News

Displaying 201 to 250 of 14597 results

The New York Times

Sep 28 2018
Art Review: At 7 Art Galleries, the Ecstatic Flow of Paint and the Stories It Can Tell
Seven new exhibitions show us the many ways that liquidity figures in the postwar history of painting.
Read More
The New York Times

Sep 28 2018
In ‘The Mile-Long Opera,’ All the High Line’s a Stage
This opera, opening Oct. 3, has a cast of 1,000 and a team of A-listers including the architect Liz Diller and the composer David Lang.
Read More
The Guardian

Sep 28 2018
Brothers in art: the Renaissance rivalry of Mantegna and Bellini

With paintings so similar their origins have been disputed for centuries, these giants of Italian art are now being exhibited together for the first time at London’s National Gallery

In a small room in a former palace in Venice there is a strange, compelling painting set on an easel at head height so the viewer looks straight into eyes first depicted more than 500 years ago. It is very like an earlier painting now in Berlin and art historians have been arguing about them both for years.

Both paintings ostensibly show the infant Jesus in the temple. The one at the Gemäldegalerie in Berlin, is agreed to be the work of Andrea Mantegna. The Venetian painting, made 20 years later, was credited to Mantegna also. But it is now accepted as by Giovanni Bellini.

Continue reading...
Read More
artforum.com

Sep 28 2018
SLANT: On the Ground: Chicago
KT Hawbaker on Chicago’s DIY and artist-run spaces
Read More
The Guardian

Sep 28 2018
Liquid Crystal Display review – a dazzling date with the mineral of the millennium

Site Gallery, Sheffield
The revamped venue opens with a compelling celebration of crystals and what makes them so alluring

Crystals are the millennial’s religion of choice. And not just because Lena Dunham likes to carry them in her handbag or because trendy skincare brands claim they improve wellbeing; crystals are at the core of technology, they are key to those captivating devices that cause minor panic attacks when lost or dropped. We cradle them in our hands, stare at them more than our loved ones and queue for hours to get the next coveted model.

Crystal obsession is not a new phenomenon. For generations people have collected them and marvelled at their shapes and shine; mystics have gazed into crystal balls and the study of crystal formation was central to understanding DNA. Site Gallery in Sheffield explores all of these avenues in its exhibition Liquid Crystal Display. Starting by acknowledging our current reliance on crystals, the exhibition delves into the technology and spirituality that surrounds these shimmering stones in a group show that is half art appreciation and half science lesson.

Continue reading...
Read More
The Guardian

Sep 28 2018
Pacific views, radical politics and all the fun of the fair – the week in art

Oceania reveals its inspiring treasures, Tania Bruguera prepares to surprise Tate Modern, and Frieze returns to London – our weekly dispatch

Oceania
This is a stupendous odyssey through the superb art and fascinating culture of the Pacific, with masterpieces that inspired Picasso, bear witness to history and are simply mesmerising to behold. A blockbuster and then some.
Royal Academy, London, 29 September-10 December.

Continue reading...
Read More
The Guardian

Sep 28 2018
The high-fliers club: how Susan Wood captured the original rebel girls

Celebrities, intellectuals, icons: Susan Wood shot the most celebrated women of the 20th century, unaware she was chronicling a revolution. She relives her great assignments – and the hottest gossip

There’s Jayne Mansfield, striding through New York in a tight dress. There’s fashion designer Diane von Fürstenberg, reclining on a flight with a notepad on her lap. There’s lifestyle icon Martha Stewart, leading ducks round her property dressed in a denim romper suit. They’re all here, along with Susan Sontag, Nora Ephron and countless other celebrities, intellectuals and icons of the 20th century – and all of them women.

Susan Wood, the celebrated photographer who took these shots, found that her subjects all shared certain characteristics. “The first thing is intelligence,” she says. “The second is responsiveness. And they all had tremendous energy, joie de vivre, openness. They could understand things that weren’t quite said.”

Continue reading...
Read More
The Guardian

Sep 28 2018
Damien Hirst retreats from Ilfracombe but his optimism lives on

Most locals appreciate the artist’s influence, and are even getting to like the looming Verity

Holidaymakers Phil and Jean, in their 70s and from the Midlands, were recovering on the beach. They had spent the morning viewing Damien Hirst’s statue Verity, which looms over the waterfront at Ilfracombe in north Devon, before heading to the artist’s restaurant for a cup of coffee amid vivid butterfly, dot and pickled fish pieces.

