National Gallery, even took the new underground railways. That he lived in London, on and off, between the spring of 1873 and the winter of 1876 still seems as surprising as Géricault painting the Epsom Derby and Canaletto working for nine years in Soho. But there is a crucial difference: Van Gogh was not yet a painter.

He was only 20 when a posting came up at the London branch of Goupil, the French art dealer for whom he worked in The Hague. A thumbnail sketch of Westminster Bridge on the company’s headed notepaper is one of only three drawings that survive from Van Gogh’s time in England. Fired from Goupil, and from his Brixton boarding house, where he fell in love with the landlady’s daughter (or possibly the widow herself, it is sometimes said), he briefly taught at a school in Ramsgate, before a stint as a Methodist lay preacher in Richmond. Not until the summer of 1880, when Van Gogh was 27, did he decide to become an artist.

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The Guardian

Mar 30 2019
40 years of photographing musicians – in pictures

Australian music photographer Wendy McDougall is showcasing more than 140 images in a retrospective exhibition of her work called ‘It’s only rock ‘n’ roll but I like it’. McDougall has worked in the industry for more than 40 years and has shot countless musicians from Mick Jagger to Neil Finn. She talks about the circumstances of 10 of those images. The exhibition is being held at SUNSTUDIOS in Sydney and Melbourne.

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The Guardian

Mar 30 2019
Dive in: aerial shots of German public swimming pools

German photographer Stephan Zirwes started capturing public swimming pools from the air in 2015. “They are very structured,” he says. “The lanes, the diving platforms – I love the geometrical forms.” But he was not just captivated by the aesthetic qualities of the pools – it was also about what they represent. “In Germany, nearly ever small town has a pool. They’re a part of the social-cultural life, open for all social classes.” His series has been shortlisted for the 2019 Sony world photography awards (announced on 17 April). They were all shot by drone, an essential gadget for Zirwes, who started to specialise in aerial photography 15 years ago. “It was my way to show the world in a new way. With the popularisation of drones, aerial photography has become a new genre.”

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The New York Times

Mar 30 2019
A Leonardo Made a $450 Million Splash. Now There’s No Sign of It.
Since a Saudi royal, most likely the crown prince, paid $450 million for “Salvator Mundi,” it has vanished from view, and museums hoping to show it say they don’t know where it is.
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The Guardian

Mar 30 2019
How an artist’s dying wish turned her neighbours into gallery curators

Julian Bovis and Nigel Durkan on fulfilling their friend Joan Charnley’s final wish to turn her home into an ‘art house’

It was a week after the funeral of textile artist and teacher Joan Charnley, who died, at 84, in the summer of 2016, that her solicitor got in touch with her neighbours, Julian Bovis and Nigel Durkan, to tell them she had left them her house – a tall, listed Georgian building in Uppermill, on the edge of Saddleworth moor outside Manchester – and that she would like, although she understood it might not be possible, for it to be turned into what she quaintly called an “art house”. She described the two men, in her will, as her “soulmates”. In her lifetime, she referred to them simply as “the boys”. I meet “the boys” – both middle-aged – before the opening, on 6 April, of the Weavers Factory and at the end of more than two years of devoted slog during which they have made their neighbour’s dream come true. The gallery got its name because these houses were once a pre-industrial weavers’ factory. Their windows look on to a former steam mill. The houses’ window frames are painted black (originally to hide the soot). “Even the soot here is listed,” Bovis laughs.

Over lunch in their own house, Bovis and Durkan reminisce about their relationship with Charnley. What I want to know is: did they have any idea she was leaving them her house? None, they say. They were busy organising her funeral when the news came through and too grief-stricken to take it in. Durkan recalls every detail of the funeral (Bovis wrote the eulogy, Durkan oversaw refreshments). Two huge Saddleworth pies had been ordered, with “JO” the decoration in pastry on one, and “AN” adorning the other. But once they had recovered from all the work that follows a death, surely they must have hesitated before taking on the daunting transformation of her house? “No – we’d have been scared not to do it,” Bovis says. Charnley, they imagine, must have been waiting for the right moment to tell them about her plans, always believing there would be more time. Her aunt had lived to 104, she had told them she hoped to do the same.

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The Guardian

Mar 30 2019
Spurs’ new stadium: let’s call it a home win

Around the pitch and in the stands, the Tottenham Hotspur stadium is both magnificent and intimate, but the jarring exterior is mid-table fodder

It was, for a while, all about the cheese room. The new Tottenham Hotspur stadium, it was reported, was to offer its premium customers a selection of specially sourced cheeses, a concept which encapsulated how far the football fan has come from those black-and-white, crackly-voiced days when a gristly pie was all you got, an edible version of the brown balls that were hacked around the Flanders-like mud of those bygone fields – a distillation (conceptually speaking) of the catarrh of a million Capstans.

