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The New York Times

Apr 09 2018
Public Art Fund Summer Season Serves Hot Dogs and Abstraction
Works by Erwin Wurm, Tauba Auerbach and B. Wurtz will spread art throughout the city from June to August.
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The Guardian

Apr 09 2018
Thomas Frangenberg obituary

My friend Thomas Frangenberg, who has died aged 60 after a long period of illness, had an unusual career in the art world. He was both a brilliant historian of Renaissance painting and sculpture and a highly astute collector of conceptual art. His collection, which is now to be divided between Tate and the Contemporary Art Society, was bought entirely from his academic salary. Thanks to his informed taste he was able to acquire important pieces by rising artists, including the Turner prizewinners Elizabeth Price and Martin Creed.

Thomas developed his passion for collecting contemporary conceptual art while still a doctoral student in Renaissance art. I met him at a conference, The Lives of Leonardo, which he had co-organised at the Warburg Institute in London with Rodney Palmer in 2006.

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The Guardian

Apr 09 2018
Diane Arbus' daring early work: 'It was a story that went untold, until now'

The photographer’s largely unseen set of 1960s photos focusing on outcasts of society is now on view at the Smithsonian

In 1970, Diane Arbus was a struggling magazine photographer in New York City. She wanted to make more money, so she put together a series of photos in a plexiglass box, which she called “A box of ten photographs by Diane Arbus”, priced at $1,000.

Related: Diane Arbus: portraits in New York City parks – in pictures

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EosArte.eu

Apr 09 2018
Milano. Mostra di artisti lettoni “Passion”
AIVARS KISNICS & ARTIS NĪMANIS  Art and Design PASSION a cura di LINDA BAJÀRE MILAN DESIGN WEEK 17 - 22 aprile 2018, ore 11 - 20 VIA DELLA SPIGA, 7 - 20121 MILANO PRESS PREVIEW: Lunedì 16 aprile, ore 17 - 19 VERNISSAGE: Martedì 17 aprile, ore 18 - 21 R.S.V.P. lb.arts.p@gmail.com In occasione della Milan Design Week, Linda Bajàre è lieta di annunciare l’inaugurazione della [...]
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The New York Times

Apr 09 2018
Night at the Space Museum: 10 Open Bars and Tons of Kubrick References
Yuri’s Night, a yearly worldwide celebration of space, was held at the National Air and Space Museum, as it enters a new era with a new leader and plans for a big renovation.
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The New York Times

Apr 09 2018
19th-Century Playbills to Be Restored and Digitized
A grant to the Museum of the City of New York will allow for the conservation of hundreds of theatrical broadsides.
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The Guardian

Apr 09 2018
Sleeping time traveller shortlisted for BP Portrait Award 2018

Four works in contention for £35,000 art prize pay homage to painters’ loved ones

Family features heavily in the shortlist for one of the UK’s most prestigious art awards, with four painters who have captured loved ones asleep, relaxing and making tea.

On Monday, the National Portrait Gallery in London announced the shortlist for the BP Portrait Award 2018 – four works selected from 2,667 entries and 88 countries.

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The Guardian

Apr 09 2018
He has wrapped the Reichstag – now the artist Christo is heading to the UK with 7,506 barrels

Christo and Jeanne-Claude, his late wife, became famous for their extraordinary sculptures, including one that made Italians feel they were walking on water. Now he’s coming to Britain, what surprises can we expect?

Christo is standing in the driving rain patiently surveying the site for his latest artwork, which will rise a whopping 20 metres from the currently choppy waters of the Serpentine lake. His white locks and quilted Issey Miyake coat are flapping about madly as the downpour sweeps through Hyde Park, but the 82-year-old artist looks happy enough.

From our vantage point on the bridge over the lake, we can just about make out dogs romping round the Princess Diana memorial fountain. From June, I learn, this popular landmark will be overshadowed by Christo’s first large British artwork: a giant stack of 55-gallon barrels, numbering 7,506 in all, floating on the lake.