“To be honest, the whole experience has been pretty overwhelming,” said Phil. “It’s not the sort of thing you expect on a visit to the seaside.” Jean said the pair did not consider themselves art fans. “But I wouldn’t have missed it,” she added. “It’s really given us something to think and talk about.”

Continue reading...
Read More
The Guardian

Sep 28 2018
Martin Eder’s Snakebite: homoeroticism via a sexy snake

With his subject’s sweaty, hungover sheen, the German painter turns the gaze towards male nudity in this flagrantly naff portrait

Martin Eder is one of the big, brash names of German art, with a rep for playing with things people really like looking at: fluffy, blue-eyed kittens, pedigree pooches, naked women/porn stars and, more recently, men.

Continue reading...
Read More
The Guardian

Sep 27 2018
How Hokusai's Great Wave crashed into Van Gogh's Starry Night

Writer says Dutch painter was influenced by Japanese print he is known to have admired

One of the great masterpieces of 19th-century western art was loosely inspired by one of the greats of 19th-century Japanese art, it has been argued.

Martin Bailey, a specialist on Vincent van Gogh, believes that the Dutch artist drew inspiration from Katsushika Hokusai’s The Great Wave off Kanagawa when he painted one of his most dazzling and celebrated works, The Starry Night.

Continue reading...
Read More
The Guardian

Sep 27 2018
The ping-pong portraitist – in pictures

Using the fast-moving skills he honed as a table tennis champ, Paul Trevor wandered through London’s financial district and a market in Brick Lane, taking spontaneous closeups. His work appears in the new show In Your Face

Continue reading...
Read More
The New York Times

Sep 27 2018
Art Dealer Sentenced to 18 Months in Prison for Fraud
Ezra Chowaiki sold artwork without his clients’ permission and misused money that had been designated for making purchases for them.
Read More
The New York Times

Sep 27 2018
Critic’s Notebook: Finding Common Ground at El Museo del Barrio
Two shows attempt to bridge the rift in a museum’s mission: to honor its Barrio roots — and reach a global audience.
Read More
The New York Times

Sep 27 2018
22 Art Exhibitions to View in N.Y.C. This Weekend
Our guide to new art shows and some that will be closing soon.
Read More
The New York Times

Sep 27 2018
The Week in Arts: Blood Orange, Glenn Close, Black Power Art in Brooklyn
The British R&B artist Dev Hynes comes to New York, and Glenn Close plays Joan of Arc’s mother.
Read More
The Guardian

Sep 27 2018
Damien Hirst to close Ilfracombe restaurant the Quay

Artist’s restaurant and nearby 20-metre statue have helped draw visitors to seaside town

Damien Hirst is to shut down his quayside restaurant close to one of his most striking pieces of artwork, the imposing bronze statue Verity, in north Devon.

Hirst’s restaurant, the Quay, in Ilfracombe, has become popular with visitors who make the pilgrimage to view the 20-metre statue, which includes a glimpse of a developing foetus in the figure’s womb.

Continue reading...
Read More
The Guardian

Sep 27 2018
Architect Nicholas Grimshaw wins RIBA gold medal

The designer of the Eden Project and Waterloo station’s international terminal awarded the UK’s highest accolade for architecture

Architect of the Eden Project and leading proponent of the British “high tech” movement, Sir Nicholas Grimshaw has been named as the 2019 recipient of the RIBA gold medal, the UK’s highest accolade for architecture.

Grimshaw made his name with a series of lightweight industrial buildings in the 1970s and 80s, developing a style that celebrated the way these utilitarian sheds were made. It was an approach that he went on to deploy at ever more theatrical scale in grand infrastructure projects, from the serpentine glass vaults of Waterloo station’s international terminal in 1993 to the soaring steel trusses of Zurich airport in 2004. But this master of Meccano has always defied being labelled.

Continue reading...
Read More
artforum.com

Sep 27 2018
FILM: Sound Off
Tausif Noor on Steve Loveridge’s Matangi/Maya/M.I.A (2018)
Read More
The Guardian

Sep 27 2018
Cottingley Fairies hoax pictures expected to fetch £2,000 at auction

Photos taken in 1917 by cousins Elsie Wright and Frances Griffiths were cause of huge controversy

Photographs of what is considered to be one of the greatest hoaxes of the 20th century are expected to fetch more than £2,000 when they are sold at auction.