Which, goes the narrative, was how it should be. In the tribal warfare of football you don’t want the food to be too nice. And what could be more Waitrose, more metropolitan elite, more Highbury and Islington than a range of fermented curds? What could be less likely, except perhaps CO2 foam or a flame-retardant blanket, to put fire in the belly?

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The Guardian

Mar 30 2019
Original Observer photography

Hastings Pier, the Put it to the People march, rappers and poets – the best photography commissioned by the Observer in March 2019

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The Guardian

Mar 30 2019
The 20 photographs of the week

The aftermath of Cyclone Idai, the fall of Islamic State in Baghuz, the crisis in Venezuela and the Bombay Beach Biennale in California – the week captured by the world’s best photojournalists

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The New York Times

Mar 29 2019
With Plans for New Hire, El Museo del Barrio Reaches Out to Its Critics
The museum announced it would take on a curator focusing on Latinx communities in the United States.
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The New York Times

Mar 29 2019
New York Art Galleries: What to See Right Now
Gilles Aillaud’s portraits of zoo animals; Paul Mpagi Sepuya’s homoerotic photographs; Christina Forrer’s paintings on a loom; and the BRIC Biennial’s third South Brooklyn Edition.
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The New York Times

Mar 29 2019
Hudson Yards: New York Chased the Olympics. It Got the Shed Instead.
How the city’s most ambitious new cultural institution in years — with a commitment to creating new work and reaching diverse audiences — rose in the wake of failed Olympic dreams.
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The Guardian

Mar 29 2019
Jeremy Deller creates 'Farage in Prison' artwork for 'Brexit Day'

One hundred copies of print to go on sale to raise funds to save London music bar from closure

Jeremy Deller, the Turner prize-winning conceptual artist, has created a print to commemorate “Brexit Day” which reads simply: “Farage in Prison”.

One hundred copies of the artwork, which are printed on silkscreen, will be sold at £110 each. They will raise money for the crowdfunder to save central London bar The Social from closure.

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The Guardian

Mar 29 2019
Art detective Arthur Brand: how I found a stolen Picasso

The man dubbed ‘Indiana Jones of the art world’ says the paintings can ‘become a burden’

The ring at the door of the modest east Amsterdam apartment came late in the day on Thursday 14 March. On the doorstep stood two men “with contacts in the underworld”, Arthur Brand recalls, and with them a large, rectangular package.

Eagerly, Brand removed the covering and examined the contents: Buste de femme (Dora Maar), a portrait by Pablo Picasso of his mistress. Unsigned because it was never sold by the painter, it bore in its bottom-left corner the date he completed it, 26 April 1938, and was worth an estimated €25m (£21.5m).

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The Guardian

Mar 29 2019
Ericka Beckman / Marianna Simnett review – no fairytale endings for these radicals

FACT, Liverpool
Cinderella shuns her prince and Freudian sexism is unmasked in an empowering show about myth and misogyny

Fairytales are not known for complex female characters. Usually, they are beautiful but powerless, awaiting salvation via matrimony. Presumably wearied by the vacuous central female, several writers have penned disruptive alternatives. Red Riding Hood has been recast as the wolf’s lover by Angela Carter and the wolf’s murderer by Carol Ann Duffy, and Merseyside Women’s Liberation Movement when they rewrote several traditional tales in 1972. The same organisation saw Snow White unionise the dwarfs and Rapunzel escape using her own hair.

It is in this canon of subversive sisters that Ericka Beckman and Marianna Simnett’s protagonists find their place. Although their work is separated by nearly 30 years, both artists rally against the restrictive structure of myth, creating video works with strong, decisive women who forge their own destinies. Four of their films are currently exhibited at FACT along with Simnett’s installation Faint with Light, which captures the artist hyperventilating until she falls unconscious.

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The Guardian

Mar 29 2019
The truth about swimming pools and whimsy from Chicago – the week in art

Joan Snyder makes a fizzy debut, Gladys Nilsson invents and Leon Kossoff dives right in – all in our weekly dispatch

Leon Kossoff
Few people have ever painted London’s streets, swimming pools and churches with the power and truth of Kossoff. This is a career survey of one of Britain’s great artists.
Piano Nobile, London, until 22 May.

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The New York Times

Mar 29 2019
On the Met Roof, Alicja Kwade’s Test of Faith
Known for confronting the laws of physics, the Polish-German artist builds a planetary sculpture and ponders our place in the universe
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The Guardian

Mar 29 2019
One of Francis Bacon's 'screaming popes' to be auctioned in New York

Sotheby’s sells Study for a Head 1952, important work seen in public only once

A Francis Bacon painting considered one of his most important left in private hands, part of his terrifying “screaming pope” series, is to appear at auction.

Sotheby’s said on Friday it was selling Study for a Head 1952, part of a collection inspired by Diego Velázquez’s portrait of Pope Innocent X, which helped to establish Bacon’s reputation in the 1950s.