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The Guardian

Apr 09 2018
Cathy Wilkes to represent Britain at 58th Venice Biennale

Northern Irish artist to take over British Pavilion at world’s biggest contemporary arts exhibition

Cathy Wilkes, a Northern Irish artist whose sculptural installations sometimes confound as much as they delight, has been chosen as Britain’s artist for the world’s biggest contemporary arts exhibition.

The British Council announced on Monday that Wilkes, who is based in Glasgow, had been selected to fill the British Pavilion at the 58th Venice Biennale in 2019. The event is seen as an Olympics for the visual arts and runs for six months every two years.

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The Guardian

Apr 08 2018
Selling fake Indigenous art should be illegal, MPs told

Mass-produced, imported works are damaging and exploitative, WA art centres say

The peak body for Aboriginal art centres across Western Australia has called for laws to make it illegal to sell fake Indigenous art.

In a submission to a federal parliamentary committee hearing in Perth, the Aboriginal Art Centre Hub of WA says fake and often imported Aboriginal art causes “significant damage” to Indigenous culture and communities and is exploitative.

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The New York Times

Apr 08 2018
Good Grief, Charlie Brown! You’re Graffiti
Seven artists have been selected to interpret Peanuts characters for a public art project in New York and six other cities.
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The Guardian

Apr 08 2018
Rare Rubens painting subject of temporary UK export ban

Buyer sought for oil sketch Head of an African Man Wearing a Turban, which could fetch £7.7m

A temporary export ban has been placed on a rare painting by the Flemish artist Peter Paul Rubens in a race to try and find a buyer so it can remain in the UK.

The oil sketch on paper, Head of an African Man Wearing a Turban, could fetch £7.7m because it is one of the few existing examples of 17th-century artwork that depicts an African man in Europe.

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The Guardian

Apr 08 2018
Sex and spirituality: Stanley Spencer’s ‘visions’ return to Cookham
Paintings by the visionary British artist that were bought by his friends and admirers have been gathered together for a show in his beloved Berkshire village

He was one of the most inspirational artists of the 20th century, a visionary who painted real village folk in grandiose biblical scenes, and the creator of the most important artistic first world war memorial in the UK.

But there were periods when Stanley Spencer was close to penury as the result of his unconventional personal life and the apparent avarice of his second wife. The acclaimed artist relied on patrons, who supported him by buying his paintings and commissioning works, but also by housing and feeding him, and offering him emotional and intellectual sustenance.

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The Guardian

Apr 08 2018
Centre Point and the Hoover building review – from beasts to beauties

Denounced as vulgar when they were built, these newly desirable London landmarks have been reborn as luxury flats boasting distinctive dimensions as well as chequered pasts

“With Britain’s entry into the EEC,” barked an early 1970s advert, “Centre Point, London, offers an unrivalled opportunity to organisations with imagination to occupy this spectacular office complex.” How times change. Now, with Britain’s impending exit from the EU, the same building offers an unrivalled opportunity for individuals wishing to spend £1.8m on a one-bedroom flat or £55m on a penthouse, the first of whom have been gradually moving in since last Christmas. A Crossrail station at its base will whisk owners from Tottenham Court Road to Heathrow airport in 28 minutes and thence to the new global opportunities promised by Brexiters.

Meanwhile, nine miles west of Centre Point’s central location, the celebrated former Hoover factory, whose colonnaded art deco billboard of a facade merges ancient Karnak with American roadside industry, is also turning into flats. For there’s an entropy in the contemporary property business, its own second law of thermodynamics, which states that eventually everything becomes residential.