The two images of the Cottingley Fairies were taken in July and September 1917 by 16-year-old Elsie Wright and her nine-year-old cousin Frances Griffiths, in the village of Cottingley, near Bingley in Yorkshire.

Continue reading...
Read More
The New York Times

Sep 27 2018
The Robin Williams Auction: On the Wall and Off the Wall
Banksy, Gus Van Sant, Martin Mull and “Hook” — the eclectic collection of Robin and Marsha Williams goes on the auction block at Sotheby’s.
Read More
The Guardian

Sep 27 2018
Dark tourism and floating road: Photaumnales festival – in pictures

Twenty-seven photographers are showcasing their work at the 15th edition of the festival held in the small town of Beauvais in northern France. On until 31 December, this year’s festival is all about the relationship between photography and history

Continue reading...
Read More
The Guardian

Sep 27 2018
Mantegna and Bellini review – 'abandon hope, all ye who enter here without a PhD'

National Gallery, London
With their spectacular light and heavenly visions, these pictures have a timeless appeal – so why crush the life out of them with deadly dull erudition?

In Giovanni Bellini’s incandescent painting the Resurrection of Christ, a nearly naked Jesus floats in the air above stunned soldiers guarding his now empty tomb. What catches your heart, though, is the sky. Nimbus and cumulus clouds – observed 300 years before they were classified by science – are tinged with the salmon-pink light of dawn as they float in a sky that’s changing from night blue to morning gold.

It is a gorgeous moment that melts away the time between us and Bellini. An artist who died more than half a millennium ago lives, breathes and shares his soul with us through those achingly sensitive colours.

Continue reading...
Read More
The New York Times

Sep 27 2018
Critic's Notebook: The Existential Void of the Pop-Up ‘Experience’
I went to as many Instagramable “museums,” “factories” and “mansions” as I could. They nearly broke me.
Read More
The Guardian

Sep 26 2018
Alastair Thain's best photograph: Joseph Beuys close to death

‘I love the fragility in his face – although that human spark, that charisma, is still intact’

In the mid-1980s I was working with a woman who wanted to make a book about artists. She was married to a very famous one herself and knew them all, as well as the dealers. She had a mega-mansion on Capri and that is how I came to meet Joseph Beuys.

I shot this portrait of him for the book a few months later. Beuys was installing a show, Plight, at the Anthony d’Offay gallery in London; that’s one of his felt works you can see in the background. The space was designed to get warmer with the felt; I remember the change in temperature. The work was up and Beuys was on a cigarette break. There’s ash on his hat.

Continue reading...
Read More
The Guardian

Sep 26 2018
News, lifestyle, fashion: Australia's emerging photographer awards – in pictures

A selection of the finalists in the Sun Studios emerging photography awards for 2018. The images will be on display at the accompanying exhibition at Sun Studios, Alexandria, Sydney, from 27 September

Continue reading...
Read More
The New York Times

Sep 26 2018
Art Review: Firebrands Who Forged a New Art for a New India
Asia Society presents the first United States exhibition of the Progressives Artists’ Group, the avant-garde painters of post-independence Mumbai, in decades.
Read More
The New York Times

Sep 26 2018
What to See in New York Art Galleries This Week
Glen Fogel’s videos and soul-baring drawings; Martine Gutierrez’s “Indigenous Woman”; and Toyin Ojih Odutola’s portraits of imagined Nigerian aristocracy.
Read More
The Guardian

Sep 26 2018
Trust us to look after Parthenon marbles | Letters
Brexit should have no bearing on where the Parthenon marbles are kept, says the British Museum’s Richard Lambert. Jeremy Chaundry reckons they should stay in the UK, while Chris Hardy has a suggestion for replacing them.

In what was one of the great acts of the Enlightenment, in 1753 parliament established the British Museum as a trust, the first of its kind in the world, which was to be run independently of politics and of parliament. This autonomy has been central to its scholarship and public purpose for the past 265 years. And it means that contrary to the arguments of Rhiannon Lucy Cosslett (The Parthenon marbles need to be in the EU, Journal, 25 September), the Brexit negotiations have no bearing on the location of the Parthenon sculptures.