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The Guardian

Mar 29 2019
Behind a Guardian classic photograph: Daffodils, April 1995

This week, in our series of classic Guardian photographs, you can buy your own archive print of Daffodils along the shore of Ullswater in the Lake District, photographed by Don McPhee

This dramatic photograph, taken along the shores of Ullswater in the Lake District by the Guardian photographer Don McPhee, captures a bank of daffodils against a backdrop of silhouetted trees and a lone figure by the water’s edge. Along with the Guardian writer David Ward, McPhee was covering the launch of a daffodil hotline – these were pre-internet days – that allowed visitors to call to find out where the best blooms were. “Don had infinite patience,” Ward recalls. “He was lying on his front to take this photograph. He would do anything to get his shot.”

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The New York Times

Mar 29 2019
Van Gogh the Wild Man? Try Van Gogh the Suburban Professional
Van Gogh’s comfortable, middle-class existence in London is at odds with how the public imagines the painter. But this period shaped his art, a new exhibition shows.
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The Guardian

Mar 29 2019
Joaquín Sorolla’s Mother: floating in a blissful sea of white bed linen

The popular Spanish artist breaks away from convention with an intimate portrait of his family in deep slumber

This painting from 1895-1900 is the brilliant standout in Joaquín Sorolla’s career. It shows his wife and muse Clotilde and their newly born daughter Elena. The set-up is strange and striking: they are heads only, floating in a blissful sea of white bed linen, gentle sunlight and soft shadows.

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The Guardian

Mar 28 2019
'Democracy has terrible taste': Grayson Perry's Brexit vases acquired by V&A

Matching Pair pots were made based on ideas, images and phrases from social media

Grayson Perry has had more material out of Britain’s political turmoil than probably any other artist but even he has had enough. “I’m officially a Bob now, Bored of Brexit,” he said.

“I just wash my hands of trying to have any kind of opinion about it, it just goes on and on,” he told the Guardian. “I have researched it and talked about it and thought about it an awful lot and I can understand how it happened. But it seems to me the people culpable still aren’t fessing up to it … I don’t think they’d like to do that.”

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The Guardian

Mar 28 2019
The National review – contemporary art from the uncanny to the inviting

Carriageworks, Art Gallery of NSW and Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney

It’s a challenge to take in the work of 58 artists over three major galleries. But sometimes the effort pays off


For those of you who came in late, The National: New Australian Art is a major survey exhibition featuring 58 artists, duos and groups, and is staged across three major Sydney art galleries: the Art Gallery of NSW, the Museum of Contemporary Art, and Carriageworks. After launching in 2017, and with a final iteration planned for 2021, its remit is to present a snapshot of Australian contemporary art.

That seems both ambitious and problematic. Whose contemporary art are we talking about? And is it really a true indication of what’s going on?

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The New York Times

Mar 28 2019
19 Art Exhibitions to View in N.Y.C. This Weekend
Our guide to new art shows and some that will be closing soon.
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The New York Times

Mar 28 2019
Critic’s Notebook: El Anatsui’s Monumental New Show Is an Act of Justice
A pilgrimage to Munich finds a resplendent tribute to the Ghanaian-born artist, and a fitting epitaph for the curator, Okwui Enwezor.
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The Guardian

Mar 28 2019
Brexit leaves Tate scrambling to assure EU museums over Van Gogh loans

Galleries expressed concern the borrowed masterpieces would be subject to hefty taxes

It has been hailed as “the show of the season”, selling more advance tickets than any other exhibition in Tate Britain’s history.

But it has now emerged that the opening this week of Van Gogh and Britain, the gallery’s spring blockbuster, went ahead only after a last-minute diplomatic scramble to assure European galleries that any masterpieces loaned to the exhibition would not get stuck in a chaotic post-Brexit UK.

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The New York Times

Mar 28 2019
Hudson Yards: How the Shed Can Live Up to Its Hype: Focus on the Artists
As the arts center rolls out its inaugural season, we offer our hopes not only for its future, but also for New York’s broader cultural landscape.
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The New York Times

Mar 28 2019
Hammer Museum Auction at Sotheby’s Will Benefit Artist Fund
Some 35 contemporary artists are donating pieces to the auction, which will take place in New York in May.
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The Guardian

Mar 28 2019
Pierre Bonnard and the mystery of the nudes in Theresa May kitten heels

Bonnard’s exhibition at Tate Modern features beautiful, bold landscapes. But what’s behind his oddly expressed foot fetish?

I think it’s about time we all admitted it: Pierre Bonnard was no dab hand at feet. The French post-impressionist painter and current subject of The Colour of Memory exhibition at Tate Modern, London, draws feet like pink rakes. There are, of course, things that Bonnard is truly great at: colour, evoking memory, breasts and torsos. Feet are not his forte.

It was visiting the show that led me to realise the painter was fond of an ingenious – and unintentionally hilarious – solution: kitten heels. Mostly only seen these days on Theresa May, they are present in the majority of the nudes in the Tate’s curation.

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