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The Guardian

Apr 07 2018
Monet and Architecture review – a world built of light and memory

National Gallery, London
From windmills cartwheeling across a Dutch sky to Venice dissolving at dusk, architecture for Monet was ever-changing nature by other means

“London would be quite ugly if not for the fog.” So wrote Claude Monet, witheringly, from the Savoy hotel in 1901. It might be his last word on architecture. There is the city – specifically Waterloo Bridge, the Houses of Parliament and the grimy lead-shot factory opposite the balcony on which he is working – and there is the ever-changing play of climate, atmosphere and light around them. The buildings are just a pretext for painting the sublime.

Weather and waterlilies, haystacks, poplars and seascapes: Monet (1840-1926) is not an artist of bricks and mortar. And even after seeing almost 80 paintings linking him with architecture, I doubt anyone will have their mind changed on this score. Of course he is indelibly associated with certain cities – there are seven paintings of London, eight of Rouen and nine of Venice at the National Gallery – but the show’s premise is at the very least counterintuitive. What does Monet have to do with architecture?

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The Guardian

Apr 07 2018
The big picture: Shop assistant, Orlando West, Soweto, 1972
David Goldblatt captures a defiant private moment in apartheid-era South Africa

David Goldblatt once described himself as “a self-appointed observer and critic of the society into which I was born”. That society was apartheid-era South Africa, which he chronicled with meticulous patience and a certain formal detachment, his acutely observational gaze illuminating the lives of ordinary people living under a system that separated and controlled them according to skin colour.

From the early 1960s, when he began photographing the landscape and people of South Africa, Goldblatt shot in black and white, later saying: “During those years, colour seemed too sweet a medium to express the anger, disgust and fear that apartheid inspired.” His detached approach reflected his own sense of being an outsider – his Lithuanian Jewish family had originally settled in South Africa to escape religious persecution – but it also allowed him to present the complexities of life under apartheid in a way that contrasted with the often dramatic images made by visiting photojournalists.

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The Guardian

Apr 07 2018
The mane attraction: hair-tossing horses – in pictures

“Horses can be hilarious!” says German photographer Wiebke Haas. “It’s my greatest passion to tease out nearly human expressions from them.” She has turned this passion into a delightful series called Horsestyle (shortlisted for a 2018 Sony World Photography award) featuring stallion Pauli with his lovely Elvis lip-curl, and Linus with a big, bouncy mane to rival Farrah Fawcett’s.

Haas grew up around animals, which perhaps explains why her horses look so at ease. “The most difficult part was to keep them straight to the camera,” she says. Her secret? Horse goodies and the occasional “tickle in the ear”.

The 2018 Sony World Photography Awards winners will be announced on 19 April

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artforum.com

Apr 07 2018
PASSAGES: Helen Mayer Harrison (1927–2018)
Caroline A. Jones on Helen Mayer Harrison (1927–2018)
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The Guardian

Apr 06 2018
The 20 photographs of the week

Protests in Gaza, the death of Winnie Madikizela-Mandela, the 50th anniversary of the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr and the Commonwealth Games in Australia – the week captured by the world’s best photojournalists

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The Guardian

Apr 06 2018
Dark Mofo 2018 lineup: Laurie Anderson, St Vincent and a festival of 'dangerous thoughts'

After bringing death threats to its curators last year, the Hobart festival returns in June with an expanded program

Laurie Anderson, St Vincent, Alice Glass and a new talks program will headline the sixth Dark Mofo festival, Hobart’s “dark”, experimental and controversial winter festival, pulled together by the team behind the Museum of Old and New Art (Mona).

For the first time, the 2018 festival will extend to a third “prelude” weekend from 7-10 June, which will feature a masked costume ball, two major exhibition openings – Zero at Mona, and A Journey to Freedom at the Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery – and the Dark and Dangerous Thoughts symposium, co-presented by Guardian Australia and Vice.