Trustees today have three broad responsibilities: to conserve and enhance the collections for ever; to generate new knowledge, especially by supporting the kind of research that is only possible in a large encyclopaedic museum; and to make the collections accessible to the whole world. They work with colleagues across the UK and around the world to share knowledge and objects from their collections as widely as possible. But they don’t see the objects for which they are responsible as negotiating chips in a political debate.
Richard Lambert
Chair of the British Museum trustees

Continue reading...
Read More
The New York Times

Sep 26 2018
Robert Morgenthau Donates Great-Grandfather’s Diary to Jewish Archive
Lazarus Morgenthau, a prosperous clothing salesman, wrote down his memories of his impoverished and nomadic childhood in the early 19th century.
Read More
The New York Times

Sep 26 2018
Show Us Your Wall: In a Bronx Home, Look Up to See a Mythical Creature
The new director of the Bronx Museum of the Arts designed her apartment around a colorful work by a lifelong mentor, the printmaker Robert Blackburn.
Read More
The Guardian

Sep 26 2018
From Prince Naseem to the war on terror: did 9/11 ruin UK Asian culture?

The year is 2001, and video clips of a boxer, race riots and September 11 paint a striking picture of hard times for south Asians in the UK. Now, says artist Kazim Rashid , it’s time to talk about it

Where did all the brown people go? It’s a question that British Pakistani artist Kazim Rashid has been pondering. The 1990s saw a boom in south Asian cultural output in the UK, from the success of Goodness Gracious Me to Panjabi MC’s crossover chart hit Mundian To Bach Ke and the Mercury prize win for Talvin Singh. The country seemed to be embracing the Blair government’s multiculturalism. And then, as Rashid identifies it, in the two decades that followed, silence.

“How come there’s this insane decade of output [by south Asians] that just vanishes?” he says, sinking into a sofa on the fifth floor of London member’s club Shoreditch House. Rashid used to be a party animal before parlaying his club kid days into a successful career in music management. “Behind the scenes, there are some really influential brown people. Why are we good enough to do the work, but not good enough to be the work? And why do we have the confidence to pull the strings, but we don’t have the confidence to tell the story? I couldn’t make sense of it.”

Continue reading...
Read More
The Guardian

Sep 26 2018
Elmgreen & Dragset review – a deep dive into sadness, humour and sex

Whitechapel Gallery, London
From an installation of a decaying public pool to lonely sculptures thinking the unthinkable, the Scandinavian duo bring their subversive wit to social and sexual politics

Remember the old Whitechapel swimming pool by Aldgate East in London? The kids dive-bombing and semi-drowning, and coming home all red-eyed and reeking of chlorine? The banter in the changing rooms, the towel-flicking and the furtive looks? After it was shut down in the 1980s, there were the club nights, the squatters and the illegal raves. It was an institution, proper old East End. The Whitechapel pool has been sold to some art hotel and resort corporation. It will be a spa, with reduced-price membership for locals on Wednesday afternoons and slack time for wellness junkies and gym bunnies. You should visit before they do it up.

A faint tang of chlorine still lingers round the drained pool. The paint is peeling off the walls and the tiles are cracked. There is builders’ rubble down the shallow end and scaffolding up by the entrance. Some of the stains are worrying. The ceiling might be about to give way. Surely this used to be the Whitechapel Gallery? I must have got it wrong. Filled with an echoing silence and with a security guard wandering about, these old baths have been here for decades. Just look.

Continue reading...
Read More
The New York Times

Sep 26 2018
A Baroness, Her Skulls and a Macabre Exhibition
When she died in 1926, Mathilde de Rothschild bequeathed a strange collection to a Paris museum. The grisly artifacts have now been given their own show.
Read More
The Guardian

Sep 26 2018
David Hockney unveils iPad-designed window at Westminster Abbey

Artist’s stained-glass creation, The Queen’s Window, celebrates Elizabeth II’s reign

A vibrantly coloured window designed by David Hockney on his iPad, showing blue skies and a red country path through blossoming Yorkshire Wolds hawthorn, has been unveiled at Westminster Abbey.

The stained-glass window was commissioned to celebrate the Queen’s reign and has been installed in the north transept, above the statues of former prime ministers including Peel, Gladstone and Disraeli.

Continue reading...
Read More