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The New York Times

Apr 06 2018
A Lost Painting Is Rediscovered. Have You Checked Your Closets Lately?
A rare painting by a 16th century Dutch master was recently discovered hidden for decades in a storeroom in Iowa. It could be worth millions.
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artforum.com

Apr 06 2018
SLANT: Moore Is More
Lorrie Moore talks about her new book of collected non-fiction
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artforum.com

Apr 06 2018
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The New York Times

Apr 06 2018
Unknown or Unreal? The Shadow on Some Russian Avant-Garde Art
In a spate of recent incidents, experts have questioned the authenticity of works said to have been painted by the Russian masters of the period.
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The Guardian

Apr 06 2018
National Gallery's £22 ticket revives debate over exhibition prices

Venue’s boss says fee for Claude Monet show is a consequence of staging large-scale exhibitions

The debate over gallery entrance fees has been reignited after the National Gallery raised the cost of an exhibition ticket beyond £20 for the first time, charging £22 for its Claude Monet exhibition on weekends.

Gabriele Finaldi, the gallery’s director, this week admitted that London exhibitions “have become quite expensive” but blamed this on the cost of staging large-scale shows. “We couldn’t have put it on for free, because that’s not the way we operate,” he told BBC Radio 4’s Today programme on Friday. “There are other exhibitions we put on for free.”

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The Guardian

Apr 06 2018
Ink splats and zombies to level up at V&A's video games exhibition

Highlights from show launching in September include Nintendo’s Spatoon and zombie blockbuster

Visitors to the Victoria & Albert Museum gallery will be able to immerse themselves in the Game of Thrones land of Westeros while watching people splatter each other with ink when a video games exhibition opens this year.

Announcing details of the show on Friday, Tristram Hunt, director of the V&A, said video games were “one of the most important design disciplines of our time”.

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The Guardian

Apr 06 2018
Magical Monet and Tracey Emin's message for travellers – the week in art

Emin has a warm welcome for everyone arriving at St Pancras station, as the National Gallery probes Monet’s mind and Linder Sterling roughs up Chatsworth House – all in your weekly dispatch

Monet & Architecture
This exhibition is a beguiling journey into the mind of Monet that reveals the serious purpose behind his visual brilliance.
National Gallery, London, 9 April-29 July.

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The New York Times

Apr 06 2018
Forensics Helps Widen Architecture’s Mission
Instead of building a house or skyscraper, Forensic Architecture builds cases against human rights violators, scouring for evidence through social media.
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The New York Times

Apr 06 2018
Puttin’ on the Ritz (Auction)
Want the couch where Hemingway once sat? What about a piece from Coco Chanel’s suite? A storied Parisian hotel is selling some of its history.
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The New York Times

Apr 06 2018
Commerce vs. Curation: Lessons From Today’s Museum World
As the ultrawealthy pay ever higher prices for trophy works, and many cultural institutions face cuts in state funding, private collectors are an increasingly influential force.
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The Guardian

Apr 05 2018
From burning cars to barren blocks: 20 years chasing the great American dream – in pictures

Mike O’Meally moved to the US in 1998 intending to photograph skateboarders but became fascinated by the idea of the great America dream – especially after the events of 9/11. Over the course of 20 years he used his camera to capture the state of a society ‘once loved and respected’. ‘Hope springs eternal that the Land of the Free will remain the Home of the Brave,’ he says. His work is on show at China Heights gallery in Sydney until Sunday

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The New York Times

Apr 05 2018
Where Spring Is in Full Bloom
Winter hasn’t released its grip, but nature’s warm-weather beauties are actually beginning to blossom. We offer a guide, starting off at the Orchid Show in the Bronx.
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The New York Times

Apr 05 2018
22 Art Exhibitions to View in NYC This Weekend
Our guide to new art shows and some that will be closing soon.
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The New York Times

Apr 05 2018
Art Review: Walk Through This Exhibition With Dread. You Know Where It Leads.
“Before the Fall: German and Austrian Art of the 1930s,” at the Neue Galerie, chronicles artists’ resistance to — or complicity in — what was happening in their countries.
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